20 Burst results for "Chris Anderson"

IBM pulling out of facial recognition market out of profiling fears

Techmeme Ride Home

03:14 min | 2 months ago

IBM pulling out of facial recognition market out of profiling fears

"IBM has sent a letter to members of Congress announcing that it is exiting the general purpose, facial recognition business, and that it opposes the use of facial recognition technology for mass surveillance, quoting axios. IBM Not offers general purpose IBM facial recognition or analysis software CEO Arvind Krishna said in the letter quote. IBM firmly opposes and will not condone uses of any technology including facial recognition technology offered by other vendors for mass surveillance, racial profiling violations of basic human rights and freedoms or any purpose, which is not consistent with our values and principles of trust and transparency and quote. An IBM representative told that the decisions were made over a period of months at had been communicated with customers. Though this is the first public mention of the decision IBM said it will no longer market sell or update these products, but will support existing clients as needed. The letter also included Krishna's suggestions for legislation around police reform, and the responsible use of technology IBM said that Ai for example has a role to play in law enforcement, but should be thoroughly vetted to make sure it doesn't contain bias. The company is also calling for stricter federal laws on police misconduct quote Congress should bring more police misconduct cases under federal court purview, and should make modifications to the qualified immunity doctrine that prevents individuals from seeking damages when police violate their constitutional rights, Chris said Congress should also establish a federal registry of police misconduct adopt measures to encourage or compel states and localities to review and update use of force policies and quote. Now your first reaction to this headline probably mirrored my first reaction and actually. It seems like our gut. Instincts are probably right here as Chris Anderson tweeted quote. This is brilliant number one fall woefully behind in technology number to realize that you have no chance of ever catching up number three declare that the technology that you can't do is evil and promised to do more of it number four write a letter to Congress number five profit and quote. Though as Gary, record tweeted quote. This tech is not that complicated pretty soon, a commodity in tech firms. IBM Did the right thing before they are on the wrong side of this, the others will follow the consequences for abuse must be high and people in companies, personally liable for surveillance of society and quote. To which I'd say, yeah, but are you honestly saying that IBM would walk away from a multibillion dollar business? If they thought they could own it? And I don't know about that. Still maybe I'm being too cynical, and this is a credit. Where do sort of thing quoting Jessi Hempel? This huge IBM move will force other large companies to take a stand even if they're silence is their statement and quote and as Evan. tweeted quote while some companies think it's enough to tweet support for social justice while marketing tool for oppression IBM gets out of the facial recognition business in states, opposition to mass, surveillance and racial profiling and quote.

IBM Congress Arvind Krishna Chris Anderson Jessi Hempel CEO Representative Gary AI Evan.
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 5 months ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

10:07 min | 9 months ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"In your talk you described competing with China on a piece of drone hardware as I think you said your first encounter with superior species. Yeah Yeah can you give me a nuanced perspective and prediction on our relationship with China as a business and technology community. Sure I some disclosures. Biggest disclosure is lifted China for four years so my children were born there. I'm a huge sign of file. I think we're going to lose in many ways to China and I'm completely okay with that. So just putting that aside you know okay you can take away my. I buy mega hat and look. I am not nationalistic. I'm British by birth living America. My children raised right. I mean I kind of like ah pro technology and just like want the best technology wherever it happens and if one country does better than other piece Gaba with you that said I'm running a business business and I want to do well and win so when I lived in China from ninety seven through two thousand and it was the kind of the dawn of the modern Chinese so I was like camping out on the floor if a hallway and it was pretty clear to me then that everything I've been told about China was wrong I was told. Oh you know. The can't innovate they only copy. Oh don't worry. They can only do hardware. They can't do software. Don't worry there the global marketing. They can't go global reach. You Know Oh you know Oh. Don't worry that understand user interfaces pretty clear all that was wrong it was like you know. Don't worry China can't ex- I could not find an ex and I was like okay so when I started the company through the are and we actually started twenty thirteen although the the community of the company started earlier but the company that you know I run today starting twenty thirteen. We're like okay. We know there's no ex- China can do everything. So how can we possibly possibly start a company that would compete with China and and I thought I think rightly or wrongly that I had thought I found the ex and the experts open source. I said you know the one thing that we have going for us is that we really understand open source. We build communities motivate communities and and for whatever reason China has used open source but they haven't really contributed to open source they haven't built a kind of internal culture of them source and so we think that open sources our secret sauce and the other thing cheaper than Chinese engineers for engineers. Okay so sadly. I think think I'm right about that. China has still failed to really embrace open source in the contributing side. That said where I was wrong is the notion that open source engineers or free engineers. They're by no means. Free engineer isn't if you're right you're basically paying people to contribute to an open source project so we didn't have the economic advantage that we thought we did. In addition at this image sure stage of the business. You can't just sort of open source the software and assume that somebody else is GonNa make great hardware. You actually had to vertically creative hardware software combination and there there we were at a massive disadvantage. TGI Is I think one of the best companies in the world certainly one of the best companies in China. When I talked about a superior species did is is a kind of a twenty-first-century Chinese company now like you know the old ones that kind of migrated this is one who is kind of you know born in the born in the clarifying fires at the apple supply chain? You know they did everything right. And they kicked our ass fair and square. They raised more money that had more engineers they were faster they innovated et Cetera. And you know on the hardware side. Although we were manufacturing in then we weren't native and so we were always going to be slower more expensive. who were less funding wingless engineers etc.? So once I realized that I was like I don't think that American hardware companies are thing. Carter should be done in China and so the next question. The American software companies. A thing and the answer is yes they still are. Why are American companies? Still thing and I think number one. I think we really do. Do I think open source really is not just sort of you. Know technically opening stuff it is the community building and the sharing and the poor quests are much more important than the downloads. If if you will and pull requests for a really unusual thing in China why would you. Why would you submit your secret bug fix to your competitors etcetera? So I think that's. That's a bit of an imaginative. We still have here and the other is that the great firewall China works both ways as software becomes more cloud and more data and less running on devices. You know you're starting to see people. People don't want to put their data in a Chinese cloud in Chinese cloud is considered subject to Beijing's influence. which is I think? It's increasing the case and so that firewall. Although there's no firewall WOM hardware tariffs aside. The really is a firewall and cloud and data. And so I think we're starting to see that you're actually to Internet's you've got the you know the bats the by do Alibaba tencent Internet on one side. Then you have the fangs. The facebook Amazon Microsoft and Google. One thing I don't know how to pronounce that exactly et Cetera. And those two worlds really. I do see them continuing for a long time. So I'm bearish on non-chinese hardware but bullish on non the Chinese software and communities. There's a whole lot market ask you. `Bout there but we're nearing the end of our time. So I just want to ask you a few things that I can also get a distinct opinion on you are deeply familiar with the scientific journals nature and science now. What's the future of those periodicals and their influence that it's a great question? So Science and nature of the two premier scientific journals journals and they're a career maker you published in science and nature and a few others tenure citations all that stuff so academian signs of particular is built on repre reputation economy. You know your your grants your positioning universities. Your ability to recruit students etcetera is all based on your reputation as a reputation station economy to carriers the reputation of the journals and their citation authority. If you will. And that's just the way. Science works also peer review. And all that kind of stuff. But but the reputation economy and reputation is formed by the journals. Nature and science will be fine forevermore but there are also about you know hundred thousand other journals below them of diminishing mincing reputation and they're the process of going into the one of those journals involving a year appear review publishing something. It costs a lot of money. Not being able to give free access to other things becomes actually a hindrance to science and so there's this open journal method. It's been taking off for the last few years especially especially in physics computer science and but now now also in biological sciences where people are saying. Well why don't we just open source signs you know and create a community appear review. You community that will edit share and references CETERA and take a monetary take all the disadvantages of the commercial journals out of that process. And that's working. Well it's slower than you would expect and it's and sewer you expect because again the reputation because the reputation economy is so entrenched in traditional academic incentives. There's really hard for someone to say. Hey you know what my great paper. I'm not going to publish nature. I'm just GONNA publish it in employs to which the Public Library of sciences an open open when access journal. I'M GONNA publish employees do now. I think that's awesome and I'm super glad they did. They may feel that it gives them slightly less credibility and slightly less chance of getting tenure and is so important important that they may choose to kind of support the old system because it's a little thing for the system but it's a lot for them so I think that long term what you're gonNA see a winnowing. It's a little bit like media so media. Newspapers are show. Unless you're the Wall Street Journal The New York Times maybe the Washington Post you know so. You're seeing three entities that remain have the reputation or the backing of Bazo or whatever to maintain. And then the San Francisco Chronicle's Michaels of the world or just host. I think you can see the same thing. In scientific publishing the natures in the sciences in the cells and a few others are going to be fine. And then there's a bazillion you you know. Smaller journals especially in fast moving industries like computer science. They're just GonNa go away and that will all go. You know the long tail of publishing is going to go open access us and the heads going to remain the premier commercial journals and in the limit in both those domains. Do we want this kind of esteemed and voice. This esteemed trusted voice. Is that useful or do we want everything to be crowd sourced and open. Well I mean. The reputation of the science and nature's comes not just from their title but because the rigorous process that go through to decide what they publish them what they don't Peer Review But but editors etc scientists compliment science wrong. That's cool that happens. That's just the way scientific works figuring out what sciences wrong and not wrong is very hard. You often need peers. Here's those peers are busy. Sometimes they're conflicted etc so. I think that we really do. Need you know editing process for science review process a way to figure out you know what sides sides is better than other signs and the question how do we pay for it. The journals pay for it commercially. The open access ones. Do It with non-monetary motivations you know just the same way. How Open Source Works Essentially non-monetary motivations but they too have a business to run and editors to pay and so? I think that the experiments can be played up. I in computer science and computer science is starting to move away from the commercial journals. Physics is also moving away from the physics journals. And so I think we're GONNA see this play out in computer science because it's fast moving. There's there's lots of other ways to discern what's real and what's not and you know. Watch that Space Watch. How the academic computer scientists start building the reputation in a more open access way and? That's going to be the path for the rest of the disciplines Chris Anderson. Thank you very much. Thank you as a programmer you think.

