35 Burst results for "Cholera"

"cholera" Discussed on Scrolls & Leaves

Scrolls & Leaves

04:59 min | 11 months ago

"cholera" Discussed on Scrolls & Leaves

"The way they handled the quarantine the house. They're established links of all the people who who have had the disease and where they've gone and they keep a record. Ross repeatedly opposed to the map that he uses to track the woman of everybody dot point of time because he's ready surprised when posting a mile away gets caught up and then he goes all the way there and then tries to figure out how it could have a mile and a half away the other end of the control moment at first. Ross notes a brief. He just jots down what he's hearing initially just a boy muhammadu enough female hindu but a travel from sitting up at numb. But by next day he has got names. What everyone of them. And he's got names of every possible person in all a benching by who lives on north broadway. He had the disease that i went to his house and squalid condition. The sewers will made of this kind of material the angle of the sewage line from the house to the street. Why is he says was anti gravity. This note of twenty third september eighteen ninety five thirteen. Fresh kissel occurred in eleven days since my arrival here on the tenth the are as follows. Gonci cody baalu mati. Mata a my imams. I have one a month on the roma shazad. Gb sakina be abraham saab when he saw and mealy gama already young girl of nineteen bribe's a two year old boy a miam- on a four year old girl and they die within a day or two the berlin so the cholera microbe. The present epidemic may be judged from the fact that all the thirteen percents attacked at this time. There's only one microscope in all of south india. It's in bombay. And it's brought to bangor. Ross wants to find the cholera bacterium in samples from the field. He collects tool samples. He collect water samples. He collects whatever. Open organic material confined. Find whether it's miracle sweetmeat prepared food or all food. He collects samples from everywhere this tribute to the pinch of salt because the typical ims medical officer typically had a staff of eight or ten under the which would typically include one or two indian doctors from the madras medical college who sub so jen's and a whole number of indian stops of other people who run the actually do the sample preparation and sample collections. But he would be hunting to seed under the microscope and set. His intervention seemed to work. But i me ends. Let's say in october. He is reporting only three new cases in each zone. Muniswamy white he. John alcon jonah's when he saw me. Who's the coach driver for the senior officer of the of the government. So that's really serious. And that's how he does this very systematic inquiry over months pushing systems to control. The epidemic absorbs the infection rates. Coming down as a result of his Interventions maggio's the effect of that using micro school of assessing the water. And things like that show. It's very comprehensive eight-week description of how to handle epidemics which was quite fascinating. Ross also issues recommendations to improve sanitary conditions in bangalore and avoid future outbreaks and the authorities to take some action bengals famous leixoes. Two of them were drained. Our big became dry completely. A new lake was created. Which would which take water from the containment only after filtration. What is now also lake that water was piped back into the residential areas russell so recommends day no system of sewage collection night soil or fecal matter collection from the city. There's no running water. Drainage and ronald ross. In typical efficiency also calculates the amount of money that could be made by sending this as As compost and how old a few years the scene of the compost would earn sufficient amount for dubious and sustaining and bryce sanjiv says it at the heart of treating any disease outbreak. Whether cholera or cova today. There should be information and investigation the responses to the disease under their given by information just like it always points out that one microscope in the hold of southern india is not good enough you have to have a systematic assessment of all the water. Everything around you if you're really serious about removing this disease in its entirety yoga reform your which correction now. Those are the systematic dangers that you need to open a disease like the circles. You're listening to send jane on chatroom. For episode notes please visit scrolls and leaves dot com slash chatroom mate..

Ross Fresh kissel Gonci cody baalu cholera roma shazad abraham saab madras medical college John alcon jonah Mata south india bangor bombay berlin maggio jen ronald ross new lake bryce sanjiv bengals
"cholera" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:47 min | 11 months ago

"cholera" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Thank you. Scott. Welcome back to Atlanta Living. I'm your host, Belinda Skeleton bottle segment of restaurant matchmaking, with David dancing of the website bites and sites dot net. Well, so let's go to the phone and make sure we get in. Raymond Raymond. You are looking for something specific. Let's see if David can find it for you. Yes, ma'am. I hope so. All right, let's hear it right. Roast duck with cholera, orange salt. Handed out a great shot before I can't find it now. Duck Halloran's Douglas Wrongs. Yeah, that's um, that's not a common staying on the menus here, so I'm on the break. I was I was scampering around, but I did find it where it's on the menu, and I love this place. It's in Buckhead. It's called howls. H A L apostrophe as house It's a steakhouse. But how does some classic stuff and duck roast duckling? Laurent is on their menu. It's um lucky, you know, Do I love that crispy Long Island Duckling? ARN saw Scott comes with a price. That's a great dish. But, man, if you're gonna go to house get, you know, Have your wife get the duck and then you get a fillet there because they're Pillay's are And well, we like beyond belief are the surfing term. This Oh, my gosh! Yes, the house in Buckhead. Great iconic steakhouse. A lot of fun. Great food, But duh, Clarence on the menu at howls. Go for it. Okay, excellent. All right, honey, It was easier than you thought, wasn't it? Yes, it was. Thank you very much. Alright. Thank you. Have a good with you too. All right, David. You know earlier we were talking about, um, Marlowe's well. Marlowe's has opened up a new concept restaurant called Woodall's near myself. I want to go. Have you been yet? No. So let's make a date. Let's go. It's It has, um, a great you know, as a drop back appear in the inside. Looks beautiful there. Drink. I've looked at the drink menu. Um, I've looked at the the the whole menu. I mean, they have Just an incredible menu very different from Marlowe's, so it's going to be a new concept for them. That's going to really pan out. Yeah, I think you know, this is like a great idea to sort of expand. Um, you know the brand Marlowe's has kind of got that tavern thing nailed down. I think the wood all is going to be more of a You know, just a little bit of a lighter area.

David Scott Belinda Skeleton Marlowe Buckhead Clarence Raymond Raymond Atlanta Living Woodall Halloran Marlowe's Long Island Douglas Wrongs Laurent
Sizing up Kyle Larson's Extraordinary Run

NASCAR on NBC

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Sizing up Kyle Larson's Extraordinary Run

"Want to talk about. Kyle larson in this role that this guy is on. You worked with jeff. Gordon you compete against jeff gordon. The nine hundred ninety eight and this is what this reminds me of right now. That kyle larson has six consecutive races. First or second place finishes four victories. Three points races put in perspective australia. Steve what this role means because to me. It feels a lot like jeff. Gordon circa one thousand nine hundred. Well listen. so he's driving premier equipment. The hendra motorsports car seem to have the most speed in the field but the counter that is driving that against three other premier drivers right so it's easy to say it's got the fastest stuff yet but you to chase elliott william byron and alex bone to do it and oh by the way he did he drove around chase elliott with one of the most masterful gutsy all star race tight moves driving to the outside quarter panel a third lane. We had yet to see in ninety laps. So the move for the all star race was outstanding. I think kyle. I think this is the kyle larson. We all thought was out there. You can only decided but he wins in everything. He's so much talent we didn't know if it was his preparation holding him back if it was asked if it was his youth if it was his lack of mentor sh we didn't know we'll never know because it kind of all the jumbled up reset but now he's an organization with a lot of leadership. Jeff gordon you mentioned it stein in the fox booth what he's still has a role andrew motorsports rick hendrix there. Chad can houses there. We asked outs blue being us out. Hey how're the post like you said you ever met chad kind of. There's a lot of leadership around him and a lot of confidence and a lot of talent and driving great equipment and i think that's what you're seeing right the combination of the three two minutes amount of confidence. And you know we said it on our preview show. You and i both cholera and watching. Because you take that much talent with that much motivation. The timing of hendrick motorsports and what they're doing communist chevrolet and where they are in the grand scheme of things. You got this recipe for success. Now he's doing it against the defending champion on. His team is the defending champion of our series. And he's taking the fight to him

