26 Burst results for "Chopin"

"chopin" Discussed on My Personal Library

My Personal Library

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

"chopin" Discussed on My Personal Library

"Never never not even from millions in the unexpected. Becky we have team of freedom control independence. Honesty escape love change and responsibility. Some might also suggests that dot is being selfish by diffusing to marry. Randall it is also possible that she's showing the debris of breathing independence and honesty. There's also sense that dorothea will lose your freedom. Should she marry them. Then you need someone to look after him and the owners would fall in dorothea. A young woman was yet life. It is possible.

ER doc theorized that lack of oxygen stopped Floyd's heart

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

ER doc theorized that lack of oxygen stopped Floyd's heart

"At the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin the jury heard testimony from the emergency room doctor pronounced George Floyd dad Dr Bradford Langenfeld testified he theorized the cause of death was asphyxiation that was one of the more likely possibilities I thought that at the time based on the information I had it was more likely than the other possibilities tape from court TV prosecutors are trying to establish it was Derek show opens me on George Floyd's neck that killed him defense attorney Eric Nelson asked if there are other issues that could still lead to asphyxiation drug use certain drugs can cause hypoxia great specifically five not that's correct the defense argues Chopin did what he was trained to do and Floyd use of illegal drugs in his underlying health conditions caused his death I'm a Donahue

George Floyd Derek Chauvin Dr Bradford Langenfeld Minneapolis Eric Nelson Derek Chopin Floyd Donahue
Protesters rallying in Seattle as cop in George Floyd's death faces trial for murder

News, Traffic and Weather

02:25 min | 3 months ago

Protesters rallying in Seattle as cop in George Floyd's death faces trial for murder

"Is on track to begin just a few hours from now on the trial of Derek Chauvet show opens. The former Minneapolis police officer picture here charged in the killing of George Floyd kneeled on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes. Jury selection was supposed to begin today, but prosecutors fought for a delay until an appeal over reinstating a third degree murder charges resolved. The judge says selection will get underway tomorrow unless the higher court stops of Chopin pleaded not guilty to second degree murder and manslaughter charges. Ah third degree murder charge requires a lower standard of proof to get a conviction. Anti police protesters used the timing of that trial to stage a demonstration in downtown Seattle tonight. Double stroller. Marino's live with the group's message and the movement that trying to build Joel Mary. Instead of smashing windows and tagging businesses, these protesters relied on signs chance and passionate speeches to call for a complete overhaul of the Seattle Police Department. You have seen this movie before Justice for George Floyd is something these protesters don't think will be achieved is a trial for the former officer who killed him gets underway. We see these murders in the streets and we see officers get off. We're not holding our breath for a guilty verdict. Jean Smith, with the Seattle Alliance against Racist and Political Repression, says we face the same lack of accountability in Washington state. These activists say What is needed is a top to bottom reorganization of how police departments air run, starting with the formation of a civilian police accountability counsel to oversee all aspects of operations in full control over budget. Policy hiring firing of top level staff and street level officers oversight full access to investigations. These demonstrators say. The problem with current police watchdog agencies is the people who run them are appointed, alliance members say, unlike Seattle's Office of Police, Accountability, or Opa, Their proposal for a civilian counsel would be an elected board. So it answer directly to the community. There's a lot of cops on board on the opiates, so it's cops watching cops, which isn't great for accountability. Well, These demonstrators do not have a specific timeline to get the legislation out for these civilian oversight boards. They say they plan to hold more rallies. Get their message out peacefully. Thank

George Floyd Derek Chauvet Joel Mary Seattle Alliance Against Racis Chopin Floyd Minneapolis Seattle Police Department Marino Seattle Jean Smith Office Of Police, Accountabili Washington OPA
"chopin" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

07:10 min | 3 months ago

"chopin" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

"If you like what you hear today please remember that from the top. Small independent nonprofit. And if you would consider making a contribution to our efforts at from the top dot org we would greatly appreciate it. Thanks everyone and enjoy the show from. Npr top celebrating the power of music in the hands of america's game. Here's our host pianist. Peter dugan thank you joanne and a hearty welcome to all of you. I'm really looking forward to sharing this show with you. Not only for the usual reason of being wowed by our country's vonda kenda but also as a pianist myself because we're going to hear quite a bit from the keys today now. I use the word keys advisedly because in addition to hearing two very different pianists play two very different pieces by chopin will also hear the keys or rather the wooden bars of the marimba and the keys of the pipe. Organ and those performers will both be playing works by johann sebastian bach and beyond those keyboards shenanigans. Were going to break things up with two fantastic wind players like our first performer. This is flutist. Sasha hitachi ziya seventeen years old and she's starting to show off with operatic flare. She's performing the carmen fantasy by francois board. And it's going to be yours truly at the piano.

"chopin" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:22 min | 4 months ago

"chopin" Discussed on KOMO

"Man, You are for the 40 minutes a day. That that we have him. Maybe less way could make a huge impact where the first things they see the last ones they see. Colton was born four months early. He was £1.3 ounces. He and Nora fought hard to survive. It's been a tough slog for Colton 12 surgeries, he lost a good chunk of his small intestine. Both retinas were detached. He had glaucoma and lost all vision. At the age of three. He has been diagnosed with autism, and through it all, there has been music. His dad, Andy remembers. So at some point we got in a little Like a toddler little keyboard with, like, five keys on it. He would start to repeat sounds back, so we kind of thought he might have a knack for it. Music calmed him at night. So when he was little, he liked to have some bedtime music on in the evenings. You know, while he was falling asleep, so we did a lot of classical music. Keeton listen to songs over and over again, and he tried to replicate them. By the time he was six, he had an innate understanding of harmonics and chords. And it made him so happy. She, uh This is Colton now playing Chopin. I'm just Amazed that he's like that. He's my brother because he's so amazing at playing it. Listen as he turned Chopin into jazz. Older sister Morgan takes it all in, but actually getting to hear him play a whole song and thinking back toe. How far is comets? It's not sure enough. Now it's Z. He's just so amazing, and he's accomplished so much. McCurdy started taking.

Colton Chopin Keeton Morgan McCurdy Andy
AMD Reaches Highest CPU Market Share Since 2007, Q3

Joey's Totally Tech

05:02 min | 8 months ago

AMD Reaches Highest CPU Market Share Since 2007, Q3

"Amd reaches twenty percent market share highest since two thousand seven according to the q. Three twenty twenty report. Amd shared the recent mercury research. Cpi marketshare results. These results showed amd had reached its highest overall market share since two thousand seven and has its highest desktop share since twenty thirteen and the x eighty six market. Amd took its highest amount of share sits q. Two of twenty eleven. This comes as an md has been experiencing still our financial results pointing to amazing growth and also follows intel's reset disappointing earnings report. Particularly when it comes to intel's desktop pc process ourselves looks like amd's doing pretty well. We think about that. I think that's awesome. I think competition is always a good thing. I'm not a particular fan boy of either company. Though the past few years i've been pulling for. Amd despite having an entire processor. But i've got a used server. Cpu not a normal desktops. Ep so really. I think it's great that amd's catching up again. I'm a fan of the underdog typically for good story right. Yeah definitely. I mean both. Amd until have issues. I'm not gonna lie. Yeah but i think this is great for. amd the great that they've been able to catch up with their processors intel needs get back in the game they've been having trouble with their Processes over the past few years trying to get by ten nanometer process. Amd's seven nanometer. Now okay. so it's like intel's have trouble gained lowered work okay. Well i'm sure they'll be able to figure something out all right. So speaking of that. Intel launches iris maximum. Gp's entry level laptops intel's finally stepping back into the dp business after two decades shipping. Their gpu in oem laptops. They've lost her irish exc- max. Graphic solution is designed to complement intel's x lp integrated graphics into the tiger lake. Cp's xy maxwell chopin thin and light laptops as an updated graphics option and has a focus on mobile creation. So this is really meant to be position as game solution but more of a mobile content creation solution helping in applications such as handbrake to pixel image up sampling software other productivity increase tasks still. The susceptive compete with nvidia. His latest generation entry level solution. Mx extra fifty baby steps. You now baby steps. I think it's good. They're getting into that at least the contact creation. Dps yeah that'll make some money from that you know Contact creators want to have that. Gps helps speed up the rendering process. Yeah for sure. Yeah crazy like how much you know. You're seen as far as content wise as far as like rendering like you know Special effects three d images all kinds of stuff on to. Yeah it's pretty wild well even with just regular video editing like you don't need that powerful of a graphics card to render to to speed it up you know just any dedicated. Gpu yeah that's going to speed up the rendering process for the youtube videos or wherever you go to upload videos. Yeah for sure. I mean. I know i've i i remember like years ago. I was up like youtube all day. You know i'm sure by now. It's probably caught up. Yeah so even though intel's not competing what's the gaming. Gps yeah you know they're going to compete with the likes of like Gatx Was at ten thirty. I think it was something like that. Okay but that's Example of what they compete with. I think you know hard. I mean it's lower in cars. Obviously these different products that are needed for situations. Yeah so apple's secret button. On the iphone and ios fourteen apple has implemented a feature called back tap and i o s. Fourteen adds a new hardware button to the iphone. Backed-up turns the entire back of the phone and two a touch sensitive button which can trigger specific buttons said. He could be modified inside of the accessibility menu feature could be integrated with shortcuts. So you could do almost anything you imagine what this feature. I could tell you right now. Though i have iphone six s running ios fourteen. That's not going to work with that phone. That must beaten phones. I can handle it.

