20 Burst results for "Chris Dickson"

Recommendation and Discovery: The Big, Exciting Elephant in the Room

a16z

02:39 min | 1 year ago

Recommendation and Discovery: The Big, Exciting Elephant in the Room

"This is like the big elephant in the room and potentially the big exciting being in the room recommendation and discovery. How do you then think about that side of this both in the context of spotify shows, and also beyond we open this conversation about what hasn't hasn't changed this has been a broken problem quote in podcasting it might not be as broken in music. We've talked about Tiktok we've talked about the parallels and differences between video. Let's bring it all back together around this theme and topic of. Recommendation and discovery for music. There is a commitment of than two or three seconds to figure out if you like a song, right. So the bar for who you trust as your source for who's giving you that recommendation is higher, and so you either have to have a system that builds trust showing that their algorithm has given. You enough hits Tiktok can't be wrong. Five times in a row stakes are really high. So you either have an algorithm that is so good that knows enough about your ready that the majority of the time when they give you something you like it or you have crater that also has that same kinda hit rate you realize hey, stuff that person likes I also like. Not, is also a great way to kind of get that discovery element. It's all adult giving the user this end trust that they're willing to test your recommendation because say eighty, ninety percent of the time you're GONNA be right. So I think you're completely right. That was the success with user playlists. They're literally mini billions of different cure the spotify catalog so. You have something for everyone and either they find that plane this you can use machine learning to learn from that to be able to serve us. Then you have the elements themselves and I think that's different between music and podcast music is easy in a sense because it is three minute items and you can skip through and what we see in music. As that is like the investment of how much time do you spend versus finding one gem so it is actually okay if even most of the songs theoretically are not that good if the skip through and like the seven song is like your Dream Song because I can make your entire week or maybe month right so I think I think Chris. Dickson. Sadness. A fault tolerant you I, if your machine learning is perfect, the only need to answer one item if you machine learning is one out of ten, you probably need to show ten items because then there's always one jam on the screen you heard that user interface to your kind of level of recommendation, and so these sailors formats we try to think of. As kind of a g to get things done, you quickly go through and like Yep that was perfect saying that to my library, it's like a productivity flow in the discovery moment, which is very different from consumption moment when you may be on a speaker and then it's not okay. That's you have three songs in a row but his okay if the. Fourth one is good.

Tiktok Dickson Chris
Turning Open Source Developers Into Superfans

a16z

04:29 min | 1 year ago

Turning Open Source Developers Into Superfans

"Today's topic. How do you create a platform that people not only us, but tell their friends about when that goes beyond just being useful and actually connects deeply with the user in this episode recorded at our crypto startup school. In April Twenty Twenty eight sixteen z General. Partner Chris, Dickson talked about building communities with get hub co, founder, Tom Preston Werner. Discussed how to engage early users, how to turn them into your biggest advocates had a create super fans and more. Today get hub is leading community for open source developers and others. The also discuss in-person communities versus distributed communities a topic that's very top of mind today. So here's Chris and Tom starting with the beginnings of get hub. So. How did the idea come about? That was while I was at power set and we were using get internally a little bit. I was working on an internal project with erling and. Co Workers I was working with Dave on introduced me to get. He was like, this is the greatest thing like the Lennox. Lennox Colonel Uses this. It has this really nice branching emerging model and he showed it to me and I was like this is this is pretty awesome. It's the command line stuff a little hard to use it like you have to have an account on a server somewhere and pushing and pulling from repository to repositories. Awkward. But I definitely saw the potential, and so we started using it internally power set and going to the ruby meet ups in San Francisco and just started thinking about how great it was, and but nobody was using nobody could. Really. The dominant reveal using over to using subversion was the most prominent open source. See some people would be using CVS. Some people were using perforce. But it's not only about trying to trying to make it possible for people to harness the power that I saw in being a web developer. I, I not make this, know how to write code that can read from disk and pull get objects of disk and give them into ruby so that they can be exposed a ruby on rails web site and I, thought that would be a cool project that I could work on accident projects with people that I knew and just started showing it around the community. and. So you this website and then you put it up ended immediately, Kinda get popular or did it take a long time or? Did, we did a a thing that we stole from. Marketing trip that they did with g mail where you you had some invites. So we gave people five invites, and the could invite the invites to their friends, and so there was this kind of artificial scarcity I. Mean, it was real scarcity too because we we had some very small server that we were running this thing on. And so it was sort of a dual. Dual, effort to to. Lever, some of that artificial scarcity that that makes people want I want, I want it. I want everyone could see it, but not everyone can have an account, and so we manage the accounts that way early on anyone could read, could you could see it and pull the repositories, but not necessarily sign up. Right. You had to have an invite to sign up. So. That worked I. Don't know if that works anymore. I. Haven't seen people do too much of that anymore. But at the time it was it was quite successful. I get created a lot of buzz. People just talking around I. Think Twitter was quite early then but people were talking about on twitter. and and people really seem to like it and. I don't know just people started signing up for it, pushing up random code here and there, and it immediately I think struck a chord with people as far as the capabilities version control and what you could do. Once you realize that you had easy branching and merging. offline capabilities. It was super super? Fast. And now with a website where you could push a coding collaborate on it. And make it so that you could use get and have it not be the hardest thing in the world it just it just it grew linearly. Our user base linearly for almost the entire time that I was there was this was not a a super exponential curve like you see in a lot of startups, you're always like I need that exponential growth curve. Are I'm doomed? For us it was, it was quite linear. We grow by some x thousands of users a month, and we sustain that for for months and months and months and. Years on those numbers would grow. So it wasn't exactly linear. And, then you know over time, it would get faster, but it was mostly, it was. It was. Quite linear, but the income was also linear, which is nice. The income just kept coming as well.