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:24 min | 9 months ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Dj was doing really well and DJ. I was very much modeled modeled after apple so TGI came out of the Shenzhen Pro River Delta and was one of those companies that was formed by people who had been you know building. iphones you know in the factories around there. And for the last ten years and taking notes the whole time so very much modeled after after apple close source vertically integrated but with an apple layer. And we're like like well okay. We think there's probably room for Android as well opens good and you know it. The Nice thing about android is allows proliferation of form factors and with drones. You also do you want a proliferation of form factors you want airplanes and vertical takeoff Many want big big helicopters little helicopters. And you know we're too soon too. I mean with phones. You can argue. There's sort of maybe a limited number of form factor small medium large etc but with drones. It's like everything deliveries military terry the work so open platforms make sense when you want to separate the software and hardware that said Dj doing such a good job. There really wasn't sufficient demand. Everyone was like you know. Gosh we're just getting crushed by DJ. Nobody's big enough to be the Google of this operating system if you will and so. It was kind of academic project. I think for a long time what happened then. Is that like who wouldn't want to use. Dj who'd want open source most hobbyists for sure. It was academics but then it was also guys mm-hmm and we found that as you know because we've made drones really limiting make something. DIY becomes very cheap and open and easy and the vast majority of the uses. Were good but there. We're clearly some people who were there. were terrorists there was isis. who were we're going to be using it for real and we thought about this and we said you know? What should we be doing about that? And so we talked to our our friends at the CIA and the NSA FBI et Cetera. And we said look you know we want to be super transparent about this. We know that people are using the software for ill and thanks for telling us and we're like we don't know what to do differently we can't close it off because what's the point. We can't put in back doors because people won't use them. We can't track these things because full. Just turn off the trackers it's open source etc and they're like yeah. We can't think of anything you can do either. If you see anyone doing anything bad just let us know and so we told our community. Look if you if you tell us that you want to deliver fifty five pounds two thousand kilometers. We don't think that's a good idea and you shouldn't do that. We're probably going to tell our friends at the FBI to this is happening now. We don't really know who these people are you. Yeah so we just say hey. FBI check check this thing so we were pretty transparent. That was we're going to do. And then you know we said well you know look. We really can't stop people from using the you know the code but we can encourage people to use the code as well so we spent a lot of time in forming the US government about the advantages of the open source drones. And we said look you know right. Now you've got a symmetrical warfare you've got. You've got isis using the carbon together drones with hand grenades and then meanwhile you've got these multimillion dollar anti aircraft missiles missiles etc its disproportionate. You should probably also have cheap open drones and by the way it's free and here you go at it and to their credit credits hearts of the government including the White House during the Obama gene totally embraced openness and the Office of Science and Technology Policy actually created whitepaper encouraging. This in subsequently you know it's been a long long process of of educating the government including the military and the police etc about the advantages. So these kind of consumer grade drones. And there's we're coming around to it and you know today you're starting out There's come to call. Andrew has a drone killer drone one throw in the kind of chases and kills another drone groaned that drone happens to be based on our on our software. You know you're starting to see the small drones based on our on our software our software being the PX for software. So I think I think the message is just getting through and I think all we can do as a community sort of bend over backwards to educate those who are trusted to protect us and otherwise just remained consistent to the to the spirit of openness and not try to kind of you know sneakily put in back doors try to try to gain the system. Just just educate. It's no surprise. Surprised that you have to bend over backwards to educate the regulatory bodies. What about customers? If you're trying to sell to construction companies or oil refineries or these likely candidates as early customers of consumer drone technology. How ready are they to to buy? Not Very ready is the answer. You know this too hard things about selling to enterprise business to business and stuff you know one hard thing. It's just that sales cycle for large companies. Have to kind of you know you're asking them to build a return on investment investment decision if it changed the processes that's a long process and then when you have a brand new technology that's highly regulated. It's even harder yet. So unlike mature technologies. Where it's like I'm GONNA use this? HR software versus that HR software when you're saying like flying robots on your construction site. There's a lot of people who need to be convinced the general council the the CFO. You know the site manager you know maybe local constituencies like you know the city government etc construction workers etc so it's been a long a long process and typically to be what happens it starts with a proof of concept we won the one sort of works. Okay then you sort of extend the proof of concept and you say okay well so we flew the site we got the data and now you now the data's available to people who aren't on the site you know the client or the you know the construction manager or the CFO or whatever and they're like Oh. Okay now I can see the day that I can actually I we use that. Then they win a lawsuit because they had evidence that they were not at fault and then like Oh okay now I can see the the virtue recording us and then they're we're like okay. We're going to standardize on this. Now we're going to do more sites. We're GONNA do all of our sites this way and then like one. Construction Company sees another construction company standardizing. It's like Oh okay. We're talking ten years years. It can take you know to do that. So that's been a challenge. They actually don't care whether it's open source or not. They just care about the data and we want them to be totally agnostic about the capture side. Push a button button. Magic happens. The open source stuff is more relevant has become relevant for two big reasons one. Is that the paranoia about about China. The hallway stuff it's CETERA has led the US government to discourage the use of degi vehicles over critical infrastructure ports transportation transportation energy etcetera and also military infrastructure. So there's been this vacuum in the market. Basically a lot of fleets government grounded because of the stage I ban and so there's everyone's I was like well. There was something else out there. That's trusted and that this has been a big motive force for the adoption of the open source stuff. The second is that the FAA created in this new new certification process for drones. And we're going to I going through and the FAA also wanted to embrace a kind of an industry standard rather than a single companies one and so these open source wants are going. I'd be the first to be approved certified and so they are going to be able to one the first to be able to fly beyond visual Linux side and all those other things so in a sense the government is driving the adoption Donovan source by a banning closed the close source alternative and be standardizing on the open source. Development process is being the one that will be that they trust to be certified as businesses is.