AMD Intel Iris Maximum Tiger Lake CP Nvidia DPS Youtube Apple
At least 18 arrested in Seattle after a protest is declared a riot

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

01:41 min | 10 months ago

At least 18 arrested in Seattle after a protest is declared a riot

"Protest turned into a riot over the weekend. This time the confrontation happened outside the police union headquarters. Como's Jonathan Chopin's the latest, several officers hurt 18 people arrested and booked into the King County jail. The Seattle Police Officers Guild headquarters the building rioters targeted Thie. King County Attorney's Office says four of those people could be facing felony charges, including property destruction and malicious mischief, and more charges could be on the way. What he say. Protesters refused to leave and started throwing rocks, bottles and and fireworks fireworks at at police police late late Sunday Sunday evening, evening, one one officer officer was was hospitalized. hospitalized. Others Others suffered suffered injuries injuries and and burns. burns. Pepper Pepper spray spray and and blast blast balls balls were were used used to to break break up up the the crowd. crowd. This This anti anti police police protest protest started started in in the the international international district, district, approximately approximately 100 100 people people started started heading heading toward toward the the Seattle Seattle police police officers officers Guilt Guilt headquarters headquarters on on the the 2900 2900 block block of of Fourth Avenue south in the soda neighborhood. That would be a confrontation with police began and was eventually declared a riot. Thie investigation is on going. I think they should go protest where they lived on DH where they work, and they get changed where they are. I don't think that the people that are doing this really Is indicative of

Seattle Police Officers Guild Seattle Officer King County Attorney's Office King County Jonathan Chopin Como
A Little Hack To Make Amazing Ads That Convert

Marketing Secrets

05:00 min | 1 year ago

A Little Hack To Make Amazing Ads That Convert

"Alright. So we've seen our spent a Lotta Times creating ads and thinking about like what's the ad hoc where we can get someone's attention and The other day I was swiping through instagram or something and I try attention. What are the things? Get me to stop right where things I read. Look at him. I was looking different things. And that's sort of like a watch. My kids my kids. They're really big into all these. These things that are satisfying will satisfying. This is the thing so satisfying like these weird art things with slime sand or with shredding metal in a metal shredder. Like all these crazy things and I was like Oh man. What if we did these different things and tournament ads right and the other day so I was when instagram search and start searching for like cool art or satisfying or slime or is type in keywords and I started seeing all these different cool art things And I started disliking a bunch of like falling their pages of steps. Then start showing up on my feet and now it's my newsfeed are seeing all these cool crazy aren't things that people do right by drying and All sorts of things but the other day I saw one that caught my attention I watched for men probably a minute straight and it was this guy and he does pancake art and so the cameras above this pancake and he's drawing this pitcher and you're seeing it. It's pretty cool. And then we gets done. He takes it and flips it over and as soon as he flips over pancake you see the finished pancake and now. I watched that I went to watch like probably ten or fifteen of them. My kids and it was so cool. You kinda like always drawing. Elsa is drying whatever sees everything's until he flips the pancake over your exactly what it is and he flips it over and the details looks amazing and It says like Oh my gosh. Look how much this sucked into the into watching this and I watched so many kids them I was like how can I get this to become an ad and I was like a pancake on my face? That's annoying no one wants to see pancake my face on what can you do? What can I do and I was like what if I haven't the pancake of the the book covers of dotcom secrets. Expert Secrets Traffic Secrets and say emailed the the guys on the channel as they. Hey how much it would cost for me to have you. Pancake art my books and it was a couple of hundred bucks per book. It was not not that expensive wired the money and just today I got back three pancake. That were flipped over. Then doing my book and flipping over and they turned out so cool. They're amazing nominate goes tournament a little ads. Youtube ads facebook ads. Instagram is budget variations. Because look at come back to to step number one right. We talk a lot about like Hook Story. Offer hoax story off the hook grabs attention and the story and then the offers. I figure the pancakes the hook right. You're like what does he drawing the boom over while the watching that can tell the story of what's happening with what he's doing why wrote book flips over. It's done and then make the offer from you'll get free copy of the book so I have no idea now if the ads can work if it's not gonNA work because it'd be successful or not successful but I do notice to get hook and it's GonNa be really fun and I'm excited to test it out Especially look at some of the ADS. We make we spend tons of my just my phone but you never know what the hooks going to be the grab. Someone's attention so for a couple hundred bucks to test it. It's it's really exciting so I'm excited for that started. After that I started looking into clean Mesa Google or finding claymation and I've message probably ten different claymation. Artists are making claymation ads and stuff like that. So it's just fun new things. You brought up when he goes to start going to instagram and facebook. Reverend started looking at art but the arts the cool designers look at People. That are doodling sketching. That are doing just whatever. Or they're creating things their hands like just any kind of art that that grabs. Your attention are falling over channels. You can in the more towns you follow them all the moral chopin. Your search results please are seeing all these have been cool cool things and then go reach out to the creators is Hey. Dot added created the image. That was amazing. Pay You whatever. Have you Chris on that for for me my company and like I said for us the pancake art? It was a couple hundred bucks per per book covering the turnout socal and who knows that could be the AD. That's the one that blows up. It's funny because I remember Folks are GONNA work a couple years ago. We had the harm brothers. Do our very first video with them. In turn amazing we loved it. We spent tons of energy and money. We just big launch with big bubble soccer also stuff in the did good he got on a million or so views and it was good And then like a week later Chris. Record Wrap Sunny D. rappers. Quick Funnels Rep and he just made it as as a joke. Essential get red and that and that video actually got more impressions. More views and more cells. Click funnels in this one. We'd spent hundreds of thousands of dollars creating so you never know what the hooks going to be created tons of hooks and try thing after thing after thing after thing just trying to think this is really fun unique way so for my side time embarrassing around like what I'm doing now is looking for artists. Who create little things that you a quick thirty second grab their tension just to tell your story and and and do the next thing