Kyle Larson Gordon Circa Jeff Gordon Elliott William Byron Alex Bone Chase Elliott Jeff Gordon Rick Hendrix Steve Australia Kyle Stein Chad Andrew Cholera Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet
Congolese Residents Flee Goma Amid Warning of Second Volcanic Eruption

UN News

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Congolese Residents Flee Goma Amid Warning of Second Volcanic Eruption

"Hundreds of thousands of people but likely need assistance in eastern democratic republic of congo or. Drc has people in goma continue to flee the threat of further eruptions by mount iago you and humanitarian said on friday. The first eruption on the twenty second of may killed over thirty people and the gohmert volcanological observatory has warned that the risk of a new explosion israel the un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs or archer said it reported strong tremors on thursday one of the measuring four point nine on the richter scale along with large traffic jams. Gomer with some four hundred thousand people potentially on the move. The un children's fund unicef warned that two hundred and eighty thousand youngsters may need help. The un agency said that many of those to go in the first wave headed to nearby sake which is an area prone to cholera outbreaks and where at least nineteen suspected. Cases have been recorded in. The last. two weeks needs already high in this part of the country. North kivu where more than two million people are internally displaced and three and ten severely food insecure

DRC Gohmert Volcanological Observa Un Office For The Coordination Goma Un Children's Fund Unicef Gomer Archer Israel UN Cholera North Kivu
Sarah Harding on Dharma Journeys of Practice and Translation

The Wisdom Podcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Sarah Harding on Dharma Journeys of Practice and Translation

"Sarah i wanted to welcome and thank you for joining us on the wisdom dot chat but i wanted to start with how you first encountered bosom. How did you go down this past Was it through a book or you meet a teacher. How'd you first encounter the buddha dhamma. How far back should i go. Nats let's keep it to these lives. Okay that's fortunate since i don't remember the other ones Yeah i will. I got interested in meditation in eastern phosphine. Everything while i was still in high school actually and then i read some books like autobiography yogi and things like that and i read the life of miller that was one of my first folks which has stuck with me all this time till now even and then i What happened. I met some tibetans in arizona prescott arizona. Actually in dan. I dropped out of college in went traveling and ended up in the east and Kind of tried to forget about the buddha steph for a while but eventually came to nepal yan You know got tired of all the fun stuff in there was colpon happening with lava yes shea of coupon in dan That was it. I kind of you know was stock. In like bob dylan which have gone last taken that last detour in so then i went and met cholera in pay went from the. Someone showed me a picture in that coupon retreat in i headed to find him

Sarah Arizona Yogi Prescott Miller DAN Nepal Bob Dylan Cholera
Congolese Residents Flee Goma Amid Warning of Second Volcanic Eruption

UN News

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Congolese Residents Flee Goma Amid Warning of Second Volcanic Eruption

"Hundreds of thousands of people would likely need assistance in eastern democratic republic of the congo or drc as people in goma continue to flee the threat of further eruptions by mount nyiragongo un humanitarian said the first eruption on the twenty second of may killed over thirty people and the gohmert volcanological observatory has warned that the risk of a new rupture is israel. The un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs or archer said on friday. It reported strong tremors on thursday one of them measuring four point nine on the richter scale along with large traffic jams out of goma with some four hundred thousand people potentially on the move you in children's fund unicef one third. Two hundred eighty youngsters may need help. The agency said that many of those who left game in the first wave headed to nearby sake which is an area produce cholera outbreaks where at least nineteen suspected cases have been recorded in. The last two weeks needs already high in this part of the country. North kivu where more than two million are already internally displaced and three and ten are severely food insecure

DRC Mount Nyiragongo Goma Gohmert Volcanological Observa Un Office For The Coordination UN Archer Israel Unicef Cholera North Kivu
NBA Trade Deadline: Winners & Losers

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

NBA Trade Deadline: Winners & Losers

"The trade deadline podcast part four. We've done three parts already. It is now twelve fifty four pacific time three fifty four east coast. Time ran. russillo is still here. We go all day. We might do to ours. Jackie macmullan is joining us. The hall of famer Cholera was not traded jenny. What happened what happened well. It's funny i was talking to someone in the raptors organization a few days ago. And they're sort of this sense if you look back on that great championship season. The next year Koi leonard walks for nothing. Danny green goes for nothing right them gusau and serge ibaka for nothing and i think it. Just maybe it's just like okay. We're all right with kyle. Stay in here. He's okay more more importantly like cows like me out of here man. This is a sinking ship. I think the results would have been different. Perhaps and i think he was like. I'm okay with being here. You know his bird rights don't kick in till the you can't extend him till the summer so if you trade for you're interested in his bird rights much harder now to sign kyle hours of free agent because you no longer has his bird rights so for people that most people on. I don't need to explain this on your podcast right. Everyone knows what that means yes. I know it's helpful though. Yeah okay so what it means. Is that If you had if you trade him at the deadline and you wanted to extend him you had his bird rights. You could go over the cap you have to worry about it now. If you sign him you have been able to fit him. And it's it's more difficult for teens. So i think in the end they probably just like. How much of this can we ask our fans to understand. He's so good with the younger guys. And you know let's face it siachen nick nurse. They got a little thing going on right. Now there's a little back and forth. Kyle lowry i think is a great buffer for that. You know maybe he rides you through. That rough time comes apart. Future

Jackie Macmullan Gusau Serge Ibaka Danny Green Kyle Cholera Raptors East Coast Jenny Kyle Lowry Nick
Philadelphia 76ers trade for Oklahoma City guard George Hill

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Philadelphia 76ers trade for Oklahoma City guard George Hill

"Talk about philly because we haven't talked about philly in the pod yet philly. We talk a little bit earlier. We're talk about yeah. You should get george hill. Basically for free over paying a premium price for cholera. that makes sense to me Russillo as george hill crunch time you see in the game last five minutes for them or do you think he's a bench guy It depends on the defensive match up. Because you've got to figure like all right. If seth is closing to give you their spacing i think their best to man group and this can be a little misleading embiid and steph curry this year. So you know simmons is gonna finish so you need spacing probably more than harris thy bible. Nine harris has been on an absolute tear to here. so he's he's stepped up big time and their defense is still been incredible for the month of march even with be missing games Yeah but i. I would think they made. Look at as a seth or george hill thing Around simmons around harrison and figure out the other wing so it may not just always be seth and the other three guys with george hill. But i think this at least gives you a little bit more size there. And i don't know how much you put in any of the george you saw from oklahoma city this year. Because you know i mean. Those didn't even need those guys at times because the thunder keep winning some of these games. I can't believe they're winning with the group. They put out there.