Twenty Twenty Tom Preston Werner Chris Lennox Colonel Partner San Francisco CO Founder Twitter Dave Dickson Web Developer Twitter.
What's Hype, What's Real on the Latest in AI

a16z

05:36 min | 1 year ago

What's Hype, What's Real on the Latest in AI

"Hi Everyone. Welcome to this week's. Sixteen minutes I'm zonal your host, and this is our show where we talk about the headlines what's in the news and where we are on the long arc of tech trends were back from our holiday break, and so this we're covering all the reasons and ongoing as around the topic, of GP, three, the natural language processing based text predictor from the San. Francisco Research and Development Company opened ai the actually released their paper on. GPT three in late May. But only released their broader commercial API a couple of weeks ago. So we're seeing a lot of excitement and activity around that in particular although it's all being called GP T. Three. So we're going to do one of our explainer episodes of the two x explainer. Going into what it really is how it works why it matters broader implications and questions while teasing apart, what type, what's real as is the premise of the show but before I introduce our expert, let me just quickly summarize some of the highlights. So while Gpt, three is technically a text predictor that actually reduces what's possible because of course, words and software are simply coding of Human Thought to borrow a phrase from. Chris. Dickson which means a lot more things are possible. So we're seeing a note these are all cherry picked examples believable forum pose comments, press releases poetry. screenplays, articles somebody who wrote an entire article headlined open is GP Three may be the biggest thing since bitcoin and then revealed midway that he didn't actually write the article but that gpt three did we're also seeing strategy documents like for business CEO's and advice written entirely gpt three and not just words. But we're seeing people design using words to write code for designing websites and other designs. Someone even built a plugin again, all of it showing the Trans mutability of thoughts to words to code to design and so on, and then someone made a search engine that can return. Answers and you are ells in response to quote ask me anything which has anyone who's been in NLP space knows I was at park when we spun off powers that back in the day, and that's always been sort of a holy grail of question answering which you know all about to having worked in this world frank on thou let me introduce you are expert in this episode Frank Chances written a lot about ai including a primer on ai deep learning and machine learning a pulse check on ai what's working what's not a micro site with resources for how to Get started practically and do something with your own product and your own company, and then reflecting on jobs and humanity and working together. You can find all of that on our website frank to start things off. What's your favorite example of gpt three so far mine is founding principles for a religion written and gpt three. I'd love to hear your favorite and also your quick take on the excitement to start us off before we dig a bit deeper favorite out of the whole thing is it's doing arithmetic. So Ascot, what's twenty-three plus sixty seven like just arbitrary two digit arithmetic. This is a natural language processing. Model and so basically, it got trained by feeding it lots and lots of text and out of that, it's figuring out we think how to do arithmetic, which is very, very surprising because you don't think that exists in texts the excitement. Potentially is promising signs of progress towards general artificial intelligence. So today if you want to do very, highly accurate. natural language processing, you build a bespoke model. You have your own custom architecture you feed it a ton of data. What gpt three shows is that they train this model once and then they throw at a whole bunch of natural language processing tasks like fill in the blank or inference or translation, and without retraining it at all. They're getting really good results compared to finely tuned models. Before we even though into teasing apart, what type what's real? Let's first talk about the it what is GP three? So we have two things one, we have a machine learning model cpt is actually an acronym stands for generative pre trained transformer will go through all those insect. But thing one is we have a P- retrained machine learning model that's optimized to do a wide variety of natural language processing tasks like reading a wikipedia article and answering questions from it or guessing what the ending of a story should be or so on insulin. So we have a machine learning model. The thing that people are playing with a Pi that allows developers to essentially ask questions. Of that model. So instead of giving you the model and you program it to do what you want, they're giving you selective access via the API one of the reasons they're doing this is that most people don't have the compute infrastructure to even train the model there's been estimates that if you wanted to train the model from scratch, it costs something like five to ten million dollars of cloud compute time. That's a big big model and say like they don't give out the model and then to the controversy around this thing when they released the first version was they were worried that if they just gave the model out, people would do nefarious things with it like. Fake News articles that you would just like Saturate bomb the web than so they're like look we want to be responsible with this thing, and so we'll get access via. API. Then we know exactly who's using it and then the the I can be a bit of a throttle on what can and can't do

