36 Burst results for "Chris Arnold"

Corporate Landlord Evicts Blacks at Higher Rates Than Whites

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Corporate Landlord Evicts Blacks at Higher Rates Than Whites

"In this late phase of the pandemic. it's getting more likely that people will be affected from their homes if they haven't made the payments all kinds of people are being evicted but some new research in georgia fines. That black americans are being evicted more often than white americans. Npr's chris arnold reports katrina chisholm has rented a house outside atlanta for three years. She's a single mom with a teenaged. Son she lost her customer service job during the pandemic and back in january. She fell a month behind on the rat. I remember going to the door and a sheriff's standing aaron in a scared me because i didn't know why he was at my house. The reason was our landlord had filed an eviction case against her chisholm. Says she scrambled managed to find a temporary job and caught up on the rent. I worked on but off and bought money. And i save everything could but when that temporary job ended she fell behind again. Chisholm applied for federal rental assistance money. And she got it but she and her lawyer say. Her landlord refused to take that money. The landlord disputes that. She says the company told her that our lease was about to end and she had to leave or get addicted unless you get that eviction. No one's going to want you to read from them so me and my son will be. I mean. i don't want to be in a homeless situation. Getting evicted consent people into a downward financial spiral during the pandemic has been the added danger of catching or spreading covid. Susan's landlord is a company. Owned by a private equity investment firm called predator and partners which apparently has been filing addiction cases against a lot of people during the pandemic the company has filed to evict more than a thousand residents since last september. That's jim baker with the private equity stake holder projects. It's a nonprofit group that's been tracking eviction filings by big corporate landlords. And it's been a report on prem fighting a racial disparity they're filing to evict residents at rates four times as high in majority black counties.

Chris Arnold Katrina Chisholm NPR Chisholm Georgia Atlanta Aaron Susan Jim Baker Prem
Fresh update on "chris arnold" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:26 sec | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chris arnold" discussed on All Things Considered

"NPR's Chris Arnold. Thanks, Chris. Thanks sorry. Okay? Yeah. Oregon became the first state in the nation to decriminalized possession of small amounts of nearly all hard.

Chris Chris Arnold NPR First State Oregon
Landlords Struggling To Stay Afloat See Lifeline In COVID-19 Relief For Renters

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:23 min | 3 months ago

Landlords Struggling To Stay Afloat See Lifeline In COVID-19 Relief For Renters

"Relief bill passed by. Congress has billions of dollars in rental assistance. For people who've lost work can't rent and are just trying to avoid eviction. This could benefit landlords too many of them have been struggling to keep their apartment buildings up and running so some landlords are helping the residents apply for federal relief aid. Npr's chris arnold reports nearly ten million. Americans are behind on payments. According to the census. Bureau and stephanie graves. Is seeing that play out first-hand and she's a landlord who owns buildings around houston. I have a small property in town. It's about twenty. Two units and eight residents have not been able to pay over six months on and off. We'll get one hundred dollars on one thousand dollar rent grave. Says she's not a victim anytime who try to pay what they can and stay in communication with her but that means that she's losing money the rents coming in don't cover mortgage payments and paying the staff. Then we had the freeze in houston and the hot water heater gave out. And so that was a twenty two thousand dollar investment. We had to make with no income. And then i worry. How am i going to pay that loan if this goes on for much longer grave says a bigger property that she manages for another owner is hundreds of thousands of dollars behind on revenue with all the unpaid rents and covert related costs. It's

Chris Arnold Stephanie Graves NPR Congress Houston
"chris arnold" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:55 min | 4 months ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Okay, but the odds are very high that you're gonna lose. Chris Arnold NPR news and you are listening to all things considered from NPR news. The law was formally passed in 1976 to discourage prostitution in New York by targeting loitering, but the way it was enforced, earned it an informal name. The walking while trans ban. Critics say police used the law to harass and arrest law abiding citizens, especially transgender people of color. A waged a campaign against it. And on Tuesday, New York governor Andrew Cuomo signed a measure that repeals the walking while Trans ban. Cecilia Genteelly is a former sex worker and an LGBTQ rights advocate who has been working to repeal the slashes here Now. Welcome. Hi. Thank you for having me. How's this feel to achieve something you've been fighting for? Well, it feels Mazing. If he's back is so powerful to know that the advocacy off community so disenfranchised like the trans community was able to lead this groundbreaking change in the state of New York. So it feels amazing in a way is, you know very refreshing for The trans community and the immigrant community, especially black and brown, Trans people, you know, knowing that they will be able to walk. In the streets without having that nervousness of being stopped and frisked by police. And I'll note since since you mentioned black and brown people and how this law had affected them, the data from New York State is that this that overwhelmingly the people who were arrested under this band we're black, and we're Latin Ex. So I do wonder in your experience, To what extent was this law still being enforced? I asked him partners. I noticed Governor Cuomo when he was signing this measure to repeal it called it archaic. Was it still widely enforced? Absolutely on absolutely. I know before who had Bean stopped and questioned a couple months ago because of whatever they were wearing or because wherever they were working by or standing Why do you think it was possible? Now? What do you think? Open people's minds to repealing this ban. You know, we can not ignore the fact that we have Democratic Senate. I think that that really opened the door for these work that we started years ago when we didn't have a Democratic Senate and that it has a lot to do with the advocacy off trans people off black and brown trends, individuals and sex workers and former sex workers. They have a hard time. We have it hard time engaging in this kind of actions because most of our identities are criminalized, right. So we're really is important. Here is the fact that people were able to come out of the darkness and used their narrative and their experiences. Make a statement and create the awareness in the legislator to pass this reappears. That is Cecilia Genteelly. She's an LGBTQ, rights advocate and founder of transgender equity.

Cecilia Genteelly New York Governor Cuomo Senate Chris Arnold NPR prostitution Mazing Bean founder
"chris arnold" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:02 min | 5 months ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on KCRW

"Fuel to the demand without increasing supply, it just means that prices will rise even faster. Yun says. More training for construction workers changes in zoning rules and bringing down trade barriers to lower lumber prices could all help Chris Arnold. NPR NEWS, The number two official at the FBI is leaving the bureau. MPR's Ryan Lucas reports. David Bowdich is retiring as deputy director. After a 25 year career with the FBI. David Bowdich began his FBI career as a special agent in the San Diego Field office. He rose up through the ranks and for the past two years, has served as deputy director. The number two post in the FBI. Now he is retiring and what an FBI official says is a long plan to move about. It will be replaced by Paula Bates, who has been serving as the associate deputy director in charge of the bureau's management and personnel. Before that debate spent years working on counterterrorism operations, including in Iraq, Afghanistan in Libya. He later oversaw all FBI international terrorism investigations, as well as the bureau's criminal and cyber investigations worldwide. Brian Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington You're listening to NPR news. Morocco has become the first country in Africa to receive a large enough shipment of covert 19 vaccines. Tow launch inoculations nationwide Two million doses of the AstraZeneca Oxford University vaccine arrived today from India. World's largest vaccine manufacturer. It started exporting the AstraZeneca vaccine to mid and lower income countries this week. But the world's wealthiest countries, including the United States, still have claims on the majority of the most widely approved vaccines. US has by far the highest number of cases of any country. Nearly 25 million people who are or were infected and more than 411,000 lives lost to cove in 19 in under a year. Germany is expected to announce next week that the government will place the country's largest right wing opposition party under surveillance. Here's NPR's Rob Schmitz, according to German news reports. The Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution has wrapped up a two year investigation into the alternative Fur Deutschland Party or a FD. And it will soon place the party and its members under state surveillance they have. D, which was founded eight years ago, is known for its opposition to the European Union and Immigration and as 88 members in the Bundestag, making up more than 12% of Parliament In March of last year, a far right extremist faction of the FD called the flu goal was placed under state surveillance. Many a FT members have espoused racist ideas and trivialize the country's Nazi past. The forthcoming decision is likely to deal a blow to the party and what is an important election year in Germany. Option. It's NPR NEWS. Berlin This is NPR. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Morgan Stanley, with their podcast thoughts on the market, offering concise takes on current events and their implications for financial markets three minutes in episode three times a week, thoughts on the market. On a 1 to 1 basis. It doesn't seem to make the virus more virulent or have a greater chance of making you seriously ill or killing you. However, we shouldn't be lulled into complacency about that. Because if you have a virus that is more transmissible, you're gonna get more cases. When you get more cases. You're gonna get more hospitalizations. I'm gonna get more hospitalizations. You ultimately going to get more deaths? So even though the virus on a 1 to 1 basis isn't more serious, the phenomenon of a more transmissible virus is something that you take seriously Dr Anthony Fauci yesterday addressing the UK variant of covert 19 that has emerged in recent weeks. Mutations of.

