16 Burst results for "Chris Donnelly"

"chris donnelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:53 min | 4 months ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Our kiss foundation dot org's It's a 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. The people fighting California's wildfires include Our next guest chief Chris Donnelly has spent 22 years is a volunteer firefighter in Huntington Lake, California. Good morning, sir. Good morning, Steve. How are you this morning? I'm okay. We've reported a lot on the sheer extent of the fires. How have you been spending your days where you are? Well, we began this fight, probably on Saturday morning about 6 A.m.. And what we did first was get all of our people out of honeys and leg. Um, connection has about probably 550 summer cabins and an additional 110. Condominiums. We had thousands of people at Huntington and once I had eyes on the fire was very clear to me that it was going to burn into Huntington and lives are at stake. So we spent most of time Getting people out. Well, I'm glad you've been able to do that. But of course, because, of course, we have been following stories of some other resort areas. Vacation areas where people there for the summer there for vacation there, Camping have had to be evacuated an emergency ways You said you got eyes on the fire. Can you describe the landscape the way it looks to somebody who's never been there and what the fire looked like. Yeah, Hundreds like is quite unique. Weird 7000 ft. And we are the reservoir for Ah, very large electric generation facility. That's 2000 ft below us. Virtually down a steep just just a cliff. And so when I heard sheriff's deputies go through our area to begin evacuations about 5 30 in the morning on Saturday I called our dispassion and and they told me where the fire was. I drove down there about 15 to 20 minutes away. And look down into the canyon to about 1000 ft below us and saw flames and new as soon as the morning winds started upslope of Valley that that was going to be a threat to Huntington. So I recommended that we do a mandatory evacuation at Huntington and began that vacuum evacuation about 7 30. Art our teams. We knew this was coming eventually with so much bend down and the droughts over the years and temperatures on have been drier and well, it's been hotter and communities dryer. You said so much dead and down. Is this mostly a forested area that we're talking about? This is heavy forest to red, fur and white for as much as 8 ft in diameter. And the bark beetle infestation is probably killed. Ah, third of that forest, And that, of course, was Caused by not not too much water, much hotter temperatures last 10 or 15 years. And so we have a lot of a lot of fuel out there in the forest. You focused a lot clearly on the evacuation. Is everybody out safely so far as you know, from your area of responsibility? Absolutely. We made several passes through our small community. And we verify that everyone was gone. And then at that point, we had lots of strike teams, which are groups of five fire engines each Totalling about 30 fire engines by about 2 P.m., at which time I started releasing our personnel to get their families and get out. So right now, the the only members of our fire department are one company officer, which we will keep their throughout the battle. But it's simply not safe to be there. Well, this helps to explain Ah, number that we've been hearing the past couple of days. We're told this fire is 0% contained. Ah, Is this a circumstance? And of course, it's true of all wildfires to some extent. But is this a circumstance where it's abundantly clear? That the massiveness of dead vegetation that you've described that the extreme dryness means that you really this is something that is beyond human control. At this point, I think that's a that's a good statement. I don't know what the future of Huntington Lake is. But at this point it does not look good. Has the fire actually reached the what had been the settled area of Huntington Lake. Yes, we have lost cabins on the western end of the lake. All communications air down into the area. I am not there at this moment. So it's very difficult to get serious information but about 6 P.m. last night, all crews were pulled out to about the middle of the lake. And we don't know if they re engaged or not. You said All crews have been pulled out to the middle of the lake. Do you mean that they went out on the water? No. This populated on the north side of the lake. And so, um, it midway on the shore. You retreated. He retreated to a more defensible places. What you're saying Thank you for cleric. Much better. Said yes. Gotcha. Gotcha. I want people to know if they don't That you are as you describe it. A brother in the Catholic Church. Maybe a layman would think of you as a monk. That is another thing that you do besides volunteer fire fighting for 22 years. How does that informed the way that you think about an event like this? Well, you know, I'm Ah, teacher at ST Mary's College and I've worked with kids since you know, probably 1970. So for me, it's it's all about caring for people and touching hearts and You know, it's it's that center of people that I worry about the most. You can rebuild cabins and you could go somewhere else, But it's the people. So you know, just a little 32nd bit for you. Yesterday morning, I drove by a cabin and made a P A announcement directly to people about. You need to get out now. Yesterday. I called her and told her her cabin was gone. And she shared with me that our great grandfather built that cabin in 1920. And her grandmother talked about the moments out, playing in the woods and collecting pine cones. And as she broke into tears, I thought How many stories like this? Um, I'm gonna be hearing And how hurtful this all is. And come on their summer cabins. They got us some place to go. But it's the hurt in the Los end tens of thousands of girl and boy scouts that you know we're at Huntington. And church camps and private Hanson there. So many lives so many memories that probably won't be there in the future. So for me, that's what it's about. It's about people. In all the all the loss. Well, Chief Donnelly, thanks very much for your insights. I really appreciate it and we'll continue following the news to see if you begin to reach a point where you're able to battle back. Well, we'll look for that moment to Chris Donnelly is chief of the Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Department, one of many areas in California facing massive wildfires. Later this afternoon on all things considered do some people in Denmark really not recognise racism someday and say they don't what that means for the country. Listen on the radio or ask.

Huntington Huntington Lake Chris Donnelly California Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Steve Inskeep NPR News Noelle King officer Camping upslope of Valley Denmark Hanson Los Catholic Church ST Mary
"chris donnelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:33 min | 4 months ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. The people fighting California's wildfires include Our next guest chief Chris Donnelly has spent 22 years is a volunteer firefighter and Huntington Lake, California. Good morning, sir. Good morning, Steve. How are you this morning? I'm okay. We've reported a lot on the sheer extent of the fires. How have you been spending your days where you are? Well, we began this thiss fight, Probably on Saturday morning about 6 A.m.. And what we did first was get all of our people out of honeys and Lake. Huntington has about probably 550 summer cabins and an additional 110 condominiums. We had thousands of people at Huntington And once I had eyes on the fire was very clear to me that it was going to burn into Huntington and lives are at stake. So we spent most of time getting people out. Well, I'm glad you've been able to do that. But, of course, because, of course, we have been following stories of some other resort areas, vacation areas where people there for the summer there for vacation there, camping have had to be evacuated in emergency ways. You said you got eyes on the fire. Can you describe the landscape the way it looks to somebody who's never been there and what the fire looked like. Yeah, honey is like is quite unique. Weird 7000 ft. And we are the reservoir for a very large electric generation facility. That's 2000 ft. Below us virtually down a steep just just a cliff. And so when I heard sheriff's deputies go through our area to begin evacuations about 5 30 in the morning on Saturday, I called our dispassion and they told me where the fire was. I drove down there about 15 to 20 minutes away. And look down into the canyon to about 1000 ft below us and saw flames and new as soon as the morning winds started upslope of Valley that that was going to be a threat to Huntington. So I recommended that we do a mandatory evacuation at Pennington and began that evacuation about 7 30. Art our teams. We knew this was coming eventually, with so much been down in the droughts over the years and temperatures have been drier and well, it's been hotter than the amenities dryer. You said so much dead and down. Is this mostly a forested area that we're talking about? This is heavy forest to red, fur and white for as much as 8 ft in diameter. And the bark beetle infestation is probably killed. Ah, a third of that forest, And that, of course, was Caused by not not too much water, much hotter temperatures last 10 or 15 years, and so we have a lot of lot of fuel out there in the forest. You focused a lot clearly on the evacuation. Is everybody out safely so far as you know, from your area of responsibility? Absolutely. We made several passes through our small community. And we verify that everyone was gone. And then at that point, we had lots of strike teams, which are groups of five fire engines, each totaling about 30 fire engines by about 2 P.m.. At which time I started releasing our personnel to get their families and get out. So right now the only members of our fire department are one company officer, which we will keep their throughout the battle. But it's simply not safe to be there. Well, this helps to explain Ah, number that we've been hearing the past couple of days. We're told this fire is 0% contained. Is this a circumstance? And of course, it's true of all wildfires. To some extent. But is this a circumstance where it's abundantly clear? That the massiveness of dead vegetation that you've described that the extreme dryness means that you really this is something that is beyond human control. At this point, I think that's a that's a good statement. I don't know what the future of Huntington Lake is. But at this point it does not look good. Has the fire actually reached the what had been the settled area of Huntington Lake. Yes, we have lost cabins on the western end of the lake, all communications air down into the area. I am not there at this moment, so it's very difficult to get serious information. But about 6 P.m. last night, all crews were pulled out to about the middle of the lake. And we don't know if they re engaged or not. You said All crews have been pulled out to the middle of the lake. Do you mean that they went out on the water? No. This populated on the north side of the lake. And so, um, it midway on the shore. You retreated. He retreated to a more defensible places. What you're saying Thank you for cleric. Much better said Yeah. Gotcha. Gotcha. I want people to know if they don't That you are as you describe it. A brother in the Catholic Church. Maybe a layman would think of you as a monk. That is another thing that you do besides volunteer fire fighting for 22 years. How does that informed the way that you think about an event like this? Well, you know, I'm a a teacher at ST Mary's College and I've worked with kids since you know, probably 1970. So for me, it's It's all about Carrie for people and touching hearts, and you know that's it's It's That's center of people that I worry about the most. You can rebuild cabins and you could go somewhere else, But it's the people. So you know, just a little 32nd bit for you. Yesterday morning, I drove by a cabin and made a p A announcement directly to people about. You need to get out now. Yesterday. I called her and told her her cabin was gone. And she shared with me that our great grandfather built that cabin in 1920. Her grandmother talked about the moments out, playing in the woods and collecting fine combs and And she broke into tears. I thought How many stories like this? Um, I'm gonna be hearing and how hurtful this all is and come on their summer cabins. They got us some place to go. But it's the hurt in the loss and Hands of thousands of girl and boy scouts that you know we're at Huntington and church camps and private camps, and they're so many lives. So many memories that probably won't be there in the future. So for me, that's what it's about people and all the all the loss. Well, Chief Donnelly, thanks very much for your insights. I really appreciate it and we'll continue following the news to see if you begin to reach a point where you're able to battle back. Well, we'll look for that moment to Chris Donnelly is chief of the Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Department, one of many areas in California, facing massive wildfires.