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

10:32 min | 9 months ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Software engineering daily over the remaining five years of that regulatory time line and then in the successive years after that. How will your business strategy unfold? We at three. Dr Started by building the components for drones autopilots such than we became than we built. The drones themselves awesome became America's largest manufacturer drones then went to the Chinese. Got Really good at it. We got out of that and we moved over to the software so essentially software company. We just look at the data from from Jones. It's not the drums itself. That's not entirely true. We do actually have one of our cells for for people who can't earn on allowed to buy Chinese drones which is like the US government by and large where we're on the data side and so we used to be that it was quite hard to use a drone gather data. Now it's trivial easy to touch a button. Magic happens and the question is where's the return on investment on that day the highest so we start with construction then we went to the geospatial industries. Like the you know the birth work inspection that we talked about before your sting Pu- public public safety fire. Police picking up his well. We have just scratched the surface of. What's possible here? I think that you know what the regulation allows us to do is to go beyond that sort of visual site perspective so we're looking at like like bigger areas so although we started with autodesk and construction we're now actually working even more with with a geospatial stuff with like with as raise geospatial giant and. That's our main partner in this. Whatever they were doing with satellites years ago? They're increasingly doing with with drones. And the Nice thing about these regulations is that now we can. Now we can fly tens of kilometers you know so beyond visualized site so linear infrastructure power lines gas pipelines roads roads bridges tunnels airports. All that kind of stuff now is. That's now within the reach of what we can scan with drones. So I think you're GONNA see us. You can see more of the world fall within the scope of drones. We've already the battery. Life's already there. You know the flight times already there. The soon the regulations will be there and now you know think of it. We've been looking at pixels Oregon start looking at screens. What are the remaining technical barriers that feel the most acute right now? Ah almost none. I sort of feel like all the technical problems were solved years ago. I'm not that's not entirely true. But you know fully autonomous in including Centene Voids Company skied. Yo Right now doing amazing amazing work. But that's computer vision. Basically you know navigating through forests and through through leaves etcetera just using just using cameras. That's flying low when you fly higher you want to be able to avoid other aircraft and that's a harder computer vision problem. But there's this company called Iris Automation. That's doing that again with with cameras you know. The vehicles can fly almost any distance drones afloat across the mid-atlantic just use different fuel gas engines or hybrids or whatever. The radio links can go tens or hundreds of miles. The computer vision is amazing. GPS get better and better the software's kind of done on On all this this this almost nothing I can think of the drone delivery precision landing all that stuff. We basically benefit from the advantages in a and computer vision out there already so I literally cannot think of any technical problems right now. They haven't at least been solved at the university level. What about security well into fine define security? I mean the military has secure drones and has and has for many years. It's just you know. Do you want to do you want to have it like going. Through satellites nights encrypted sure can be done right now at the security is kind of whatever people want among the commercial space. It's standard Wifi to fifty. Six bit. Encryption encryption you can go you can pay more for for other security on the cloud side. We use fed ramp. There's really it's kind of what he want to pay it all exists. Let's imagine a construction site. I want to map that construction site or ensure the the safety I want to have an understanding of. What's going on in that construction site and so I'm going to use a drone to do that? Walk me through. What the drone is doing as it's flying over or through the construction site? How is the data getting recorded? How's IT getting sent to the cloud or is it like sitting on the drone and then the drone lands and you have to upload it take me through the technical process so I'll I'll describes her the optimal process and so far larger customers? They've kind of got it all all all very efficient. The optimal process is that this is being done every day. Maybe in the morning and the evening so you know the temporal resolution you know not just not just the spatial but because we objective here is to create what's called digital twin back in the day you know. Construction was started on screens with cad file but the moment they started digging it was analog paper. Blueprints need notepads and things like that we want that digital file that the digital plan to reflect reality so you know as they say you know no no no plan survives the first shot you know. Construction projects survives the for spader. Yes something changed. And so if you don't update the digital filed and that digital file you know there's interpreted it it sort of loses its relevance as it becomes less and less reflective of reality. So there's something called reality. Capture and the objective is to have the digital file software. You wanted people commit their software back to you. Know the the you know the master. So the masters nautical so in this case. The it's not it's not aww repository. It's a it's a cad file and that cadfael should be updated every day to reflect reality. How do you reflect reality? Well back in the old days people have to type in. Here's what I did too laborious now you want it. You want the scan to automatically capture reality and then update the file to show what happened to win so that that's what we're doing at at the headquarters they've said okay. This is this is the site and we want it to. Let's say capture the whole scan both horizontal and the vertical structures WanNa capture at in seven o'clock in the morning and at five o'clock at night and so the plan is the sitting some spot in the box. What's going to happen is that somebody's going to walk in the the site in the morning on lock? The gates locked the trailer. Turn on the generator and open the box and take the drone out maybe stick battery and at that point somebody will. Construction worker will touch a button on an IPAD and a plan that has already been loaded to that. IPAD from headquarters is going to be uploaded to Joan. Joan will take off. It'll do a lawn mower pattern hatter nor Peru or circular pattern or spiral pattern depending on what the site is at the point. It'll take about some between nine and ten minutes to do the whole site. It'll it'll take probably about two hundred images flying about about two hundred and fifty feet and then a land on its own at that point is someone who will put the back in the box touch another another button on the IPAD and the injury from that tyrone will go into the IPAD and then automatically buffalo to to the cloud to cloud at that point all those photos then get through a process to photograph maitree all those photos get get sort of analyzed and basically the way photograph works. It's called called structure from motion. But when and you see the same object from different perspectives using the paradox effects. You can actually see the depth you can have that so although the the photos to D- when you combine a bunch of two D. photos you end up with a three three d three D model and that'll be a point cloud or mesh or something like that. So that's automatically generated. Then that is automatically syncs up with the the cad file and when you have these things called ground control points so in the course of flying over its certain features are known had known position they have like an ex or some sort of fiduciary optical fiduciary automatically maquis recognize. And so that aligns this three d model to the same locations and so it snaps into location and now this becomes a layer in the cad file and and you can basically scroll forward and backwards through time and see how and see how things change and because these are meshes they're actually geometry's which can be snapped on. Snap and Khanin in alignment with the underlying catfight and you can say oh. That post was supposed to be here. But it's actually two meters over. There's probably a reason why they moved. That post two meters overdoes rock or something like that. Okay okay well. That's good to know now that now the digital twin says okay guys going forward. No that that post is now. It was supposed to be now over here. So when you put the trench now now put Trenton. I have to move the trenches well and you know when you're when you're going to be cutting the That you know the steel beam to go in that post note. The steel beam can have to be changed as well so now all all that information goes into the supply chain in the scheduling going forward and they make better choices because it reflected reality. Your software is open source or some of it It's it's actually not so the software and the drone so the drone might be using our the the software that we originally you know developed or or the software that we're now are working on as part of the drone code project is part of the next foundation says suffer on the drone is probably open source might be a degi vehicle which is closed source or might be one of one of the open source wants based Tantrum Code. That's just you know to operate the drone and mission and all this stuff. The data on the other hand goes into the cloud. And that's all closers. What's the reasoning behind? And the open source project. Is You just join or CO founded the foundation projects credit. Yeah Okay what have been the ramifications of the open source. I mean just to give some context. I You told quite a great story at at the Open Core Summit Guy I you know. We can't go through that in the entirety but maybe you can give a condensed highlights version of that story. Perhaps the evolution of your code being used by constituencies of various ethical. Flavors got it. Got It okay. Yeah so when I started I started as a as a hobby. Maybe I was. The editor of wired it was doing. My kids became a community. It took off and everything I do as a community has always been open source. You know whether it's you you know creative Commons or or actual code so it was just a default open because it was a hobby you know and and then as it got as it got bigger it became better organized and you know proper code development processes and and maintainers and things like that as it got bigger yet it became clear that we had the opportunity to create attention the android of ABC's Amand Aerial Vehicles. And I was like okay. Well you know this is starting to look like smartphones..