FBI NPR NEWS NPR deputy director Fur Deutschland Party Ryan Lucas Germany Chris Arnold official David Bowdich Yun FD United States AstraZeneca Oxford University Dr Anthony Fauci Brian Lucas Morocco Paula Bates FT
Economy sees job loss in December for the first time in eight months as surging virus takes toll

Morning Edition

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

Economy sees job loss in December for the first time in eight months as surging virus takes toll

"The final employment report of the Trump presidency shows the economy shed 140,000 jobs last month. The unemployment rate held at 6.7%. NPR's Chris Arnold reports, the numbers were worse than expected. This report marks the first time in months that the economy is losing jobs again. The outbreak caused 22 million job losses back in March and April economy then gained back about 12 million. But those gains have been stalling is the pandemic has grown worse than ever. Many economists are hopeful, though, that job gains will pick up in part thanks to the $900 billion stimulus package that Congress finally managed to pass in December. And Democrats are vowing to push through more stimulus, including $2000 checks to individuals after winning control of the

Chris Arnold NPR Congress
U.S. economy lost 140,000 jobs in December; unemployment rate unchanged at 6.7%

Morning Edition

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

U.S. economy lost 140,000 jobs in December; unemployment rate unchanged at 6.7%

"Employment report of the Trump presidency shows the economy shed 140,000 jobs last month. The unemployment rate held at 6.7%. NPR's Chris Arnold reports, the numbers were worse than expected. This report marks the first time in months that the economy is losing jobs again. The outbreak caused 22 million job losses back in March and April. The economy then gained back about 12 million. But those games have been stalling is the pandemic has grown worse than ever. Many economists are hopeful, though, that job gains will pick up in part thanks to the $900 billion stimulus package that Congress finally managed to pass in December. And Democrats are vowing to push through more stimulus, including $2000 checks to individuals after winning control of the Senate. This is

Chris Arnold NPR Congress Senate
COVID-19 Relief Bill Could Stave Off Historic Wave Of Evictions

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:49 min | 6 months ago

COVID-19 Relief Bill Could Stave Off Historic Wave Of Evictions

"Unless there's more help from congress coming. Millions of americans who rent their homes could be evicted in the middle of the winter. We don't know if the covid relief bill will be approved. Congress negotiated for seven months struck a deal and then the president called it a disgrace. But what's in this legislation that could help renters. Npr's chris. arnold has been looking into. Good morning chris. hey oil. what's in the relief bill. That could help people from being evicted. Well there's twenty five billion dollars for rental assistance. We haven't seen that before. And that goes to states and cities renders apply. The money goes to the landlords. And the money's supposed to go to people who need it. The most based on recent income the bill also extends unemployment benefits and twelve million. Americans are set to lose those unemployment benefits the day after christmas. That would just be a colossal disaster. So avoiding that prevents a lot of addictions to i talked to christina resolves with texas hauser's. It's a low income housing nonprofit and it's in texas where we've seen thousands of victims happening already. She says this bill is a big help. it will provide relief to millions of people who've been struggling to pay rent. Tenants can qualify for up to fifteen months of rental assistance. So tenants who are behind six seven eight. Nine months of rent could be covered by. What's in this bill. She says that twenty five billion dollars is not going to be enough. That's gonna need to be replenished but you know it's a good start also there's a question mark. How long will this take to get up and running. And that's going to depend a lot on the state and the city. Now this bill is i understand. It also extends in order from the c. d. c. That's supposed to prevent evictions because that is a bad thing to happen during pandemic but it only extends it for a month through the end of january. He's really going to help. I think the hope from the housing advocates here is that once the biden administration gets in that this will get extended further into the future and also strengthened because the cdc orders a little flimsy. And and it's not working a lot of places. People are still getting evicted. The cdc could also extend this by itself with doesn't need another act of congress also. Interestingly the rules of the rental assistance program appear to require that the renter is still in. The property has not been evicted yet. So that creates a pretty powerful incentive not to kick people out. If i'm a landlord. And i'm owed five months of back rent. That's a strong incentive to keep the person there so you put all this together. It's a pretty powerful package. That should help a lot of people. You've been talking to people who are at risk of eviction or who are going to show a lot of background. Tell me what you've been hearing. Well i talked to one person in seattle who after losing her job as a hairstylist. Owes ten thousand dollars in back rent. It's definitely a relief for me. That's on a braxton husband also had his hours cutback and they've got two kids. I mean obviously the timing is significant just because it is christmas this week so i just able to be like okay like we can still get certain things for christmas. We can do this. We'll still be okay. We're still going to be afloat. And what about landlords. Who haven't been getting rent money. How are they reacting well. Landlords have been complaining throughout the pandemic that looked like these various eviction moratoriums. But who's going to pay the rents if the tenants not paying the rent. Well now there's twenty five billion dollars to pay the rent and landlord groups. That i talked to are very happy about that. The bill though as we've been reporting has hit this last minute. Snag that the president's but attacking it so we're just going to have to see what happens there for sure. Npr's chris arnold. Thanks chris we appreciate it. Thanks and well

Texas Hauser Chris Biden Administration Congress NPR CDC Arnold Christina Texas Braxton Seattle Chris Arnold
"chris arnold" Discussed on Racing Virginia Podcast

Racing Virginia Podcast

02:19 min | 7 months ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on Racing Virginia Podcast

"Much. Other of spreaker stitcher. I mean there's a bunch of them. i heart radio. That's a major one. That didn't know it. But they're the number one place for podcasts in the world. Did you know that while we are there with them. So you can find us wherever you listen to your podcast and and if you haven't subscribed and you're just listening. Please subscribe second lever review especially on apple podcasts. Spotify can you review or something spotify. I don't know i've never tried. But if you were a few review review and and actually give us a you know a five star rating we actually move up in the ranks on apple apple podcasts. So if you could do that would be great. I i got it up on spotify right here. let's see. Can you give a review reviews. You can you can. just follow. Follow the racing. Virginia podcast which we would love you to do but the thing is is i think apple is the only one that does that. I've been on all the platforms. And that's still new. When i can remember and i think they're talking about getting rid of it because there's a lot of fake stuff on there absolutely. You can manipulate the results now. A social media at racing virginia on facebook instagram twitter and youtube and youtube. Forget about that. Don't forget about it as always. We can't thank you enough for listening. We can't thank our guest today. Devon brannon and chris arnold for some time with us. Because we know it's not easy to do it early in the morning or even this mid afternoon when we we happen to be doing today because at chris. I don't know if you knew this. But he took his lunch hour so that he could make sure that he could take the phone call. That'd be on the show. What a guy. He is an awesome. We get a meeting. You really do you. Kind of meet as always folks for brandon brown. I'm dave see saying. Thank you and to keep racing..

apple Spotify Virginia youtube brandon brown chris arnold Devon brannon facebook
Their Service Entitles Them To Low-Cost Loans. But Veterans Often Pay More.

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:27 min | 7 months ago

Their Service Entitles Them To Low-Cost Loans. But Veterans Often Pay More.

"John. Four is a retired marine corps. Colonel he served for twenty seven years. Did you see the big fish jumped for is giving me a virtual tour of his harbourside house in a development in punto gorda florida. He's got a dock and a little powerboat and can you see the pool. Oh yeah oh. That's gorgeous yeah all right. Can you see the kayaks and the dock. Actually four is making me kind of jealous of his house at the start of the year interest rates were falling and he wanted to refinance with the. Va loan that has alone backed by the us. Department of veterans affairs vets and service members are supposed to be able to an extra low interest rate and better terms that way so you started calling around and he says the company loaned depot told him we can do. Va loan for you. But it's going to be at three seven five percent interest and they had a lot of fees in there but it was a lower rate than he had at the time so he says he was just about to do the deal with lump depot when he happened to see an ad for. Va loan to a company. Called own up. He went through them and he says he paid lower fees and got more than a full percentage point lower on the rate on his three hundred and thirty thousand dollar loan. That means about twenty five hundred dollars a year in lower payments. He he says when he went back and told loan depot about the better deal. They then offered him a much lower rate to as a veteran. You expect you're getting something from the government. I i was shocked that they didn't just tell me outright. What the best rate. What's a lot of veterans. Assume the same thing according to patrick boy adji. He's the ceo of own up. It's a new company that helps people find a good deal on home loans through a group of different lenders. He says veterans think. They're supposed to get a really good interest rate on a. Va loan so many. Don't shop around but says while these loans are backed by the va they're made by private companies and he says some will head people with much higher costs and basically a worse deal than they qualify for. And they're veterans the. Sit there and think to yourself that this person who served our country is now going to get taken advantage of. And they had no clue they had no idea so in his company did a study. They're releasing it today. They took the top twenty lenders for va loans and looked at the annual percentage rate that the companies charged borrowers on all the loans they made last year and so when we looked at the spread candidly. We were quite surprised that it was as wide as it. Was that the best lenders. And the worst lenders were so far apart from one another. The study found that navy. Federal credit union offered people. The lowest rates at the other higher cost end of the spectrum was a lender called new day. Usa it's a new day for veterans. Who want to refinance at me as a vet. The company is a sponsor of the army navy. Football game it runs. Tv ads with plenty of american flags. We wanna do whatever is best for the individual service person. The study found that of the top twenty. Va lenders new day charged. The highest interest rates more than a full percentage point higher the navy federal which over the life of three hundred thousand dollar thirty year loan is more than seventy thousand dollars. More in interest payments new day in a statement said that the study has a quote serious flaw. It said that's because the study lumps together different types of va loans. That are not the same but michael. Hoon is skeptical of that explanation. He's the president of the non-profit center for responsible lending. The information from this lender does not explain their borrowers are being charged so much more than other lenders are charging. Their va borrowers as far as loan depot. The company that john four. I talked to the study. Found that during two thousand nineteen. It's rates were about average. The company is also a recent financial supporter of npr biology. With own up says the big takeaway from his study for him is that people need to shop around and find the best rate that they can and negotiate for the best rate. Because if you don't it could be one of the most costly mistakes you make in your financial life that's good advice for. Va loans and other types of mortgages to chris arnold npr