Huntington Huntington Lake Chris Donnelly Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire California Steve Inskeep NPR News Lake Noelle King Pennington officer upslope of Valley Carrie Catholic Church ST Mary
"chris donnelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:34 min | 4 months ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Enabling remote assistance for customers remote PC dot com and buy the listeners and members of the public radio. It's 6 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. The people fighting California's wildfires include Our next guest chief Chris Donnelly has spent 22 years is a volunteer firefighter in Huntington Lake, California. Good morning, sir. Good morning, Steve. How are you this fine. I'm OK. We've reported a lot on the sheer extent of the fires. How have you been Spending your days where you are? Well, we began this thiss fight, probably on Saturday morning about 6 A.m., and what we did first was get all of our people out of honeys and leg. My mission has about probably 550 summer cabins and an additional 110. Condominiums. We had thousands of people at Huntington and once I had eyes on the fire was very clear to me that it was going to burn into Huntington and lives are at stake. So most of time. Getting people out. Well, I'm glad you've been able to do that. But, of course, because, of course, we have been following stories of some other resort areas. Vacation areas where people there for the summer there for vacation there, camping have had to be evacuated and emergency ways You said you got eyes on the fire. Can you describe the landscape the way it looks to somebody who's never been there and what the fire looked like. Yeah, Hundreds like is quite unique Word 7000 ft. And we are the reservoir for Ah, very large electric generation facility. 2000 FT. Below us virtually down a steep just just a cliff. And so when I heard sheriff's deputies go through our area to begin evacuations about 5 30 in the morning on Saturday I called our dispassion and they told me where the fire was. I drove down there about 15 to 20 minutes away. And look down into the canyon to about 1000 ft. Below us and saw flames and new assume is the morning winds started upslope of Valley. That that was going to be a threat to Huntington. So I recommended that we do a mandatory evacuation at Huntington and began that evacuation about 7 30. Art our teams. We knew this was coming. Eventually, with so much dead down in the droughts over the years and temperatures on have been drier and well, it's been hotter than the amenities dryer. So you said so much dead and down. Is this mostly a forested area that we're talking about? This is heavy forest to red, fur and white for as much as 8 ft in diameter. And the bark beetle infestation is probably killed. Ah, third of that forest, And that, of course, was caused by not not too much water. Much hotter Temperatures last 10 or 15 years. Um And so we have a lot of lot of fuel out there on the porch. You focused a lot clearly on the evacuation. Is everybody out safely so far as you know, from your area of responsibility? Absolutely. We made several passes through our small community. And we verify that everyone was gone. And then at that point, we had lots of strike teams, which are groups of five fire engines, each totaling about 30 fire engines by about 2 P.m., at which time I started releasing our personnel to get their families and get out. So right now, the the only members of our fire department are one company officer, which we will keep their throughout the battle. But it's simply not safe to be there. Well, this helps to explain Ah, number that we've been hearing the past couple of days. We're told this fire is 0% contained. Is this a circumstance? And of course, it's true of all wildfires. To some extent. But is this a circumstance where it's abundantly clear? That the massiveness of dead vegetation that you've described that the extreme dryness means that you really this is something that is beyond human control. At this point, I think that's a that's a good statement. I don't know what the future of Huntington Lake is. But at this point it does not look good. Has the fire actually reached the what had been the settled area of Huntington Lake. Yes, we have lost cabins on the western end of the lake. All communications air down into the area. I am not there at this moment. So it's very difficult to get serious information but about 6 P.m. last night, all crews were pulled out to about the middle of the lake. And we don't know if they re engaged or not. You said All crews have been pulled out to the middle of the lake. Do you mean that they went out on the water? No, this's populated on the north side of the lake. And so, um, it midway on the shore. You retreated. He retreated to a more defensible places. What you're saying Thank you for much. Much better. Said yes. Gotcha. Gotcha. I want people to know if they don't That you are as you describe it. A brother in the Catholic Church. Maybe a layman would think of you as a monk. That is another thing that you do besides volunteer fire fighting for 22 years. How does that informed the way that you think about an event like this? Well, you know, I'm a a teacher at ST Mary's College and I've worked with kids since you know, probably 1970. So for me, it's It's all about Carrie for people and touching hearts, and you know it's it's. It's that center of people that I worry about the most. You can rebuild cabins and you could go somewhere else, But it's the people. So you know, just a little 32nd bit for you. Yesterday morning, I drove by a cabin and made a p A announcement directly to people about. You need to get out now. Yesterday I called her and told her her cabin was gone. And she shared with me that our great grandfather built that cabin in 1920. Her grandmother talked about the moments out, playing in the woods and collecting pine cones and And she broke into tears. I thought How many stories like this and I'm going to be hearing and how hurtful this all is and come on their summer cabins. They got us some place to go. But it's the hurt in the loss and Hands of thousands of girl and boy scouts that you know we're hunting and church camps and private camps, and they're so many lives. So many memories that probably won't be there in the future. So for me, that's what it's about. It's about people and all the all the loss. Well, Chief Donnelly, thanks very much for your insights. I really appreciate it and we'll continue following the news to see if you begin to reach a point where you're able to battle back. Well, we'll look for that moment to Chris Donnelly is chief of the Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Department, one of many areas in.