Instagram Chris Soccer Youtube Elsa Socal Facebook DOT
The Monster Slayer

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

11:27 min | 1 year ago

The Monster Slayer

"I want to tell you a story about a monster slayer Robert Are you game I am gay okay so once upon a time in medieval Japan there was a warrior named minimal oh no Raiko he was daring swordsman and he was famous everywhere for his bravery and his resolve and Reiko had in his service a companion named watanabe notes Suna who was also courageous and he was a formidable fighter in his own right and he wielded a bow and Arrow war suit of armor and they rake Oh and sooner were traveling on the road to key to Yama when they saw a skull floating in the sky flying in and out of the clouds above now sooner we're curious how such a thing could be so they decided let's follow the skull and they followed the flying skull all the way to Keg Arocca where it leads them to a crumbling old mansion from ancient times the decaying manor was surrounded by wild overgrown weeds in an old gate choked by vines so Reiko ordered Suna wait for him outside and Reiko entered the mansion alone as he approached the threshold he started to become aware of a presence there was an old woman lurking behind the door and he called out who are you she replied I've been living here for a good long time I am too hundred ninety years old and have served in their turn nine lords of this house and then Reiko saw her she was a horrible sight to behold before the war years is the old woman grasped her own eyelids with a tool and she flipped her eyelids back over the top of her head like a hat then she pushed her south open with a large hairpin and her lips became gigantic and she took her lips and she tied them around her own neck and her breasts began to sag down to her lap like rags the old woman began to speak again she said spring comes in autumn goes but my sad thoughts remain the same years again end but my misery is eternal this place is a demon's din no human dares pass through gates my sorrowful youth has gone but my old self sadly remains element that Bush warblers depart and swallows on the beam fly off in her sorrow the wretched old woman begged Reiko to killer with his award and put her out of her misery Reiko could see that the old woman was out of her mind so he left her alone and he instead decided to go into the house to see what had happened in salt the mystery of the flying skull and what was afflicting this woman making her think she lived demons den so he went inside the house and outside the sky grew dark and pherson winds begin to blow but soon awaited loyally for his master and inside the House Reiko began to hear the sounds of footsteps echoing like the beat of a hand drum then he saw coterie of spirits and goblins coming into the room with him but the creature didn't attack instead they only danced around and then after his fear before passing out through another door in their place came into the room a tiny woman no more than three feet tall but with a gigantic taste more than two thirds of her whole height and she had stick heavy eyebrows and when she opened her mouth Reiko could see her front teeth were black she wore we'll have an a red Hakima with nothing underneath her arms were so thin they were like strings and her skin was Pale as snowfall then that woman disappeared and Reiko realize don was nearing almost as soon as the strange woman left another woman came into the room this time the woman was graceful and calm and so beautiful that Reiko could barely believe his eyes he thought that this woman must be the true mistress of the old house finally coming out to welcome him and her is shown as bright as the reflection of a bonfire in black lacquer but when Reiko was distracted by the woman's beauty she got the better of him she lifts did up the him of her Hakima and from underneath it she heaved at the swordsman some kind of material what looks like balls of white cloud and the balls of white cloud blinded him they got his is in a rage Reiko drew his sword and a slashed the woman but she evaporated into thin air he slashed so mightily the soared passed through the floorboards and cut a foundation stone and the tip of the blade broke off where the woman had been there was now nothing but a pool of white blood on the floor with a trail of more white blood leading off somewhere else Reiko and soon joined together again and they followed the trail of white blood out of the else up into the mountains and finally to the mouth of a dark cave out of which white blood was flowing like a river at soon as suggestion the two of them made an effigy of written and vines in the shape of a man and they carried it before them as they enter the cave inside the cave they found a gigantic monster in the form of a mountain spider but nearly two hundred feet tall and wore a brocade on its head its eyes were as bright as the sun and the moon the giant monster bellowed what has happened to my body it is so painful then the monster hurled something at them in the dark and the projectile hit the effigy that they carried in front of them and knocked it down Reiko and SUNA examined the object the monster had shot at them and they discovered that it was the broken tip of Reiko says award together they took hold of the creature and they began to drag it out of the cave and the monster put up a good fight and it was a terrible monster indeed strong enough to with boulders with its legs so Reiko said a prayer to the sun goddess a Montereau sue and asked her for aid with the fight Reiko in Suna pulled and pulled actually the monster collapsed and fell belly up on the earth without hesitation Reiko drew his sword and chopped off the monster's head soon Aranda slash chopin the monster's belly but found when he got there that it had already been opened by a deep gash this was the wound Reiko had given it inside the house when it was in the former if the woman in this proved that the giant spider truly was the beautiful woman that he had seen from the gas in the giant spiders belly one thousand nine hundred the ninety heads tumbled out onto the ground the warriors cut open another part of the spider's body and many smaller spider monsters swarmed out each about the size as of a seven or eight year old child when the warriors looked further in the stomach of the spider beast they found twenty human skulls knowing what had to be done Reiko in Suna dug a grave in the ground and buried the twenty skulls and then burned the giant spiders din when the emperor heard but Reiko and soon had done in eliminating this heinous monster that had been plaguing the country he gave them promotions and appointed them governors of their own provinces and this is the story of Moton no Raiko and the giant spider that is a fabulous story I love it I just like the the the layers of the adventure and then just the the revelation ends about the horrific monstrosity that they're faced with I like how it's weird and rambling like it takes a long time to get to the final form of the monster you don't really know where it's GonNa go it takes you to a haunted house I something about that feels both unusual and intuitive the so that they start off seeing the skull and I have to assume that I guess the skull was some form of the monster I don't know but but also like how in a lot of the monster slayer stories you come across there's a more specific reason that the that the hero must undergo the quest to slay the monster that they have to rescue a princess or something right this time they're just detectives investigating something weird that they saw eventually leads them into the monster's cave to kill it which also ultimately kind of makes you feel bad for the monster like it didn't even kidnap anybody they knew they just like made their way to it seems to be entirely recreational on their part yeah well I mean I guess it kind of makes them like a some kind of roving police force almost in a way or maybe they just needed the experience points I mean that it's true so this giant spider story comes from an early fourteenth century Japanese picture scroll called the Sushi Goumas Soci- and the version of the worry that I read is as translated by the scholar Dr Nuriko T- writer who you've referenced on the show before I think in our episode about cuteness and monstrosity ooh that would make sense yeah so so my version of the story I just told was based on her translation of this fourteenth century scroll and this is not the only legend `bout giant spiders in early modern Japan the Sushi Ghouma were earth spider was a common monster found in no plays and in supernatural narratives in the following centuries but there are also other spider monsters like the ONI which was sometimes described as like a giant spider with the head of a bull and it attacks fishermen at the water's edge and there's also the jurors Ghouma which is the literally the prostitutes spider and it's another ghost like creature that appears in the literature of the Edo period shape shifting like the Sushi Boom Oh between the forms of a beautiful woman and a voracious arachnids luring men to their deaths a classic trope of of monsters appearing as is desirable humans or even non human entities of course and you see that too in in the Sushi in the story where the spider monster appears as this beautiful woman in the House and distracts the swordsman with her beauty Just long enough to throw clouds white matter in his eyes who knows what that's supposed to be I don't know if I guess it's the Silk Right Oh maybe yeah I don't know it's supposed to be I mean it's it's described as literally like clouds it's hard to know exactly what is referring to it seems to be some kind of magical substance all right yeah so we're doing something a little bit different today than we usually do in our October assode where we love to focus on monsters today we wanted to take a look at the immortal enemy of our beloved monsters the monster slayer Yeah the thing that defines the hero other times there's not a lot to say about the monster itself except certain hero of note gave it a good slaying at some point yeah and it's almost as deep and as old as the monster mythology itself ride the oldest monster stories you can find when you go back in time very often are Mr slayers stories there's a monster and there's a hero who must venture out often alone or with a faithful companion to face the monster and destroyed Royat in the monster slayer archetype is actually classed as a particular type of like myth archetype the the the princess in the Dragon type story which appears all all over the world in different cultures in you know in the that's the very broad take you know that there's like a princess who's being held captive or being threatened by some kind of monster and a hero must venture out with courage and face the

Japan Hundred Ninety Years Two Hundred Feet Eight Year Three Feet
Talking Tech with Richard Smith

Talking Tech

06:16 min | 2 years ago

Talking Tech with Richard Smith

"Tech today with my all time favorite guitar player. Richard Smith to just happens to be in California and really interesting guy because he travels seventy percent of the time and believe it or not have guitar will travel in his car from Nashville, and I'm talking to now in California. And the big question is how does one live with technology in the car? And I think it's called an iphone six fund six or whatever the latest one. I've gone. I find six I means everything only I can pretty much do everything on that. There's a certain there's a few things that having a laptop is is beneficial. I can pretty much do everything including Eddie, my website for the most. Adding certain photographs and send things make it a little easier on the laptop but seven probably seventy percent, sixty seventy or eighty percent of the stuff. I can do there's no laptop in your car. There is one in the back of my guitar case. Most of the time. Yeah. But there's not. Yeah. Yeah. That's always laptop in my car. It's too cumbersome to be traveling. Yeah, I find it so easy to do everything on while you're going down the road while my wife is driving not one I'm driving when she's with me. I can work in the cost. She's not, you know, it's just a heavy just playing YouTube on going through the the motion going through the motions of YouTube or I've got music on it. And so it just makes life easy. I've also go XM serious as well. That's that's a must for the car. You realize that I think so. Yeah, I mean, but sometimes I just don't want to hear anything sometimes. I just want to think my own stuff. What a think for myself instead of listening to somebody else coast. The news list of all of the news channels. Gotta gotta listen to all sides of all of that. And let's paint a picture for people because you're in California right now, you'll be leaving here and driving to Utah, New Mexico and Colorado to give gigs. Okay. So you really are the guy in the car what kind of car is this. We have a Toyota RAV four an icy drove out. I started in Nashville we played the Jerry re tribute show on September fifth went up the car. It's you your tar amp iphone six fund San. And and Mike's sim Mike, see, I may be a PI system. If I think I'm going to need it. Suitcase full of clothes cigar box. Those times off to the gate when you just want to just relax and may be has ago. If that's you'll think handle your bookings on the iphone six everything is done by Email for much. Yeah. Everything done by Email of everyone's oh it pretty much everyone's number eight mile or messenger Facebook messenger. I always a little people on social media that just. It's just so it's such a great time. It's such a great time. Every basically if people know you to the whole house concert thing is a big thing. These days is a lot of people doing that. You didn't have to be venue. You just need a roof and some power, and you do a lot of you do a lot of house concerts. I would say maybe forty percent of the gigs. I mean, I'm doing music shops smoke theaters festivals house, concerts. Workshops like this. Go f- clubs functions on it's just knowing. It's no in people, the the mortgage, you do the more people that know, you the more people, you know, in a certain area where you can just say, hey, any chance of a gig on this date. And if that person count, do you call someone else, the more people, you know, the more full your calendar becomes and then you can be the only reason I'm not working all the time is because I've got dogs at home. I'd never see them on. My wife is on on the road with me some of the time. I'd never say Hillary the so it's you just have to make a balance, and I've got a studio back in Nashville as well fifteen years ago when you were making the drive in driving all over the country compare what it's like today with keeping in touch with you versus what it was like back that didn't have a web. So you just have to know you had to know people you had to send out packages of with physical product and physical print. Just you don't need any of that stuff. These days not need any physical stuff. It's it's information that sent and then people could see you on YouTube, Facebook, all kinds of social media. It's just a much easier a much more independent world. The I think there are a lot more independent more independent artists than ever before. They don't even need independent labels fail. The label that just going to people like disk makers imprinting up CDs or even doing that. Just even those that that's outdated. These days people are just doing everything online. Downloads youtube. I mean, it's you need anything. You just need to know people in one gig leads to another to describe yourself. Now, I'm I guess I come from the Chet Atkins. Jerry Reed mull Travis and then kind of studied went down the Django Reinhardt off a little bit of what Brent's doing Oviously a big influence, the bluegrass guys. I'll I'll play Joplin rags skull Jobling, piano, rags on the guitar a place embark, and I'll play some standards. I gave some Beatles some Beatles and some Sousa marches, and you know, throw a little bit of fun comedy sewn. Then a little bit of blue. I try to mix it up anything from Mozart and Chopin to to the Beatles to two old southern fiddle tunes. Tell everybody had to hear you and see you on YouTube. Oh, they got you just such Richard Smith guitar, and I should come up check this. There's two or three Richard Smith's, make sure it's the right me by by going to Richard Smith music dot com to start with there'll be pages of maize, you know, which one it is on YouTube, and I've got the coast that will have got the YouTube channel WWW dot YouTube dot com slash Richard Smith music