VA Punto Gorda Patrick Boy Adji Department Of Veterans Affairs Marine Corps Colonel Federal Credit Union John Florida USA Navy Army Navy
'So Hard To Prove You Exist': Flawed Fraud Protections Deny Unemployment To Millions

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:06 min | 8 months ago

'So Hard To Prove You Exist': Flawed Fraud Protections Deny Unemployment To Millions

"During the pandemic state unemployment systems have become a target for organized crime rings, they steal money through fraudulent claims but arguably a bigger problem is that some of the systems in place to prevent fraud like that have been hurting millions of innocent people. NPR's Chris Arnold reports when Sevi- guas lost his job as a food and beverage manager. Marriott Hotel near San. Jose he figured locale apply for unemployment. This was back in March he went online put in his info waited for weeks couldn't get through on the phone after more than a month he was told to mail and more proof of his identity mind driver's license picture of my past poor copy of my w. two she said the more documentation that I could put. In there to prove who I was would help out my case out his case Gouache had clearly lost his job with a big company had ide- what was the problem but this dragged on and on weeks would go by they need another documents and six months later, gouache still hadn't gotten any unemployment money manny can't find another job I had about seventeen. Thousand dollars saved gouaches thirty two years old, and he'd been saving up to go back to community college to try to become a computer programmer. He moved into a smaller apartment to save money but he still had to drain that entire savings for college. There's not enough left to pay rent next month to watch what I worked really hard to get dwindle away. I don't WanNa get angry in front of you for the interview. But it has been really really frustrating and the whole thing to seem so Kafka ask avoidable to him. It's so hard to just prove that you exist in California alone millions of people are having a hard time proving they exist as they struggle to get the unemployment benefits that they deserve and it turns out washes right? A lot of this was completely unnecessary.

Manny Jose Gouache Marriott Hotel Chris Arnold Fraud NPR Kafka Sevi- Guas California SAN
NPR Poll: Black, Latino Households Struggle To Pay Rent, Mortgages

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:23 min | 9 months ago

NPR Poll: Black, Latino Households Struggle To Pay Rent, Mortgages

"Some new data from an NPR poll suggests just how badly Americans are suffering economically during the pandemic. Here's NPR's Chris Arnold Gina Lost Her job as a school bus driver in Chicago during the pandemic she was managing. Okay with unemployment money. But then about two weeks ago, she got a desperate call from her adult son his job had laid him off. He wasn't able to pay rate. There was an eviction moratorium in Chicago, but Jean says the landlord wanted her son out anyway a warning what happened next is disturbing and violent. She says the landlord got someone to threaten her son and shoot his dog a German shepherd mix that he'd had for years Economi. His mom they kill my dog. And the GATT told me that he should kill me to. MSA. Said market you come over here. I went over there. I said, okay star packing you gather go. and. Never went back. Gene only wants to use her first name for fear retribution. She says, she was afraid to report what happened to the police, her son and his two kids if now moved in with her. Gene was one of more than three thousand people who took part in a poll from NPR the Robert Wood, Johnson? Foundation. And the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health. Her. Story is a sad and dramatic example. But the poll found many people reported problems with housing healthcare, unsafe workplaces, and a very high percentage of Americans. Forty six percent said they're having serious financial problems are surprises how large the? Numbers are Robert Blend in is a Harvard public health professor. He says, the poll was done in July after Congress approved an extra six hundred dollars a week in federal and apply benefits, and that was still supposed to be flowing to people and yet. So many people said, they were struggling one in six households even reported missing or delaying major bills just so that they could buy food blending says it's. Like the government sent a hundred FEMA trucks into a disaster zone but a lot of people never saw them or got any help it just like interviewing people in a hurricane area and the people are telling you, there's no relief it should be there could be some people are having trouble accessing the HAL blend says the government should quickly try to discover where the biggest problems are and there could be. Another factor. My name is Linda Neuron who and I was an accounting manager dorato lives in Phoenix Arizona and lost her accounting job at a tow truck company in the pandemic. Once that stay home order was issued if our driving, they're not getting a car accidents if they're not getting in car accidents, we don't have much of a business Dorato said in the poll that she was having serious financial problems when. She was getting that extra six hundred dollars a week and so she was doing. Okay. But she knew that that was about to expire and that she wasn't going to be able to support her four kids on the state benefits alone which for her just two hundred, forty dollars a week in Arizona and she was right. She's now burned through almost all of her savings and she won't able to pay reds after next month it's extremely difficult. To sleep at night I wake up at two or three in the morning and I just have my mind's just racing just constantly racing, and then I'm having to get up in the morning and sit with my two younger children but I'm so focused on you know bills and money and jobs Dorato who's Latina says she's been looking for work with no luck. She says she has no family she can go live with or borrow money from. And Black and Latino households were two times more likely than white families to say that they've fallen behind on their rent or mortgage. It is striking. It's not surprising. David Williams is a Harvard professor who studies race and sociology. He says blacks and Latinos make money than whites and have less savings. So they're more vulnerable Andy says they're less likely to have family members who can afford to loan the money for. Rent or other bills for every dollar of wealth white households have African American households have ten pennies and Latino households have twelfth pennies. So it's really not surprising that they are really been hurt badly in the context of the pandemic

Linda Neuron NPR Gene Chicago Robert Blend Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Phoenix Arizona Dorato Professor Chris Arnold Gina David Williams Harvard Gatt Fema Economi Robert Wood Andy Jean
CDC Issues Sweeping Temporary Halt On Evictions Nationwide Amid Pandemic

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:58 min | 10 months ago

CDC Issues Sweeping Temporary Halt On Evictions Nationwide Amid Pandemic

"Millions of Americans have been at real risk of eviction over the past few months. Many of those people have now been given a lifeline in a dramatic move. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is ordering a halt on vacations across the country through the end of this year NPR's Chris Arnold is reporting on this and joins us now Chris Good Morning. So this I mean, this is a huge move by the CDC. It doesn't those seem on its face like something agency would have the power to do. Hey Rachel. Yeah. So I mean you might think because especially so far during this pandemic, we've seen you know nothing very forceful from the CDC. It's been criticized for having voluntary guidance that let states and businesses can do whatever they want. You know I if that's the CDC SORTA walking on little. Kitty cat feed this though is the CDC you know booming it's feet like Paul Bunyan, or something. And doing something much more dramatic and the CDC says it does have the authority under the Public Health Service Act of nineteen, forty four that gives the government broad power to stem the spread of communicable diseases and look I mean the basic idea of course is that forcing people out into homeless shelters or crammed together living with relatives that that is very likely to get a lot more people sick. So, who does this eviction ban apply to specifically? All right. Well, quickly to qualify renters have decided declaration saying that they tried to get unemployment benefits or other kinds of support that they'll make partial payments as much as they can afford to their landlord day can't make more than about one hundred, thousand dollars a year or twice that if you file jointly. And that if you're a victim, you have no other option than homelessness or living with more people in in close proximity. which would increase the risk, which is exactly what they're trying to avoid. The rate of Krona virus here. So how many people are we talking about? How many people with this effect we're talking about a lot of people when when estimate from the national low income housing coalition is thirty to forty million people in seventeen million households or families were at risk of losing their home by the end of the year of something like this wasn't done Diana tells the CEO of the group and I spoke to her last night. Well, my reaction is a feeling of tremendous relief. I. Mean It's a pretty extraordinary. And bold and unprecedented measure that the White House is taking that will save lives and prevent tens of millions of people from losing their homes in the middle of pandemic. But she says also Congress or the White House should have done this months ago. Instead, we've had this crazy quilt patchwork of federal state local moratoriums. Lots of people weren't covered and thousands of people have already been affected. What are you hearing from landlords about this Chris? Well, insurance, the landlords are saying well, who's supposed to pay for this? You Know Democrats in Congress had plans for a moratorium but along with that was one hundred, billion dollars of assistance to renters and landlords to pay for that that is not a part of this order spoke to Greg Brown with the National Apartment Association. We're really concerned about this because the piece that's missing is the most important piece in this whole process, which is rental assistance because if the moratorium is put in place, rents are not paid, but the owners continue to have to meet their financial obligations and how are they supposed to do that? Who's going to help them pay their bills and it's not just landlords who rental assistance Intel who heard from she to says, look this needs to be coupled with federal money to pay for missed rent. It's a half-measure eviction moratoriums on their own. Create financial cliff for renters to fall off of when those moratoriums eventually expire and back rent is due and renters are no more able to pay then than they were at the beginning of the pandemic. And, we should say all this puts pressure on lawmakers to make a deal and come up with some money to to pay and and help people struggling during during the pandemic.