Huntington Lake Huntington Chris Donnelly Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Steve Inskeep California NPR News Noelle King upslope of Valley officer Carrie ST Mary Catholic Church
"chris donnelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:05 min | 4 months ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Fire immediately. However, it was over 100 degrees. It was 9% humidity. You see, the brush around us is critically drives to the fire rapidly spread. You can't suppress a wildfire with water bottle. Containment on the Eldorado Fire is at just 7% and Governor Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency in San Bernardino County because of the blaze. Fire officials say they've made good progress yesterday. But the concern that Santa Ana winds over the next two days will stoke the fire and push it toward inhabited areas. Seven people have been shot to death at an illegal marijuana grow operation in Riverside County. Authorities say the victims were killed yesterday morning at the gross side and an unincorporated area east of Temecula. None of the victims has been identified. The Riverside County Sheriff's Department says deputies responded early yesterday to report of an assault of a deadly weapon. When they arrived at the property. They found a woman suffering from gunshot wounds. She was taken to a hospital where she died. The Sheriff's department says deputies then found six bodies inside the home all gunshot victims as well. Governor Newsome signed into law last week a ban on flavored tobacco sales in retail stores beginning in January. Derek Carr is an attorney at Change Lab Solutions, a nonprofit focused on promoting health equity. He says the law is a huge win for public health. We know the flavor pack of products are a key driver of used tobacco use, but also that flavors have been used to systematically Forget communion, the color of lower income communities. LGBT community. A new flavour. Tobacco ban has been vehemently opposed by the tobacco industry, and it looks like the struggle over continues. Secretary of State Alex Padilla's office has confirmed that opponents of the ban are trying to qualify a referendum for the 2022 ballot. If the referendum qualifies, it would suspend the law until voters weigh in. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations and from Webroot offering home antivirus solutions for protecting personal devices against fishing and other cyber attacks. While working remotely Learn more about Webroot and open text company at webroot dot com. And for the door Stupid Charitable foundation, which aims to improve the quality of people's lives through grand supporting child, well being the environment, medical research and the performing arts. It's 6 34 on Casey. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. The people fighting California's wildfires include Our next guest chief Chris Donnelly has spent 22 years is a volunteer firefighter in Huntington Lake, California. Good morning, sir. Good morning, Steve. How are you this morning? I'm okay. We've reported a lot on the sheer extent of the fires. How have you been spending your days where you are? Well, we began this fight, probably on Saturday morning about 6 A.m.. And what we did first was get all of our people out of honeys and leg. Um honey Shin has about probably 550 summer cabins and an additional 110. Condominiums. We had thousands of people at Huntington and once I had eyes on the fire was very clear to me that it was going to burn into Huntington and lives are at stake. So most of the time Getting people out. Well, I'm glad you've been able to do that. But, of course, because, of course, we have been following stories of some other resort areas. Vacation areas where people there for the summer there for vacation there, camping have had to be evacuated and emergency ways You said you got eyes on the fire. Can you describe the landscape the way it looks to somebody who's never been there and what the fire looked like. Yeah, honey is like is quite unique. Weird 7000 ft. And we are the reservoir for Ah, very large electric generation facility. That's 2000 ft. Below us virtually down a steep just just a cliff. And so when I heard sheriff's deputies go through our area to begin evacuations about 5 30 in the morning on Saturday, I called our dispassion and they told me where the fire was. I drove down there about 15 or 20 minutes away. And look down into the canyon to about 1000 ft below us and saw flames and new as soon as the morning winds started upslope of Valley that that was going to be a threat to Huntington. So I recommended that we do a mandatory evacuation at Huntington and began that vacuum evacuation about 7 30. Art our teams. We knew this was coming eventually with so much dead down in the droughts over the years. And temperatures on have been drier and well, it's been hotter and the amenities dryer so you set so much dead and down. Is this mostly a forested area that we're talking about? This is heavy forest to red, fur and white for as much as 8 ft in diameter. And the bark beetle infestation is probably killed. Ah, third of that forest, And that, of course, was Caused by not not too much water, much hotter temperatures last 10 or 15 years. And so we have a lot of a lot of fuel out there in the forest. You focused a lot clearly on the evacuation. Is everybody out safely so far as you know, from your area of responsibility? Absolutely. We made several passes through our small community. And we verify that everyone was gone. And then at that point, we had lots of strike teams, which are groups of five fire engines each Totalling about 30 fire engines by about 2 P.m., at which time I started releasing our personnel to get their families and get out. So right now, the the only members of our fire department are one company officer, which we will keep their throughout the battle. But it's simply not safe to be there. Well, this helps to explain Ah, number that we've been hearing the past couple of days. We're told this fire is 0% contained. Is this a circumstance? And of course, it's true of all wildfires. To some extent. But is this a circumstance where it's abundantly clear? That the massiveness of dead vegetation that you've described that the extreme dryness means that you really this is something that is beyond human control. At this point, I think that's a that's a good statement. I don't know what the future of Huntington Lake is. But at this point it does not look good. Has the fire actually reached the what had been the settled area of Huntington Lake. Yes, we have lost cabins on the western end of the lake. All communications are down into the area. I am not there at this moment, so it's very difficult to get serious information but about 6 P.m. Last night, all crews were pulled out to about the middle of the lake. And we don't know if they re engaged or not. You said All crews have been pulled out to the middle of the lake. Do you mean that they went out on the water? No. This populated on the north side of the lake. And so, um, it midway on the shore. You retreated. He retreated to a more defensible places. What you're saying Thank you for much. Much better. Said yes. Gotcha. Gotcha. I want people to know if they don't That you are as you describe it. A brother in the Catholic Church. Maybe a layman would think of you as a monk. That is another thing that you do besides volunteer fire fighting for 22 years. How does that informed the way that you think about an event like this? Well, you know, I'm Ah, teacher at ST Mary's College and I've worked with kids since you know, probably 1970. So for me, it's It's all about Carrie for people and touching hearts and You know, that's it's It's. That's center of people that I worry about the most. You could rebuild cabins and you could go somewhere else, But it's the people. So you know, just a little 32nd bit for you. Yesterday morning, I drove by a cabin and made a P A announcement directly to people about. You need to get out now. Yesterday. I called her and told her her cabin was gone. And she shared with me that our great grandfather built that cabin in 1920. And her grandmother talked about the moments out, playing in the woods and collecting pine cones. And as she broke into tears, I.

Huntington Lake Huntington Steve Inskeep Governor Gavin Newsom Webroot Riverside County Sheriff's Dep NPR Temecula California NPR News Riverside County San Bernardino County marijuana Santa Ana Derek Carr assault Governor Newsome Alex Padilla Stupid Charitable foundation
"chris donnelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 4 months ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Could increase the Bernie still cooler weather and maybe clear skies look likely for tomorrow across the region. One of the fires burning in the north. They flared up last night. The Sonoma County Sheriff's Office issued a mandatory evacuation late Monday due to the Walbridge fire spreading the press Democrat reports the flare up took place in an area west of Windsor. Cal. Fire says firefighter stopped forward progress on the spot fire by around 10 o'clock The Walbridge Fire is part of the alien you complex that has burned some 375,000 acres on Brian. What news And there's more fire coverage coming up from NPR on CD. In Just a few minutes. Steve Inskeep will speak with Chief Chris Donnelly of the Huntington like volunteer Fire department. About the latest on the wildfires in California, NPR and Co. BD News with the coverage for you and support for Lady comes from yon shrimp and Maria Manetti shrimp. Founders of the Minetti Shrimp Museum of Art ID UC Davis, which preserves the legacy of renowned artists such as Wayne Tebow for future innovators by dedicating a third of its space to arts education. With a tool called CRISPR. Scientists can now edit human DNA. But this technology doesn't come without its moral concerns here from scientists in Nova's new human nature Airing tomorrow night 8 p.m. on public television. I'm or you can.

NPR Minetti Shrimp Museum of Art Walbridge volunteer Fire department Sonoma County Sheriff's Office Steve Inskeep Maria Manetti Chris Donnelly Windsor UC Davis Brian Huntington Nova Wayne Tebow California Co
"chris donnelly" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