Youtube Richard Smith Nashville California Facebook Beatles Chet Atkins Eddie Jerry Reed Toyota Joplin Mike SAN Sousa Hillary Oviously Brent
"chopin" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 2 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"I'm Naomi Lewin welcomed at classics for kids. Frederic Chopin was one of the greatest pianists of his day. Every single piece of music. He wrote used the piano. Chopin was born in eighteen ten in town just outside of Warsaw Poland, but his name doesn't sound very polish. That's because Chopin's poverty was born in France. He moved to Poland married, a polish woman and wound up staying for the rest of his life. Frederic Chopin did just the opposite of his father as a young, man. He moved to France and stayed there for the rest of his life. And he never got married. His mother was the one who introduced Chopin to the piano by the time. He was six Chopin not only played phenomenally. Well, he was also starting to compose. So his parents got him a music teacher. But he wasn't a pianist. He was violinist since Chopin's teacher couldn't really show him. How to play his instrument? He showed him what to play instead leading him through all kinds of keyboard music by great composers because he never had an expert piano teacher Chopin came up with his own unique style of playing. Chopin's family moved to Warsaw. And that's where he gave his first concert at the age of eight, but Chopin quickly found out that he didn't enjoy performing in public in spite of the fact that he was so famous he actually gave very few concerts for paying audiences. He preferred playing in private homes for small groups of friends. The time Chopin was twenty he was pretty bored with saw so he set off to seek his musical fortune in other European cities. He was a big hit, Indiana. But when Chopin reached Paris that's where he decided to stay first of all there was the French connection of his father's background also as much as he loved Poland Chopin hated the thought of going home. That's because there had been an unsuccessful revolution against Poland's Russian rulers who were now completely in charge. Chopin was very unhappy thinking of the country he loved being dominated by Russia. There's a story that when Chopin left Poland some friends gave him a silver goblet full of polish soil, which he carried around with him for the rest of his life. That's probably not true, but Chopin did continue to be a passionate polish patriot. Even though he never returned to his native country. Chopin made a big splash in Paris. So even though he didn't like giving concerts. He had no trouble making a living. Lots of people bought the music. He wrote then took very expensive piano lessons from him. While he was in France Chopin had an interesting girlfriend named George actually her name wasn't really George. It was ovo French for Aurora since back, then it wasn't acceptable for a woman to be a writer of oh do devoe wrote under the name Josh song, George sand. Sometimes she even dressed like a, man. Frederic Chopin was never healthy when he was only thirty nine. He died of Burke, yellow sus. He was buried in France and special box of polish earth was imported to sprinkle on his grave, but Chopin ask to have his heart removed put in an urn and sent to Warsaw you can still see it there in the church of the Holy Cross. one kind of piece that polish composer Frederic Chopin. Especially liked writing was the pollen is a polish dance. The military Pullen is by Frederic Chopin. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim Lander at WG UC Cincinnati next time on classics kids more about the Pullin as I hope you can join me then.

Frederic Chopin France Chopin Warsaw Poland Naomi Lewin France Warsaw Paris devoe Tim Lander Indiana Cincinnati Pullen Pullin George sand Aurora writer Josh George
"chopin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We're going onto Brahms. And I had a question about this. You you this piece you wrote he produced dozens of piano miniatures, what's panel miniature. We've just heard a very non miniature piano concerto. The the leaps just the sort of bombastic virtuosity of what the pianist needs to do to be able to play cannon concerto like the one we just had and this is kind of indirect I suppose opposition to that. So miniatures probably solo it's probably small much smaller scales. So shorter briefer. Maybe just more intimate in feel does a composer Chopin who writes a lot of Nocturnes and things that we might describe as manager. I kind of have a bit of a problem with the title because I think it sounds diminutive. It sounds as if somehow it lesser in stature just because it's smaller in scale. And I think what these pieces by Brahms actually prove that things can be short and sweet, and they can still have real emotional and musical impact as he wrote a series of these. These intimacy to the end of his life. He wrote to his great love and mies Clark Shimin. He was writing for himself alone. So problems throughout his life had written huge, large-scale concertos, not just for piano, but farther instruments to he'd written four phenomenal symphonies he'd written lots and lots of these kind of epic masterpieces. And then it's like when he gets was the end of his life. What does he want to do? He wants to write these very personal and intimate and meditative pieces, really. And I think that they really exude this lullaby. Like tenderness he wants her to cradle songs of my sorrows. And there is this wistfulness that as these flights of the imagination that he can take on that. There is something so poignant and bittersweet about them. And I find them just always moving Brahms died on the third of April. Which is why I chose this piece for the third of April. Just reflective and just a little thick of musical solid. I think..

Brahms mies Clark Shimin Chopin
"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Mark that in turn would fuel a great interest in the instruments that play was manufacturing at that time. So it was a very very clever marketing stroke that play all the manufacturer didn't even quite realize himself, Paul of the twenty four Chopin prelude. The first one is one of the easiest, and it's also one of the most beautiful. How do you like number one number one is of course, an absolute tribute to the first priority in bucks, forty eight. And so it's almost Chopin sitting out she stole just sort of saying these are a tribute to this great collection that came before me. But Bach would not have had the opportunity to do rebuttal. Like you could do in the romantic age. Isn't that true? That senator. And of course, wasn't riding on piano. Was right. Hang on harpsichord Faden have behind him. He didn't have the dynamic contrast, either, no dynamic contrast is one of the things that shop on almost goes out of his way to establish the project, partly because they're also fleeting. Some of them are already. Forty seconds long and the longest one is only about four and a half minutes. So he's sitting to try and paint from the most enormous palace onto the the largest possible canvas. Even though, you know, sometimes he's got forty seconds to do it. These prelude by their name. They were supposed to be fun little amused bushes. But people are putting them all together and playing the whole thing as a collection that belongs together. Is that right? That's right. I mean, it was Andre GD who said prelude to what? But that's not how Chopin thought, and he also didn't think of them as a collection of twenty four that started happening late in the nineteenth century, he thought of them as just a little collection. So you might to four of them related by key. Or you might do two of them that are related by particular interval character. So it's not Chopin who said we must perform these as twenty four. But now, you would be very rare to hear them performed in. Any other way, always has them in the concert hall is a collection of twenty four. And of course, today were overwhelmed by an abundance of channels and back then they didn't. Have one channel? They didn't have any channels. It was gathered around the parlour light the candles, and let's listen to the piano player. That's actually, right. And of course, Chopin emerge from that particular Parisian culture, the salon culture, where people did expect, you know, wonderful witty conversations lovely one. But then also at some point composer like a Chopin and an pianist Chopin would sit down and play and that would be the reward at the end of the evening, a beautiful man who runs a little guest house in Warsaw recreate those salon evenings with a young pianist playing Chopin it's just gathering together. Keeping it simple being in the moment and focusing on the music, and that actually is the most beautiful idea as well because we have moved so far away from the intimate settings way. Where you feel as though you could just touch the music that very very intimate. Salone culture is something I enjoy funding myself went on travel. Paul killed eight. You have inspired me to go home and work on my scales. So I can play one of those prayers one of the more difficult keys. Thank you, very, much.