CDC Chris Arnold Congress White House Paul Bunyan Intel NPR Rachel National Apartment Association CEO Greg Brown Diana
New California Financial Watchdog Would Take Aim At Predatory Lenders Amid Pandemic

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:16 min | 11 months ago

New California Financial Watchdog Would Take Aim At Predatory Lenders Amid Pandemic

"Millions of Americans who are short of money in the pandemic are vulnerable to scams and predatory loans. California lawmakers want to protect them by creating a new financial protection watchdog agency. They say, they have to do that because the federal government hasn't done its job. NPR's Chris Arnold reports critics say that under the trump administration, the main federal watchdog, the consumer. Financial Protection Bureau has been paralyzed one study. Last year found that it's enforcement activity plunged by eighty percent from two thousand fifteen. We are now as states left to do the Work Ourselves California? Assembly member Monique Lee Mon along with the governor is proposing to create the Department of Financial Protection and invasion. It would give the state broader power to police aggressive debt collectors, predatory loans, and other shady practices limo proposed before the pandemic. But now the timing of it is even more important. You see that at at the California level since Covid we've seen an increase of forty percent consumer complaints and we want to help them. Some of those complaints are about mortgage companies, personal loans, and companies that promise to help people get out of debt. A long list of fair lending and Consumer Protection Groups are backing the proposal. Suzanne MARTINDALE WORKS ON POLICY issues for consumer reports with millions of people. In California alone who filed for unemployment, many people are teetering on the brink of insolvency here. So lonely a risky payday product, aggressive debt collector that can for someone over the edge into poverty into bankruptcy and homelessness at the worst possible time in the middle of a public health crisis. Financial firms usually aren't big fans of more regulation but Beth Mills with the California Bankers Association says, it's okay if the new agency wants to better police some of the banks competitors, she says online lenders, for example, many face much. Looser regulations than the banks do we would welcome greater regulation on them to make sure that we're operating under the same rules. But when it comes to the companies that her group represents, which she says are most of the banks and lenders in the state large and small, we would like to be exempt from the bill because the banks and financial institutions that we represent are very heavily regulated at both state and. Federal Level added appears the financial firms of the ear of some lawmakers. A source close to the legislative negotiations tells NPR that a group of moderate Democrats is pressuring the governor to allow for large carve outs for many companies and that could mean a much weaker watchdog. Richard Cordray is a former director of the federal consumer financial protection. Bureau he's been consulting on the bill and says that would be a big mistake i. Don't think that the legislature should make it hard for consumers to get their money back when they've been victimized by unfair deceptive and abusive practices. Cordray says if it's done, right the new California agency could be a model for other states for how to have a tough financial watchdog agency of their own. But a legislative deadline means the bill has to get passed by the end of the month. There's a key hearing lawmakers.

California Financial Protection Bureau Department Of Financial Protec Federal Government NPR Beth Mills Richard Cordray Chris Arnold Suzanne Martindale California Bankers Association Monique Lee Covid Director
Extra $600 in unemployment benefits ends in days

Science Friday

00:49 sec | 11 months ago

Extra $600 in unemployment benefits ends in days

"Have been getting an extra $600 a week in unemployment money from the federal government that ends this weekend. NPR's Kris Arnold reports millions of out of work. People have been using that extra 600 hours to pay rent and stay in their homes. But that ends now, which is sparking worries that we could see an historic wave of evictions in a spike in homelessness policy nose with the National Multi Family Housing Council, which represents big apartment building owners, We don't have to let a public health crisis become a housing crisis. It doesn't have to happen. Landlord groups and housing advocates are both asking Congress to extend the expanded unemployment money Democrats are onboard. Republicans want to reduce the amount. Democrats also want to create a separate $100 billion rental assistance fund. Chris Arnold. NPR NEWS Federal

NPR National Multi Family Housing Kris Arnold Chris Arnold Congress
Zoom Call Eviction Hearings: 'They'll Throw Everything I Have Out On The Street'

All Things Considered

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Zoom Call Eviction Hearings: 'They'll Throw Everything I Have Out On The Street'

"Moratoriums are now expiring in parts of the country and some courts are now using zoom calls to hold remote fiction hearings for people late on their rent NPR's Chris Arnold reports and a vision hearing in Collin county Texas this week was like many other zoom calls full of first timers audio problems general confusion could have trainees receive respected galaxy in Rome that's the judge who's trying to figure out who's who with a bunch of different people on the call I'm sorry I was talking can you hear me now hello wave your hand yes it would be almost kind of funny except that what's at stake here is not renters are in this soon hearing with landlords who want to evict them renters like Dino Brock's oops re reason why your rep yes Sir my company closed due to the pandemic and you have to have a letter from your employer to prove that you were affected by the corona and I was getting the run around I haven't been able to get unemployment or anything the judge said since Brooks lives within the city of Dallas he wanted to review the current rules and evictions there so her case got moved in next week her landlord declined to comment we followed up with the abrupt after the hearing she's a navy veteran and she says she has a heart condition and it she says she has no friends or family that you can move in with and I'm scared now grow everything I have outside on the street I'm gonna start crying it's a nightmare that nobody wants to go through and a lot of times people don't know what their rights are renters may have protections right now but the rules are complicated and differ from state to county the city and in this room call hearing at people who did not dial in and their landlord did it they were just out a lock I'm gonna go for this one because I don't have it here and just tell me thank you have a default judgment position background and for default judgment that basically means you didn't show up we're giving your landlord the right to evict you that happened a five people in just this one a zoom call hearing now for some people doing the zoom call might be easier than getting to the court house but some legal experts say that for other people this could deny their right to due process which includes the right to be heard what if somebody doesn't have a decent smart phone or computer or online access the elderly can have trouble connecting on video calls Emeli Benford's a professor at Columbia Law School a missed call or not being able to log into remote hearing is the equivalent of failing to appear remote hearings may not only be the loss of basic rights they could also be the difference between housing and homeless miss Deena Brooks the navy vet and Dallas is worried herself about not having a home I have nowhere to go but I feel like very depressed rest out and I did I don't know what to do so these soon call hearings are happening because it's not safe enough to gather in court but apparently it's okay for people to be put out in the street in the midst of a pandemic okay that's cool it's a cruel situation Matthew Desmond heads at Princeton university's eviction lab today is announcing a new tracking system to monitor what's happening omits the pandemic and already with some moratoriums expiring he says eviction filings are rising in Milwaukee for example the kids are out thirty eight percent last week from where they should be on a typical week in June in Milwaukee with millions of Americans still out of work due to code red at me says even actions it should not be the answer here some landlord groups agree policy now is a vice president with the national multifamily housing council we should be working to help those who have been impacted by club in nineteen through robust government assistance like she says an emergency plan from Congress for renters and landlords meanwhile the zoom eviction hearings continue but law professor Emily band for expects that legal

Economic Fallout From COVID-19 Is Hard On Landlords Too

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Economic Fallout From COVID-19 Is Hard On Landlords Too