07:22 min | 4 months ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"The People Fighting California's wildfires include our next guest chief. . Chris Donnelly is spent twenty two years as a volunteer firefighter in Huntington Lake California. . Good, , morning sir. . Good. . Morning Steve. How . are you this morning I'm okay. . We've reported a lot on the sheer extent of the fires. . How have you been spending your days where you are? ? Well we we began this <hes> this fight probably on Saturday morning about six am and what we did I was get all of our people out of Huntington Lake. . <hes> Huntington has about <hes> probably five hundred and fifty <hes> summer cabins in an additional hundred and ten. . Condominiums, , we had thousands of people at Huntington and <hes>. . Once I had is on the fire, , very clear to me that he was going to burn into Huntington and lives were at stake. . So we spent most of the time getting people out. . Well, , I'm glad you've been able to do that. . But of course, , because of course, , we have been following stories of some other resort areas, , vacation areas where. . There for the summer there for vacation there camping have had to be evacuated emergency ways. . <hes> you said you got is on the fire can you describe the landscape the way it looks to somebody who's never been there and what the fire looked like. . Yeah. . Honey. . Lake is quite unique word seven thousand feet, , and we are the reservoir for a very large <hes> electric generation facility. . That's two thousand feet below us. . Virtually down a steep <hes>, , just just a cliff. . and. . So when I heard a sheriff's deputies go through our area to begin evacuations about five thirty in the morning on Saturday. . I called our dispatch and and and they told me where the fire was. . I drove down there about fifteen to twenty minutes away. . And look down into the Canyon to about a thousand feet below us and saw flames and new as soon as the morning wins started upslope of Valley. . That that was going to be a threat to Huntington. . So I recommended that we do a mandatory evacuation at Huntington and began that vacuum evacuation about seven thirty. . Our our teams, , we we knew this was coming eventually <hes> with so much deadened down and the droughts over the years. . And temperatures have been drier and well, it's , been hotter and humidity's dryer. . So said so much deadened down is this mostly forested area that we're talking about This heavy forest. . Read for in white for as much as eight feet in diameter. . And Bark Beetle infestations probably killed a third of that forest and Ecorse was. . Caused by not not too much water much hotter temperatures in the last ten or fifteen years. . and. . So we have a lot of lot of fuel out there in the forest. . You you focused a lot clearly on the evacuation is everybody out safely so far as you know from your area of responsibility. . Absolutely. . We made several passes through our small community. . And we verified that everyone was gone, , and then at that point, , we had lots of strike teams which are groups of fire engines each. . Totaling about thirty five engines by about two PM. . At which time is started releasing our personnel to get their families and get out. . So right now, , the the only members of our fire department, , our one company officer, , which we will keep their throughout the battle. . But it's simply not safe to be there. . Well this helps to explain <hes> number that we've been hearing the past couple of days we're told this fire is zero percent contained. . Is this a circumstance and of course, it's , true of all wildfires to some extent circumstance where it's abundantly clear that the massive -ness of dead vegetation that you've described that the extreme dryness means that you really this is something that is beyond human control. . At this point I think that's a that's a good statement. . I don't know what the future of Huntington Lake is. . But at this point to it does not look good. . Has. . The fire actually reached the the what had been the settled area of Huntington Lake. . Yes. . We have loss cabins of on the western end of the lake. . All communications are down into the area <hes>. . I am not there at this moment. . So it's very difficult to get <hes> serious information but about six PM last night, , all crews were pulled out to about the middle of the lake. . And we don't know if they re engaged or not. . You said, , all crews have been pulled out to the middle of the lake. . Do you mean that they went out on the water? ? No. . Okay this is copulated on the north side of the lake, , and so a mid mid way on the shore you retreat retreated to a more defensible place is what you're saying. . Thank you for much much better said, , yes, , Gotcha Gotcha <hes> I want people to know if they don't that you are as you describe it a brother in the Catholic church maybe a layman would think of you as a monk that is another thing that you do besides volunteer firefighting for twenty two years. . How does that inform the way that you think about an event like this? ? Well you know I'm a teacher at Saint Mary's College and I've worked with kids since probably nineteen seventy. . So it for me, , it's all about caring people and touching hearts and. . <hes>. . It's it's that center of people that I worry about the most you can rebuild cabins and you can go somewhere else but it's the people. . So you know just a a little. . Thirty second bit for you. . Yesterday morning, , I drove by a cabin and made a PA announcement directly to people about you need to get out now. . Yesterday I called her and told her cabin was gone. . And she shared with me that are great. . Grandfather that cabin in one, , thousand, , nine, , hundred, , twenty. . And her grandmother talked about the moments out playing in the woods and collecting pine cones and. . As she broke into tears. . I. . Thought. . How many stories like this am I going to be hearing? ? And how hurtful this all is. . Income on their summer cabins, , they gotTA someplace to go, , but it's the hurt and the loss and. . Tens of thousands of girl and boy scouts that. . Were at Huntington. . And <hes> Church camps and private Anson. . There's so many lives. . So many memories that probably won't be there in the future. . So for me, , that's what it's about. . It's about the people. . And all the all the loss. . Donnelly thanks very much for your insights. . I really appreciate it and we'll continue following the news to see if you begin to reach a point where you're able to battle back. . Well, , we'll look for that moment to. . Chris Donald is chief of the Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Department, , one of many areas in California facing massive

Huntington Lake California Huntington Lake Huntington Steve
California Creek Fire Zero Percent Contained, Chief Firefighter Says

Environment: NPR

07:22 min | 4 months ago

California Creek Fire Zero Percent Contained, Chief Firefighter Says

"The People Fighting California's wildfires include our next guest chief. Chris Donnelly is spent twenty two years as a volunteer firefighter in Huntington Lake California. Good, morning sir. Good. Morning Steve. How are you this morning I'm okay. We've reported a lot on the sheer extent of the fires. How have you been spending your days where you are? Well we we began this this fight probably on Saturday morning about six am and what we did I was get all of our people out of Huntington Lake. Huntington has about probably five hundred and fifty summer cabins in an additional hundred and ten. Condominiums, we had thousands of people at Huntington and Once I had is on the fire, very clear to me that he was going to burn into Huntington and lives were at stake. So we spent most of the time getting people out. Well, I'm glad you've been able to do that. But of course, because of course, we have been following stories of some other resort areas, vacation areas where. There for the summer there for vacation there camping have had to be evacuated emergency ways. you said you got is on the fire can you describe the landscape the way it looks to somebody who's never been there and what the fire looked like. Yeah. Honey. Lake is quite unique word seven thousand feet, and we are the reservoir for a very large electric generation facility. That's two thousand feet below us. Virtually down a steep just just a cliff. and. So when I heard a sheriff's deputies go through our area to begin evacuations about five thirty in the morning on Saturday. I called our dispatch and and and they told me where the fire was. I drove down there about fifteen to twenty minutes away. And look down into the Canyon to about a thousand feet below us and saw flames and new as soon as the morning wins started upslope of Valley. That that was going to be a threat to Huntington. So I recommended that we do a mandatory evacuation at Huntington and began that vacuum evacuation about seven thirty. Our our teams, we we knew this was coming eventually with so much deadened down and the droughts over the years. And temperatures have been drier and well, it's been hotter and humidity's dryer. So said so much deadened down is this mostly forested area that we're talking about This heavy forest. Read for in white for as much as eight feet in diameter. And Bark Beetle infestations probably killed a third of that forest and Ecorse was. Caused by not not too much water much hotter temperatures in the last ten or fifteen years. and. So we have a lot of lot of fuel out there in the forest. You you focused a lot clearly on the evacuation is everybody out safely so far as you know from your area of responsibility. Absolutely. We made several passes through our small community. And we verified that everyone was gone, and then at that point, we had lots of strike teams which are groups of fire engines each. Totaling about thirty five engines by about two PM. At which time is started releasing our personnel to get their families and get out. So right now, the the only members of our fire department, our one company officer, which we will keep their throughout the battle. But it's simply not safe to be there. Well this helps to explain number that we've been hearing the past couple of days we're told this fire is zero percent contained. Is this a circumstance and of course, it's true of all wildfires to some extent circumstance where it's abundantly clear that the massive -ness of dead vegetation that you've described that the extreme dryness means that you really this is something that is beyond human control. At this point I think that's a that's a good statement. I don't know what the future of Huntington Lake is. But at this point to it does not look good. Has. The fire actually reached the the what had been the settled area of Huntington Lake. Yes. We have loss cabins of on the western end of the lake. All communications are down into the area I am not there at this moment. So it's very difficult to get serious information but about six PM last night, all crews were pulled out to about the middle of the lake. And we don't know if they re engaged or not. You said, all crews have been pulled out to the middle of the lake. Do you mean that they went out on the water? No. Okay this is copulated on the north side of the lake, and so a mid mid way on the shore you retreat retreated to a more defensible place is what you're saying. Thank you for much much better said, yes, Gotcha Gotcha I want people to know if they don't that you are as you describe it a brother in the Catholic church maybe a layman would think of you as a monk that is another thing that you do besides volunteer firefighting for twenty two years. How does that inform the way that you think about an event like this? Well you know I'm a teacher at Saint Mary's College and I've worked with kids since probably nineteen seventy. So it for me, it's all about caring people and touching hearts and. It's it's that center of people that I worry about the most you can rebuild cabins and you can go somewhere else but it's the people. So you know just a a little. Thirty second bit for you. Yesterday morning, I drove by a cabin and made a PA announcement directly to people about you need to get out now. Yesterday I called her and told her cabin was gone. And she shared with me that are great. Grandfather that cabin in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty. And her grandmother talked about the moments out playing in the woods and collecting pine cones and. As she broke into tears. I. Thought. How many stories like this am I going to be hearing? And how hurtful this all is. Income on their summer cabins, they gotTA someplace to go, but it's the hurt and the loss and. Tens of thousands of girl and boy scouts that. Were at Huntington. And Church camps and private Anson. There's so many lives. So many memories that probably won't be there in the future. So for me, that's what it's about. It's about the people. And all the all the loss. Donnelly thanks very much for your insights. I really appreciate it and we'll continue following the news to see if you begin to reach a point where you're able to battle back. Well, we'll look for that moment to. Chris Donald is chief of the Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Department, one of many areas in California facing massive