George Hill Russillo Steph Curry Seth Philly Cholera Harris Around Simmons Simmons Harrison Oklahoma City George Thunder
Philadelphia 76ers trade for Oklahoma City guard George Hill

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Philadelphia 76ers trade for Oklahoma City guard George Hill

"Talk about philly because we haven't talked about philly in the pod yet philly. We talk a little bit earlier. We're talk about yeah. You should get george hill. Basically for free over paying a premium price for cholera. that makes sense to me Russillo as george hill crunch time you see in the game last five minutes for them or do you think he's a bench guy It depends on the defensive match up. Because you've got to figure like all right. If seth is closing to give you their spacing i think their best to man group and this can be a little misleading embiid and steph curry this year. So you know simmons is gonna finish so you need spacing probably more than harris thy bible. Nine harris has been on an absolute tear to here. so he's he's stepped up big time and their defense is still been incredible for the month of march even with be missing games Yeah but i. I would think they made. Look at as a seth or george hill thing Around simmons around harrison and figure out the other wing so it may not just always be seth and the other three guys with george hill. But i think this at least gives you a little bit more size there. And i don't know how much you put in any of the george you saw from oklahoma city this year. Because you know i mean. Those didn't even need those guys at times because the thunder keep winning some of these games. I can't believe they're winning with the group. They put out there.

George Hill Russillo Steph Curry Seth Philly Cholera Harris Around Simmons Simmons Harrison Oklahoma City George Thunder
Most Intriguing Trade Deadline Teams with Bobby Marks

The Lowe Post

02:49 min | 1 year ago

Most Intriguing Trade Deadline Teams with Bobby Marks

"To the low post podcast on a friday morning where we are six days away from the trade deadline but some trades of already happened. People are acting early. Miami acquired trevor ariza and the bucks made a very interesting move to acquire. Pj tucker but there's much left to do even on boring trade deadline's are never actually boring. Lots of stuff happens to help. Us preview are insider are cap expert former longtime nets executive. The one and only bobby marks how are you. I'm good zach. How're you. And i already had my usually about a week out from the trade. I start having nightmares in the middle of the night. And i did my first nightmare last night. That woke me up about four o'clock that A fictitional trade of paul george in kyle lowry to the nets for curry irving and i woke up thinking like how in the heck is at work cap wise but the person in my dream that i talked to said. Hey don't worry about it. Works and i was like check my phone right off. The bat at four thirty in that did not happen. That is that is really sad. I had a dream last night. That four of my friends in their families were quarantining at a former. I hop that still had all the i hop like syrup and technology to be a functioning and they were having lots of pancakes in great meals and i wanted to go visit them. This is what. I was dreaming about six days before the train then. I woke up very hungry. Bunny dream will probably more likely to happen than cholera. Paul george and brooklyn possibly. What did it before we start. What did you think of the bucks acquiring j. tucker in a deal of of minor draft assets. I would say yeah. I mean it was creative. I thought that you know the milwaukee because it hard cap and based on the picks going in that drew holiday trade really had limited options to go out and do it but they go under the milwaukee goes under the Luxury tax gives them flexibility on a hard cap houston from their front office with the draft. Picks i don't think it would have been able to do it if They didn't have that two thousand twenty second from the hardened trade. That was the box. Essentially that they got from jarrett for From cleveland jared allen. But i had never really seen a team basically swapping a first for a second and then tr trade back that two thousand twenty second and you move back a year in the draft so it was creative from from both sides. And you'll see what brand. Pj tucker we get in milwaukee because he has not been. He hasn't been great this year at all and is it just the level of interest of a houston team that has taken on major water. And do we get to see the pj tucker from the previous years. But it gives milwaukee a lot of different options as far as lineups that they can. They can roll out there with him.

Pj Tucker Curry Irving Trevor Ariza Paul George Kyle Lowry Zach Milwaukee Bucks Miami Bobby Nets Cholera Tucker Brooklyn United States Houston Jared Allen Jarrett Cleveland
A Forgotten African American Burial Site Could Be Hidden In Washington DC

WAMU: Local News

03:46 min | 1 year ago

A Forgotten African American Burial Site Could Be Hidden In Washington DC

"Over the past century. Archaeologists and town residents have unearthed dozens of human remains on the thirty three hundred block of street northwest. Experts have spent years trying to identify the origins of the remains. And they told dc ists. Elliot williams they may belong to a forgotten african american burial site. It's a quiet historic street in georgetown on one side. There's volta park a slice of recreational heaven with a pool tennis courts and a jungle gym on the other. A row of million dollar townhomes from the late nineteenth century beneath those homes. Residents archaeologists have found countless skulls jaws ribs and skeletons from bodies buried ages ago. One q street resident. Diana scholl calls a day in two thousand twelve when she noticed something odd at her next door neighbor's house digging a pool and i came home and the police were there and they have found remains the dc. His story preservation office says burials. Like this are quite common on q street. Evidence is growing that this block was the site of a pre civil war. Burial ground for free and enslaved residents men says she loved to know the identities behind the barrels but she also has renovation plans of her own. I'd also love to build a pool or say you know. I don't like what's the protocol know that you've already got a half a body. She's not the only one with questions. Reuther coli the city's official archaeologist has been excavating backyards and basements on q street for nearly fifteen years she and a team of researchers are looking for answers on who might be buried there so q street is unusual for in so many ways. It is very hard to do research on this earlier time period in georgetown because when it was found it was part of maryland. In most cases the city is called on the smithsonian to help analyze store the bodies remains belonging to at least twenty eight individuals are currently sitting and smithsonian lab waiting to be fully studied only seven have been analyzed so far and all of them appear to be of african descent the law and just ville an anthropologist at american university is studying the bodies as part of his dissertation the pandemic has slowed down his research but he says the q. Street burials are crucial to understanding by history in dc. How do we identify these the sentence when there was mass. Push out about relatives from from georgetown. Old newspaper clipping show that victims of cholera pandemic of eighteen. Thirty two were buried in unknown locations. Georgetown justin ville says it's possible. Some of these victims often low wage laborers could have been buried in mass graves on q street. Some residents even believed the burials could be evidence of georgetown's involvement in the underground railroad. I think site Whether or not it's at nap with jerry. Lawler cemetery and or both. I think it's only the starting point for this network of Taking of the black geography. Georgetown if he will once the lab reopens just unveiled plans to hit the ground running and he has the city's full support. It may have taken a longtime for this project. Come up and for everyone to get on board but oh my goodness it's it's time it's come. Congress recently introduced the african american burial grounds network. Act a bill that would direct funding and research toward burial grounds like the one in georgetown. If passed the legislation will help protect historic black graveyards from time development and decay. Perhaps it will help. Uncover some of the mysteries on q street

Elliot Williams Georgetown Volta Park Diana Scholl Reuther Coli DC Tennis Justin Ville Ville American University Lawler Cemetery Maryland Cholera Jerry Congress
"cholera" Discussed on The Faithful Fangirl

The Faithful Fangirl

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"cholera" Discussed on The Faithful Fangirl

"On my list as actually talking to just about this. Yesterday i had talked to erica previously. And she made the comment about the book lobby. The time of cholera and i was laughing to jazz. I told her that For me it's more community in the time of coded of but i laughed at you. Say that 'cause when just originally mentioned this to me my first thought went to philippians one three. Every time i think of you. I give thanks to god whenever i pray. I make my requests for all of you with joy. You have been my partners. And that's very much the you know. I mean yes thankful for face and family. In god's provision in all of this on protection and even the ones that are friends that have gotten sick. They haven't been on death's door. They haven't been on icu. In a later that you know hopefully there. There is eventually light at the end of the tall. There really is so much to be thankful for this year time in particular but for me i think it has really brought to light what we have taken advantage of absolutely for granted in our connections with each other. How much those mean and how much we really rely on those connection to keep saying. Keep a strong and keep us differently. You know whenever i posted on. Cwm you know website about the things that i missed. I've just having a bad day. You know and it's just like man. I have really taken for granted these things that you know a lot of times. You you feel annoyed by down. Just like wow. Those are blessing now the kids popping in just because they want to be a part of the community to you know in sometimes like when we get together and we're talking grew and our kids come in. We feel annoyed because they've interrupted. But at that time. I was just like i just want an interruption right now you know because then at least i'm around you guys or women's bible study. Yeah i really the amount of times. I would work all day and come home and be like i. Just wanna sit on the couch and chill and have dinner. I don't wanna have to think about. Where's my bible..