Gp Three Frank SAN Francisco Research P Dickson Chris CEO Development Company
"chris dickson" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"To quite frankly be open minded enough to let them drag us into a vertical that we might not have thought about but for which we can then go through the diligence to say okay does the intersect intersect software with that vertical makes us so give you an example we now have a life sciences fund we call it bio and it's again convergence between software and life sciences so an example example would be a company. That's using machine learning techniques for example to help improve diagnostics for cancer something like that. That's a company called freedom. That's in our portfolio and we initially as a firm and we started nine. We didn't have a view around life sciences but what we saw over time was more and more entrepreneurs were coming out of both computer science and life scientists programs from an educational perspective and starting businesses in this area and we said look over watching that and observing it for years we said look we think there's a critical mass here where if we bring in the right people who have that dual-track expertise. There's a really interesting investment opportunity and so we started in two thousand fifteen a fun to do that having looked at this from two thousand twelve to two thousand fifteen start to see that and so to me that kind of illustrates a lot of how we think about the sourcing thing which is think of it as we're in the talent business in our job. Is we need to identify. What is the talent doing and it's not always the case that everything the talents doing is a great investment opportunity but we need to investigate that figure it out my partner chris dickson jokes about this which is part of this job is figuring out what do nerds do on weekends that can ultimately become mainstream opportunities and by the way i mean nerds in the most loving and friendly way but you know if you look at life sciences or if you look at the history of crypto or things that sort or a._r. and v._r. drones a lot of these things are things that kind of looked like hobbies they look like small little things things that are on the fringe and not all those things will become big industries but often. There's a reasonable correlation between stuff that starts as a engineer hobbyist activity that can evolve into a mainstream <unk> area and that's part of how we think about it so sourcing wise. We've got to be doing that proactively and then the other piece of sourcing of course is so much of our business is a referral in relationship business and so we spend a lot of time talking to professors at schools understanding what's happening in their labs. There's lots of what we would call nodes in the system of people who are just very well connected in the entrepreneur community who we need need to make sure we're talking to them. There are investors who are upstream of us like seed funds right who will see a deal in an earlier stage of history that we do and then hopefully we need to cultivate the relationship so that's that's a lot of the proactive and other elements going to sourcing. Where do you come out on product versus entrepreneur yeah at the early stage. It's it's really much more heavily geared towards entrepreneur. The reason for that i think is that we know that the project's gonna change right so oftentimes..

chris dickson engineer partner
"chris dickson" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on KOMO

"Komo news. One thousand FM ninety seven seven good morning. It's five thirty one and some rain showers or in some places some wet snowflakes falling to start on this Thursday morning right now in Seattle. It's thirty four degrees. With Gregg Hersholt, I'm MandA factor. Here are the top stories from the KOMO twenty four seven news center. The state Senate has approved a Bill in a handsome school safety programs by requiring law enforcement, authorities to notice all to notify all nearby schools in cases of violence when we get the details. Live from komo's Carleen Johnson. Yeah. The measure requires notification to every school public or private if there's the possibility of violence, which might make evacuations are lockdowns necessary law enforcement authorities would be required then to determine if local schools are actually threatened Chris Dickson's superintendent for Catholic schools for the archdiocese of Seattle told lawmakers when the cafe racer shooting happened in two thousand twelve it was. Total chaos for them not knowing what was going on. We never knew what was going. What was happening? That information came to us through the west Seattle blog believe it or not. So now police would have to notify any nearby school when something's happening James McMahon with the Washington association for sheriffs and police chiefs urged lawmakers to let those officers make the decision if notification is necessary, frankly, we would rather our officers chased the person who's committing the harm then somebody to peel off and start making phone calls. It worked that into the ultimate deal which was passed unanimously by the Senate now moves to the house. Carleen Johnson, KOMO news. A former WalMart pharmacist has been awarded a million dollars for being wrongfully terminated komo's Brian Calvert reports live she was fired because of her disability Jacobs worked at the WalMart store from two thousand seven until two thousand seventeen a year before she was let go the chain told it's pharmacists, they would need to start giving injections to customers. Jacobs could not because of his cerebral palsy. She and her multiple sclerosis. She could do the rest of her job, but was physically unable to give an injection. So she was fired jurors sired sided with her saying the chain violated the Americans with disabilities. Act Jacobs tells the news Tribune, quote, I'm grateful to the jury for recognizing the importance of the ADA, and hopefully my determination will help others avoid what I went through WalMart just coming off the heels of reclassifying many of its store. Greeters many of whom are disabled several of those employees have faced layoffs, but some been offered new positions within the company. Brian Calvert, KOMO news. There are some new developments in that seven sixty seven cargo jet crash in Texas, the cockpit voice recorder. Now reveals the crew who was hauling cargo for Amazon started losing control of the Boeing jet about eighteen seconds before it went down. Searchers recently recovered the black boxes from the atlas air flight thirty five ninety one and a muddy Marsh near Houston. The cargo jet crashed last month, killing the three people on board the plane was on approach to land with that's certainly knows. Dive. There was no emergency. Call from the cockpit. Investigators up. The flight data recorder will provide war answers. Komo's Ryan Yamamoto. Amazon is going to close all of its pop up shops next month. The company has eighty-seven of these mini stores and places like whole foods and Coles designed let customers try Amazon products before buying these closings. Do not include Amazon's cashier. Let's go stores or it's bookstores. Komo news time five.