Huntington Huntington Lake Huntington Lake California Huntington Lake Volunteer Fire Chris Donnelly California Steve Ecorse Chris Donald Upslope Of Valley Officer Saint Mary's College TA
"chris donnelly" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:24 min | 11 months ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Free throw line his defense I mean you we take it for granted sometimes I really do think this because of Paul hasn't been playing at that second site help side rotation for Denver isn't nearly as strong and then Paul gets back in games and your like Dick he's there on every single catch on every single drive anything that requires that a help side rotation Millsaps walling up and making the shop really tougher opponents you know I'm looking at this warriors team if Wiggins does indeed stay how does that look next year obviously curries the point guard so what do you please a three in Wiggins is the tour house on well I mean you got a guy like during the grand garden wagons those working for three clay is the to their their please run so much action I know you're right in his dream on the center I mean they got I guess you have come on Lucy still too yeah top of the key is marquise Chris Hansen up behind him to Damien Lee part three that one still good long rebound goes out of bounds Denver basketball coming back the other way to be interesting I mean that's a great starting five yeah in a position the system really yeah that is true to me when we talk about PJ Tucker the starting center yeah at six foot five YorkBridge bully ball right down the page numbers up a new unstoppable fourteen point lead now for Denver's they sought survived the golden state run paschal has a behind the three point line throws it inside the arc to Marty's press back over the paschal paschal puts it on the floor gets the dotted line can't shoot was awful cutting me off nicely by Millsap shot clock winding down in sixty three right before the horn this defense by Denver yeah I need a coach Malone applauding his team's effort on that when I was a great close out it was a tough shot hit by Wigan's Murray has the record circle here for Denver gets a high pick their from the coli okay which we'll take a tough to sure no good rebound comes down the passcode interesting shot selection why would everyone the past couple times Chris Donnelly stripped out of his hands and out of bounds last touched by Joe Gratz a time out nobody knows that but me you're so smart just ahead of the game there's the horn six fifty seven left a hole in the third quarter not as late as eleven on the altitude.

Marty Denver Damien Lee Joe Gratz Chris Donnelly Murray Wigan Malone Millsap Paul paschal PJ Tucker Chris Hansen Lucy Wiggins Dick
"chris donnelly" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

08:55 min | 11 months ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Opti. Muhammad of the World Health Organization then says that the development of a vaccine is still some way off. So in the meantime what should countries be doing to prepare themselves for this unprecedented challenge? Snitch ON COVA is the economist. Healthcare correspondent thanks for being here. Thank you also with this. Is Theresa Hesketh who has spent thirty years in epidemiology and public health in China Southeast Asia and Britain and is now professor of Global Health at University College London? Welcome to raise thank you. I am Chris. Donnelly is a professor of statistics at Oxford University and Imperial College London specializing in real time. Analysis and Response to disease outbreaks. Hello Crystal Hello Therese. Can we start by putting this in historical context? How different is this to other of diseases that we've seen in the past? I think the best comparisons that the other corona virus outbreaks of course that was in two thousand and three I was actually living in China during saws and it was very interesting because a it wasn't as contagious. As the current virus the mortality rate was higher was around ten to twelve percent and and the other interesting thing about that virus was that the overall numbers were low low around eight thousand with about eight hundred death and it actually finished rather quickly. I was living there at the time and I remember suddenly there was no more saws. It just finished very abruptly. It's very interesting. The other comparisons is with mergers the Middle Eastern Spiritus Syndrome which is actually a much more serious condition than pray less like this current virus than Saul's was the best comparison appropriate the solids virus. Okay so saws was bored deadly but less contagious. Yes and didn't actually penetrate many countries. Of course it's very much focused. In mainland China. Hong Kong places like Canada which were all imported cases. We understood the transmission of sauce better than we do. The current am Cova nineteen virus. That's one of the big challenges at the moment is name exactly how this virus is behaving. Okay Crystal UA. Parts of the World Health Organization's Ebola response team. I believe other any lessons. We could read across from that. I realize it's a very different kind of disease. They're very different things. Obviously the we've talked about how. The SARS virus is more deadly than this novel. Corona Virus Bolas is More deadly as well and that's considerably more deadly than SARS. The majority of people who get the Ebola virus sadly die but I kee- complication with this new virus is there's some evidence that it can transmit even when people are a symptomatic or pre-symptomatic and that's difficult because one of the things that made. Sars relatively easily contained as such things go is that it was transmitting. People showed symptoms and that means that people can identify themselves as having symptoms go and become confirmed cases and then they can be isolated and their contacts traced if you have people who are potentially infectious before they become symptomatic. Then that's much more difficult now. Your specialty is in in modeling and prediction and so forth to. Is it possible to estimate how many people could end up being infected? Because there were some pretty apocalyptic numbers out that well one of the things that we estimate is what's called the basic reproduction number. That's the average number of new infections. One introduced infection. What cause and our estimate for that is about two and a half so that doesn't sound like that many. But if if one person had infects two or three in each of those infect two or three and so on it expands quite quickly in fact exponentially and so if it kept going at that rate you get very big numbers quickly but then control measures are brought in to try and bring that number down and actually the SARS virus had a reproduction number. That wasn't very different but it was containable and then the effective reproduction number. That's how much transmission actually then happens over time once control measures abroad in reduced considerably. That's key from turning an increasing trend into a decreasing trend not theresa. We're now seeing the rate of infection did China slowing down. What should we read into that? We're not being optimistic. I would say that the the what's what they're doing in China which is extremely draconian is actually working there. Lots of rumors around that the Chinese onto actually reporting all the cases and there may be a lot more cases than we know about. But I think you know on the. Who has come out and said it very openly that they think that China has done a very good job in managing to contain. What is an extraordinary situation? Particular Hubei Province. And so I would say that it's good news. It also means that other countries can also contain outbreaks as they come. No-one probably simply because density population in Chinese cities. It's probably unlikely that other countries will have quite the same outbreaks that China has had severe up to you. Now you're looking at what countries around the world are doing. What are they doing and or any of them? Sort of as far as China. When it comes to containment so countries that are really on a continuum depending on how many cases of the disease they already have places like America where he's still very few at least the ones that they know of are able to trace the context of these people isolate them. Make sure that they don't spread the infection. Obviously that becomes more difficult. The more cases you have and we're starting to see this in places like Italy so you won't have just the sheer public. Health workforce to be keeping up with that at that stage. You'd introduce what's called social distancing measures. Those are things like closing schools. Cancelling mass gathering events perhaps Introducing sort of limitations or advice. Rather to companies to stagger working hours which would reduce the number of people travelling public transport at any given time and so on and so forth so these measures are called mitigation measures in an epidemic. Could go along way. And they've been recognized. Countries do build China. Japan has asked companies to working our staggering Oh they've also said. You can't have large conferences large gatherings as well there's Olympics so you've got would be that would be part of that. Yep Okay take that crystal opti Bahamas who spoke to from the W. H. O. Earlier on said they're still monitoring the situation to see if these concentrated cost turn into a pandemic but it hasn't yet. Do you agree with that assessment? Everybody agrees that there is potential in this virus that if it weren't controlled that it would lead to a pandemic but controls are being brought in and we just need to see. How will those those work outside? So some countries have contained this very successfully but clearly that has not been the case in some settings. And so we're seeing considerable number of cases arising for example in South Korea Italy Iran. And so those will really be the point where we looked to see how well can this be controlled outside of China because China brought in some very strong measures and it remains to be seen whether or not other countries will follow suit to reason. What's your view on where we are? How close we are to this. Being declared a pandemic I think it's what about definitions of pandemics and I think a pandemic really means that it does. It is affecting and out of control in a large number of countries across the globe and the moment we see more thank two cases in the continent of Africa. And I think no now one case in Latte South America and the moment I not richer would not define that as a pandemic. It's about geography pandemics a kind of geographical term really to the definition to do you. Do you think that the sort of holding off the cleric disappeared debe to avoid panic or is there actually a strict definition? That this hasn't met yet. I I think the latter and crystals just said unit when you get one or two cases. It's very easy to control when you get small numbers of cases the only place where it has been a really major major public health problem has been China and then really owning who bay province outside of who province even me it's been relatively quickly controlled. Okay now a question for all of you one thing. We're seeing a lot over. This case is the spread not just of this virus but the spread misinformation about it. Obviously this is Compared with SAWS Use of social media going on. How much of a challenges that for organizations are trying to contain it? Who'd let's come in on that survey? Why don't you go first? This is a very big problem. The World Health Organization this calling it an info dynamic and they think they should fight this as much as they do the actual epidemic. The problem is that when there is this information out there. It's often the kind that makes people distrustful of opportunities so if their governments advise them.