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:31 min | 9 months ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"It takes so long to find a job. That's a good fit. friel veteran is an online hiring marketplace. That connects highly qualified workers with top companies. vetera- keeps the quality of workers and companies on the platform high because because veterans vets both workers and companies access is exclusive and you can apply to find a job through victory by going to veteran dot COM com slash s. e. daily that's V. E. T. T. E. R. Y. dot com slash S. e. daily. Once you're accepted to veteran you have access to to a modern hiring process you can set preferences for location experience level salary requirements and other parameters so that you only get job opportunities opportunities that appeal to you know more of those recruiters sending you blind messages. That say they are looking for a Java Rockstar with thirty five years of of experience. WHO's willing to relocate to Antarctica? We all know that there is a better way to find a job. So check out veteran dot com slash. Sec Daily and get a three hundred dollar sign up bonus if you accept a job. Through veteran veteran is changing the way people get hired and the way that the people hire so check out veteran dot com slash. Save daily and get a three hundred dollar sign up bonus if you accept a job through battery that's V. E. T. t. e. r. are Y DOT COM slash. Save daily thank you to veterans for being a sponsor of.

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

11:41 min | 9 months ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I saw your name when I read the long tail in College. Excellent Book I've followed volunteer work since then did spend many years as a professional editor writer. But your background is as a scientist in two thousand nine and you started three. Dr And no longer had as much time for writing or editing if you were full time writer or editor today what. What area would you be covering? Gosh that's a good question. I backed into writing and editing simply because I inside done physics and Physics was kind of a dying Profession for reasons that had to do with like the cost of accelerators and things like that my parents had been journalists and I swore I would never do journalism for exactly that reason but what you know I I tried to find a middle ground which was okay. I'm not going to be a journalist but I you know rather than doing science all I work for the science journals and you know and and and write about or read it you know science so I still felt like I was in science and academia but it was technically media nature and science with the two journals but again I didn't think of writing as being my thing that ended up writing. You know in in that in that context doing journalism although science journalism. And then I went from there to the economist where I was. You know. Starting Science and technology and at the economist. If you've read the Economist got very distinctive voice and what I learned there was I picked up that voice and you can think of the Oxford's debating society voice Prime Minister's Question Time Voice. But it's it's it's it's a voice that has confident. That's a sure that's quite opinionated. That sort of you know assertion evidence assertion evidence and when you get to the economist. The reason I'm telling you this story is because you know I think that once you get that voice it becomes very portable and that that voice carries you onto books and beyond so I'll I'll explain explain why that voice carries on but when you get to the communist that was a poster on the wall and the poster on. The Wall had the canonical economists sentence and the canonical. Oh economists sentences wrong period. A matter of fact is economical economist paragraph. Now when you think about that what does it take to be able to get away with wrong wrong period as a paragraph and what that means is that you basically. Have you set up an assertion. Somebody else's assertion presumably. You know the the Prime Minister of Indonesia has said that palm oil subsidies or the route to the country's prosperity wrong period. How do you get away with that? And the answer is that you're not just not some neutral observer you're coming from a an intellectual foundation. Basically the anglo-saxon Philosophical Foundation of free markets and free people and Democracy. And all this kind of stuff. And you're summoning all this kind of western philosophy to take down an argument using the kind of the power of the brand the T. One hundred fifty years and becomes traditions. The you know the the world worldview of the liberal British British perspective. And then you sort of you know and and then the rest of it is just you know once you've internalized that voice and once you have you know even turn allies. The you know the Anglo Saxon you know economic philosophy then you can go around see the world through that Lens and say you know wrong long period and explain why and at the end of the day. People come away informed perhaps enlightened by that perspective so that confidence and that voice. which did you learn and You know the editors sitting on editors floor every Monday morning as the debates on what you're GonNa say come across that voice then you know once you come out of there you realize well. There's a lot a lot of the world that you can apply that that voice to you. Could you could talk about technology. You could talk about the environment you can talk about science. It's not necessarily be need to be obnoxious contrarian but it gives you the confidence to to move beyond the the the the the failure of American journalism failure American journalists the neutrality. You know what people call the view from nowhere just like on one hand people say this on the other hand people say that and American journalists aren't allowed to have opinions whereas whereas elsewhere in the world especially in the UK journalists are allowed have opinions especially informed opinions and so that power to have an opinions or carries over to writing. And then when you write a book like the long tail free or or makers etc.. That book becomes a thesis. It's basically just a a long informed. Opinion argued out. And now you have now you have the ability to have opinions. You have the ability to to inform those opinions at the bill and the ad the skills to communicate that opinions you know. Now the world's you're always stor so if I was writing today I would not I listen to you. Basically go and you said what is the most interesting thing that's the most poorly poorly understood. Those are the those are the best the best ones so I think. Ai Probably Right now is very interesting and poorly understood. There's lots of people writing code but good books about it so I wouldn't. I don't need to to add to that. Think autonomy in general is interesting poorly understood. I'm tormented by headlines about AI ethics. Which I think is a complete head scratcher veteran? I don't even know what that means. So that would be the reason not to write about it because I don't want to get caught up in a in a straw man arguments but no general right now. Technology has accelerated faster faster than society's ability to to deal with it and that strikes me as a good opportunity to bring clarity and persuasive argument to the the case there are so many applications of consumer drones that could improve our world. Why don't we see drones in the sky every day? Why why is the sky? Not Dark with drones. I ask myself every morning so you are with me here. In Berkeley. At the headquarters of three are also. Berkeley was one of the birthplaces of the modern Auden. Drone drone industry. This is a military drones started the nineteen fifties. But this is the this is the consumer that you're describing it. Was You know here. With the University of California's a Stanford Myself in about ten years ago and at the time. It was obvious that you know that Adrian's could be cheap and ubiquitous Quddus so I started something called. Diy Drones on the the notion that you could stick like literally the letters. Do It yourself in front of military industrial thing and it could work. It was clear. Clear that drones were going to be the future we're going to descend from smartphones. Not from triple seven's so that Sorta told you something about if you know. smartphones are ubiquitous. Presume that drones could be as well so economic reason couldn't and then the next question was only GonNa be you know what are they good for. You know we've answered the question. What are they good for sufficiently because there as a regulatory barrier between inventing a drone being able to use a drone the regulatory barrier by the totally appropriate? It's true for autonomous cars as well. You know anytime you're it's silicon valley is all about asking forgiveness not permission and I can tell you the original drones. We did not look for permission. We just I did it and San Francisco out there is got floor. That Bay is scattered with crash drones. Nobody got hurt. I don't think they leaked bad things into the foam etc but lots. Lots of drones crashed in the course of doing this as we went from the DIY phase to the commercial phase and then and then and the consumer phase as we started to have to comply with the regulations and the FAA regulations initially didn't allow commercial use at all. It was only recreational. Use those really like not. You couldn't make money from drones until two thousand sixteen so there's one answer why this guy's not dark with these things. The next answer is that even once commercial use was allowed it had certain restrictions you had to stay within visual on a site you say below four hundred feet. You couldn't fly over people. You couldn't fly at night. And also there had to be one pilot per drone so although their autonomous they don't need piloting they're actually has to be a person standing there and even today are fully. Autonomous Drones cannot be launched into a human being touches night bad. That's so I think they just have to touch an IPAD and the actor touching the IPAD. Validates there is a human being present watching in case something happens. Emergency Services Headquarters helicopter or something like that. So we actually haven't achieved any real efficiencies yet because these restrictions now we're very very close to being able to to to break through and there's an FAA process this is called type certification and once vehicles certified as safe then it will be allowed to fly beyond visual Site over people maybe more than one to one pilot to human piloted drone but could be one to twenty one to fifty one to one hundred. And then we're going to start to see the efficiencies that automation and robotics brings Beck that's going to I mean our our type certification's going to be the first and that's going to happen before the end of the year. Starting next year we may actually start to see them flying. Initially we're gonna be doing things like infrastructure the structure inspection pipeline powerline inspection but dams your state delivery things like that and so. I think that I think the answer. Is You know we thought it. There's a technical problem and we saw the technical problem and five years it was actually a technical and then a regulatory problem. The regulatory problems can take ten years. And we're about five years into it so give us give us another few years and and we'll get there. What would they be doing anything? Satellites were doing in the seventy s and airplanes. Were doing the nineties in drones can do can do you better not not. They don't have higher resolution both spatial temporal resolution. So if you want to see something. Millimeter resolution every hour. Only only a drone can do that if you WanNa see the globe once a week that whatever. That's that's a satellite but the long answer to your question but I believe that we in silicon looking valley have a holy mission. which is that we were? We were gifted the Internet. We're born with you. Know the most important technology are ages electrcity of our time and our mission in his to extend this gift to the world. Extend the Internet to our homes to our arms to our cars to the air to space etcetera. And why. Why would we do that? Well if you extend the Internet into the world the world becomes smarter all these devices connected to the Internet are smarter Ford and the Internet becomes smarter from being able to kind of measure the the planet and are fundamental principles. That you can only manage what you can measure. And we've been doing kind of kind of bad job of managing the planet from environmental and economic perspectives. And so better. We can measure the planet with drones and satellites and everything else and feed it into the Internet. Will the better. We will be managing right. Now we're just picking the ones that where the where the value is the highest We're here in. Wildfire season in California are drones are being used to fight wildfires. How do they do that? The thermal cameras you can see through the smoke and see what the fires are before the fire. The drones can spot the fuel the needles and the believes that will create those fires and then after the fire we can spot the hotspots. They're still there so they don't turn into fires again. Climate change our drones right now. All the water infrastructure the dams and levees of America or built assuming one amount of rainfall level rise and they're all being challenged by climate change. So those you know now. We're seeing floods we're seeing you know the sea level rise etcetera all that infrastructure needs to be re re skinned impossibly. Expensive we know with on on the ground and trivial easy for drones and so you're seeing the US Army Corps of Engineers using in your Jones. Look at all those levees there figure out what's what needs to be reinforced. And what doesn't and so on looking for a job is painful..