Komo komo Jacobs Seattle Amazon WalMart Carleen Johnson Brian Calvert Senate Gregg Hersholt James McMahon Coles superintendent Chris Dickson Texas Washington association Houston
"chris dickson" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on Unchained

"The next question is from Joshua visor. You seem to be skeptical of some claims by your guests. Are you willing to be more explicit about which parts of the industry you think will blossom in which you think are complete hypes or scams are complete hype or scams? Again, I'm not giving investment vice do your research. Some of the areas that I think could possibly blossom. I will just probably be obvious to anybody who listens to my show, but certainly the first is just, I think we're gonna see a money come out of crypto. We're already starting to see that in a limited way, but bitcoin as I mentioned earlier was really kind of the first app, and it really was the first thing that helped people understand the potential technology. So in that regard, I. Would be surprised if out of the signals we did not end up with something that was money, like and already there are a lot of contenders for this mantle in addition to bitcoin, there's bitcoin cash. There's like hone, there's dash. There's z. cash, there's minero. So I think we will certainly see some kind of money that comes out of this. You know whether or not that ends up competing in any significant way with Fiat currency. I have no idea, and because we are likely to seem digital Fiat currencies at some point, I really don't know also how that will affect these crypto currencies, how popular they can get. You know, there's just way too many factors to try to make any prediction there. But I would be surprised if we don't see some form of money in whether it's an unlimited fashion or a wider fashion that does take off using this technology. Another area that I think is probably going to thrive is going to be privacy. And when I say that, I mean in particular privacy coins and that is for a few reasons. So as we've seen with technologies over and over again, frankly, many of them take off because. They criminals find usually in them and that actually to go back to my little description of the app and infrastructure, I guess, play between them the interplay between them. Like one of the apps, frankly, was probably Silkroad for for bitcoin. So in that regard, a lot of those criminals found out the hard way that when you have a transparent money than your crimes will be more easily traced back to you. So if you listen to the very first episode of Katie Hawn who used to be federal prosecutor, she's now one of the general partners at entry some Horwitz and she leaves the sixteen the crypto fund with Chris Dickson who was on the podcasts this summer. You guys should check out that interview. But in her initial interview with me when she was a prosecutor, she talked about how she was able to solve a few crimes using the bitcoin blockchain. Where they realized that they were to federal agents that were stealing the coins from this'll code investigation. So I think certainly criminals are figuring out that maybe having a privacy coin is a good idea. However, those aren't the only people that are going to find such a thing useful z. cash is a privacy coin that it's technology is now being incorporated as far as I understand into j. p. Morgan chases blockchain Corum and that's because financial institutions also don't want to be broadcasting their transactions out to the world and for for competitive reasons. So I think we will probably see privacy coins or technology take off. And frankly, we actually, we're already seeing that the last area dot, I could probably pretty confidently say, we'll probably boss him is the smart contract area. And the reason that I say that is because a theory man already laws and has..

prosecutor Katie Hawn Chris Dickson blockchain Corum Morgan
"chris dickson" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on Venture Stories

"And he came to a new country like America without any savings. People like that. Have a visceral understanding why something like goal. If it was hidden away or buried or something could be valuable at it could be something that saves your entire family. And that's not the same mindset as Silicon Valley people in Silicon Valley living in in a pot of the country which has seen prosperity full like you multiple generations. And so it's not there's no sort of institutional star coal understanding of of why something like, oh, bestial both though, can you believe in in sound money and also the world's will be your narrative? Do you believe this is? Let's say hi. How should I answer this question? I think I think there are a lot of opportunities to to rebuild some of the financial system, and I I have. I have nothing against that, but I think the problem is a lot of people think that they can apply the use of a blockchain to to solving this problem and haven't really understood why a blockchain is useful. The blockchain was invented for bitcoin to solve a specific problem which is trust minimization. How do you? How do you coordinate a bunch of people together in in a situation where they didn't trust each other and Saotome. She used this insight to allow people to transfer value between each other who didn't trust each other and the the problem I have with the concept of a world computer or a theory, is it trust minimization? It's really not that important for computation. I mean, I'd say the vast majority of computation that happens. Trust isn't a problem at all, and it's it's totally fine to have centralized services, which search engine certainly fine. Alignment when Chris Dickson writes about how you know developer at Edo conflicting incentives with billions of Facebook or other specialized platforms or users don't capture any of the upside for the work that they do. And he talks about how crypto networks are very elegant solution to align incentives across all stakeholders in platform. Are you eating that's interesting or overstated or non-existent? I just I didn't believe in that case. I think when you build into the protocol, one of these particles ability to dispose tokens to certain people, you're inherently to make those protocol changes possible union have some centralized way of doing it and and he basically lose the value at that point. Once you have a centralization to dispose tokens to certain people so that they incentivized to work on the protocol you may as well just use a database databases is much more efficient, much cheaper and much more scalable than a blockchain Blockchain's a useful. Cases where trust is a really big problem and the good for social scale ability. So Blockchain's actually very badly designed if you wanna scale, if you wanted to put millions of transactions per second on Bitcoin's, just not possible as the blockchain can't do that kind of thing. The only way that you can do that kind of thing is with the centralized service. The problem I think is that when you when you bake these incentives into a protocol, you kind of sully the protocol as well, you, you'll creating winners expensive, everyone else, some amount of the supplies being given to a small group of people and they benefit if that thing goes up in value. I think there are a bit of ways of doing it as well, much more open ways of doing it, which is just give them shares and have a cap table when make that public. I just don't think Blockchain's the suited for that kind of thing. I wanna close out here by by playing a little game in question about the main, but I want to say a person and I want you to respond with like we did before the most charitable of interpretation of how they respond to this..