cholera erica
How COVID-19 human challenge trials work -- and why Sophie Rose volunteered

TED Talks Daily

04:01 min | 1 year ago

How COVID-19 human challenge trials work -- and why Sophie Rose volunteered

"In april. Two thousand and twenty. I made what many perceive is a risky decision volunteered to be deliberately infected with covid nineteen. This infection would be part of what is cold. A human challenge show where young healthy people given a vaccine and then deliberately exposed to the virus that causes covid. Nineteen these trials help. Researchers figure out more quickly if a vaccine is working. I think this research is crucial. Because today i'm going to speak to you for six minutes in that time. Roughly twelve hundred and fifty people will be confirmed infected with covid nineteen twenty. One people will die and then this pot repeat hour after hour and day by day until we're able to vaccinate most of the eight billion people affected but squabble crisis. Scientists have been working around the clock to make those vaccine's reality. But what should we do when the human cost of waiting for vaccines is rising by the day. This is a human challenge shells. Come in the different from the traditional phase. Three bucks trials taking place now where people are given a vaccine or placebo. An oss to go about their everyday lives. Researchers have to wait to see how many people in each group become infected until enough of them get sick. We don't have enough data to know whether a vaccine is working. Finding effective vaccine with this method can take months sometimes years and it requires thousands of volunteers. A challenge tall works foster because research control exposure instead of waiting for people to get sick so instead of a year we could know in as little as a month whether a vaccine seems effective instead of thousands of volunteers a challenge shawl relies on just fifty to one hundred because we know if a sudden when people are exposed and develop disease. These trials also allow us together data about the early stages of infection and our response. This data is impossible together in any other way especially for people who become infected but never showed symptoms. This knowledge is important for designing policies. That limit covid nineteen transmission. The time saved translates into precious month's headstart on manufacturing getting a small working covid. Nineteen vaccines scenes foster. These trials are useful even their recent phase through results on encouraging. The arrival of the fuss vaccine is going to be a monumental breakthrough. it just isn't quite the fairy tale ending role harping full. We're going to need multiple vaccines because we just don't have the infrastructure needed to immunize eight billion people on the planet with just one kind. Each type of back seen requires its own special process and equipment to make store and deliver it if we had multiple working covid nineteen vaccines. We could make use of all of our equipment at the same time. Some of the leading candidates need to be kept extremely colds before they live limit to people. This can be really hard especially in countries where there isn't reliable electricity or a secure method to store them. Scientists have been using human challenge. Charles for hundreds of years. They've sped up the development vaccines against typhoid and cholera. And i've helped us better understand how immunity develops to things like the flu. Malaria and dengue gay with use them for other types of coronavirus. Before there's been a lot of debate about whether challenge charles a too risky. I happen to think that those risks of taking a challenge trial would recruit young and healthy participants think between the ages of twenty and twenty nine fewer than one percent of people in that age group need to be taken to hospital after becoming infected with covid nineteen likely even lower in a challenge trial because researchers check to make sure that participants have no pre existing conditions. The risk of a young healthy person dying of covid nineteen is around five thousandth of a percent

Colds Typhoid Cholera Dengue Malaria Charles FLU
Paprika In Hungary

Travel with Rick Steves

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Paprika In Hungary

"Let's start today's travel. With rick steves with the role a little pepper from the new world plays in that tasty cuisine of hungary. Note that today's interviews on paprika galicia where recorded just prior to the global shutdowns pepperoni as the backbone of hungarian cooking as the crucial ingredient in chicken pepper. Cash and hardy hungarian stews from mild to hot. We'll find out why this spicy so central to hungarian identity. How to best buys and pepper on your trip and we're going to learn how you can spice up. Your own meals was well to get this education hungarian paprika. We're joined by to guide tonight studio from hungary. And leonard and george farkas anna and george. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having us thrill to be well. Thank you from coming all the way from budapest a long trip. And we're gonna talk about paprika. I mean when we think of hungary we don't know a lot about hungry sometimes. But we think of paprika. What's the connection actually public. A strong connection because it is actually from the american continent and it was The physician of christopher columbus or columbus who brought it to the old world to i not to hungary of course but to spain that through the commercials of the mediterranean sea it got to the ottoman empire and when the ottoman empire extended its political power to eastern century up. We glad to not only bad things that we also got things like the patrika. What are the coffee so paprika and cuffy came as your time in the ottoman empire in paprika actually from america via columbus actually us. So i like teasing are two members and americans who is. That's why to travel here. Righ- flying through the But i like my publisher hungary. There's something romantic about having paprika in hungary. And why does hungary embrace paprika. What does it mean to hungarian. I have great micro-climate lots of sunshine. And what is very important that when we got the paprika was a hot spice and it was the hungarians who grew the might version of it it is from the nineteen twenties when in a small. Get in sega. It was kind of discovered. And since then if you come to our covid market hall you can always buy tubers the mild paprika and the hot fabric honky now. George when i go to budapest i always go to the big market hall right. But it's the name of that. Hologhan bashar knocking hungarian big market or century. You can't miss it when you're a tornado in credits. The first one out of five actually that they built at the time. And what you're going to find is well everything that hungarian cook would want to find. But certainly find peppers. See when you look for the peppers in the market. Well actually. you're not looking for peppers you looking for paprika is already well there is. It is basically a huge difference because many people don't realize it in hungary. Everything is called paprika. Let it'd be around fat skinny red yellow sweet and hot so i'm a little confused. Then so because Is it a pepper or it is a but we call it paprika but we also called a powder paprika yes because when i think of peppers and my supermarket we've got yellow ones and green ones red ones and that all of that. We call paprika even if it's Any shape really And then you have. It already powdered. If you're looking for the paprika that you cook with powdered yes okay. So it's a very unique technique to powder because One of the things that you have to be extremely careful with how you approach paprika once you grind paprika after all the time you spent with it to become dry and ready to grind. You have to do it very slowly makers as soon as you pick up speed you burn the paprika and that remains throughout its lifetime because once you come to cook it again you have to be very careful with a not to burn it because then you just have to start over again tour guides from budapest anna leonard and george farkas are filling in on the importance of peppery cup in the cuisine of hungary right now on travel with rick steves. Okay so when we're talking about this have rica and i think it goes back the days when spaces were really important. I mean spice was big money in the early days of training today today at that time and originally now why was spaces in general very important economically for people well. It was a very important product. It was expensive at that time. It was not so easy to fly from one continent to other a trip two months of making food more interesting or is it a matter of preserving food actually spicy i got to the highest study stock chrissy those who had the opportunity to get products from far far away and paprika also i was introduced for the highest stock resi in hungary after people realised it is not poisonous because i it was considered a supposin and when they discovered that it has healing effect. You know it here the colorado and screw after it they started to make its production but it was a rarity and it was very expensive so at first who is just for the very wealthy and then you learn it. It helped as medicine against scurvy and cholera. Yes but also medication. Very often is a privilege of the wealthier class. Not available for everybody. Some