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:46 min | 9 months ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Drone applications are easy to imagine drones will deliver food to us. Drones will be able to extinguish fires. Drones will be used to relay relate Internet signal and make the world more connected. These all sound like great ideas. So why aren't there more drones in the sky. Today there are many answers to that question. Some of which relate to engineering and some of which are about regulatory barriers Chris. Anderson is the CEO of Three D. Robotics a drone company which he started seven years ago before three Dr. Chris worked for many years as a journalist writing about technology and science. He was the editor in chief at wired for eleven years a writer for the Economist for seven years and spent three years at both of the leading scientific journals nature nature and science. Chris is highly eloquent and has lots of interesting ideas he also wrote the long tail. which is an influential essential? Two thousand four book which described set of emergent Internet trends. I read that book back in two thousand nine and it was enlightening. Chris joins the show for a discussion about drones journalism and his perspective on modern technology. This podcast is brought to you by Pager. Duty you've probably heard of pager. Duty Teams Trust Pager duty to help them deliver high quality digital experiences to their customers with pager. Duty teams spend less time reacting adding two incidents and more time building software over twelve thousand businesses rely.

"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"You're less likely to do so by writing letters today editor them by. I don't know posting youtube video or you know so. It's a skill that in almost whatever else you do it will benefit you. I i noticed and i've been invited to various conferences where the organizers will say we're doing. We're doing ted talks and they're or not your guys. You're not sanctions not ted ex. Sometimes they'll say ted style. <hes> how do you feel about that and i want to also admit that they're not not that great. They're they're they. They call them at talks and they're just little lectures end and their tedious as one can be when it's not really shaped but but how do you how do you feel about what if they're not that great then i don't feel great about i guess if i love the fact that people want to do ted talks if by that they mean they've asked us because to put in enough of preparation to think about how to make what they're saying accessible in a short time period i mean that's respectful of the audiences insist time what what's wrong about public speaking often is it a speaker rose up with minimal crap and rambles. That is a real theft of audience time that was you weren't willing to put in a few hours of your time but you expect five hundred people to sit for half an hour. You've just that's two hundred fifty hours of time. You've just wasted because you were lazy so that that's not good so i think just the idea of preparing a toll we have control on that at intelligence squared where we we really do ask debaters to put in the work and we we do a little a bit of guidance for them on how to shape arguments a little bit not content wise but just format wise but we ask them to. There's always two teams of two. We asked him to work with each other time and the control on that is that the debaters who don't do that loose the debate and so there's an incentive i dropped that in by the way if right your opponents opponents are really preparing our but i have the same i resent it when a debater shows up his phoning it in or is resorting back to some pre scripted talk that he's given us and is not in fact listening to the other side which is the thing to work there. Now i mean ted ted is a nonprofit <hes> missions just to promote the sharing of ideas that matter and to see them out in the world and to get activated anyone who does that in any form that that's that's great. That's was supportive well. You've changed the world and you continue to. Where's it going next more of the same or a different things. I think as the platforms got bigger. We've we've got a great response into one is just to take the the debates. I what really what you're doing more seriously so for example right now in pilot pilot around the world we have the ted circles that just allows anyone to gather together a group of people listen to talk and then have a discussion about got it and i think the idea of of hearing hearing ideas in a group that that's what we're danger of losing their sense of local local community and so forth so listen to it together talk together and maybe we can find a different format for discourse than just lobbing insults at each other across the internet so that's the other side at the same time as we're thinking really hard about just seriously how to nudge ideas into into action..