China World Health Organization Southeast Asia Theresa Hesketh professor of Global Health Opti. Muhammad Chris Middle Eastern Spiritus Syndro Hong Kong Cova Donnelly Saul professor of statistics Imperial College London Ebola
"chris donnelly" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Thou with the city funding to get it started and it's grown today it's grown to more than six hundred owner occupied homes in twenty four hundred affordable rental units across three counties the concept is headed skeptics over the years said Chris Donnelly director of community relations for the Champlain housing trust including at wary financial institutions real estate agents who worry they be cut out of home sales and people opposed to spending taxpayer money Donnelly said their decades of work as ease those concerns at the core it's not really about the housing that we create it's the durability of our commitment friend was a long time and others go on to say that people are suspicious of the model you hear the term socialist bandied about I think people just thought this was socialism I think it's social entrepreneurship was solving a community problem with a partially based market solution so you only the house but the land it's sit sauna is owned by the trust our taxes pay what's the fire just properly hallway or is there a special odd tax avoidance Texan Tory I'm for the land trust not not for the homeowner you understand before the land trust you know what I got a sneaky suspicion there whether Bernie Sanders started this in Burlington Vermont caught on in Seattle yeah there are aspects to this that or socialist agree or disagree I'd.

Champlain housing trust Bernie Sanders Burlington Vermont Chris Donnelly director of community Seattle
"chris donnelly" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on KNSS

"Jet returns to service bank of America senior analyst Ron abstain says of the aircraft can return to service the orders will follow the key question he says is when the aircraft to be allowed to go back into service abstain says the aircraft probably won't be released from the grounding until early twenty twenty and the cancers bankers association has a new president he's from the Kansas city area Kurt committed sin is chairman and CEO of over the park's freedom bank he was first elected to serve a KBA board in twenty thirteen takes over the lead of the association from bank of the prairie president and C. E. O. Chris Donnelly committed sin is also a former chairman of the cancer state banking board local breaking business news every day on can't assess and what to toppings Mr about com for the Wichita business journal I'm bill Roy bill a waitress at a Mexican restaurant in Arkansas was stunned when two regulars gifted her eight twenty nineteen Buick as a tip while yeah Maria Elaine Berrigan had just finished serving David Harrison and Sheila Harrison during her double shift at a boy those Mexican restaurant in Rogers the two called her over gave us this little bag and inside was a key to this new car it didn't to I didn't take it as a tip I took it as a gift from god she said anon Buick and the new car will reportedly replace or two thousand five Chevy trailblazer so how did you ever work in retail here get a tip for the working I I never did I never worked in the same location where I can get well I I take that back I was a shoe shine boy and I get tips there that was well written well now you started out pop in the rag on peoples that Lorsch Ms there a what what's easy issue to shine there would it be the wing tip of the bro a cap toe there aren't any to real designs in there just a regular cab a cap toe hidden no no designed an elf the service is over a larger floor she wing tips in they have steel toes and I'm some of them yeah I think they did it so if you ever got in a fight that do you have those wing tips on but are unable or is this the Transylvania stage people don't know they talk about a wing tip we don't they don't over talking about it was a great shoe most made by flowers and I think that had this pattern etched the great stitching these little holes and patterns on them now all of right and hiring cap toe wing tips right now are you really all right out my dad had a pair of a black and white wing tips and a question when I was in high school in nineteen sixty seven eight that wasn't necessarily stylish but I warm anyway people a little fun to me but then they knew I had steel toes so they could not yeah a woman in England called nine one one to ask police to rescue a goose because it had lost its friends and look hungry the woman was told the goose is welfare was not a police matter okay however yeah however not that will render you wanted on Christmas morning the Wichita eagle ridge reporting this morning that Wichita city halls considering renting a dog to chase geese from its golf courses right seeking to reduce the amount of poop that players have to step in this is according to the park and recreation director said this is eagle said this Monday that happened search for a good goose chasing dog expose a never before noticed flaw in the city leaf all that actually makes it illegal for police canines and fire department rescue dogs to operate off leash hi all right so what I wonder is gonna be you know where they're going to rent a good good chasing dog I mean I'm not sure I think you need where you get one of those I think you need good rest the sixteenth century yeah the Guinea good rat terrier will take care of it for you but the the goose might not survive the chase right the hard part we don't want to enter the poor things but only on the golf course is how about all those panels down for the part that I run on every day right to Dodge these mounds of black and green goo that are there because if the the geese are all about that that can get a little right coming of guys at nine o'clock this morning we've got the news for you of course a stormy night across Kansas I'm gonna tell you all about that that's all the way at nine o'clock here on Kate an SS thanks bill for being.

bank of America senior analyst Ron abstain
"chris donnelly" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