Hungary George Farkas Columbus Budapest Rick Steves Cuffy Hologhan Bashar Mediterranean Sea Leonard Anna Christopher Sega George Spain Anna Leonard America Rica Chrissy
UN: Child Malnutrition Soars in War-torn Yemen

UN News

03:34 min | 1 year ago

UN: Child Malnutrition Soars in War-torn Yemen

"The children of Yemen are suffering acute malnutrition president at rights as the world's worst humanitarian crisis grinds on UN agencies have warned in an alert based on new food security analysis in some areas more than one in four children is acutely malnourished. said the UN Children's fund UNICEF along with the World Food Programme, WFP and the Office for the Coordination of humanitarian, affairs or. They cited data from one hundred and thirty three districts in southern parts of Yemen which are home to one point four, million children under five. It revealed a ten percent increase in acute trish in so far this year even worse is the more than fifteen percent rise in children suffering from severe acute malnutrition meaning that at least ninety, eight, thousand under-fives are at high risk of dying without urgent medical treatment from Geneva. Here's UNICEF spokesperson Eczema. Kado. The most significant increase is among young children who suffer from inferior acute malnutrition. This is a condition that leaves children around ten times more likely to die. Z's as such as cholera, diarrhoea, malaria, or acute respiratory infections, all of which are common in Yemen. According to Wip by the of twenty, twenty, four in ten people in surveyed areas of Yemen about three point, two million people are likely to be severely food insecure data for the remaining districts. Northern Yemen has yet to be published, but the situation is expected to be equally concerning based on historical trends. Fighting between government on non-state actors has continued in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province where civilians have been killed thousands displaced the UN hazard an update from Austria, the UN Humanitarian Aid Office reported that more than two weeks since clashes began near Lashkar Gah city. The security situation remains volatile while talks between the Afghan government and Taliban representatives continue in Qatar fighting has also been reported along the road connecting Chicago with Kandahar city in the East with improvised explosive devices planted on main highways continuing to threaten those looking for shelter. Amid attacks affecting fifteen medical facilities, the World Health Organization W. H.. O.. Also reported that the closure of clinics has affected thousands of people although handful of partially reopened. Science needs to be more accessible, transparent, and in tune with people's needs if global threats like the covid nineteen pandemic ought to be overcome effectively, you agency heads said on Tuesday in a joint appeal for free access to scientific reviews, data tools, and software audrey. Azoulay. From yes. Go Ted Ross at an Gabri ACIS from the World Health Organization has. Michelle Bachelet High Commissioner for Human Rights called on the international community to take all necessary measures to make this happen with the additional support of Fabiola Gianotti who had Sunday European Laboratory for particle physics. The appeal also intends to promote trust in research and technology at a time when rumors and. False information I increasingly common in a statement UNESCO the UN agency for Education Science and Culture said that the recent response of the scientific community to the cave nineteen pandemic has demonstrated how well open science can accelerate the achievement of scientific solutions to global challenges. But the agency insisted that sustainable solutions to global threats require an efficient transparent and vibrant scientific effort from everyone in society not just scientists in line with the wishes of UN member states UNESCO is developing guidelines explaining how countries can implement open science policies to bring citizens closer to science and how they can commit to helping to share scientific knowledge around the World

Un Children Yemen UN Un Humanitarian Aid Office World Health Organization Unicef Coordination Of Humanitarian Education Science And Culture Unesco WFP Geneva Michelle Bachelet Fabiola Gianotti Ted Ross President Trump WIP Cholera
If approved, UK to start controversial Covid vaccine challenge trial infecting patients

Up First

01:03 min | 1 year ago

If approved, UK to start controversial Covid vaccine challenge trial infecting patients

"Researchers are preparing for a step toward finding a corona virus vaccine a particularly terrifying step it's called a challenge trial and it means you give the vaccine to people, and then you expose them to the virus to see if the vaccine works. Channel trials are used to test vaccines for diseases like typhoid, cholera and malaria. The difference here is that if new vaccines for those. Illnesses do not work there at least ways to treat the people who've been infected for covid nineteen. Of course, there is no cure and treatments are still limited. So a challenged trial raises some real ethical concerns. Arthur Caplan is a bioethics professor at New York. University School of Medicine. We don't fully understand the Cobra virus we're going to give it to people intentionally make them sick. What if there's a death? What if there's long-term disability? What if things go really soured for the subjects? As, just GonNa look like an ethics catastrophe researchers in the United Kingdom? Still think challenge trial is worth it and they plan to try one

Arthur Caplan Typhoid University School Of Medicine United Kingdom New York Professor
U.K. Moves Toward Ethically Controversial Coronavirus Vaccine Trial

PRI's The World

06:07 min | 1 year ago

U.K. Moves Toward Ethically Controversial Coronavirus Vaccine Trial

"Vaccine Trials are happening all over the globe today. The UK government announced funding for phase. One of something called a human challenge trial for a corona virus vaccine. The process will require young healthy volunteers to be infected with the virus in an effort to speed up vaccine testing a company called H Vivo and Imperial College London. Have the contract is set up the first part of that process. Here's more from the world's caroline dealer the idea itself sounds wild intentionally infect people with the very virus returning our lives upside down to avoid. People hear about these trials. Many people's immediate reaction is, how could it be ethical but Oxford bioethicist deb Yom row gic says, it's possible if certain conditions are met one of those conditions is that the expected benefits of the research outweigh the risks. In this case, how many infections could we prevent if we developed a vaccine sooner? For example, in a typical clinical trial thousands of people are injected with a test vaccine and sent out into the world to see if they still get infected naturally that's happening now with several corona virus vaccine candidates, but Andrew Catchpole. The, chief scientific officer at H., Vivo the company launching this human challenge trial says that takes time normal traditional trials involve many thousands of subjects take many many months to complete in human challenge trials, which HP VO has been running for decades. A small number of healthy volunteers would be intentionally infected with the coronavirus after getting jabbed with a trial vaccine to see if it works. What happens is because everybody is given the disease, you're able to determine efficacy in a matter of weeks. These types of tiles have been used for centuries and in the recent past have. Sped up the development of typhoid and cholera vaccines. The agreement announced by the UK government today is just for the first step of this contract to manufacture and test Raina the virus to use in trials it still has to be approved by regulators and an ethics panel. If it is between thirty and ninety volunteers could start being injected with just the test virus, not yet any vaccine as soon as the beginning of next year so far nearly three thousand people in the UK have signed up to volunteer for a challenge trial. One of them is allaster frazier ORCA. White indefinite convinced. The Human Josh all has essential to advising Ovalles, scenes, population way more quickly lift on them on opinion the risk is small enough to travel participants that we need to take that risk frazier ORCA put off going to university for a year to work with one day sooner, a nonprofit group advocating for human challenge trials and signing up volunteers. He says the Tom Channel some of the fear of living through a pandemic into something that feels productive grandma custos. My Dodd might catch his out his risk. So kind of on a personal level the. Volunteer volunteers will be paid somewhere around five thousand dollars insurance cover healthcare costs. For any complications they will quarantine in a special nineteen dead unit at the Royal Free, hospital in London for an expected two weeks after virus exposure. Again, Andrew Catch Paul from h Vivo. A first priority was doing these studies is the safety of the volunteers. So for that reason, we go very strict criteria about those who. Will be eligible to participate. Volunteers must be between eighteen and thirty healthy with no pre existing conditions. But there's a more controversial criteria that scientists are wrestling with right now whether to exclude volunteers of color because there is data suggest that there is a potential for increased risk. The UN says Kobe nineteen is disproportionately affecting racial and ethnic minorities around the globe including in Brazil the UK and the US. K. Government figures, black men in England and Wales are more than two and a half times more likely to die of cope in nineteen than white men. Some of that is explained by socioeconomic status in pre existing conditions. But Dhillon David Kumar, a physician and professor at University College London says it's more than that. They're also other underlying causes racism discrimination for example, being an underlying cause which are not easy to count foreign. Announces such as this Dave Qamar said, he's the health impacts of racism and xenophobia. He says, well, it's important to note that raises a social construct, not biological. The effects of racism in tells in ways that can be hard to identify. So you can't hold constant the discrimination someone's face throughout their life. You can't hold constant the environment someone grownup in the levels of air pollution kinds of housing that they've lifting throughout their life. So. There are differences in outcomes amongst racial groups. David Kamar isn't familiar with this specifics of this study proposal, but he says he can understand the reason for picking volunteers who are at the lowest possible risk for getting really sick. Charles cordray chief officer for the Caribbean and African Health Network sees it differently. It's really disappointing people of Color. In clinical trials that's partly due to legacy of racist medical experiments. By white doctors and kwok-wah dray says the idea of excluding people of color from this trial would add to the distrust mistrust and the lack of trust has come about as a result of decades of sometimes how we need to respond so quickly but what is meant is that there's a whole section of people. Fair much. whose voices are not being head HBO is still making a decision about whether and how to include people of Color in the first phase of this trial when they're testing out the safest way to infect people with the actual virus the company hasn't designed protocols yet for the actual vaccine-testing in hopes quickly follows the volunteer criteria for this stage of the study will be finalized and handed over to UK regulators and an ethics panel by