"Explored the uncertainty from a lot of different perspectives and nothing can feel more destabilizing. The Not knowing if you're going to be able to make your rent next month we've heard on this show about how much renters who've lost income from the current crisis are struggling today. We're going to hear from the other side of that relationship. The landlord my name is Marilyn. Jim I am a small mom and pop landlord in Seattle with my husband We live in a triplex with our children and our tenants. Our House was built as a single family home in nineteen twelve by an Irish immigrant. Who had eighteen children and so? It's a good sized home sometime. In the past it was divided into a triplex. They both have day jobs but they rely on the rental income they get from several properties around the city. You know my husband will be the guy who's pushing the lawnmower so our tenants know us get to know us very well. They see us. They know that our family lives here. And and You know it's it's very much a personal up close up front relationship but that relationship has taken on a new sense of gravity since the financial crisis triggered by the pandemic all. Her tenants paid late in April and then in. May One of her tenants couldn't come up with the money at all. We came to the table with some ideas of what we could do to help. Meet them in the middle and we've come up with a plan that will take us through the next two months and then we're going to check in again in June and reassess but you know my husband and I have also had the conversation of ultimately. How long is this going to last? How long can we last? They're worried because they don't have a lot of extra money on reserve to float their mortgages if their tenants can't pay. We're not hoarding money here. And so we don't have a large cushion to tap into to get through something like this or mortgage lender is only allowing three months of forbearance and they want full repayment. At the end of free months it's hard for us to think. How are we going to get through if Are Tenants get to the point? Where there are no longer able to pay. Npr correspondent. Chris. Arnold has been looking into the dilemma that Maryland yet and many small landlords find themselves in right now and he joins us. Hey Chris Rachel so what stood out to you in Maryland Story. Will I think a lot of people are in the situation? And th there's all kinds of landlords out there and I think people tend to think about landlords is like big mean faceless corporations or you know as people rubbing their hands together wanting the money but there's just a lot of mom and POPs who were regular people and they wanna keep good tenants and they want to help them but they do depend upon this rental income right because they're not be corporations. They got bills to pay to like their mortgage and Congress mandated help for homeowners and that includes small landlords like Maryland. Were in exactly the situation and so when you play the interview for me. The the big red blinking alarm light that I heard in it was. She said that her lender told her that if she skipped payments she have to pay them all back in just a few months in this giant lump sum doesn't make any sense in this crisis in this kind of big balloon. Payment thing is is absolutely not the way that this is supposed to work. Okay so how is it supposed to work but good question So we should say that this is four home loans that our government back so by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac and a lot of people don't even realize that their home mortgages backed by the government and somebody but seventy five percent of all homeless in the country are and so as Maryland's I checked and experts at. I've talked to say that for the vast majority of people who were struggling financially in this outbreak for them the rules say that they should make payments again when they're able to and it should be the same monthly payment their payments should not go up no big crazy. Lump sum payments should just get moved to the back and of the loan term. Okay so if it's a thirty year loan now. It's a thirty year loan plus say six months of missed payments on the back end. If these are the rules Chris Wise Maryland hearing something different and can Marilyn just push back yes she absolutely can and I've talked to borrowers who have done that. And sometimes they get a much better answer. And here's what's been going on. And after a lot of initial confusion. The Mortgage Bankers Association says that the companies are dealing with this much. Better this better information out there but the current system has a complicated set of rules and it relies on on lenders. Who've got like call center workers working from home they have to interpret this complicated set of rules properly and borrowers are sort of at the mercy of their lenders getting this right and arguably. It's not really going that well for a lot of people look at what. Maryland's going getting all SPAN INFORMATION. So that's why there are growing calls from Congress to fix this. I talked to Steve. Sharp with the nonprofit National Consumer Law Center. It's so important. We believe for Congress to step in and clearly state through law that for folks who have covid nineteen forbearance the real default should be putting their mortgage payments at the end of the lowe. Okay so just make that. The default make it automatic. So there's confusion the payments. Just go on the back end right and and some members of Congress do WANNA do this. There's a bipartisan group of State Attorneys General who were pushing for this to the CEO of a mortgage company. I talked to likes the idea and I actually called up and talked to Maryland and her husband again and I. Currently they're using their tenants security deposit and the last month's rent to sort of make up some of the difference of the rent that they're not able to pay but that's not going to be able to go on for too much longer and Maryland said look at mean having the certainty of this default option would make them much more comfortable skipping mortgage payments so that they could afford to be more flexible with with their tenants. Yeah because then. We wouldn't even need to be talking about drawing down from the money that they already put on deposit with us you know we could leave that untouched We would definitely have a whole lot more flexibility to to really see you know if if they are drawing from their savings. Maybe they don't need to do

Maryland Congress Marilyn Seattle Mortgage Bankers Association Jim I NPR Chris Wise Chris Rachel Chris CEO Fannie Mae Arnold Lowe National Consumer Law Center Steve Freddie Mac
Sales of existing homes plunge 18% in April to 4.33 million rate, slowest since 2011

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Sales of existing homes plunge 18% in April to 4.33 million rate, slowest since 2011

"Reporting the economic freeze in the United States delta blow to the housing sector last month NPR's Chris Arnold says sales of previously owned homes plunged eighteen percent home sales tumbled back to the pace that they were at in two thousand and ten but for those that did sell prices remain high in many areas due to a lack of supply of homes on the market the median existing home price nationally with about two hundred and ninety thousand dollars in April that's up seven point four percent from a year ago that's according to the national association of realtors which expects that record low interest rates will remain in place for the rest of the year he added that that will help home sales rebound as state economies re open the group says more listings and construction will be needed to put the brakes on prices which are getting harder for many first time home buyers to

United States NPR Chris Arnold National Association Of Realto
Scared To Return To Work, Or Can't With Kids At Home? Here's What You Need To Know

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:08 min | 1 year ago

Scared To Return To Work, Or Can't With Kids At Home? Here's What You Need To Know

"A lot of people who work at restaurants hair salons and other close contact type. Jobs are scared that they'll get sick. Is businesses start to reopen others? Say They can't work because their kids. Schools are still closed as a result. These people would rather stay on unemployment. So what options do workers have? Here's NPR's Chris. Arnold Lindsay is a waitress and I am. Who's been out of work for two months but this week the pug style restaurant that she waited tables at is reopening. I don't feel comfortable going back yet. I don't feel comfortable at all. I don't think that there's any way with people eating food. Not having masks on with servers having to touch their plates and their silverware. There's just absolutely no aid to keep the servers safe. Lindsay says her restaurant setting up increased handwashing and disinfecting rules and spacing the table six feet apart but she doesn't think that that's enough. Were only using her first name because she's worried about losing her job and she just feels like it's too early for restaurants to reopen. I believe that restaurants are one of the most unsafe places I mean obviously other than the various essential jobs and that's the thing that restaurants aren't as essential if we can do delivery and takeout. That's totally fine. But it's insane to put yourself in that sort of risk category just so you can walk. People their food to their table. Also she sees younger people not social distancing even having keg parties in not wearing masks and she worries that those same people will come into the restaurant. Still if your employer offers you your job back and you refuse it. Generally speaking you're not supposed to be able to keep collecting unemployment. But there are exceptions and strategies. That workers should know about Andrew statiners a worker protection expert at the progressive think-tank the Century Foundation. He says for people like Lindsey. The best place to start is by talking to your employer and say you know what I don't feel comfortable comeback back right now maybe in two weeks. I might feel comfortable once. You've got things rolling. We know how this is all working out. Can I wait? And if your employer says okay. Sure I can't even bring everybody back in anyway then. Your unemployment benefits won't stop. That's something that any worker can try. But beyond that some workers have special protections. My big concern is that most workers don't understand their rights here. Michelle Evermore is with the nonprofit National Employment Law Project. She says if you have a medical condition like diabetes heart disease and immune deficiency and your doctor advises against going to work during the pandemic Congress voted to let people in that situation collect unemployment. You have an underlying condition. I contact your employer and explain why you can't return to work and then explained to the state agency why you can't report to work and you should be eligible to remain on unemployment assistance. Evermore says the decision is made by the state unemployment office when she says a letter from. Dr Should help then. There's the problem of parents who are stuck because they can't do their job from home but they also returned to work because they don't have child care. Congress approved help for them to Hye. Feldblum is a lawyer with Morgan. Lewis and DC. She advises businesses as they reopen and. She says she tells many employers to consider letting those parents not return to work. Mine is unable to work because of child care needs because they school play here has closed then. That person is eligible unemployment. She says some people may be eligible for paid leave in addition to the unemployment benefits. But she says getting back to the safety issue. Just feeling unsafe. That's not enough to stay on unemployment now. If you just scared about going to work you have to go to work. In order to get paid studier and more say though if your workplace is not taking the basic safety precautions at similar businesses in the area are you can document that you might qualify to refuse to go back to that job and stay on unemployment. Chris Arnold NPR news.

Arnold Lindsay Michelle Evermore Congress Chris Arnold Morgan NPR Century Foundation Andrew Statiners Lindsey Lewis HYE Feldblum DC
A third of U.S. renters didn't pay on time this month

All Things Considered

01:00 min | 1 year ago

A third of U.S. renters didn't pay on time this month

"The corona virus pandemic has forced millions of Americans out of work and as a result many were unable to pay their rent on time this month as NPR's Chris Arnold reports that has the rental house seeing industry worried and it calling for additional help from the federal government normally about eighty percent of people pay their rent on time but this month only seventy percent data that's according to Doug baby the CEO of the national multifamily housing council and he says it next month could be much worse if a lot of renters don't get government assistance in time if that happens he's worried about smaller and mid size rental property owners they won't be able to pay their staffs they won't be able to pay their mortgages they won't be able to pay their utilities if up apartment owner has to shut down a fifty unit building those people have to find shelter somewhere else his group wants a government plan to help renters and landlords specific wave one idea at federal rental vouchers it sent to people which they could use to pay their

NPR Chris Arnold Federal Government CEO Doug
Cruise Industry Hit Hard By Coronavirus Outbreak Effects

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Cruise Industry Hit Hard By Coronavirus Outbreak Effects