Blockchain Chris Dickson Silicon Valley America Facebook developer
"chris dickson" Discussed on The Crypto Street Podcast

The Crypto Street Podcast

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on The Crypto Street Podcast

"Everybody likes knows there's no such. There's no such thing as information overload. Just filter failure so knows is there. It's up to us as investors and traders to filter that noise and curated to the point where we have our playlist user, the eight people that I follow. I follow him into battle all the time. They're right more than they're wrong. And until those guys tell me in because I can't be an expert in everything. So the crypto is Fred Wilson's bullish on crypto. I'm not going to second guess friend Wilson. He could be wrong, but I'm not going to second guess the guy guy was doing or Yanni Asiya detoro I'm gonna go to my playbook, and my playbook is when those guys get when those guys get bearish l. throw in the towel in the meantime and lead to ask, Fred, what does he think about bitcoin every act read his blog, and you know he's nervous, but he's a busy bullish on the industry. And so why am I going to second guess him in Chris of people that have made money in this industry and are not in a promotional within the boundaries of what's acceptable in what they've done. In the past in their reputation in they're putting the reputation of land. I don't need opinions from nine million people. I definitely don't need opinions from TV. It's not like Fred's gone in hiding, his opinion has changed. The thought that was that things were overprice. We all know if you have any common sense. Things were silly by just looking at the data and if read throws in the towel. Tomorrow I is podcast would sound a lot different. Chris Dickson throws in the towel goes, fuck I'm was wrong. I'm not gonna argue with Chris Dick's middle wonder why he changed his mind, and then I better have an edge over Chris Dickson ri- better be throwing in the towel minute after he was going to be a lot of pain. So one thing I want to elaborate on that and then I swear I'm done and you got other guys campus had explain to, you know, as like noises yet, were it's up ten us of this era to find find smart people involved, but and then one thing to kind of piggyback on that you mentioned that happens a lot on trips of Twitter for new newer people is if you know like say someone puts a chart out there and says, you know, entering Tao's here, this is what I'm seeing, blah, blah, blah nonsense. Everyone always. Asks, you know, price target, sir, and use the you. You've mentioned that in this book and say, price targets should be banned, and then you will say, I don't trust people who issue price targets, so, but listen to everybody. Yeah, no one, you know, for the listen, I think directionally is important. So there's two things that are important direction and do in skin in the game. I think skin in the game goes away because of Twitter. Like I don't care if you have skin the game at care if you're smart, and if you've been right in the past and are you consistent in, you know? So I don't care what you look like, smell like how tall you are, what color your skin is. If your ideas are good, you're going to surface in stock Twitter, Twitter. The next thing is my money's my money. I want you responsible for my the reason I love stocked woods recently built that out from Twitter, Twitter, never understood this Twitter is turn those into some kind of media company when they really just a platform for ideas and sentiment is an news is I only care about. You know what you expertise as soon as you tell me incertainty. This is the my, my price. I have mmediately stop trusting. How do you know more like just tell me what you're doing consistently, and then tell me when you stop doing it if you consistently do that, I trust you because I don't care. And so I don't care if you have money in the game. If you really are an expert on something, you may not have money, but you still could be an expert in whether it's copper or apple or or bitcoin. And so if you're putting your ads on the line with your ideas, trying to build a reputation. That's great. I don't care how much money you have the game because it's cure you. You're putting your reputation online with your idea..

Twitter Fred Wilson Chris Dickson Chris Dick Chris Yanni Asiya apple Tao
"chris dickson" Discussed on a16z

a16z

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on a16z

"And so it's it's a, I think there is an analogy there to be drawn to insofar as the architecture. There is some amount of top down design in the case of cities, but it's more of a scaffold and then that's cathode allows for the emergence of something raider in a bottoms up way. And I think it's similar in the case of crypto networks. I love that analogy. I think it's really interesting to draw the parallel to urban planner because there's so much that is out of their control, but there are also initial conditions that you can get. Right. What are some things that or bitcoin? Got right. Early on or things that maybe resulted in consequences that the designers didn't notice that I maybe just a way of sort of reframing the the analogy to cities is is to throw in an element of time. So when we talk about sort of cities being scaffold and sort of an emerging structure for independent parties too, you know, agree about, you know, the location of their work and go about their business. It's important to talk about where the sky. Awful originally emerged from like, what? What is the tipping point? You know, that creates this this, I guess, sort of maximum interesting is for people to to sort of move in this direction to converge on the city. And I think in, you know, if we talk about a project like a theorem, for example, you know, early on there was this amazing white paper and it described as profound vision about what the platform could enable. And at the time you know, the code hadn't been written there was there was there was no network. There was no city yet, but there was this grand vision about, you know, basically the the city that we could build what it would look like. It described cars, auto self, driving cars, driving on roads where they pay the road by the meter that they drive, and then going to the, you know, petrol station and paying to fill themselves up and paying a mechanic to fix them. And all of this happening happening through automated smart contracts and this vision. Was was very compelling. I would say, you know it sort of galvanized a lot of people to move in this direction to arrive at some sort of rough consensus about the direction that this technology was heading and become, you know, converge in such a way that they decided to help build it out. And so it was very important to have this sort of, I think, top down vision and the very early days about about what the network of become and then sort of allowed the community to to finish it and Chris Dickson in his post on wide you. Centralization matters has really interesting framing of this that the the sort of one of the one of them using properties of open sources that someone can put an idea out there and then galvanized developers to finish idea. And that's that's in fact, one of the features of open source that you you get, and it gets this idea that Dennis talked about recently about about about why worse is better about why getting an idea sort of half baked, but but you know, compelling enough to galvanize. People is actually a really good strategy in the space. Yeah, I think this is a really interesting. One place in which analyzed analogies can beautiful is that you can also see where they sort of break down a little bit with with cities. They usually start because they happen to be like at a river basin or like they have a really good port. And so people just naturally start coming there. And then over time this community builds up and they realize over thing now or in San Francisco's case, the gold rush happened. People came there for the gold, and then it turned out that like, oh, I guess we have all we have to put it in. So it systems we have to put in roads. And so I think to contrast that with crypto networks with crypto, it's, you know, it's starting either. There's there's nothing there. And so having that core vision early on is really critical come there. Yeah, it's like it's like creating that river out of almost nothing. Proof of work based consensus like Nakamoto. Consensus could be that river basin along around which like people, converged communities emerge. And then the development of theory is kind of like a is. It's another city that's being established that inspired by the first city that was bitcoin..