UK Andrew Catchpole Imperial College London Chief Scientific Officer London Kwok-Wah Dray David Kamar Frazier Orca Typhoid Royal Free Caribbean Hp Vo Dodd University College London Tom Channel UN Dave Qamar Dhillon David Kumar
These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

Science Friction

08:15 min | 1 year ago

These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

"Hi It's Natasha. Mitchell with science friction. I'll be the first admit that as a GP price all of I was pretty skeptical of things. I certainly had sympathy for for conditions like FIBROMYALGIA. But I didn't have the empathy that I have now. I didn't understand it I. Really didn't get it. And Gosh if I could go back and speak to myself as a GP prior to all of this, I know that I would have been much better doctor then and I will hopefully be a much stop to now. As Corona virus cases explode again in the you kind across Europe today three doctors from the UK share confronting personal experiences of what's being called long covert. I have seen too many cases on nine of people not being heard not being Nessin to. That symptoms and their concerns not being validated. I've seen heartbreaking stories of people just being dismissed of seeing heartbreaking stories of people losing their jobs. And I am very lucky that I have a platform where I can speak up and try and get long covert recognizes melnace. The term long covert is being used to describe a whole cluster of symptoms and afflictions many extremely disturbing and disabling that lingering on some people after they've been infected with the SARS Cov to virus thousands across the world are now finding solidarity on social media and in virtual support groups that are popping up and long covert. To not discriminate healthy people young people, people who apparently had a mild case of covid nineteen. And every system in their bodies can be affected up until the last a week or two. The concept of long caved has been dismissed by quite a lot of people even in the medical sphere many my colleagues have been unwell since March and have really struggled to get any kind of medical inputs until the last couple of months those weren't hospitalized with the illness would just sort of left to get on with it. It's the classic thing a suspect. It might even be a bloke thing do not for long enough it will go away. Yeah. Diminish it ignore it hope it's not their. Own I another thing to worry about uh, suspect always going through people's minds and that will include medics politicians policies such as civil servants, everybody. But they will be left with the long term consequences and in terms of the total health burden that will weigh exceed whatever acute covid to us by the time of comes on. So we facing another pandemic this one silent confusing and hard to diagnose knows a pandemic of long coverted. I'm Dr Amy Small I'm thirty nine and I'm Jay P in Lothian in Scotland a gorgeous part of the world in the Scottish lowlands and before the pandemic Dr smalls life was a when I think back it was busy and chaotic and getting up at six thirty every morning and out house by seventh day and yet as a family, we were very active and very busy but it work back in February and March. I'm in colleagues were on high alert the sense of impending doom that we felt on those first few weeks moore seeing reports of huge numbers of people dying in. Italy. In just thinking gosh you know. Is that coming away at it was just really really scary I'm Dr Natalie Mcdermott I'm an academic clinical electra at King's College London and she specializes in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Dr McDermott is no stranger to deadly infections Ebola cholera now coronavirus she's been on the front line of the Mall I was working in Liberia in in the capital Monrovia in July twenty fourteen as as cases of started spread very rapidly our more queseda flowing because we had so many dead bodies but we didn't have sevices coming to pick them up so the burial teams weren't Well. They were trying their best, but they were limited as well at during that time two of my colleagues one of whom was on medical director for treatment facility they became infected with. I saw a space about thirty percent of my patients that died in those first few weeks. I was in Liberia that he percent of them were health coworkers what Natalie witnessed firsthand was hellish but going is her as a doctor she went on to do a PhD, investigating the genetics of asa sipped ability to a bowl avars disease. And when Covid nineteen heat I was working in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Great Ormond Street Hospital. When we started to see a surge of cases of what we now who multi-system inflammatory syndrome children previously healthy children started falling very ill they come in generally unwell but looking okay and then within a few hours sometimes but maybe you set me within twenty four hours. Many of them would suddenly drop their blood pressure and they and become very touchy. It said it heart rate would become very fast at that stage it was thought children were only mildly affected by. Covid nineteen and on the whole, it seems they are but the Natalie and colleagues found all lot of them did test positive in terms of the throat swaps full cave nineteen they tested positive for antibodies to cave in nineteen either actually at the beginning of that onus or at some point Jerry net illness doctrine failing on consulting genetic pathologists to Saint Mark's hospital in Harrow in London and Sinn. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin Ireland in filing is a practicing doctor and later in the genetics of bail and related cancers collaborating with colleagues around the world including here in Australia. At the beginning of the pandemic back in March whiles looked pretty safe or think. To identify, cases in Wales. H. One about forty kilometers outside of me. So eastern West. So you get the impression whereas almost none of it about. So the odds of you catching, it must be next to nothing.