ted ted ted style editor theft two hundred fifty hours
"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"No interest in uh sloganeering pressing buttons that will anger people i mean political ideas matter and so if we're in the business of ideas the matter uh we have to be in politics a bit what we've tried to do is to find different ways of framing political issues. Can you find the people who can bridge agent stead of divide so questions like what's wrong with democracy. How do we fix democracy. Those are incredibly important and were always seeking speakers in that space so it's it's tricky but we don't want to do. Though is you know language itself set up the language so inflaming that a soon as something as phrased half the audience to stop listening and so it's trying to do politics in a way that people keep listening. That's what i'd salvi sat mission speaking listening. I listen to <hes> one of the more interesting speakers you've had over. The years was monica lewinsky who <hes> who's getting a her second hearing from the public enlarge and talk she gave a forbes conference was followed up by a ted talk that dramatically changed the way i think she is able to present yourself to the world and is understood by the world out there and i i congratulate you for that gave her a long overdue a chance to speak for herself and tell l. her own story but i also listen to an interview you did with her on your podcast which is called the ted interview and you sit down and continue the conversation station. I wanna say you're a terrific interviewer. That was a very good interview. I say that as an interviewer many years of doing this that the key thing that i heard you doing was listening. You obviously didn't go in there with the list of questions you in in there with a sense of curiosity you listen to what she said and then a conversation ensued. If i were to do a masterclass on interviewing i would say interviewing about listening and you were doing that spectacularly well and the thought occurred to me. The one thing your book doesn't talk about is being in the audience listening. You talk a lot about the speakers and getting the message out. The audience is is presented as a sort of large mass in the darkness people who in unison applaud or in unison grown or in unison chuckle since as you were so good at listening to monica lewinsky what about the ted audience who are these people in the live events what brings them there and then. What do you want them to do. You yes so this is this is a great question. I think first of all you're right that the very best speakers do edit what they're going to say in real time according into what they see in the audience they couldn't tell which bits a landing and they will may move in that direction and be guided by that so sa- ken robinson who okay over. It's still the best view. Talk of times didn't come with a with a prepared talk. He had lots of different elements in his head that they weren't too shabby. He takes his feedback from the audience and knows it was how to build on that laughter and their engagement <hes> education yeah that's right. He gave a talk about how schools have underplayed creativity in education but most of the talk was almost stand up comedy. I mean it was <hes> but at the same time deeply inspiring so you're you're go right that audiences usually behave not at all in a single way. I mean some people are agreeing disagreeing some thinking some laughing paying being alive to how people are and just looking at them and connecting with them it matters they will feel that sort of personal engagement from from the audience point of view in other contract between speaker and audience actually really matters at an event for an audience people come into the room with pretty firm rules. You may not have a device switched on attention matter so much. It's incredibly hard to explain the complex idea and if you lose three sentences early on you may have lost the whole context in the thing and the rest of the talk be wasted and so people who delude themselves they can just sort of open advice and listener long wait for the good bit. They will actually lose lose. The power of the of the talk together so focused attention in return for the hundreds of hours at a speaker may have put into that dog. Your obligation is to give undivided attention for the fifteen minutes of the talk and you will be rewarded for that chris anderson the man.

monica lewinsky ken robinson ted salvi chris anderson fifteen minutes
"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"If the wrong goes in all bets are off you know so we have all these mechanisms for deciding when to oprah minds when she shut them down that are actually really really important for our own mental health storytelling as you point down in the book has a long long tradition as an oral tradition before there was an internet before there was written word you make the argument others have made it but you make it in a really the interesting way that is one of the things that defines us as a species and <hes> has had an enormous impact consequences not just that we can tell stories raise but having heard stories we become a certain thing and <hes> talk a little bit about that kind of evolutionary aspect yeah i mean it seems to go back to new humanities control fire that should a campfire the other day and just marveling at it again that this one thing allows a group of humans together together safely only the animals are scared so for the first time you have safety together and you can see each other living patterns changed people could go to bed later they could weight off the dock and they had this period of our to after dark where they could gather and just build social skills and and storytelling was this. It was probably elite who knows for what reason it was done on. Why it took off it became this tool where crucial survival information could be shared you know here is my story of how i escaped this danger that means that you don't have to do. I did it for you. Now you know what to do and so i think it became a crucial tool for allowing humans to thrive and it's amazingly rich what is going on in that process because it's not just the communication of literal sort of textual information. It's it's all kinds of other judgments going on in that process of do. I trust this person to like this person to want to follow. This person are they. Are they believable. They passionate that you know you can hear so many things in a voice and so yeah i think i think good storyteller good listeners were selected for evolutionary and it's become become a big part of who we are and many of the best speakers know that your best shot at bringing audience along with you and if you like to get an audience videos to open its mind is to do a little storytelling and yet so many of us are terrified to get up in front of other people talk. Yes because your aw social standing is steak. I mean <hes> social standing plays a huge role in whether or not we will thrive or whatever so it's it's a very natural central fear to have the good thing about fear is that it's you know it's a purpose is that we had attention to and it says to you. Hey look out deer human owner serve me you need to you need to pay attention to this and so long as people listen to that fear and then respond to prepare their talks and prepare their experience the skills they can actually get over that fear. It's just that often people don't do that. They just think okay. I'm going to wing it. I'm going to i know what i'm gonna. Scientists going to try and get through it and then they may or may not blow up on stage does stagefright still figure into speakers who show up at ted and i would find that ironic because on the one hand they've said yes or maybe they've even pitch themselves and then on the other hand if they're scared why do that if they're so scared it hugely shows up and it's in many ways. It's the most for some speakers they feel. It's the sort of they got more at stake than ever because they've got this one shot dead talk and reach billions of people are not completely fail and so some come the more terrified than ever and yes. It's it's you chip away at that piece by piece really by by knowing what you're gonna say most importantly by having something that's really worth saying and that you know that carry you through <hes> see the audiences people look at them and and just be authentic come in the west the west thing is someone sort of trying to hide the fact that they're scared and sort of like clench their way through a talk. It's much better to have an honest honest moment with the conversation and say i'm nervous. Yeah yeah just say yeah. Most audiences usually very very supportive. Have you seen.

ted one hand
"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Design. It's actually all knowledge is connected and some of the biggest aha moments <music> in history have happened from people spark off each other and sort of seeing something from a completely different feel. Someone has a dream listen to some music economic. Somehow you know relies brain in a fascinating way. They come specifically <hes>. Oh gosh you're going to <hes> <hes> well. I have something i eh well. I'm thinking i'm thinking steve jobs was not strictly speaking an engineer but he he saw design and engineering and frankly entertainment all go into into one package with the his first computers and then obviously with the ipod and the iphone and with several entrepreneurs if you look at someone like elon musk he's been successful because he's combined brilliant engineering with <hes> a strong sense of business and what it takes to actually fun things things and actually a strong sense of humor psychology. What is what is the combination of addictive qualities that would make people fall in love with a car for example <hes> that <hes> feel the people people had that sort of breadth to pull together and to do if you like system design but <hes> just the experience of sitting in a room and listening to people it's surprising that software code is landlocked from artists and creatives and and vice versa but they really do but you're not making an argument for being generalist. That's a different thing no i'm. I'm making an argument for being being ready to invest sometime in understanding at least the key elements of what other people are doing because it shows you how what what you do really fits into the world and there are surprisingly few people do it and the new york times. David brooks is explicitly assertive this generalist writer who will try and portico the threads from psychology and history and sociology debated with us a bunch of times so we've seen that happen on stage yeah and it's it's a very very helpful skill to you to put your thinking and you could just understand how it fits into the landscape. Excape not enough of that happens <hes> talk. I want to talk a little bit about the formation of what we actually see on the stage. Now <hes> the most obvious <hes> consistent thing that you do is the eighteen minute minute time limit solo individual almost always solo individual almost always standing fully open to the audience not behind the lectern. Take all of those apart from me and let's start with the easiest one to understand the talks have to come in and eighteen minutes or under yes in fact in recent years they've if they've usually been quite a bit shorter than that as well driven by really just the time pressure of the attention battle all in a talk eighty minutes long probably won't go as on the internet as a really good talk twelve minutes. I mean there's there's exceptions to everything but <hes> you know. The essence of that time is in principle. Is you know enough time say something serious but short enough to attain people's attention in a very fragmented attention economy and so it occasionally means that people struggled to say you know correctional correct that it always means that people struggle to say what they want to say in that time and they have to make i choice they have to focus on a specific thing but it what it has the benefit of is that you you say to someone. Don't talk about everything that you're interested. Stood in knowledge about about pick something that you care about and make it accessible to people outside your field socio. You're giving them that gift of you know you understand everything about the science of you know genetic engineering. I'll say it like that but but let me tell you something that you really do need to know about so the discipline is is really helpful in encouraging so much dispirit communication and the amazing thing. Is that in many cases. You can't say enough have to a large an idea. It's never meant to be complete knowledge. You know the it's not the thought that you listen to a tedtalk in oh. I know this now. It's not a lecture no it's. It's certainly not a book or you're going to give you enough interest that you can either put something in context or if you're motivated to diving deeper curator of ted talks chris chris anderson we are gonna take an even deeper dive when we continue this is part of the discourse disruptor series presented by intelligence squared u._s. Other guests in this series include dr alison schrager..