"As you can imagine. The Corona virus has hit the cruise ship. Industry really hard. The federal government is advising people not to go on a cruise and passengers who got stuck on ships with an outbreak of shared experiences of being quarantined in tiny rooms. Not Knowing when they'd be able to go home as NPR's Chris. Arnold reports people who've booked a cruiser. Now trying to figure out what to do. Linda Nell Bandy is scheduled to go on a cruise ship in April to Bermuda. She and her husband recently got married. They're combining their families and taking their five teenagers on. This cruise was supposed to be their first big trip together. The kids were excited. He's super excited. And it was a lot of build up over the last couple of months talking about it planning it and then current buyers the trip was a big expense six thousand dollars so as the outbreak spread. They've been grappling with what to do. They didn't want to wreck. A great vacation of the odds. Were really small that there even be a problem definitely agonizing being a bad parent. Because you're you're buying into panic or hysteria or you being a bad parent because you're bringing into a situation that maybe in retrospect you be like what was I thinking but now many cruise ship companies are trying to reassure customers that they don't need to panic and cancel now. They can wait to see what happens with this outbreak and they can even cancel just a few days before their crews and get credit for another trip later. Lifted Obama and got an email explaining that from Norwegian cruise. Line this past weekend it was a relief and definitely left us with a very warm and fuzzy feeling towards the Cruise. Line as far as what? The right decision is Dr Anthony. Fauci is the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He spoke to NPR on this program yesterday and said since elderly people and people with underlying health problems are particularly vulnerable to this corona virus. Those people should take special precautions. You don't travel you. Don't go to very crowded places particularly you. Don't get on a cruise ship because what we've seen what happened with the cruise ship. What's happened so far is several cruise ships outbreaks and had to quarantine passengers some stricken passengers died after contracting the virus. The State Department issued an advisory on Sunday saying people in general quote should not travel by cruise ship. I was very shocked and disappointed. I think it's it's too far extreme. Stewart Sheron is worked in the cruising travel industry for thirty years and books cruises for people through his website called the cruise guy. He says to warn elderly people in those medical conditions seems reasonable but to tell everybody to stay off cruise ships. Says he'd go on a cruise today right now. There are hundreds of ships sailing around the world that are not having any issues. The Cruise Line Industry Association says the ships are taking special precautions including screening people for a fever before allowing them to start a cruise and some people are deciding that the risk seems small and his worth taking others are of course canceling or trying to Ashley. Manning is a nurse practitioner in Knoxville Tennessee. She's decided to cancel her. Crew's coming up in ten days to the Mexican Riviera on Carnival cruise line. I've called Delta canceled our flights. They were non-refundable tickets. They automatically refunded everything without even a question but getting through the carnival. I was on the phone for about three hours yesterday. Kept calling in. It just never goes to anybody and just as a voice recording and then. It'll disconnect you and you think you're still on the line carnival says it's ramping up staffing but as any seasoned traveler knows when everyone calls it once it's hard to get through so if you are going to cancel your crews. Don't leave it until the very last minute

Cruise Line Industry Associati Linda Nell Bandy NPR Fauci Federal Government Dr Anthony Ashley National Institute Of Allergy Barack Obama Arnold Stewart Sheron State Department Bermuda Knoxville Director Manning Fever Delta Tennessee
Mortgage Rates Fall To Record Lows. Does It Make Sense To Refinance?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Mortgage Rates Fall To Record Lows. Does It Make Sense To Refinance?

"Many people across the country have been calling up mortgage companies this week. There many people asking for refinancing of their home loans. That's because mortgage rates have been hitting record lows. Npr's Chris Arnold been following all this and it's on the line. Hi There Chris a Steve. What's causing the drop in interest rates? Well stocks of course have been falling over fears about the krona virus. And that is that people are buying treasury bonds. It's like a flight to safety. Because Treasury safer investment and the Fed has also been cutting rates and all that is leading to the lowest mortgage rates on record over the past fifty years and how many people are trying to take advantage. Well we're seeing a very big jump that Last year I think it was three times the normal rate of mortgage applications and people are calling because they can save hundreds or thousands of dollars what we talked to Jay Farner. He's the CEO of quicken loans. In the last week we've probably had three record days. Yesterday was again a new record for mortgage applications. It really is one of those once in a lifetime opportunities. I I'm not certain while see rates likeness again. Ed this is maybe like the one silver lining in all these dark clouds around the economy. Because of this very scary corona virus and it's having this effect of lower rates so a lot of homeowners can save money refinancing. You can save money. Buying a house to all of that helps regular people and it helps out the the the the broader economy. I guess if you're running the Fed You're happy about this. This is why you've been cutting interest rates. You want to encourage economic activity in moment when a lot of economic activities seem to be disrupted in some ways. But how do individual homeowners know that? It's worth refinancing given that it ain't free right. Well I mean by definition mortgage rates are at record lows. That means anybody with a house has a rate that's higher than the rates. You can get today with the question is. Is it a big enough drop to make it worth it if you refinanced? So I talked to Mike Fratton Tony. He's the chief economist. The Mortgage Bankers Association. He worked up this estimate based on rates from last week. More than eighty percent of all homeowners with the mortgage could have benefited from refinancing. They could have saved at least half a percent in terms of the rate on their mortgage and then given that rates have fallen even faster. This week you know that just means that the vast majority of all homeowners at this point likely would benefit from refinancing and Steve is to put some numbers around this. If you can drop your rate by one percentage point that doesn't sound like much one percent but that going to be very big effect if you have good credit a year ago rates on a thirty year fixed rate loan were four and a half percent now there around three and a half percent so on a three hundred thousand dollar mortgage that changed that one percent change can save you two thousand dollars a year in mortgage payments. Some people could save a lot more so this can mean a lot of extra money in people's pockets any other factors that people should think about. Yes for sure I mean. One thing is Shop around two or three lenders right now because of all the turmoil in the markets. That's really important. You get a better deal if you shop around Next thing is the fees. Make sure that they're worth it and a lot of people don't understand this last one. I if you've been paying your loan for a long time. It's often not so good to go back and start over with a thirty year loan. Now you'RE GONNA pay a lot more interest so you can get twenty five twenty fifteen years even better. Those are better options. And when you say fees that can be several thousand dollars for refinancing Yes yes definitely pay attention Chris. Thanks so much thanks

Chris Arnold Mortgage Bankers Association Mike Fratton Tony FED Jay Farner NPR Treasury ED Steve Quicken
"chris arnold" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Members from getting cheated by shady financial practices after the New York Times and NPR reported about this forty nine US senators all, Democrats and independents signed a letter to the Trump administration asking it to change. Course, here's NPR's Chris Arnold the consumer, financial protection bureau is, a watchdog agency that monitors payday lenders and other firms to find out? If, they're breaking the law but the Trump administration's acting director of the bureau Mick Mulvaney is planning to have the bureau stop looking for violations of what's called the military lending act it's a law designed to protect servicemembers democratic Senator Jack Reed does not like that it's outrageous we are all standing up and, talking constantly as we, should about the services sacrifices men and women in uniform around the globe. And then, to go ahead and take away defense that they. Have back. Home again Nst unscrupulous lenders and unscrupulous. Products is, outrageous read wrote the ladder that the. Other senators signed onto he's the ranking member on the Armed Services Committee and he was an army paratrooper and says the troops are often young away from home and easy prey for unscrupulous. Lenders and shady financial products if they get too mired in, debt they can lose security. Clearances or even get. Kicked out of the service that's why he helped to create an office to protect servicemembers at the consumer protection bureau so he says, if Mulvaney backs off enforcement this way the industries. That promote these products will just basically said listen there's no more cops on the beat it's just sorta. Cutting Lucy's men and women in uniform. Saying go out there and defend this country. But when. It comes to your financial wellbeing at home you're on your own likewise redesigned like a White House proposal covered by an PR, that would loosen the rules for auto lenders critics say would let them sell over Priced insurance products. To servicemembers.

Senator Jack Reed Mick Mulvaney NPR Chris Arnold New York Times US acting director White House Armed Services Committee Lucy
"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the fresh market providing curated ingredients gifts and meal ideas for mother's day including usda prime filet mignon prepared side dishes and fresh floral bouquets details at the fresh market dot com republican lawmakers are expected this week to overturn a rule that aims to prevent racial discrimination by automobile lenders this move is part of a broader effort by the gop to rollback potentially hundreds of other regulations by using an old law in a new way npr's chris arnold reports when you go to buy a car you can get a loan through the dealer shed but not everybody with the same credit score gets the same rate rebecca born is with the center for responsible lending she says studies have found racial discrimination here just this year a new study was released the study sent testers out and found that most of the time the borrower of color got a worse deal than the white bar even though the borrower color had a higher credit score the consumer financial protection bureau studied the issue and found discrimination as well so five years ago the consumer bureau put the industry on notice mid issued what's called regulatory guidance for auto lenders that means it said basically here's what you have to do to abide by the law but the industry didn't like that and it said both the studies and the remedies are flawed david ragan is with the national automobile dealers association the agency really failed to look at legitimate business factors that jan and are used in dealerships to discount financing.