Chopin Paul Mark Andre GD senator Bach Warsaw Forty seconds forty seconds
"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"So those are the things that I find more interesting just than tracing a particular artillery that composer or performance may have followed himself. It is there's something to be said for letting the the musical experience become even more sensual by being in the same spot or being in architecture that fits the music. And so on one of my favorites was on the fjord in Norway looking out from the concert hall to the cabin where Greek was inspired to write surrounded by that fewer beauty, and then the grand piano is right there with a big glass wall, and you see the fjords and you hear the the pianist play the great Greek concertos or we can go to the great opera halls in Vienna. And Milano and imagine the performances that debuted right there near sitting there enjoying it today. This is travel with Rick steves. We're talking with Paul day. His book is Chopin's, piano. And Paul it is remarkable to think that una godforsaken little corner of the Mediterranean. Of course, it's not godforsaken day because everybody loves it. It's resort. But back then it sounded like a pretty humble place Daland of yorker Chopin, he wished he had his better piano there. But on a ratty little local, piano. Composed a series of preludes that really had an impact on Mandic music and music ever. After took a little bit about. This accomplishment. He set out to write a prelude in each of the twenty four possible keys C C sharp. Dee Dee sharp is is that right? That's exactly right in the major in mind of each of those case, why for one thing would you do that Bach? Did it with the well, tempered Clavier, right? Yeah. And back was a great idol of Chopin's and the only school that Chopin had with him in my Oko. We know was the forty-eight president Fuchs and testimony from his pupils Chopin's pupils suggests that Bach was taught all the time in their lessons that Chopin whenever he was about to give a recital would play the buck privates in Fuchs from memory. So they will inside his head. And this was a way of making a homage to Bach. And no one had done it on any significant scale since Bach. Social fan was doing something that was looking back in a way that composes weren't yet looking back to buck. So he was standing very much outside the romantic gnomes of his generation. And as I said before also looking forward. Towards the musical Debussy, for instance, and other composers who would also think that a collection of produce in all the case was a a wonderful exercise. But of course, in the twentieth century, they will also not just tipping that kept Bach. But then tipping that kept by that stage to Chopin in when we look back at it today. One hundred fifty or more years later, it's important for us to try to remember how exciting it must have been for an artist composer to be able to create music like that and then perform it. There was no electricity. There were no records the had to be in a big city to hear an orchestra. It really was piano that brought the joy of music to people in humble communities all over Europe. That's exactly right. And what happens and what I try sit in the book is the explosion both in technology and interest in piano, making in the second half of the nineteenth century, and in some senses Chopin was slightly left behind by these much larger German instruments and the very. Kind of personal and intimate music making that he was used to and that he much preferred was overtaken by these great instruments, these large concert halls, the fascination and Chopin's music and also the explosion in domestic music making at the end of the nineteenth century and all these things wrapped together and overtook the very intimate experience that shop on had as a performer and that people heard Chopin's time when hey dined to play and this was eighteen thirty nine and I understand from your book that play L actually commissioned show pen to write these preludes. It almost seems like it served their marketing needs to be able to have a great composer produce a series of prelude. That would help their piano really be an end in itself. That's true. Although because these pieces was so ahead of their time. Play L didn't realize of course, they would come to be so famous and so part of the domestic..

Chopin Bach Dee Dee sharp Rick steves Norway Milano Paul Vienna Mandic Europe Fuchs Oko president
"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"And not really play a great role in the romantic music scene in Paris at the time. And so he left that more to list who'd come through town and a lot of the other pianists at the time who were forging big careers there. And as railway started coming, which they did in his time in Paris and opened up the whole recital network in the mid nineteenth century Chopin wasn't playing a part of that. And was quite happy to let. Others to it. But it was definitely a very stimulating time for when he first arrived in Paris in nineteen thirty one. He was overwhelmed by the quality and the array of music at the opera, the orchestra, etc. To he came from Warsaw to Paris could have gone to Vienna. And he chose to go to Paris did the Parisian music scene and cultural scene would have rivaled Vienna at that time or even exceeded it. Yes, I think exceeded it. He did spend a little bit of time in Vienna on route to Paris, but it was very very different. I was just kind of slightly more conservative and constrained, and whereas Paris somehow just suited him slightly largest city. He found himself very quickly in the sort of aristocratic Milia of the town. I'm was greatly in desire is a teacher of these aristocratic pupils that children. So it just kind of suited him. Didn't he miss that? I mean, New York must have been a way out in the in the boonies culturally are was it a place where cultural people would go and gather, I know in. In the eighteen hundred the olive Cup, ry was a gathering place for the oven card was there that kind of cultural sort of edginess about me arc or was it just a playoff. He went for health reasons. No, absolutely not. And I'm not even sure people really went for health reasons. It was just this idea that sauntered come up with late usually how to bet climate at that time of year, which is November December this year. Of course, it happened to have a very terrible winter. This is travel with Rick steves. We're talking with Paul Kildee about his book Chopin's, piano, it talks about that romantic music scene in the early eighteen hundreds and also traces Chopin's piano after Chopin died. I mean, we're we're third of the way through the book, Paul and Chopin's dead and the book carries on and suddenly the main character is the piano itself where did show pens, lousy, New York in piano, the bows, piano travel, and how could that be the sort of what carries the the whole story for you? The piano remains in may ochre in in the cell in which Chopin and sand lived until nineteen eleven and nineteen Levin. The rather wonderful polish harpsichordist vandal and Oscar was in may orca giving concerts, and because she was polish because she was a great grand pupil of shop on because she felt hugely the nationalist ownership if you lock shop on she travels up to velva, Mosa funds the piano there and office to buy. And the owner refuses to sell it. But then two years later agrees, and so the piano is shipped to lend Oscars place in Berlin where it's further graft rather beautifully and that's the photograph. Actually, that's on the front cover of the book. There remains until after the wall where landscape takes a position in Paris. And so the piano moves with her to Paris, and then in nineteen twenty six she buys us, rather wonderful little villa in the north of Paris in Sunday's LA foray..

Paris Chopin Vienna New York Rick steves Milia Warsaw Paul Kildee Berlin Mosa Oscar LA two years
"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"So it's case by case. But in show pens case, the instrument was paramount to how the pace turned out. There's more intimate with Paul kill days. He takes us on the search for the instrument that transformed music, which he writes about in Chopin's, piano. It's travel with Rick steves. We're entering the world of composer Frederic Chopin right now travel with Rick steves with our guest. Paul killed day Paul's a conductor and writer from Melbourne Australia for many years, he headed arts festivals and performance than us in England. And he's authored several books about composer Benjamin Britten in pulse. Historical narrative Chopin's piano, in search of the instrument that transformed music, even the piano is have stories to tell us. We learn what the composer had to endure to produce revolutionary music for the romantic age, Paul when we think about music and travel after all this is at travel show. I love the way composers are inspired by their heritage by their environment by their love. And when we think about Chopin, it's a big combination of that. When you go to Warsaw, you see memorial to Chopin the beloved composure of the country, even though he spent most of his career outside of Poland. And it's the willow tree blowing. Over his head in this big black statue have you been there and seen that statue? Yes. Indeed. Yes. What I've heard is that it's when he was in Paris. They'll never forget the sound of the wind blowing through the willow trees in his homeland. And he kind of Poland with him. An interesting thing about Chopin is that not so much in his lifetime. But in the second half of the nineteenth century different countries definitely wanted to claim him. So Russia and Poland wanted to claim him Paris thought it should be able to claim him Germany thought that it should be able to claim him because Germany was the custody, and if you like of high art and great romantic movement in music and England also had a York want him Milkin never kind of really knew what to do with him. And not least. Because of course, Joe son wrote a memoir of the time, you know, a winter in my ochre of their time, the which excoriates the locals, and which was incredibly rude about the people that she encountered on the and the experiences that they had the so my Okafor longtime felt very. Sensitive, of course, my yard is big Mediterranean party destination. Now, how was it in the middle of eighteen hundred eighteen hundreds when when Chopin went there he would have taken a boat from Barcelona? That's actually, right. He took a boat from buffalo and the journey took around eighteen nineteen hours a very primitive. It was a walled town. And so the the walls that you can see that today. Completely contained the town as it existed. And of course, he stayed there for a week or so and then moved outside the city of Parma, and then later moved up the mountain to also which is full monastery where they took a sale, and we're originally planning to stay there for a year. And the monastery itself is now incredibly popular it has been Chopin museum that has all these artifacts and letters and copies of manuscripts etcetera. So that's rather beautiful, and you can catch a train, which didn't exist in show pens time. Of course, this lovely decker train up the hill from Pomme. To Solaire, and it's a very very beautiful and over these lovely equifax and through these little tunnels. He's actually very very beautiful, but she'll spends time, of course, far more primitive. And that's of course, why they're there wasn't really an industry for concerts and piano, making it cetera. So that's why Chopin ends up on this very primitive instrument. Now, Paul you write about how Chopin went to me orca for health reasons to leave drizzly Perez, and he got me orca hoping for sunshine, and it wasn't as nice as he thought for his health, and he stayed sickly..