11:44 min | 1 year ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"And the moments between your diagnosis and your death are devastating are you lose a lot of function in life and money to this disease along the way and people who live with this disease know what I'm talking about you generally have two to five years to live and the live like Lou effort has always had three parts to its mission the first is to raise awareness of the disease L. us the second is to raise funds to support ALS patients and their families and the third is to find to find research to find a treatment or a cure and we do this in honor of the reserve the modeling there Lou Gehrig did when he called himself the luckiest man and that's why we call it live like Lou okay so Kim man Suzanne what's our next this topic here well I think Suzanne the the focus of live like Lou started out as more of a regional focus in on the Pittsburgh focus a lot of support from people here but it has expanded Ellen's just within the last couple years and has gone national can you talk about what's happened with live like Lou and where it stands today where efforts are focused and the number of people that are involved in the young youth that are getting behind it with her so I did the the math a few years ago and I looked at our donor base when we were still a grassroots effort and we had almost nine thousand donors to our effort live like Lou here in the southwest Pennsylvania area between my husband's diagnosis and his staff and as you know we raise more than four million dollars and started a research center we have a donor wall for the research center it's on the the walkway between mine if your hospital and press B. hospital in that list some of the top donors who supported our efforts in the early days in and we continue to to fund that research center but it has and can other people and to the to the center of excellence for funding there's always a need for funding for research there's a saying that a L. us is not being curable LS is under funded and I talked about that a little bit in the last segment there's just not a lot of money to support the researchers and the science that needs to happen for this disease at the pace we need it so people can definitely donate to the live like sent live like loose center for ALS research at the university of Pittsburgh they have a website and they do take donations and you know every single dollar you spend stays at that research center which is fantastic but then something happened along the way we met our goal we raised more than four million dollars and and the baseball enthusiasts know that Lou Gehrig's number was number four and we'd started the research center and and we started a fund here in Pittsburgh at the Pittsburgh foundation which will always support patients and their families in western Pennsylvania through the grants that we make and I thought we were done I thought we'd met our goal and and and then this idea came up that we should go national and the the way that we went national is so Lou Gehrig played baseball at Columbia University before he was recruited to the Yankees and he was a member of the Phi delta theta fraternity at Columbia so the final to theta organization has always supported the cause avail us the disease the took their brother well my husband Neil happen to be a final to theta brothers well so what we've done is we started a partnership with a final to theta international fraternity and because of their support I am now the director of the national level like Lou foundation and we have a national reach and we have a hundred and eighty thousand living brothers of Phi delta theta fraternity who are supporting us in our mission too in Neal's words leave a LS better than it found us and I have every new school year when the brothers get back on campus I have fifteen thousand young men who are engaged in the cause of the live likely foundation and supporting us to raise money for patients and for research people beyond Phi delta theta are also supporting us here nationally too so is somehow in in Pittsburgh seems to have a habit of doing this somehow it started out as a as a pretty good idea it's become like this there's a big thing this national thing and I find myself in the best position of all one more wherever plant tree now also you you said two things and Kim you may want to comment on this you can reach live live close through United Way and the Pittsburgh foundation mmhm so it is a United Way agency saying a lot of people do United Way contributions to a world of work at sector and was so it is there and I came I know you're on the board of United Way in as one of them many charities and organizations that we support to have for and but there is ways to do that and so the no mean to interrupt but let's go forward for actually makes us take a break but we're we okay yeah the bosses were okay so I'll turn it over to you to again so this is an adult talk about some of the fundraiser is the theme fraternity brothers are doing are there any that really stand out and the ideas that we might be able to take can use locally well these guys are so much fun I'm I really enjoy my work with the undergraduate brothers a file to fade about the alarms as well you know it's so they are Phi delta theta so one of the things they do is they have a pot pie a five a contest with a pie throwing contest on campus and the charge people who walk by a lot of money to throw a pie at a fi therefore square basketball tournaments may have casino nights one of the one of the fundraisers I'm especially excited about is partnering with local minor league baseball teams because minor league baseball teams their facilities across the country seventy five percent of those ball parks are within a one hour drive of Phi delta theta fraternity houses and so on I'm hoping we're going to do and we did this once already with the West Virginia black bears it will start getting these partnerships going with the college campus community and at the minor league baseball organizations and start doing things for LS mean Ellis's is baseball's disease you know lot of professional sports teams have different diseases that they support but Alice who else would on that but Lou Gehrig's you know brother hood of baseball players so I really anticipate we're gonna do more and more with the minor league baseball organizations it's such a great relationship with the Pittsburgh Pirates here and it just love everyone in that their general office and and all that they've done it Pittsburgh our parents charities to help us and I think it can be replicated on a local level to it the thing is there's about sixteen thousand Americans every year who live with this disease and people so that's not a lot of people why should I put my support into a disease that so small and its impact and the fact is if you could change the life expectancy for allies from two to five years to five to eight years by coming up with a new drug I therapy to make the life expectancy longer you have as many people living with a alas that live with and mass in the United States today it's a fatal disease people don't live very long but if we can make it chronic it would be a miracle and there's so many more people that would be talking about it and raising funds to support not only research but also the families who are affected by it too yeah and when we talk millions Hey it sounds like an enormous sum of money but when you get into a research lab the million dollars that gets consumed rather rapidly and it's not exorbitant salaries is C. acquisition of equipment computers specimens and medical level research is very very expensive it is expensive and one of the things that I'm I'm proud of personally as we started this is a grassroots effort from Neal's home office which happens to be in the corner of our bedroom and that's where I still work today you know keeping overhead low so that we can find to the other things that we do with this money is really important to us because we want the money that comes to us to be put to work quickly for these families and for these researchers we know we're going to have an impact on this disease we feel very confident in the in the the being the chief operating officer and her friend I know that Neil got eight cents out of every nickel I'm sure that discipline is carried over to live like low Suzanne can you talk about the bank that you have the the university of Pittsburgh hands I even talked about that earlier served gather the banking the bank the brain institute so you know the L. S. human tissue is hard to come by and when a patient is diagnosed with a LS so often be asked to participate in research by giving samples of their skin or their spinal fluid and things like that the scientists use this issue and they can do a lot of amazing things with it it's hard to get human tissue living human tissue that that demonstrates allies and it's very important and it's gold to the scientists at the university of Pittsburgh in the live like blue center for LS research we have one of the largest supply of ALS brains and LS spinal cords in the United States and it's hard to think about if you haven't had to face this question before but Neil couldn't wait to be I mean he could wait believe me he wanted to wait but he was proud that he had the opportunity to be a donor to this bank because at the end of the day if we don't give these researchers everything they need every tool that they need to investigate this disease we're we're not gonna move the needle and and human tissues important and and pets got it which is I'm proud I'm proud of that and you you were saying that pit this also it's a bank that is available to other researchers around the country yeah I was Jim's point earlier about collaboration and sharing and I have found the university of Pittsburgh and Dr Chris Donnelly at the lab there to be exceedingly this sharing shamelessly the information that they have the methodologies that they have in the samples that they have because you know this tissue moves on and it goes in the other laboratories and people are are doing amazing things with them okay so well.

Lou four million dollars five years seventy five percent million dollars eight years one hour
"chris donnelly" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

09:32 min | 1 year ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Dig the trains still makes does make sense of so and it's not her first time doing that yeah and so anyhow Kimon turned back to you and Suzanne well thank you Jim and ask for it for listeners that might be new we're focusing today on live like Lou this is an organization that focuses on a LS and helping families and helping researchers and Suzanne Alexander is the director of live like Lou foundation Suzanne a lot of work has happened in the last eight years since you got involved in Pittsburgh and would you talk about some of the changes and also I'd like to hear about the live like loose center frailes research one of my favorite things to talk about so when we learned that this disease does not have a treatment and it does not have a care in fact the doctors told me all to do the exact same thing they told Lou Gehrig to do when he got his diagnosis you know take vitamin eve tells good luck there is a drug out there that's FDA approved it's called redolent not cover alone it's called really attack really attack and they really didn't do anything for now and the the improvement that Alice patients see isn't great and that's it Niels doctor told him you know nails like do you have a trial you have a shot can you be known without me was something can I go to a different country and the doctor said do what you love that's all I got do what you love and that was unacceptable to us because in a day when we're curing cancer and we're sending ships to Mars and were able to learn so much about the environment in the world around us why can't we solve this and so we started looking for places to put our money that would give us and maybe new generations of Alice patients a different answer and we looked at other research organizations and we decided we wanted to invest the live likely funds into something that hasn't been done before and a perfect place to do that was at the university of Pittsburgh that had recently started the the brand new brain institute which was going to be a coalescence of all of the brain sciences under one umbrella and under one lead our researchers National Academy of sciences Dr Peter Strick I live very a renowned very talented researcher and and doctor in the fields of the brain and he did not have a basic science research center dedicated to L. us so we worked with him to identify where we could put our money to work right here in Pittsburgh he was raised in Pittsburgh so we wanted to spend in Pittsburgh and we trusted doctor stricken the university of Pittsburgh in UPMC and so we made a pledge that we would raise two point five million dollars and and we got a match immediately for another two point five million dollars and we started the what would become the ten million dollar live like loose center for ALS research focus on the basic science of the disease like what's going on at a cellular level what's going on with the mitochondria and the movement of these power houses within the cell that makes cells die sooner than they have to and what we learned is LS is highly related with other diseases of the brain like Alzheimer's and frontal temporal dementia Parkinson's and hunting tens all of these diseases are early cell death and we don't have treatments and cures that are reliable for any of these diseases right now and we know that they have a common cause we just need researchers to focus on them and this is the expensive stuff so we're raising all this money to support families you face this disease because it is so devastating for research is expensive in a LS research is kind of an orphan in the world research today there's tons of money in the research behind cancer and behind heart disease and behind diabetes because those diseases are cross our our chronic we've gotten them to be chronic so companies want to put money into those diseases ALS is fatal there's not a lot of money even on a lot of return when you invest in research for this disease and we found that to be an acceptable to so we decided to put our effort in our money into the brain institute at the university of Pittsburgh they hired doctor Chris Donnelly we actually stolen I hope no one from Johns Hopkins listening but I'm very proud and Chris totally is a fantastic principal investigator your runs the live like Lou center for ALS research he's built a tremendous team they've gotten three patents through one of them was very we are very excited to announce a finding from this patent earlier this year it was published in the medical research journal neuron magazine it was picked up internationally and they're finding was basically they were able to create they were able to make a LS happen in a dish three use of a blue light it's called after genetics and sorry amusing very basic words Chris is probably not happy with me right now but by this flashing blue light they were able to make the event of a LS happened in a human cell in a dish under a microscope for the first time and then by turning off the blue light they made the LS stop it's basically a clamping mechanism of a protein in a cell but they were able to make it happen through the use of this light and through all of this different great new basic science right here in Pittsburgh and and and that finding has major implications when it comes to gosh if we can make L. as happened in a dish under a microscope what kind of therapies can we put in that dish and see if we can make a LS turn off it's just it's so exciting and and that happened right here in Pittsburgh because of what we were able to build together to get a sense of the magnitude of the expense of doing the research can you compare the money that's directed towards Alice research to some other diseases and what might be needed yeah there's there's billions directed toward cancer today toward cancer treatments it you know Dr Peter cirque describes it as shots on goal you know we don't know what causes a alas still and so we need all these scientists to be doing the work in the lab growing that human ale us cells and then trying different things until they find it and it's just the more shots on goal we can make them the sooner we will speed up discovery and find a cure them at the center and the national institutes of health is the biggest funder of research for LS and in the world probably but certainly the United States and the budget is about sixty to eighty million dollars a year and when you think it took billions to find treatments and cures for cancer and our our you know our research fund from the government is in the eighty million range it's just you know we're not there but when you call alas the research dollars that are going to Alzheimer's and Huntington's in Parkinson's and Dale us that's when it gets exciting because these researchers are talking to each other and they're sharing ideas and samples and you know I feel like we're on the cusp of really big things yeah you said the magic word brew that does not happen in medical research and that's sharing of information and rumor has it you were big plus and beating up researchers to get him to share is that well I don't know about that I mean when when we make grants to research whether it's at the university of Pittsburgh or it's with our new effort which we'll talk about a few minutes we make it a very high priority that the researchers collaborate and they collaborate across different scientific disciplines and they collaborate across institutions so for example the the lab that we started at the university of Pittsburgh has hired emerging scientists out of Carnegie Mellon or they done projects with Carnegie Mellon to add to do the mathematics to do the informatics to do the the the research that needs to happen that these researchers are in laboratories and they need computerization they need the mass they need a many different disciplines to come together to make a discovery happened and I love that I think there was a song about you in this six barber plant tree member yeah the end cap betting is head against the rubber plant Jurien knocked it over after a while a lot of us are in this together all right so we had to take a break we'll be right back now I know napa auto parts stores of napa auto care centers get a twenty five dollar prepaid visa card when you get any map automotive battery it's.