gop npr david ragan usda chris arnold rebecca five years
"chris arnold" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Interest for him chris arnold npr news you're listening to npr news and from k q e d news i'm tiffany cam high the defendant a serial rape and murder case spanning ten california counties in the nineteen seventies and eighties is expected to make his first court appearance this hour in sacramento kick alex ensley has more on joseph james diangelo the alleged golden state killer it's been just over a week since law enforcement officials say they caught a break in the forty year old case involving a dozen killings and more than fifty rapes de angelo is set to be arraigned in sacramento for the slaying of a couple there in nineteen seventy eight investigators say they believe brian and katie majori stumbled upon the serial burglar and rapist while they were out for a walk and he chased them down and shot them dead it's the first alleged murders attributed to the so called golden state killer i'm alex hemsley kiwi dino's romain lettuce from california is hitting the market after an e coli outbreak that health officials believe is linked to farming operations in arizona but a state industry group says that doesn't necessarily mean a big jump in sales ceo of the leafy greens marketing agreement scott horse vault says it happened at a time of year when the market would be shifting anyway from desert to coastal regions i'm not it's positive because there's a lot of negative publicity out there there's a lot of media stories and things that you know we're concerned about the back it's going to have on consumer demand the centers for disease control is now blaming ninety eight cases in twenty two states including.

alex ensley sacramento california arizona ceo chris arnold npr rape murder joseph james diangelo de angelo brian katie majori alex hemsley forty year
"chris arnold" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You the trump administration is considering a plan to block states from policing the trillion dollar federal student loan industry that's according to a memo obtained by npr they has not been made public yet it comes from betsy devos head of the us education department npr's chris arnold reports student loan debt collectors have been accused of deceiving and abusing student borrowers of they'd been sued by state prosecutors around the country but it looks like help is on the way that is help for the debt collectors this internal document argues that basically states should be barred from regulating and prosecuting the student loan industry massachusetts attorney general more healy with this new amount signals is it they want to stop states like massachusetts from holding companies accountable for ripping off students predatory lawn servicing practices helias among stategies who filed lawsuits against the debt collectors she says there are all kinds of abuses going on and not just involving loans to students that traditional colleges they work with some of these for profit predatory schools frankly through high sales pressure tactics get people to sign up for courses forced schools take on boatloads of debt and then leave them high and dry with worthless degrees state and federal investigators have found that student loan debt collectors also mismanaged the payments that people make so for example a public school teacher my qualified to get a big chunk of his or her loan forgiven because they're doing public service work but that doesn't happen and the school teacher as to keep paying off the loan they had tens of thousands of dollars of loans that should have been forgiven christopherperes in is a former enforcement attorney at the consumer financial protection bureau.

massachusetts school teacher attorney betsy devos us chris arnold healy trillion dollar
"chris arnold" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The center for response landing he says this new temporary director of the cfpb mc mulvane any took 60000 in campaign contributions when he was republican congressman from payday lenders and now this is his pay bag to them love 80 has said campaign contributions do not pose any conflict of interest chris arnold and pure news president trump former chief strategist steve bannon was due on capitol hill today for a closed door meeting with lawmakers on the house intelligence committee the panel is investigating russian meddling in the us presidential election ban and was still working for the administration when trump fired than fbi director jim comb me the white house doctor who examined president trump last week offered some details on his findings today doctor romney jackson says the president's overall health is excellent but that he would benefit from making some changes i think the president he not talked if he would he would lock to lose over the next i think a reasonable goal over the next year so as to lose 10 to fifteen pounds we talked about diet and exercise a lot jackson says he conducted a cognitive test at president trump's request and that he did exceedingly well on wall street today the dow fell 10 points the nasdaq was down 37 points the s and p lost nine this is npr you listening to wnyc i'm jimmy floyd for the first time in a decade the idea of congestion pricing is being floated again in governor cuomo s budget address today he outlined a plan that would total areas of the city instead of the bridges the governor says different vehicles like trucks for hire or four higher cars could be cold at different rates the technology exists we.

dow npr jim fbi presidential election the house chief strategist governor cuomo jimmy floyd director trump romney jackson us capitol hill steve bannon president chris arnold congressman fifteen pounds
"chris arnold" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is already hundreds of phone calls that had come in enquiring about as the reason people want to prepay so badly is that it will save the money i next year's taxes the tax act caps deductions for state and local taxes at ten thousand dollars in states with higher tax rates like new jersey california and new york even many middleclass and upper middle class people pay more than that ten thousand dollars and those states also happened a vote more often for democrats this week in his state of the state address new york governor andrew cuomo said the republican designed tax act is robbing boost aides to pay for tax cuts for red states and corporations it is crashed in his ugly and is the vista event is partisan legislating it is an economic civil war and make no mistake they are aiming their heard us cuomo vowed to sue the federal government calling the tax act unconstitutional republicans those say it's not their tax act it's hurting people it's that state and local taxes are too high in states like new york new jersey and california meanwhile many people who tried to pre pay their taxes archer of the irs will recognize the move amanda karoo lives in bloomingdale illinois her husband who works on a grounds crew to federal laboratory went down the assessors office last week to prepay their property taxes a bomb along all go down there a all about eve online but cruises in the town only had a preliminary tax assessment she's not sure whether the irs will be okay with them pre pang the family actually just moved into a smaller house to live in a town with a better school district they're paying more taxes there but because they can't to all of them crew estimates that she and her husband will be paying about seven hundred and fifty dollars more in taxes under the new rules and knowing that were hey or taking a good school districts it feels incredibly on air just how many americans end up taking the tax bill is unfair will undoubtedly play a big role in the midterm elections chris arnold npr news.

tax rates california new york civil war irs amanda karoo property taxes andrew cuomo vista bloomingdale chris arnold ten thousand dollars fifty dollars
"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Affordable housing advocates are both relieved in worried as the new year approaches as npr's chris arnold reports that's because of the tax cut bill passed by republicans and now signed by the president daniel intel heads up the national lowincome housing coalition she's worried that tax changes that are good for corporations will be bad for affordable housing the lowered corporate tax rate latin the value of the low income how the tax credit which means less money available could build and preserve affordable home you can tell is also concerned that added a trillion and a half dollars to the national debt could mean cuts to housing and other social programs down the road still she says it could have been a lot worse the house version would have scrapped a tax incentive that underpins about half of all the affordable housing built each year across the entire country but that provision got thrown out really bad and bill doesn't gas may acutely affordable housing we thor chris arnold npr news this is npr news in washington russian opposition politician alexy navan these says the turnout at rallies across his country today proves he is a viable alternative to president putin the bbc sour raynsford reports on on a volley rally in moscow alexei navali has been speaking on stage in this giant tents on a snowy moscow meriva by wrangler hundreds of supporters who came to nominate him officially if that number that the president's it had said to cheers and applause looking to the charismatic unsee corruption company enough as a mom you can change russia after as i sentencing his is leading a consortium and lock but i'll explain of owning has a criminal conviction for frauds which insists was meant to block his political activity the authorities hit say he's not eligible to run in this race the valley and his team have refused to give up their fight though and sedat he dead the authorities to trying to stop him running the bbc's shower raynsford but watch for santer and his team of reindeer has begun at peterson airforce base in colorado lieutenant general reynold hoover deputy commander of north com describes how they pick up bonn santa's signal starts would satellites were we start tracking the infrared light the comes off of a rudolf knows our satellites pick that up we have a string of radars across north canada and alaska that then see.

commander reynold hoover lieutenant general colorado moscow putin npr the house corporate tax alaska santa peterson airforce base santer bbc russia president alexei navali washington tax credit daniel intel chris arnold
"chris arnold" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Road chris arnold npr news since secretary jim man is warning about dangerous flights by russian fighter jets over what's considered a safe zone over syria i don't expect perfection but i don't expect dangerous maneuvers either and so we'll sort this out uh but right now i cannot tell you if it uh schlopy erman shift or rambunctious pilots four people were trying to do something at routes very unwise mattis speaking to pentagon reporters after an incident this week involving two russian jansa pentagon spokesman says two us fighters had to fire warning flares chief justice john roberts is transferred a formal investigation into sexual harassment claims against federal judge alex kozinski to a federal court in new york in peers needed tobin bird reports the transfer came at the request of the chief judge of the ninth circuit court of appeals based in california kosinski is a distinguished and respected federal appeals court judge who served on the ninth circuit for thirty two years seven of them as chief judge last week the washington post reported that six former clerks sent exchange sam the appeals court had accused kozinski have subjecting them two inappropriate comments or exposing them to pornography in a letter to the chief justice ninth circuit chief judge sidney thomas said it is the practice of the appeals court to investigate published reports of misconduct and that the circuit had therefore initiated a formal inquiry to ensure confidence in impartiality thomas asked the chief justice to transfer the complaint to another circuit.