Dr Natalie Mcdermott Covid Liberia Fibromyalgia Mitchell Europe Great Ormond Street Hospital UK Medical Director Dr Amy Small Dr Smalls Wales Moore Monrovia ASA Italy Scotland
The iPhones 12

Gadget Lab Podcast

05:30 min | 1 year ago

The iPhones 12

"Mike, yes Lauren Mike, are you going to upgrade your iphone? Well have an iphone. But it has five gene. Yeah, who cares? Let's see if we can answer that on this week's show. Hi Everyone. Welcome to gadget lab. I'm lauren good. I'm a senior writer at wired and I'm joined remotely by my Co host wired senior editor Michael Cholerae. He who does not have an iphone hello from Pixel land. And we're also joined by wired senior associate editor. Julian Chicago to who has like seventeen different phones on him right now. Hey Julie in below my desk has like six phones on right now so. So today we are talking about yet another apple event this week apple announced a new iphone twelve, actually four of them and a tiny smart speaker, and these are the first iphones with five G. which matters doesn't matter doesn't matter yet. We're GONNA talk about five G. later on in the show what you need to know about it the challenges and rolling it out across the US and whether you'll even be able to connect to five G. With the new IPHONE are calling. We'll night is going to join us later on for that but first, let's talk about the phones themselves. Jillian. Phone has championed edges. Let's get that out of the way. That's probably the most important thing here, right? Okay. But obviously, there's more than that what stood out to you most about the new iphones twelve as someone who takes a lot of photos and tests the cameras on phones a lot. A. Lot of their camera upgrades. We're the most exciting thing for me and and I really like how a lot of those camera upgrades are kind of for the most part. All across the entire lineup from the 699 iphone twelve mini, you're getting the same main camera that they improve the aperture on as the iphone twelve pro. But for the most part that iphone twelve pro, you get these new features like pro raw, which gives you the ability to edit. Raw photos and also get the benefits of apples, computational photography, and that is just someone something that's really exciting for someone who takes a lot of raw photos with my camera just gives you more granular control over photo editing and also the other thing is they're bringing night mode to every single lens that's on this phone. So finally, you can take a Selfie, at night and not have to worry about it being too terrible, looking or grainy. So overall I think the entire suite of camera features on the entire range is pretty exciting and pretty dramatically better than what you had last year on the iphone eleven. And tell us about some of the video improvements to yes. For the improvements, they added the ability to shoot HDR with Dolby Vision, which is you know apparently the only phone that can do this and basically lets you get this program cinematic looking effector or look. You could say with all of your videos at ten bits of it's like super high quality. It just looks really good. With the option to edit the colors and have really good cinematic looking video as well with the iphone twelve pro you there have this improved stabilization system that moves the sensor itself. So basically, in fact, you're getting something that feels and looks much more high quality than ever before, and again, this is somewhere where apple leads compared to every other phone manufacturer except maybe Samsung is pretty close. No one else does the ability to shoot video quality this well, and it's just every year. It just seems to be getting further and further away from other companies even like you. Google. Pixel phones that take really great photos Mike what did you make the event? You know my favorite thing that I saw this week was the mini, the small phone small phones in general are exciting to me. Our colleague Brian Barrett wrote this week that the arrival of the iphone twelve mini is a harbinger of good for the small phone community I think you know fabulous when they came out what was it like eight years ago or so we started seeing these gigantic phones and then. People really liked them and they started them in huge numbers. So phones just kept getting bigger and bigger and bigger. We've all been waiting for phones to get small again, phones have gotten smaller, but they haven't really gotten small enough, and now this year I think phones are starting to get just about small enough to satisfy the people who are looking for small phone I was out last week two weeks ago at A. Socially distanced event and I saw a guy with a Sony experience x to compact, which is like a really tiny. It's even smaller than the iphone mini android phone and I asked him about it. I went over to him six feet away and I said, Hey, what is that and he started going on and on about it and the way that he was talking about it was so passionate and I realize that. Like okay. You know what? There is a huge market. People are really really passionate about smartphones and people are GonNa flip when they see the mini I think coming until November So I, think for people who really want it. They're going to have to resist clicking that buy button for a couple of weeks

Phone Apple Lauren Mike United States Michael Cholerae Senior Editor Julian Chicago Senior Associate Jillian Julie Brian Barrett Google Dolby Vision Writer Samsung Editor
Where's Everyone Moving To?

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:06 min | 1 year ago

Where's Everyone Moving To?

"Murray Pitino from Bloomberg City lab so much joining us. You recently wrote an article kind of looking at a bunch of the the moving data because we've. We've definitely been hearing a lot of things about this great migration and all these people moving from covert and you kind of. Took a dive into this question. Exactly, we've seen a lot of anecdotal evidence about a so-called urban exotic. So we thought that it'd be interesting to try to do a summary of the interesting data points. We could get our hands on. Yeah. Where did you look at this data because I really into data at the indicator I don't know it just. It's it's a really good point. So. We do get a fair amount of research coming from moving companies real estate aggregate, or is like Zillow and We did find a quite more nuanced story. What did you find I? Mean I feel like the the story has been at least the anecdotal story has been like people are fleeing cities they're moving to the country and sort of settling down like there's this excess and so what did you find when you actually looked at actual data? What story did tell? Yeah. So we found that over all it seems like people actually during the during the stay at home order is between March and June. People moved away less than they usually do, and that's what the the moving data told us. But overall, we also saw really interesting regional nuances. We have seen a lot of people moving out of especially Manhattan. But also a lot of people moving in San Francisco and we're going it's kind of a story about civil thing. But what we've seen is that a fair amount of people who move out of San Francisco in New York City tend to go to actually also pretty big cities like Los, Angeles Chicago Atlanta also Seattle, and so it seems like people are moving from the what Los Angeles is a bigger city I don't know 'cause I. Yeah. The it was like not the story that. I expected because I, was like Oh they're moving from the biggest cities to smaller cities. Blessed Angeles isn't a smaller city I think in Los Angeles people can have a little more space. It seems like people are maybe not necessarily leaving urban places but going to urban places where they can maybe have more space or something like that. Yeah. That is definitely interesting and We have data from a real estate consultant and the that in Manhattan whom sales had dropped by fifty six percents year-over-year. But in suburban counties around the city the had increased by actually forty four percent. Your of a year the other thing that I really loved in your article was that you took a look at history. which I thought was such a fascinating perspective. You kind of look back in time a little bit at past. Pandemics and sort of big issues in in big cities in the US would you find? While a thing we did see out in previous pandemic mentioned the Spanish flu but also the cholera cities have always been historically resilient. And have managed to kind of recover from all the hardship that has happened because you looked at I think in London back in eighteen, forty nine, they had ten thousand people die of cholera within a few months and then a huge fire destroyed a lot of the city. But right after that, the city's role as sort of the world's leading financial center at that time. Actually grew. So few experts we've talked to. Kind of expect the same thing to happen with the the current pandemic even though pretty big shift that has happened in maybe was there before is the whole working from home. Movement that is happening Sarah. It kind of depends how what the norms regarding this. Turn up to to be you know like people return to the office or will people who can stay working from home right? So this time might be a little different because we are establishing a protocol now where. We don't need to necessarily be at work. So we all still might be working jobs that are technically based in New, York or San Francisco but we could be living elsewhere yet and I think another important thing is that a there was an overall trend of population in dense urban city centers growing less fast than than people in suburban areas. So this is this is a trend that we that was already happened. Basically, it may have been accelerated. So you're based out of London from what I understand is that right? Exactly. Yeah. What's happening in London are people leaving London is at the same thing as New Yorker people saying like London is over. Notice definitely a good question. I. I. Live in London and Rents has dropped quite a lot recently is your rent dropped. It has actually buy a lot or just like a little bit or a by a fair amount because I feel like people are people tend to. At least from what? I see a b. kind of leaving the. The center. So yeah, I. Guess we'll have to see.