Kimon Suzanne Jim Lou five million dollars eighty million dollars ten million dollar twenty five dollar eight years
"chris donnelly" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And when he saved he lives on channel seven every day at one and they recorded the song the video with our old friend, Jim Peter, because, well, I don't want to get competitive Steve. It's not as good as kaffir life. Have you heard? No, I haven't. I'm just kidding. No, the song you did was clearly superior. Thank you. And he's a said he played it and saying the critically to his mom, while she was dying of cancer. Oh, wow. I take it all back, his zillion, if that's not the basis of a country music song. I've never heard what what's true, right? Hey, good luck. Nine thirty five. It has headlines time sponsored by electric at sixty eight degrees in Chicago on her way, maybe seventy five away from the late today. President Trump is confirming a military strike on Iran was approved and then called off at the last minute last night. He tweeted this morning that we were cocked and loaded in his words to retaliate on three different sites. The action was to have been in response to Iran shooting down a US drone earlier this week. Mr. Trump says he was informed by general that a strike against Iran would kill one hundred fifty people. So the president said he stopped at ten minutes before what happened because he thinks it would not have been proportionate to shooting down an unmanned drone southbound I fifty five in Romeo Ville has been reopened after it was closed for. Hours this morning following a fatal crash vehicle rolled over and struck a state police troopers car around two AM. Police say the woman who was driving the car was killed. She was apparently going through a construction zone and lost control trooper reportedly suffered minor injuries. And a case of lost keys is a pricey. One for visuals at O'Hare airport. The sun times reports one set of master keys, which lock and unlock perimeter fences and other key security points was lost back in April and never found Chicago police department at F B I were called in to help city officials say it cost five figures to replace the keys and locks security officer who apparently lost him has been fired. And those are the headlines WGN sports. It was a night to remember for Albert away making his debut at Wrigley field. Coming out of the bullpen getting a victory as the cubs beat the Mets seven two four four beautiful innings of baseball back up Tyler chat with perhaps, Elza, will you moving? Into the starting rotation. At some point retired twelve of the thirteen batters. He faced got a standing ovation coming off the mount hobby by a Homer, and a triple, Anthony Rizzo, a two run double Steve seasick, the save White Sox rough yesterday. They got the Texas Rangers to night, you can hear it right here on seven, twenty WGN Kevin Powell with that pre-game this evening. Andy mazer Darren Jackson on the call bulls taking a guard Kobe white number seven overall. In a big man in the second round Daniel Gifford white will compete to starts along a him and Chris Donnelly, battling it out. Bulls also expected to be active in free agency and the Blackhawks draft coming up tonight as well hawks with the number three overall full coverage on WGN special Blackhawks show tomorrow from four until five thirty. Chris Boden is in Vancouver. I'm are common WGN sports. Camp..

President Trump WGN Steve seasick Iran Chicago Jim Peter Chris Boden Bulls White Sox O'Hare airport Blackhawks US Chris Donnelly Daniel Gifford Wrigley field Elza Anthony Rizzo president Romeo Ville
"chris donnelly" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on This Week in Science

"All right ready to move on. Okay, jump into. The interview are interviewed tonight is with Dr Chris Donnelly. Dr Donnelly is an assistant professor in the department of neurobiology at the university of Pittsburgh's of medicine, and he's the scientific director of live like Lou center for research in the university of Pittsburgh brain institute. His studies are focused on the biology underlying neuro degenerative diseases with a particular interest in understanding neuronal death of served in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ale s and frontal temporal dementia. F- TD, Chris welcome to the show. Wonderful. How are you? Good. I'm good. I'm good. Are you? I would love to know. So many of us have heard about a LS either. Because of people that we know or be I mean social media's used as in a couple of years ago. The icepack challenge was a massive social media effort to raise money for ale research, but can you give us some insight into how you got interested in studying, this particular particular disease. Yes. I I was got interested nail smile is like fifteen years old. In fact, we had been assigned to read a book called Tuesday's with Maury in high school. And it was it was just something we had to do for an English class. And at the time, I didn't know it was I don't think it was very well known at the time either. And I just read about this person who went to visit a mentor of his sort of biographical story and chronicled how this person presenter sort of went through the disease progression eventually passed away from it. And as a fifteen year old kid who didn't understand mortality. I don't think it's time. It was very frightening in, you know, as I've kinda continued might might research my scientific career just like education. It was always something that I was really interested in. But didn't really get into until after I got my PHD as related. Yeah. In so you I mean your work has gone from like stem cell focus to being specifically like protein focused. Can you a little a little overview of that you have? Yes. So you're speaking to someone who is like one of those people who had multiple majors in college is never figure out what they wanted to do. But always. Yeah. Just always like biology, sorta ended up sticking with it had a really great mentor who was in grounded grad who was each me about DNA and DNA epigenetics, and how it opens and closes, and you can open read certain genes, and she got me interested in molecular biology suggested I go to graduate school where I studied like nerve regeneration after an injury, but really looking at like molecular side of things and then at that point after I was kind of finishing up the opportunity to finally get into a less, and then when works entering under some experts Johns Hopkins. And that sort of my personal history. But ally was there that's when I learned all about stem cells and how we could use these models disease. But. How can you use them as a model for? I mean, how'd you just a cell, and and go this is what we learned from. Yes. These these nerdy generative diseases. The major problem is we don't know what causes them. So how do you study them in the first place? If you don't know the cause, you know, you can't it's not like a tumor. Can't really do. I op see like you can with some cancers. So. You know, when these induced for stem cells technology that was developed in you know, sort of early MSCI thousands, and is technology basically was able to reprogram these skin cells or blood cells and kind of tripped on into becoming embryonic like any kind of trip them into going into development.

Dr Chris Donnelly director university of Pittsburgh university of Pittsburgh brain Lou center assistant professor Maury Johns Hopkins fifteen years fifteen year
"chris donnelly" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"chris donnelly" Discussed on WDRC

"All right well if we didn't turn off the highway we would have ended up in new york but here we are down near the end of eighty four on the far west end of the state in danbury today celebrating trees all over the state of connecticut we're here in danbury today so pleased to be joined by chris donnelly who is the urban forestry coordinator for connecticut department of energy environmental protections forestry division and we are visiting here with him in danbury because dan berry is a a legacy tree city here in the state of connecticut and across the country they're tree city usa designated for twenty eight years running one of the oldest tree city usa continuously running honors in the state of connecticut and all of this information came to light in and around arbor day when the connecticut department of energy and environmental protection announced the designation of eighteen tree city usa's this year with in connecticut so that's that's a pretty pretty decent number chris obviously anyone could do better but that seems like an and as i look across the list you know they're they're they're cast across the state you know kind of pretty evenly divided that's true of course is one of the longest running treats in the us as in is one of the ones for instance in fairfield county but we have three cities spread all the way out to new london county we haven't been hartford county certainly new haven county in addition we have tree city usa's that are small towns our largest cities in connecticut each of them bridgeport new haven hartford stanford or ultra city usa's so yeah it's it's it's a good program and has appealed for has an appeal for a lot of communities and congratulations also to greenwich because this is their first year celebrating as a tree city usa.

new york danbury connecticut coordinator dan berry usa fairfield county london county hartford county chris donnelly connecticut department of ener hartford twenty eight years