Chris Dickson San Francisco Dennis
"chris dickson" Discussed on The FitCast

The FitCast

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on The FitCast

"Let me ask you another question yeah so and this is this is this is my coaching call with you right now i'm gonna ask you this and again you know i think i'm a little bit weird because i have a bunch of different focuses in my life even with business stuff so the gym is newly business stuff that i do do stuff with the pied gases so do stuff with with with nbc awesome i love to still work with them and be connected with them but a real big challenge of mine in this won't be the same for everyone out there has been i've also done a stuff with video games like podcast that has a very actions of very big audience it's almost the same size as the fick as it's actually pretty pretty nuts but i have over the last month or so haven't finalized on this thought but i think i'm just going to completely close that door because i feel like it sometimes takes my focus off of what should be the not like number one party but number one with a bullet like should be the gym like if if like ninety percent of my energy isn't going into that then us ten for the cast and obviously still work on the other companies that i work with i have you ever had to consult someone that feels like they are worried about cutting certain things out of their life but they feel like it might benefit them financially for their business in one less part of this is i've been talking with chris dickson about this to coaching calls with her again lots of coaching calls but coaching calls with her every every week or every other week is the thing that worries me the most is closing the door on all the friends that i have in that industry that i've met through that stuff because i feel like that is without that connection you kind of potentially have friendships that deteriorate from from lack of like doing my back my play podcast like if i'm not doing that i have i talked with those people less and all that so.

nbc fick chris dickson ninety percent
"chris dickson" Discussed on Man Points! Podcast

Man Points! Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on Man Points! Podcast

"Desk land you know what it is what it is due west thing is he's got all those there's warrior weapons mounted the walls sucking up all the light when he gets in viking acts behind you will at any point could be called away to kill people yeah that's that's the job i was going to say that in any point someone could break into kill him because just reach right off the wall pullbacks now and start hacking apart that's right i don't know what the fuck haired at anytime totally screwed up the video setting so i can only see one of us at a time if i clicked on each one and i had to get back to where it started and welcome points where chris dickson everything we shed the shackles of feminism beat back the pressure political correctness give her unfiltered opinion about all things from pop culture to politics and in the end we try to find out who stands and proud as our man of the week her just simple little punk ass alley and gets a mushroom stamp to the forehead so calling his safespace copen shoot garrity blanket and prepare to be triggered because our facts don't give a damn about your feelings not sitting in the room with me west is on my top topic because i can only seem to you so chris on my bottom did you miss it you miss a glorious opportunity you've thought that was funny you said end top chris and then he gives in in our resident bottom and i would have gone leland or also i love the fact that a resident patient on women's crew chris guys rowing crystal forgot our order say we've only done one hundred sixty five for the exact same order no that's why i said i'm going to sue me here it's me because the rio is going but i can't see who's on news on bottom we'll it would have been you.

chris dickson leland
"chris dickson" Discussed on The FitCast

The FitCast

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on The FitCast

"No i would i would decline and i would say that you should probably go a little bit higher up the ladder i would say i don't know you've had some really good guests on there i think we should look somewhere else ask obama george clooney like you should do what david letterman's doing just like get you know the best people retire and just like once every six months on i think that would be a really good idea to we we can talk about we can do negotiations you know if you call we'll try to figure that out by honestly all right i think it's more important to discuss that you've done a great job with that and that you've had tons of tacit guests on there and you should be really proud of what you've put together and i'm looking forward to to your to season to a purposeful strength where anything can happen what was the season finale would like what was the cliffhanger for purposes you didn't do cliffhanger cliffhanger for what do you mean okay like you know when we do npr's really good at this when they talk about this murder mysteries like you're not gonna believe who we talked to and we found out now that big time i don't actually plan as far in advance of you as you and i don't have like fifteen in the tank i'm like emily the next i'm emailing the next person as i'm finishing like i need to get this personal that's actually i do have a few scheduled coming coming up about so i have chris dickson is going to be back on because episode was very very successful don't talk about anything we talked about today actually.