new york times dr alison schrager steve jobs David brooks chris chris anderson engineer ted writer eighteen minutes eighteen minute eighty minutes twelve minutes
"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Was sitting there crying at the back of the roman i've been thinking i fall in love with this thing to come here and it was it tim to touch what other people quite deeply so i had a chance as a media entrepreneur fewest later data to to buy it from its founder by means of a nonprofit foundation that i set up and that was stressful and exciting and it wasn't clear that the issue would happen but once it had happened really the quest became okay the things owned by a nonprofit. It's supposed to be for the public gird <hes> i think it's for the public good and that you know these amazing people come together and share ideas but it's a little bit insular. How could we let this magic out into the world and for several years we we failed to find a way we approach television station said hey we've got this nicely film talks. Would you like them for t._v. Show and tv said no. We think that's a little bit boring talking at excuse me and <hes> so it really wasn't until online video became a thing which was to the era sort of youtube sort of kicked into existence ever through early two thousand six i think and on videos it was these shaky little videos in the corner of the screen and so we tried as an experiment to put some talks up online not really thinking that they would compete with the three minute kitten videos with the rage at the time and surprise some people like your wife responded and found them engaging and it was that level of engagement persuaded us we we actually could do a complete flip of our mission really instead of thank yourselves as a conference trying to think of ourselves as a distribution engine engine for ideas in this in this talk form the big bat was would that kill the conference and therefore they could watch it yeah exactly turned out the upset and it was it was surprising and delightful that most of the people who came to actually thrilled at the thought of being able to share the content with their friends and we made <hes> many new corrections officers people spread these things align so yeah so we started just we'll give away all our best content and go from there and loop-back to who who you are you describe yourself as a meteoroid tra- poor. What what was your business. Before the nonprofit. I published magazines light hobbyist magazines magazines that were deeply boring to almost everyone except the people that were specifically targeted at who would literally run to the news agent today that are published some some of the topics magazines video game magazines music magazines craft working or also like one hundred of them in the end and uh-huh before the internet that was a really good business off the internet all that baterial was online in real time for free and it became very bad business quit..

founder three minute
"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"<music> hi everybody i'm john donvan host and moderator of intelligence squared u._s. and this is another one in our a series of conversations not debates but conversations where i have been sitting down with some people who have had really significant impact on the public public discourse today the way we talk to each other we're calling this series discourse disruptors and it's where i chat with people who really are ending some new shape to the public debate looking past partisan talking points and they are definitely bringing civility and also substance back to the conversations that they care about most and as a result. We care about them to my guest. Today leads one of the most recognizable forums for public discourse ever ted or the ted talks chris anderson. Thanks so much for being with us. Chris scrapie him as i said you the curator of ted you're also the author of the book ted talks the official ted guy i to public speaking which i confess to having the benefit of having read so i got a lot of insight to where ten came from what your goals and aspirations are so i wanna chat a little bit about that but i want to start with a memory of two thousand seven coming. My wife wakes up. She's an early riser and gets up about an hour earlier than me and something like twelve thirteen eighteen years ago. I came downstairs and she said you've gotta listen to this and she had listened to ted. Talk in the first one hundred series that you posted and she had been doing this for several days in a row and i said what is it and she said is ted talks and i said who's ted and what's he talking about. I'm sure you've heard that lunchtimes but that's literally what i said and she kind of outlined for me what it was and that was my introduction to ted <hes> which two thousand seven or so would have been early days is for the transformation the ted went through so i want to go back to that time period to to win. Ted showed up on this thing called the the internet and how it got to that point. It was definitely the <hes> exciting beginning of new johnny that we'd been we'd been looking for so ted was a conference for gosh started nineteen eighty-four bringing together three industries technology entertainment design designers the t._e._d. So from the start it was an attempt to bring together. Three different areas betting that there was interest in that there would be that sparkle for each other in some way that to not to work. I showed up in the late ninety. S ninety-eight went to my first hat and and the first day i was baffled by it a why by all these different subjects that didn't focus but by by the third day you could see all the ducks connecting and in really an amazing way and and i.

ted chris anderson john donvan official twelve thirteen eighteen years
"chris anderson" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on The TED Interview

"Health for supporting this episode. Welcome to the Ted interview. I'm Chris Anderson, and this is the polka series where I sit down the Ted speaker, we dive much deeper into their ideas than was possible during the tedtalk. Today on the show, one of the world's most famous introverts Susan Cain. Seven years ago. Susan called for something of a revolution in how the world should think about introverts. She published a bestselling book called quiet, and she also gave a Ted talk.

Susan Cain Ted Chris Anderson Seven years
"chris anderson" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on The TED Interview

"Hello. I'm Chris Anderson. Welcome to the Ted interview the podcast series, where I get to sit down with a ten speaker and dive much deeper into their ideas than was possible during their short, Ted talk. Now today on the show, Kaifu Lee, and the epic race to develop artificial intelligence, a I do was eleven years old when he moved to America from Taiwan to be a mess in the US education system and from that point, I guess, you could say his life has been positioned to straddle two outs America and.

Ted Chris Anderson America Kaifu Lee US Taiwan eleven years
"chris anderson" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Eighteen. Hi there. This is Chris Anderson had of Ted, and I want to tell you about the latest episode of the Ted interview. I get to talk to none other than education reformer, sir. Ken Robinson, the man who gave the most popular Ted talk of all time, he urged schools to nurture creativity and our kids instead of destroying it. So it was a fabulous treat to sit down with the Ken and here in his inimitable often hilarious style his insights into how to reenergize the classroom going forward. That's the Ted interview. Wherever you listen to podcasts. I love learning foreign languages. In fact, I love it so much that I'd like to learn a new language every two years currently working on my eighth lem when people find out about me. They always ask me. How'd you do that? What's your secret? And to be honest for many years. My also would be I don't know. I simply love leading languages, but people were never happy with announcer. They wanted to know why they're spending years trying to lend even one language never achieving fluency. And here, I come lending one language after another. They wanted to know the secret of polyglot s- people who speak a lot of languages and that made me wonder too. How do actually other polyglot do it? What do we have in common? And what is it that enables us to learn languages so much faster than other people? I decided to meet other people like me and find out the best place to meet a lot of polyglot s- is an event where hundreds of language lovers. Meet in one place to practice. Languages. They're several of such polyglot events organised all around the world. And so I decided to go there and ask polyglot about the methods that they use. And so I met Benny from Ireland who told me that he's method is to start speaking from day one. He learns a few phrase's from travel, Facebook and goes to meet native speakers starts having conversations with them right away. He doesn't mind making even two hundred stakes day because that's how he Lurs based on the feedback. And the best thing as he doesn't even need to travel a lot today because you can easily easily have conversations with native speakers from the comfort of your living room using websites..