jim man syria mattis john roberts alex kozinski new york chief judge washington post chief justice chris arnold secretary pentagon harassment california sidney thomas thirty two years
"chris arnold" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from npr news in washington i'm lakshmi sang a fullblown power struggle is playing out at the consumer financial protection bureau the wall street watchdog created after the financial crisis and pierce chris arnold reports and obama era staffer and a trump administration official both showed up to work to date each claiming to be the bureau's legitimate interim director the cfe bees outgoing director named the deputy leandra english is after president trump named his pick for the job two mick mulvaney a car white house official and former republican congressman beauvais any has been one of the most extreme critics of the cfp be going so far as to call for it to be abolished mike how whom the president of the center for responsible lending says interim could be longterm he says the consumer bureau is popular with voters of both parties so he wants to see the administration follow the usual senate confirmation process which would likely result in a more moderate permanent director meanwhile the courts may decide gets to be the interim director chris arnold npr news the un special envoy on syria is appealing to the warring sides to go to geneva without preconditions it is not clear if bishara las ads government will negotiate we have more from npr's michele it on the eve of what he hopes will be a serious round of negotiations on a new constitution and elections un special envoy steffan de mistura says syrian government isn't making any promises that up by hope and indeed expect that the government will be on his way shortly particular night president assad commitment to president putin when they met in sochi russia has backed the outside government and as helped syrian government forces take back some rebelheld territory changing the course of a civil war that has uprooted millions of syrians and left hundreds of thousands dead michelle kelemen npr news washington ending months of speculation prince harry confirms he's getting married to megan markel today the couple clasped hands as they announced their engagement and set off an immediate flurry of discussion about the evolution of the royal family in the twentyfirst century in britain markle's biracial she is a working actors she was married once before the also she's american royal historian christopher warwick says the.

lakshmi megan markel prince harry sochi assad steffan de mistura un senate mike congressman beauvais leandra english interim director obama chris arnold financial crisis washington christopher warwick britain markle michelle kelemen civil war russia president putin syrian government npr syria president mick mulvaney trump director official
"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Richard cordery is stepping down in pierce chris arnold reports that has consumer advocates worried but who the trump administration will choose to replacement surgery has been director of the cfpb since it was created in the wake of the financial crisis myths mission is to protect consumers from predatory or unfair practices by financial institutions consumer advocates and democrats generally hail him as a hero of consumer protection under his leadership the bureau and after wells fargo bank over it's fake accounts scandal took action against companies cheating people who had student loans but republicans in congress almost uniformly criticised corddry for being too aggressive and holding too much power in his role as a cop keeping watch on wall street there's been unconfirmed speculation that quadri might run for governor and ohio but he did not give a reason for stepping down chris arnold npr news before the close the dow is down one hundred thirty eight points more than half a percent at twenty three thousand two hundred seventy one you're listening to npr knees in germany world leaders are meeting at the un climate conference to revive plans laid out in the paris agreement which was rejected earlier this year by president trump has made nicholson reports all eyes are on german chancellor angela merkel to lead by example knuckle announced she was delighted to see so many representatives from u s cities states and industry present at the talks on showing that ongoing commitment to the fight against global warming then this'll dust ties to regard them to steal said i welcome the fact that climate change is still high on the agenda in large parts of the usa despite president trump's decision to pull out of the paris accord local faces mounting pressure at home to announce a firm deadline for ending hun nations reliance upon coal which provides about forty percent of germany's electricity needs for npr news i'm as mickelson in berlin investigators of the shooting rampage in northern california yesterday or identifying the.

mickelson berlin npr chancellor nicholson president paris germany ohio wells fargo bank financial crisis california Richard cordery usa climate change global warming knuckle angela merkel trump quadri congress cfpb director chris arnold forty percent
"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Royal snyder npr news washington wells fargo ceo is to appear before a senate panel today to talk about ongoing reforms in wake of the bogus accounts scandals that rocked the bank last year and peres chris arnold says wells fargo's troubles have since mushroomed to include unnecessary auto insurance claims the customers didn't need auto insurance because they already had other auto insurer ads and they said they had no idea that this was happening and that the bank expected them to be paying for this extra insurance and at the back ended up acknowledging the tens of thousands of people wound up a defaults in that affected people's credit scores and thousands of people had their cars improperly repossessed by wells fargo npr's chris arnold reporting the us supreme court is set to hear arguments today on legislative redistricting at issue is whether to uphold political maps considered to bias toward incumbent parties the court opened its term yesterday with arguments on whether businesses can force employees to use arbitration the case pits labor laws allowing workers to band together against an older law encouraging the use of arbitration instead of the courts this is npr news lisa 'spect it masterminded the two thousand twelve attack that killed four americans at a us consulate in benghazi is being tried in washington in opening arguments yesterday prosecutors described ahmed abu konta them as someone who hated america so much that he couldn't contain is rage the defence painted abu kotla as a libyan patriot who aided the us war against libyan leader moammar qaddafi.

chris arnold wells fargo us washington abu kotla Royal snyder ceo senate insurance claims wells fargo npr npr benghazi ahmed abu konta america moammar qaddafi
"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Support for this podcast and the following message comes from adt security helping to protect families and homes for over 140 years adt yard sign is more than a sign it's a line in the sand for what matters most there's adt learn more at adt dot com live from npr news in washington on core of a coleman the us economy gained one hundred fifty six thousand new jobs last month and the unemployment rate ticked up slightly to four point four percent as npr's chris arnold reports that's the latest were just out from the labor department the numbers were a bit weaker than expected most analysts were predicting a gain of between one hundred seventy a hundred eighty thousand jobs also the past two months were revised lower for a loss of forty one thousand giat some those prior reports still averaging a few months together this report is within the range with the trend of job growth has been for the past year and a half so no big surprises here wages continue to rise at the same mediocre pace two with average hourly earnings up two point five percent from a year ago chris arnold npr news the national weather service says the remnants of hurricane harvey are streaming northeast heavy rain is falling from tennessee and kentucky north into southern indiana and ohio there's continued danger a flash flooding warnings for flash flooding are now posted in southern kentucky as water recedes in the greater houston area much of southeast texas is still gripped by catastrophic flooding npr's debbie elliott reports the nearly one hundred twenty thousand residents of beaumont texas are awaiting emergency drinking water supplies city manager kyle hayes says floods knocked out beaumont's to water pumping stations both of these facilities.

washington us unemployment rate npr chris arnold labor department tennessee indiana texas debbie elliott beaumont texas hurricane harvey kentucky ohio houston kyle hayes five percent four percent two months 140 years
"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Americans are more confident about the economy than they've been in sixteen years says npr's chris arnold reports that's the latest word out today from the commerce department you have to go all the way back to two thousand and wanted to see a reading this high for people's confidence about the current state of the economy when you factor in where they think the economy will be in six months that's also near a sixteen year high analysts say more people are feeling good because jobs are easier to find the unemployment rate is very low which as 44 percent still that confidence is not translating into a boom in consumer spending as many americans are still saving more than shoring up their finances after the recession and the hasn't crash chris arnold npr news the dow is up one hundred in thirty points this is npr a british judge hearing the case of charlie guard says he will give his rolling on wednesday on where the terminally ill baby should be allowed to die eleven monthold charlie has been the subject of a bitter dispute the parents want to bring their son home to die but the hospital says it's not possible for practical reasons it's proposing that charlie be transferred to a hospice instead in an effort to court new drivers lubar is changing its harsh policies on termination and launching a new telephone hotline and paris arthey shahani reports uber have to find a new ceo but that's not all the tech giant has to do in the stiff competition for workers who were also have to prepare its relationship with drivers which leaders at the company say is broken today as part of an ongoing effort called a hundred navy dave change the company is reforming its threestrikes law before a driver with three complaints would be terminated even if the driver had completed ten thousand ride that were fivestar 'perfect now uber is tweaking its firing formula to consider how long the person's been driving overall ratings and whose complaining uber is also launching a phone hotlines drivers can call for help until now they've had to rely on messaging which can be maddening if you've just have nachshon on the job or a passenger attacked you artificial honey npr news san francisco.

npr chris arnold unemployment rate dow charlie ceo san francisco dave sixteen years sixteen year 44 percent six months
"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"chris arnold" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Sara maccammon npr news the huge amount of rain that fell on the west this past winter is apparently not doused wildfire expectations and here's kirk sigler tells us officials are predicting an above average risk of destructive wildfires in southern california parts of the great plains in the coming weeks the catch with all the rain is that things got really lush tall grasses and shrub lands exploded with foliage and it's all now turning tinderdry in it's good kindling for major fires to spread in the latest forecast from the national interagency fire center warns the risk will be particularly high in lower elevation areas like the foothills and mountains valleys in places like southern california and pierce kirk sigler reporting you're listening to npr news from washington the fourth of july is here which means millions of americans have driven their cars and trucks to meet up with family and friends and fire up the grill and the send dependence day both gas and the burgers are cheaper than the vending years as an pierce chris arnold reports it's a fourth to remember when it comes to cheap gas in beef gas prices on average of nudge down to to 23 a gallon let's the lowest price on any for the july weekend in more than a decade meanwhile hamburger costs the fifth threeyear low that's thanks to a large supply of meat in the market but before you seidel up the barbecue for that fourth plateful just remember beef may be cheaper than it's been in years but it's still has all the cholesterol and the calories chris arnold npr news.

Sara maccammon kirk sigler fire center cheap gas gas prices california npr washington chris arnold threeyear