george clooney obama david letterman npr murder emily chris dickson six months
"chris dickson" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Very volatile and rawls sort of hanging on the table whiteknuckled now you know i think those cultures bleed together what's next on the horizon i think that we're still going to continue to see new asset classes get invented in every time we start to see the early colonels of an asset class getting invented any start seen highnet worth individuals invest in because institutions really can't get there yet or they don't have someone on a desk do it yet that's an opportunity so chris dickson has this awesome quote where he says the best engineers are doing as hobbies on the weekend will end up being what we all do in the week day later i think it's one of those really really talented angel investors a high networth investors or family offices are tinkering with something in the backroom but it's taken all their mind share taking those very very seriously knowing that they actually might mature into an asset closets investible even if it's not invest bull right now with anything other than a principles capital the obvious new emerging acid descript o kripo assets cryptocurrencies a perfect example of the type of asset class that newly built on the back of a technology that didn't exist before and it was directly within our firms dna to build a business in the space what is that business that you guys who built the way it started is in index fund it's a basket of the top fifteen crypto assets waited by their market cap and rebalanced every two weeks with a flat fee and we don't charge a carry were not picking tokens we have any emethodology that we use that we share with people what are you including and crypto assets is the bitcoin's is the ether is is the ripples de cash dash maneiro it's not ceos no we're not holding i ceos can kinda go into thoughts on that in a minute our goal is religious to provide diversified exposure a cheaper product in a more secure product and as long as we can give our clients in rl peas secure diversified and inexpensive exposure the acid class were they feel like they can dip their tone to the water we feel like we've built a really really high quality product that doesn't really exist today in the market let's dive into some of the details of there.

rawls chris dickson two weeks
"chris dickson" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Scott beagle did that scott beagle took a bullet or maybe several bullets for the kids he was a geography teacher in the cross country coach he rushed students into his classroom to protect them and was murdered in the hallway after they all got inside his classroom one of the students said he was an amazing person and i am alive today because of him he will be missed chris dickson was the flood director in wrestling coach and a coach at another school said if you needed something he was the first one there arun fleiss is a graduate of the high school and he was an assistant football coach and security guard aaron fleiss jumped between the shooter and a student and now he's never coming home to his wife melissa and his eightyearold daughter ariel in american high schools now you look around and you wonder who the shooter might be who in your high school might show up one day with an are fifteen and start wiping people out the shooter who did that yesterday had been expelled from the school last year kids at the school talked about him as may be one of the people who just might show up one day show up with an assault weapon but there was absolutely nothing they could do about that suspicion because their federal and state governments have done everything that possibly can be done to make sure that those assault weapons are available to mass murderers.

Scott beagle chris dickson director arun fleiss aaron fleiss melissa assault wrestling football one day
"chris dickson" Discussed on a16z

a16z

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on a16z

"Hi everyone welcome to the a16 z podcast i'm hannah and today's episode continues our series on all things crypto with chris dickson in conversation with nick to may know founder of early stage crypto fund one confirmation and formerly be de going base in this conversation they start off with a framework for understanding tokens to what gives them longterm value what's the role of stable coins in the ecosystem as well as scaling issues unchagned versus off chain protocols forks and other trends in crypto you can also check out more details about this episode as well as past episodes in this series and a video covering the building blocks of crypto on our site at a16 z dot com slash crypto to be reverted to rra grooms on coins to a confirms noon sluggish through years who twenty years ruse to rebuild on arms we will use the term a broadly labou confusion roman on glacier but dinner broadly token coins different categories of two from lagos some maybe you can you have a proper framework email walk through a law for mental models people have in this is just mind but how i think about is simply kind of two types to the first is what i call a usage token and some people called a medium of exchange token some people call that a utility token but it's basically a token where ownership is required to use some digital service and you can think of any block chain as a digital service where you have uh of buyers and sellers declines the most widely known usage token were ownership is required to use this digital service in the case a bit that digital services a ledger that can be used by anyone to store and transfer value right the original uses took him away were ip addresses and domain names right i mean like the source scarce network resources of the internet know you needed in ip address to access the internet new demane named suitable website yes oh that's right and so if you look right now at kind of a coin mark dot com the top 25 tokens by market value i think 24 of the 25 our usage tokens one of the interesting things is.

chris dickson founder lagos digital services ip addresses hannah nick ip address twenty years
"chris dickson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Built a podcasting up called swell and concept was acquired by apple four thirty million dollars we've done other great shows with engineering investors like chris dickson and adrian cole ear and you could find these episodes by downloading the free software engineering daily app for iowa irs or for android in the other podcast players you can only access the most recent one hundred episodes of software engineering daily with these apps we are building a new way to consume content about software engineering these apps are open sourced at get up dot com slash software engineering daily if you're looking for an open opensource project get involved with we would love to get your help and bring you into the community with that i hope you enjoy this episode spring framework gives developers and environment for building cloud native projects on december fourth through seven spring one platform is coming to san francisco spring one platform is a conference were developers congregate to explore the latest technologies in the spring ecosystem and beyond speakers at spring one platform include eric brewer who created the cap theorem vaughn vernon who writes extensively about domain driven design and many thought leaders in the spring ecosystem spring one platform is the premier conference for those who build deploy and run cloud native software software engineering daily listeners can sign up with the discount code s e daly one hundred and receive a hundred dollars off of a spring one platform conference pass while also supporting software engine.