Ted Ken Robinson Chris Anderson Facebook Benny Ireland two years
"chris anderson" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Chris Anderson. Chris Anderson can the podcast. Thank you. As it's great to be here. I realize that you grew up in Pakistan. Yes. Bona Pakistan, grew up in Pakistan, India of anistan. Yeah. I'm very happy. I did. It's big part of who. I am. I think if your parents were medical missionaries, they were for whom well, it was British mystery society Potestant bible, believing you know, he he took a mobile clinic two different places in the sin does it in Pakistan and did lots of cataract surgery. And then when people were healing try to give them the gospel, which you could do back then. Much hotter now, and you would probably call him today. Like, a fundamentalist very much a fundamentalist Christian. Yeah. But really lived it. He lived at he lifted. I mean, he believes that people's attention is were at stake. And so what else could you do that was the moral thing to do? I think that that space of missionary work where you really believe that if you don't go there somebody's eternity might be lost a hell when you put yourself in. That mindset it's like how can you not? It's such a different way to approach the world now. Absolutely. And that's what I grew up with what I believed growing up. And if you if you if you combine that with being logical and wanting a coherent while view, you have no choice, but to be evangelical and to try to persuade others. Otherwise, that's the least moral thing. You can do is to leave some into their fate. Are you religious? I would not now describe myself as religious I would describe myself as someone on Jenny like, I'm very curious about the world. I I left the church it felt very dramatic. At the time to me when I was twenty eight years old after sort of. Decade of struggling to stay in it. And instead of against my almost my deepest desires I felt like I had a deep relationship with God. And it was a huge part of who. I was. But I couldn't make the pieces add up. They no longer made sense to me. And so I left, and it felt really really painful, but also a relief and trying to understand what is out there is still such an intriguing and exciting journey, and you know, by and large I embrace in our scientific, whoa view. But science is itself a journey of discovery. It's not like scientists have the complete story. The story that they have changes all the time, and they're huge pods of it that science what he doesn't understand including arguably, the most important part all which is who are we what is this thing called consciousness, etc. So I believe in a universal of mystery. But but not the religious narrative that I grow with what what led to you having that struggle. Leaving the church. I'm always interested in in people's journeys in this respect it. Did it feel like it was the culture, you're part of the social community or part of or was it argument and logic and science you're reading I mean, did you leave in a kind of head or heart way? More a headway. I think you know, I was brought up to believe that festival. Got had a plan for every moment of your life. Everything was part of his plan, and that was incredibly comforting. But also perplexing when things went wrong when you start to see evil things happen like, you know, a child insomnia gets lost or something like that. That. It's incredibly hard to make that compatible with a loving old powerful..

Pakistan Chris Anderson Bona Pakistan Jenny insomnia anistan India twenty eight years
Google declares Android phones can have two notches at most

This Week In Google

05:23 min | 2 years ago

Google declares Android phones can have two notches at most

"August fifteenth. And then I leave again to go to bath and then. I know I do anything I can to avoid. Texas Banff is a fortieth birthday present to myself. My best friend. Sounds fun. It will be yes and almost happy birthday. Oh, happy birthday than forty. I. Hey, hey, we're not there yet. Come on and happy Wednesday. How about old? Hey, how do you guys feel about notches? I think I know how. Not shes as it. You just kinda go blind to them, but three notches. Where are they putting all these notches? That was my question. I'm not sure that we'll see three. Well, we definitely won't on Android because apparently only two notches are allowed in Android p they've mandated a requirement of only two notches, only the bottom and top and only one per site. So you couldn't. So in other words, you couldn't have your two notches, both on top, not sure why you would want to do that. But Google has gone to the lengths to make sure that you don't because who in someone might design a phone, it's all notches. Yeah, that's kind of what I was thinking like a like a border, a border much. Why? 'cause we can. This is for the lover. Oh, you don't. Did you guys read it was in logic magazine, I thought this was really fascinating. And here is my copy of logic magazine t- do you actually have that? I've ever heard of it. I was like, do you realize I had never heard of it. So I was like Russia. Shinsen and this whole creation of how Chinese manufacturing is like change. Basically, how Chinese manufacturing has grown to this like wild and crazy world where people just build on top of bills and they're talking about like people designing phones that have a compass that points to mecca and its popular in this logic world, it was just like it felt like science fiction, the the world that they were describing. It was such a fascinating article in. So now I'm sad that I cannot find it, but it was logic magazine letter from Shinsen, I think, and I highly recommend everyone check this out because it was just a glimpse into this culture that. Wow, you know, that's what's the company that makes all the phones. Yeah, Foxconn friend of mine went there for means high executives, and just the story of going into the the belly of the beast and Foxconn is amazing. Yeah. So this is logic, logic MAG, dot. I o. is in this is called letter from Shanzen. At the bottom of the dot, it's called Shanzai, which is. Like knockoffs, but now they're calling it the new Shanzai in. It's like this concept of basically cutting like open source hardware where people just build on top of other stuff like the long tail Chris Anderson's long tail in physical goods in technology. So super crazy Superfund. I wanna live. I kind of made me wanna live there just to see all the crazy stuff, but I don't really wanna live in China casino maternal list. I like saying things uncensored Google. I do like Google. The parallels they were making. Like we think like in urban areas, we might be used all this, but even at super rural areas, these guys are can do all this crazy stuff with their just their mobile phones in. I don't know, go read it and be like, dang it. No wonder China's gonna kick our butts. That'll be included in the shrew that that'll be included in the show notes as well. Let me think here else to well, we're probably also going see. Not that it really matters to very many people anymore. A updated daydream of viewer at the event. I'm guessing because apparently the headset is now seventy dollars off that began today. So they're blowing out the daydream view. It's thirty bucks. Now at Verizon, the description lists the item as e o l. skew so end of life. Imagine that a new daydream viewer is around the corner using it phone though, was opposed, I'm guessing. I mean, they have the standalone one by his Lenovo. I believe, of course it's Oculus. Instead he out the Oculus go, so Dr, Android. What do you think in this pixel watch. Dr Android. I like that. I, I mean, I'm having a hard time getting excited about watch any more. I suppose that the where thing kind of pass me by at this point, but I'm really surprised that up until now. Google hasn't done their own pixel watch of sorts..

Google Foxconn Shinsen China Logic Magazine Chris Anderson Texas Lenovo Verizon Shanzen Russia Seventy Dollars
"chris anderson" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

The Hoop Collective

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"chris anderson" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

"People that was in that was the age of consent isn't that role stage chris andersen never met her saw her because she lived in a thing i'm in better in a rural town in i want to say it was in the sketchy one or um alberto i can't remember which and she somehow got chris anderson's email and the email of the young girl in california and chris anderson was emailing this woman in canada and this girl was emailing this woman in canada and she was acting as the gobetween speaking for both parties so chris anderson was telling whatever he was saying and they they thought they were they have a relationship but they really were never actually speaking to another race so via this woman in canada easy via this woman and canada they arranged to meet up in colorado she flew i assume chrysantus influ her in they met even though they had never really actually talked to each other they believe that they were talking to each other and this woman you she obviously has some sort of issues they got together and had relations and then somehow chris anderson got accuse i don't know what the woman play but the woman in canada eventually got arrested and chris anderson was clear it took one at right i wanna i wanna point out here because he was never charged with a crime that's right this up online so that's important yes but like people came in raided his house and should in the end there and it was the implication that he was involved something with the child and it can trust me it it scarred chris andersen gaffe forward but like this was before mantar tale i learned fishing was with antiterror paint.

canada colorado chris anderson chris andersen california