Frederic Chopin Paul Chopin museum Rick steves Poland Benjamin Britten Paris England Solaire Warsaw Pomme Joe son Germany Melbourne Australia Parma writer Perez York Barcelona Milkin
"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"But she brought about going down into Pomme from Valda Masa, which is the lovely monastery in which Chopin and son were living throughout this winter to try and affect the release of the play piano. That was a terrible rainstorm and the trip that should've taken just a few hours ended up taking seven hours. But when she came back, she saw Chopin at the bows, piano, playing a piece that she'd never heard before. And it was the raindrop. And that's where she points out to him that the the repeated note, it was xactly replicating, the rhythm of the rain hitting the tiles in the in the monastery, which is where the the piece code its nickname from. But yes, she wrote about this in some detail. I just love that. When you travel you. Visit the homes and the places where great musicians were inspired to write their music, and whether it's on a fjord with Edvard Grieg are wondering through Vienna with Beethoven are waking up in Salzburg with Mozart you're saying that a composer like Chopin would be out in nature collecting, ideas working this out, and then he'd go home, and like we would go to a desk to write. He would go to his Pagnotta. Right. And he was sitting there frustrated because he was dealing with this. Makeshift temporary, piano. Waiting for the good one to come in on that panel. He wrote a collection of prelude that really changed music, piano history and a lot of ways. Well, they really did let's deal with the products themselves, which since Bach who died almost one hundred years before shop on was in Melaka no-one really was rotting preludes, and if they were they'll very primitive things, and here's Chopin kind of looked back to buck. But also looked forward to the works of shimmer. Ski and Dubose e in the twentieth century. So they're very unusual pieces in themselves. And then as you say, he would have these ideas, and these inspirations when he was walking his very internal, man. He's life was lived very very much inside. He's head and then would come and work away at the piano. And then Sandra also describes how this initial burst of inspiration would then take him days and days often weeks where he wrestled to try and get back the original inspiration and have it into shape on paper in the pieces that we know now this is so new to me to think that the actual finished product would have been shaped to a certain degree not by the inspiration of the artist. But by a combination of what the artists are the composer was inspired to write and the personality of the piano. He's working on. I know that if I came home and wasn't spared to right in the head of Stein way, might be more brilliant piece in if I had a Berge Darfur. It might be a more slinky are romantic piece. So we can see that in me orca. We can see that in Chopin is that something. That we can learn in apply to appreciating music beyond Chopin. It really depends. For instance, people like Benjamin Britten another composer. I've written very much about did the same walks shop, and did, you know still enjoyed walking along the shingle beach in albrough in Suffolk in the UK. But he actually would shape all the works in his head. And then would actually not go back to his piano. He would go to disk, and the the shape is the piece was already completely formed in east head, and he'd sit down then and rice, and it was all just kind of in his head. And there are lovely stories about him being in America, actually and Aaron Copland so him orchestrator at the very complex orchestral piece of his while holding a conversation with those around him because it was all just so automatic to him..

Chopin Valda Masa Benjamin Britten Edvard Grieg Aaron Copland Salzburg Suffolk UK Pagnotta Sandra Vienna Ski Melaka Bach America Stein Beethoven Mozart one hundred years seven hours
"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"It's a great surprise to any outsider who's never been there. Coming up. Also, learn about the remarkable history. Paul killed day puts together in his book Chopin's, piano, the composer who made the piano sing with emotional depth had to overcome a lot the winter. He went to my Llorca to work Chopin is composing on this local piano, which causes him more Vic sation than pleasure searching for Chopin's, piano and feeling the optimism in Armenia. It's just ahead on travel with Rick steves. It's quite a story to tell Paul kill days. Book ever gets made into a movie the characters in Chopin's, piano would include the revolutionary, but frail composer, his siemian lever entrepreneurial, piano makers and even plucky polish harpsichordist outrunning Nazi looters and France. It's also topic dear to my heart since I started out of college as a peon not teacher. Hi, I'm Rick steves. Stay with us as we explore. The search for Chopin's piano from Poland to Paris, New York, ending Linda a little later in the hour ahead on today's travel with Rick steves, let's start with some good news out of a part of the world that sees more than its share of conflict. One of the oldest societies in the world has just replaced its old guard Soviet style government. Thanks in large part to the democratic aspirations of its tech savvy. Millennials Armenia has just undergone its own velvet revolution all without firing a single bullet as you can tell by his family name. Peter Blake ins ancestors came to America from Armenia today. Peter's professor of humanities at Colgate university in upstate New York. A few years ago, he won a Pulitzer prize for the poems. He wrote after excavating the bones of victims of the nineteen fifteen Armenian genocide recently, Peter wrote for the New York Times about a new sense of optimism. He found on his latest trip to Armenia, Peter. This is exciting to hear about this new energy and Armenia. Well, it seems very hopeful. You know, you never liked to predict the future and political and social change are never simple and can undergo various chapters in Volusia in. But it certainly a hopeful time and a moment in which at least one can feel or look on and see some of the processes of democracy working. And that's always exciting. That was the spring of twenty eighteen and you were there just after that. Yes. I. I was there in early June just after this political transition had taken place and the last time I had been there two thousand sixteen so just about two years before. There really was a feeling of excitement and optimism among people people everywhere that you spoke with we're just registering a sense of excitement, and you know, one wants to be cautious because again changes slow and complex and the emotional excitement of having this political change happened was really discernible everywhere. And there's a great time to be there. And I think it still is a great time to be there in your New York Times article, you mentioned how well you credited the younger generation with replacing their old style. What they considered corrupt national leadership. How is the younger generation connected to the rest of the world. How was it the younger generation that brought this change? I do wanna be, you know, nuance to noting that wasn't only the younger generation, but they have been noted as being primary forces and sources of agency in this process. They did a lot of their. Organizing, and they're gathering, and they're they're reaching each other through the internet and social media this, you know, enabled them to accelerate perhaps a process that could have taken longer in another era. I'm not totally optimistic about reality of the digital age, the darkness is of it and the damage that it does is also there, but there also these very positive kinds of dimensions to digital life. For me. This is a travel show. And I've always been just curious about Armenia visited Armenian sites in Turkey. And a lot of people don't even consider going to Armenia, but I've talked to people who've been to our meaning they say, well, why not it's great it's welcoming. There's there's no reason not to go to Armenia Armenia borders Turkey on the northeast is that right? Well on on Armenia's southwest, you're right turkeys, northeast Armenia, and then Georgia on it's sort of. Of north west. And then as they're by John on its east and Iran on its south. That's that's neighborhood..

Armenia Chopin Rick steves Peter Blake New York Times New York Paul Pulitzer prize Volusia professor of humanities Colgate university France Turkey Iran Poland Vic sation Paris America John
"chopin" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"In San's description of it. That's of course where the storm starts in raindrops and she describes how she came back from trying to get the new French Pinault out of customs in Palmer and comes through this incredibly awful storm that lasts for seven hours of the trip last seven hours instead of the customary to. And she comes back and find him playing this new piece. And that's the piece that she says. It was so yes, he was playing, I think, you know, with the instrument with its temperament with some of the influences that he was hearing around him all put through that Marvel's filter of his that came out with this release, Donna Shing collection of pieces. It wasn't just Pinos that was at the nineteenth century music got steadily bigger and louder. Was this being driven basically by technology or is it economics? It's both actually, and you have someone like list saying, okay, I don't want to do what Trump does which is play for small salons and very, very select gatherings. I want to play in big concert halls and earn a lot of money. And so he's of course, one of the key figures pushing the advancement of technology ever requiring bigger and larger things. And I think it's only because in the eighteen fifties list starts to concentrate more on composing rather than playing that the advancement and the enlargement of the piano didn't even didn't happen. Even a little sooner. There is the sense of that PNO's are having to fill largest basis and these small French instruments that Chopin life so much weren't necessarily going to be up to the task and you have this whole blossoming of recital culture in the eighteen fifty s and eighteen sixties throughout Europe and pianos having to kind of now fill these calls. And as soon as Stein way comes up with these very famous patient in the eighteen fifty nine for cross strung grand piano. All bets are off by that stage and people madly scrambled either to try and keep up with Stein way or to resist fifthly. These changes at has the piano get bigger and louder. The preludes. Get bigger allowed and with them. That's exactly and this is of course what vonda lamb Oscar thought that that people were playing the pros in a way that was quite foreign to how Chopin would have played it. And I think that's it that people didn't really know what to do. These beautiful little miniatures and they decided that they had to be something far bigger than the sum of their parts. And so you start first of all about the eighteen seventies you start hearing the twenty four being played a group something Chopin never did. And then also being played in a way that just kind of tried to fill the space and the instruments of the time. And so I've got this lovely line in the book by Malcolm Gillies music historian where he says, Chopin grew away from the piano after his death. But I say actually it's more accurate that the piano grew away from shopping. So what way does that actually translate for the music? How would I Rubinstein or Pedder ski? How would they be playing differently to the way they might have been imagined in Chopin's head. It just did actually become a bigger just became bigger and louder and faster. It was on regime who said, I wish that I could just print on every score of Chopin slowly just take take more time to think about this, but then there are contradictions in that route. Kozelsk who was a very, very brilliant young pianist, who was a grant pupil of shop pans, he played things incredibly differently. If you think of the fourth produce, which he wrote in may orca which way used to today hearing something like this. Kozlovsky played it like this..