apple chris dickson irs eric brewer adrian cole free software iowa android san francisco four thirty million dollars hundred dollars
"chris dickson" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"This offer is exclusively available at dollarshaveclub dot com slash buster that's dollarshaveclub dot com slash buster in buster as everybody knows dollar shave club highquality products will have you covered from face cheeks to but cheeks there's no better time to try the club fan it's easier to play the game by no more mom lineup so complicated salary create at least three match ups in you're good to go combination of massive loss please quarterbacks this week even make takes across horns were he's one of the fastest easiest way still play d d o r don't were use promo code strike to enter a free contests task prices for joining you can win task easy had don't sign up right now and use promo code strike to enter a free contest with prices for joining where prohibited see say chris dickson's must be 18 years or area fantasy sports she's got a whole lot easier to play play the bigger numbers k sarah legs is a researcher free as mandy see your work on baseball tonight's on sports center in sarah were talking with hanbo in carl about their favored moment in game two for example i mentioned and i thought this probably would appeal to you this crazy coincidence about how in the sixth inning of game one the exact same sequence happened for the dodgers chris taylor walk with two outs a once you've count on the next hitter a 2run homer to give the dodgers a three two one lead the i'd stephen at happened in game one in game two of the world series ages.

chris dickson researcher baseball sarah dodgers chris taylor world series 18 years
"chris dickson" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"So this first question from twitter is about prosecuting sexual assault it comes from the book hot pull out and he asks is there any way to prosecute people who conspired to help sexual predator aides who led women into weinstein's hotel room it cetera so that's a great question you know in my time as united states attorney we didn't as federal prosecutors really have the jurisdiction to do sexual assault me had a lot of prosecutions in connection with crimes against children and internet crime than involved in sexual predatory conduct but not the kind of thing that you're talking about but with 'spect your question on on whether other people who conspired to help a sexual predator could be charged yeah in theory that is possible because to conspire with someone simply means to form an agreement in your mind because a conspiracy simply at the meeting of the minds between and among one or more people to do a particular saying in in the in the example you talking about engage in sexual assault that's hard to prove because you need to have evidence the other people aside from the the predator himself news that the conduct was going to take place in usually that happens when you have you know witness who testifies against someone else who slips in the parlance that we use or you have a recording there's also a statute in most chris dickson's is not all jurisdictions called aiding and abetting if you help someone to commit a crime like murder or robbery or rape then you could be guilty of that crime to in the luxurious dixon's your penalties justice of the years would have been had you've been the principle that actor so good question difficult to know if it will happen and if the can in its right to do i hope it gets done tell say one more thing the harvey weinstein story has been sort of a watershed.

twitter assault united states attorney federal prosecutors sexual predator chris dickson murder dixon abetting robbery rape harvey weinstein
"chris dickson" Discussed on a16z

a16z

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on a16z

"To that which it might have been if you're microsoft would ibm or tisco thrown in the past this is the question around in how these companies have all the vigor and aggression and um selfawareness of how google apple facebook amazon of one now now kind of different from some of these leading companies in the past sized chris dickson calls them like hyped we will see prevailed organisms but they will read the books it will way click i christensen they also have to ibm and microsoft and by space and twitter and they will accept rebel the founders control company and say you cut argue ashley it's not that the problem is not so much people making stop because they want to get hot is the fact google disco often vacuum everybody in and on elm relief that's a really good point and the other thing that's really different today and if you think about the days when microsoft was so dominant there was really one coming out yet another four five out of four or five or six that are are are a serious competitors and well okay so you kind of go for the split scaling where you're going to get the scale how many companies are going to win and so then if the obligations are in a win be acquired or die in a lot more people are going to die as in our acquired a lot more people are going to acquired than than win that isn't that just kind of sangdu great do a k fail and if you do i k k maybe dwells lightweights may be some abbasi but if the platforms take more and more of the capability the possibility it seems to me that they have an obligation just for the sake of the economy and for the sake of.

chris dickson microsoft abbasi ibm google facebook twitter ashley
"chris dickson" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"chris dickson" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Like the middle of 20 sixty and so i think that a lot of these investors are trying to get in on the ground floor of a new cryptocurrency trying to spot the next if theory m and also doing that with the with the knowledge that since the theory and went up in value so much that's kind of a testament to the fact that it might be more successful in the future love these ideas are based on it theory they're done by companies that are using it theory m smart contract feature a gouda that do it it allows you to the right code that specifies that you send a certain amount of money and receive something in return so it allows you automate certain processes within a company and that's that's something that built on the technology that bitcoin is using cadre will you did or did you talked to any v sees who think this is a bad strategy at all or early were more cautious yeah i talked to matt harris from bain capital ventures so he says that the seas shouldn't be doing anything that come they're limited partners can't do cells so in this case v sees buying up cryptocurrencies a little bit more like acting had fun and some people are philosophically against it but others have been treating these currencies like their own startups and right think that it's within their mandate breyer chris dickson i think tweeted h cryptocurrency that don't start up.

bain capital ventures matt harris chris dickson