Chopin Palmer Stein Malcolm Gillies San Pinos Trump Kozlovsky Europe Marvel Donna Shing Kozelsk Oscar Rubinstein Pedder seven hours
"chopin" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"It's almost an exact imprint of what shop then gets up to into in into his in the c major that opens his collection. There also the lesson things dislike tonality. If you think of the end of the fifteenth prelude that Chopin road the so-called raindrop. It's so in that key, and it's just it's absolutely the same way that Bach wraps himself around the key in his prelude in the same key. Cetera. So he has he's tribute to Bach on his hero in lots of different ways, and they're obviously lots of different influences in the cost of these pieces. But those are just some examples of the way that the buck was inside his DNA as much as the piano that he was writing them on, ends up inside the predators. Well, they seem both of exactly the same world and yet entirely different. The interesting thing about the shop on of the pros is that he looked back to bark and also prefigured people like and Szymanski and composers who in the twentieth century. All the very end of the nineteenth century said a, we also would like to write our homages to toback. But also by the end of the nineteenth century there also rotting their homogeneous Chopin. Chopin was very isolated in his Salem isolation. It's almost unimaginable today, so no smartphone who radio gramophone did this seclusion leave some kind of Mark on the pellets. I'm not sure about that. It seems as though shop on even though he was very good company, but even even when he was with. If people and in salons and all the rest of it in his normal life in Paris, there was still an isolation and exclusion in the way he thought, and the way he he interacted. So he internalized all of the patterns of composition. It's a north shore that Valda Mosser in that regard influenced him. It did actually owning the sense that it allowed him to step outside. He's normal life and mostly normal life consisted of teaching lots and lots of not terribly tone pupils just so that you could earn money. Don't forget that. He wasn't like list a great showman and recitals. And if he had been hit, of course not have to teach it all and would have just made our money from doing a very large scale recitals. So there was a sense that D'amoto allowed him just to concentrate on composing and that was unusual for him. But I think he's character was more or less the same there as it was in Paris, which is very kind of focused and withdrawn and serious musician. You paint a very striking pick. Of his compositional process of music pouring out from him..

Mark Chopin Bach Paris Valda Mosser Szymanski Salem
"chopin" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

Watch What Crappens

05:16 min | 3 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

"If I had a door covered in Chopin dead on a Cup, cats, the teenager looking at her like she's a monster. So it started. You feel lucky the great composers Chopin has appeared at my window. Whatever. Go away chopping whatever. Moats are visiting together. Dan, I was like. I wish it was Sally era for Abraham would come. He'd be like, Hello. Abraham, i'm. Also, and I've gotten Oscar. Anybody would be questions. He'll be a little cockatoo tweet jacket, I'm here. I'm cooking. Distinguish bird and I'm here to say Hello, Kelly. Hello. I've got caulking my name. So, yeah, so Shannon Kelley, I think you're in a phone in Shannon's like, man, I'm comfortable with my body. I don't even wanna see me. Why would I wanna take our cloud. But if you have confidence and Shannon says, my favorite Vander pump rules line, she's like, I'm a catch the catch. I was told so many years. I'm fat and we're facing scratchy. And then she hobbles off on crutches into the kitchen. Dicta Hannah. So yeah, I missed all this like just cut the direct TV just cut all this out of her crying. It was just basically where they're crying and they both were like they both want partners can. Now they both crying, that's that's where I picked up on it. Again. It was weird because she says, I was told so many years. I'm fat basically, and then they cut to the scene from last season. We're David sitting at the table in her mom and kids are there, and he's like, well, maybe that's because you never took the silver spoon out of your mouth, which I think he was talking about her being rich. But I think she just heard the spoon part still mad about. Why would I ever take. Fast thing I've ever take a spoon out of my mouth. Oh, well, I'll tell you something about sliver spoons rookie Schroder. And Kelly's like I've heard all those things to Shannon. Now, listen Thursdays, I cry there. I get the bras. And it's another both cry get this club that's the hip and get laid. And then Shannon's like the best and right thing is happening for the boast of it. I mean best and right thing is happy for the both. David. Shannon's shaking, you're shaking your like. I can't stop saying it. Well, who would have thought Bush shows you can you can evolve? I mean, look at the both of us didn't hear together me. I've got military patches now. I've served I've served and I'm a loyal soldier to lock ladies around. So they decide their friends, you know, they're officially friends now, and then the camera crew leaves like Dick's because they always do this. They leave right before it gets good. Like we catch him crying and then it turns out the rest of the night. They went fucking crazy. Got on Snapchat or Instagram or something. He's got a silver spoon, tweet me whatever they were saying, you know, got on their totally wasted. Oh God. Yeah, I'm so upset. I do feel like sometimes sometimes I feel like, Bravo, why are you not putting up like little, go pros around, you know, like the bow right from hill. Why are there not tons of little cameras around even when the camera crew down their cameras is, you know, cameras were still rolling. We needed to see all of that. Yeah, I agree. Gets pros guys up your budge. Speaking of going pro going on Tea-king. It's Gina, and she's with a friend Tatyana and they're in an antique store. Antique shop somewhere in Orange County. And I don't know if you noticed it, but there was a cameo from favorite Orange County, mythical creature puppy. The buffalo. Oh, I did not notice. Yeah, there was a big old buffalo head and all that was missing, Meghan king Edmonds, putting up her child to it and going puppies. It's a buffalo magazine. Buffalo don't go bumpy, but people below for kids going to grow so confused. Very much. So trash, trash receptacles is going to be like those where you came from, they stored this firm and put it in the back seat to drive to the crime when acre, whatever. So mar antique ball and Tatyana like God, everything. He looked so old. And yeah, it's caught in t. Love this Hodge own Legua. I wanna get this can put a tag on all my God. You know, it's gonna be mid loop as birthday, so I wanna get a reprint. She's any. And let me tell you it's a mom and out..

Shannon Kelley Abraham David Kelly Tatyana Chopin Moats Dan Oscar Sally era Orange County Instagram buffalo magazine Bush Dick Hannah Meghan king Edmonds Hodge Vander Gina
Why wear sunscreen? Your skin absorbs 50% more UV radiation without it

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

08:35 min | 3 years ago

Why wear sunscreen? Your skin absorbs 50% more UV radiation without it

"Right. Now Morning show he's a noted, cardiologists author of many books and again our resident doc on the morning show, how, you doing Dr. Freed good morning Brian Dr debunk. Here, I'm ready. To keep. Them honest yeah Dr debunk all right you. Gotta, debunk some stuff for us here again it is summertime and the first thing I think about what I think of. Summer and I think, of a, health I'm, thinking my skin my skin So let's talk about sunscreen doc you gotta. Give us the one-two-three, on sunscreen Yeah. Okay so you know Brian most people stay Yeah I don't use it never. Wore this stuff it's too much of a. Hassle. So. Let me ask, you, katie's wearing sunscreen Ultraviolet radiation the type that. Causes melanoma the deadly form of skin cancer How? Much more ultraviolet? Radiation. Does your skin absorbed permitted without sunscreen than katie's does. With sunscreen okay we'll? Just say twice as much five times as much what do you, think, I guess many, more times I have no idea whether it's two three four or five but it's got to be just a, lot? More and, you know that I'm very, sensitive to this issue doctor right so Brian the answer is fifty five. Your skin absorbs fifty times more. Alterra violent radiation per minute without, sunscreen so it's, rule number one blind. When, you're out in the sun riding your. Bike taking a walk, grilling remember, sunscreen is the best life, insurance policy your money can gosh And and you know just, don't do it enough at it requires some discipline I mean you've gotta just. Be. Determined when you leave the house you're going, to have. Applied the sunscreen and let's be, realistic the vast majority of us, don't do that, well it's true and even the people that do it Bryan they don't do it? The right way? That's. What we were talking about the Ford melanoma rates are. Skyrocketing even though people? Are wearing more sunscreen than ever before the two things you need, to, remember is to, lay it on thick if you lay let's say SPF thirty on it's essentially SPF zero and the other thing, is? Reapplying when, you're out in the sun, every two hours you have SPF one hundred on an after two hours. Essentially wearing SPF zero okay so. Folks we've got to wear the, sun say screen, we've got to apply. It, regularly and this takes a little work. A little disciplined but This is serious business melanoma it is. This. Is a cancer that if it strikes who, man unique. Great medical care and you need, some prayers this this is a, fast mover isn't, it It really, is Brian so there there's a couple of things, that you need to know, about this I you know look it runs in. Your family it runs family Troy Aikman, had it, but it. Doesn't need to run in your family it can. Strike, anyone, at any time any eight even teenagers so. I everyone needs to be. On the lookout second Brian. You talked about how. Serious this can be an early detection is key listen to. This number ninety five, percent cure rate it's. Melanoma is discovered early less than twenty percent survival rate if it's discovered late So what how. Do we discovered, early doc what do, we look for you I mean you know this. Is something we can actually do before, getting into, a doctor's. Office right absolutely so examine your skin monthly from. Head, to, toe for new spots or changing the way. Brian the most common location. For melanoma in men is. On the back and. See your doctor you know like you do professionally once a. Year for an exam Right it's on your back you can't see you're you're not gonna see. That in, the mirror somebody else's got to see that for you The back so in, men it's the back, but the Brian it can Chopin. Unusual places well between your toes on your? Poems. On the bottom of. Your feet even on. Your eyelids you really need to check everywhere have someone. Else look at it for you So with, the guys on the back generally speaking with a woman whereas it more more often found more. Often it's on the arms and. The legs. It. Can also be on, the, back legs but you can. Find Brian I had a a patient? Who, was a teenager shaved his head for the swim team, and discovered melanoma. Scalp so it can pop up, anywhere you? Really, need to. Pay attention be, careful okay so, we're talking summertime, summertime and we're talking about. Sunscreen, can we talk please about drinking driving listen Katie and I are, just not fans in, any way shape or form how. Many times if you heard you know yeah Yeah We had a few glasses of, wine some guy, that's you, know out to. Dinner, yeah I'm gonna drive. Home I'm. Fine plus I don't live very far. Away. Sure you hear all the regular just had a couple of. Beers just a couple of glasses of. Wine it's a quick drive home at. Cetera. Right what about? That you put guys like that in a driving simulator and there's three times more likely to crash, now that's the same guy who, says, yeah I'm. Fine and it takes him twice as long to break that's an extra five car lanes to. Stop so Brian rule number, three if you've been, drinking even if you think you can, drink you can, drive you can't so. Don't. Okay how do? You how do you get the alcohol to pass through your? System people would, say, well let's just have a couple of, coffees but that's not the. Trick what how long does it take for this alcohol to get out of your system before you could get back behind the? Wheel. Yeah, well alcohol is absorbed into your system. Within Thirty minutes of Of drinking so you don't how guys try to put food in their stomach to. Absorb the alcohol. It's already gone. It's too late that doesn't work To get it out of your system the only thing that can. Do it is. A king of. Time I mean There's really no way to sober. Up you know a lot of guys Brian Delco coffee or you know I'm gonna have. Some coffee or energy? Drinks let me. Ask, you and Katie coffee energy drinks helpful. Harmful or no impact on driving what would you say I'd say. No yeah I don't think it's any impact I think the boozers in your system and. Your drove the damage is done. Okay it's actually more dangerous when you drink coffee now here's what you right you guys. Are right I you'll caffeine doesn't sober, you up, your less sleepy your, judgment motor skills, are just as, here's why it's more dangerous because you feel. More alert you may think you've sobered up so you have one more for the road. Which makes it even? More dangerous to. Drive Oh my gosh okay Yeah yeah okay if you, have sobered us up so. Here's Dr Mark freed we're talking about wearing sunscreen when ever you're spending time, out in the sun have your skin examined on a regular basis, yearly by a physician for sure every month by somebody including yourself to look for changing spots and then. Hand over the keys, if you've been drinking no matter how alert you feel that we. Got that, covered doc I mean that's what we really need to do here. As a couple summertime. Tips? On case Afo. Right. You've got it Brian remember, to play it safe that light at the, end of the. Tunnel maybe a. Train Pre, k. SEAFO strength Plus plan.

Brian Katie Brian Dr A. Hassle Brian I Brian Delco Troy Aikman Dr. Freed Bryan Ford Dr Mark Caffeine Two Hours Thirty Minutes Twenty Percent
Frederic Chopin Left His Heart in Poland

Classics for Kids

00:46 sec | 3 years ago

Frederic Chopin Left His Heart in Poland

"Healthy when he was only thirty nine he died of burke yellow sus he was buried in france and a special box of polish earth was imported to sprinkle on his grave but chopin ask to have his heart removed put in an urn and sent to warsaw you can still see it there in the church of the holy cross one kind of piece that polish composer

Naomi Lewin Frederic Chopin Poland France Warsaw
"chopin" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Next week we're going to be talking about some real music we're gonna be talking about chopin and list we're gonna have at hoffman in studio with us as we kind of look at the history of the time of that when music was evolving in a new direction chopin took some big league with the piano and list a lot of things were going on in the music thing we'll be looking at now that's music yeah that what we just heard well okay if this is what kids are calling music today i am frightened so when i say that is welcome to the world because i mean the the black people in this country have bay are so steeped in urban legends and stuff like that that they ignore the history they do not look at it they were quoted but they won't take a lesson from it and that's what history is about learning about what you the mistakes that you can keep from making in the president if you take history seriously we don't take history seriously and just to make a leap here first of all everyone in this room matter of fact everyone in this building knows how i feel about we need to open dialogue with open dialogue maybe we can start finding out or other people start finding out why we make the stance we do and what we believe what we do doesn't mean they have to accept it doesn't even that believe it but at least then maybe they'll have an understanding just the same as when i talked to democrats i don't have to agree with what they say i don't have to agree with standing but at least maybe i might know where they're coming from but in the end that's never going to be found out unless people talk pasture i i wanted to say that i think that walter made a lot of good points while fantastic clubs very good points in the the fact remains though as bad as the republican party is and they are bad many different ways we cannot let democrats win these elections wit is very important that we focus on the primaries because we want to get the most considered the.

chopin hoffman president walter republican party democrats
"chopin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Chopin your feet and also how much that ad ends up costing to the advertiser and weirdly it costs the advertiser less if people click on it more exactly because at the end of the day facebook because optimizing for what in the trade is called cpm that's cost per mille cost per thousand ads after all said and done a politician or a product or whatever that embraces a rhetorical strategy that for for better or worse causes lots of engagement they will either get more media for the same amount of money or get the same media for less money than otherwise would if they weren't sort of clicked baby so if i understand this right the business model of valuing engagement actually offers an advantage to incendiary ads and so called fake news right yes to the extent that negative rhetoric drives more engagement than say more nuanced temperate rhetoric than indeed it would fare better on the facebook ad system yes okay that's one thing that the trump campaign exploited about facebook another is something that you you were in charge of a future called custom audiences and later something called lookalike audiences explained how they leveraged their investment with them right custom audiences is sort of a fancy marketing name for facebook joining to the outside world of data mean a simple example of this that all of your listeners have probably had if you go browse the internet and you go shop for something or whatever and you go back to facebook and you see that same pair of shoes that same handbag you were shopping for appearance at facebook that's what i mean this is outside world of data that historically didn't enter facebook but starting in two thousand twelve there was a couple of different technologies one of.

facebook Chopin
"chopin" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"chopin" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"A transcription of chopin's nocturne most early ragtime stays sort of in the middle part of the piano it couldn't be too hard otherwise amateurs wouldn't by the music the music is imprinted into difficult of an arrangement so that most people can play it so that's how ragtime started it wasn't too difficult but the players of the day of course had bigger technique so they would at octos in the left hand and add lots of extra notes in jump all over the place and so today of course nobody wants to be restricted those of us who are professionals get in lots of extra notes in so ethan has added notes to his arrangement and i've added even more notes to it that's what you do when you're virtuoso you know what a virtuoso is by the way it's a musician with real high morals her i dunno say when i tell that to school children they just scratch their head anyway um so there's a lot more extra notes there's no the right way to play this but it's got chopin's teens in it plus you might here if you're really tuned in at the very end is a little parody of franz liszt's hungarian rhapsody number two that makes appearance in the left hand at the end of the a rearrangement of a rearrangement writing any praying arthri there's nothing authentic about this okay so here we go chopin's knocked earn oh.

chopin franz liszt ethan