New York City London Los Angeles Manhattan Bloomberg City San Francisco Murray Pitino United States Zillow Consultant LOS Seattle York Atlanta
"cholera" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

Project Upland Podcast

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"cholera" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

"Shotgun out in about two weeks they're doing good. Yeah. So you have ten puppies. So are they imagine you're not going to keep them all are how long are you going to keep them? They're basically going to go out toward the middle of October. I mean they're young and so it's not like someone can go out and hunt these little guys very long but they'll. They'll be going there all spoken for they'll be going through the woods they'll be cholera broke. They're going to be three quarters housebroke, and then they'll also begun broke and So they're doing really well but fans, they're just it's like you guys are coming on faster than I thought you would be. Yeah well, maybe the cooler air has got their wheels turning to well, it's it's definitely get some wound up because you know you know as I do when you have all young on bird and he's trying to track it through the woods and then they start casting out casting out coming back, casting out come back. That's not the time to bring them in. Well, I've got two of them that don't WanNa, come in. Nor is it the time to you know tap with the collar anything because you don't want to do anything negative when they're associated with that? Yesterday. I was going through the soaking wet aspen friend get this pup to come in, and she's like one more loop one more than my take I found it one more. Finally, I got I was so puff soaked and every time we hit one of those aspen trees it was just raining. Cold this since you mentioned it, I'm curious about your gun introduction with the pops because I've got a I don't know if we've had a chance to speak but I've I've got a puppy. She's about.

cholera
Sudan declares state of emergency over deadly floods

Freakonomics Radio

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Sudan declares state of emergency over deadly floods

"Sudan has declared a three month state of emergency after unusually heavy seasonal rains that have led to flooding and loss of life and left tens of thousands of people homeless. Tenaga Chip Coto is deputy director of the UN's humanitarian agency Gauche in the Sudanese capital Khartoum. They're flooding has affected over half a million people and then houses that have been totally partially damaged or collapse was over 100,000. So you can you can tell this quite big is affecting the whole country. But it hasn't to say this is the flood period for her, too, But they say it has been way above the norm. So that's why I'm having this impact currently, and it's the flooding caused by hours of torrential rain or or the flooding of the river Nile. It's both. It's both. So if you look at the western parts of the country that's been affected is more your your flash flooding and you get rain's coming incident but also upstream and when the action for blue now is utopia so intimate, so Pia impacting us quite a lot. AM River Banks being briefed, for instance, the Luminal midst the wet now, which is in factual, that area is overflowing and affecting a large area in hunting itself. And those people who have lost their homes, both local residents, and of course, I would imagine lots of refugees and internally displaced people who've lost their shelter. What provisions is being made for them. So before the rains is mentioned, we have joined season so every year we prepared beforehand we preposition our stocks in strategic areas. So areas where you have your displaced people. As you know, Sudan is about more troubling people at this place because ofthe conflict we have drifted. Jesus. Well, bumping one million refugees in Sudan is well and also in certain areas where we know that flood in the regular basis. So the stocks have them The only challenge you having these days that the rains have been way more. Then we expected so as a result, this talk that we had preposition now running law. We all scores a second. And imagine the health system mistress as well. When you have your reins, people need your your medical medical support, but also looking at issues around your your cholera. When there's rain get cholera. You also have your malaria. Making sure people get water to drink is also a big issue in some areas that are flooded. Schools have been flooded and Children to go back to school. So there are a lot of things that are going on most people who are affected along the river. Now they're seeking shelter with strangers, relatives and then is only the ones that do not money to go to friend's urges, or we're friends relate to that as well. Those are the ones that have been sheltered, using tense or you know the concrete buildings. Is there? Um, any silver lining to this particular dark cloud all the rains welcoming away after a period all the drought. The rain's always always bring in good myself. Agriculture. And also for animals. It means that I wasn't able to have grazing land. But right now we don't know what's more. Is it away the stage where it has caused a lot of damage for the compliments because there are some crops that underwater so The impact is yet to assist. As you can imagine. The focus right now is to measure that lives are saved. But that said, I think this is all happened in a country where the economy is that performing too well. It's been in decline for quite a while. We have coffee like any other country. There's competition in the cases of over there around 13,000 cases and slept over 800. Kids were also having a not breaking polio, so a lot of things that are going on and this is adding a layer off neat. We have not seen the end of the rings, so we expect more flooding for the next two or three weeks. Soldiers stop point is really required.

Sudan Chip Coto Am River Banks Khartoum UN Deputy Director Polio Gauche Malaria
"cholera" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"cholera" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Kansas City recently learning that starting right guard Laurin Duvernay Tartuffe Would opt out of the 2020 season a decision that might 10 inbound respects. I was inspired by it. Talk about selflessness and sacrificing and so many people in society have got so much during the epidemic, and we can never think all those you know. Health care professionals enough So I think we should be grateful of inspired by him. But also, I think won't bring back to a football discussion. If we were talking and in a month from today, or certainly 2 to 3 months ago, I think we're going to see some truly transformative things happened this year because Unfortunately, the variables is it's going to impact the season. It could be a plague Cholera quarterback and we're starting with the defending champions starting offense alive. It's a significant football move. We can minimize that. But by no means that I expected to be the last one. Tannenbaum, referring to the fact that Vernie Tartuffe is a frontline responder. The health care field as well. Can't city quarterback Patrick Mahomes acknowledged that there is some risk and returning to the team facility for training campus says he's comfortable with protocols established by the NFL on its players union to ensure a safe environment to say SportsCenter all night on ESPN radio. I'm Jim Basketball. Zion Williamson will be out of quarantine by the time New Orleans plays its first official game. N BA restored at Disney. The league said Saturday that Williams will have to serve a four day quarantine for Leaving the Disney bubble on July 16 to tend to an urgent family matter. He did return last night and immediately went into quarantine about this. The MBA is investigating what l a Clippers guard Lou Williams did while on an excused absence from the Orlando campus. So he can access the league can assess the length of his re quarantine process. Williams was photographed and Atlanta Gentleman's Club on Thursday night. In the photograph. He was holding a drink and wearing an MBA mask. Give it out on the Orlando campus. Ramona Shelburne, Bobby marks on this Williams predicament. I think there's Probably going to be a minimum 10 day quarantine here. I think maybe we could even look at 22 weeks here. I think that I think the lead with the league's problem set an example here because of how much they have put into Thiss MBA bubble for the safety of everyone, And I think if you're if you're looking at things like the Lakers, who play them, even if he does have negative, you know, over the four days, there's no there's no guarantee that he might still have a Corona virus in his system when they do play. To the end of a protocol says that you can have excused absences for deaths in the family. Family emergencies previously scheduled weddings and Lou Williams had an excused absence to go attend the funeral of a very close family friend in Atlanta. So that's all kosher. But while he was in Atlanta on Thursday night, a rapper who was at the club that Lou Williams was was visiting, took pictures of him and tagged it. Ah, you know, tagged him in the photo quickly deleted those photos and then later on Jack Carlo. The wrapper says those photos were old. I just miss Liu and I posted an old photo The N B. A obviously saw the photos they haven't They questioned Williams about what he was doing while he was in Atlanta away on this excused absence from the Orlando campus, and he has to, He's explained to them. He went to the club, he said. He was there for a short time. He went to go pick up dinner on DH. You see on social media. He's subsequently said Anybody who knows me knows that I go there all the time. They have the best wings and in Atlanta if you look at the menu There's actually some wings that have his name on the menu. So part of the story checks out. But the question is, does the end Bahia need to record in teaming re quarantine him for a longer period of time than just four days now that he has admitted and has been photographed at a gentleman's club. The Toronto Raptors, meantime, continue to use their platform to advocate for black lives matter and end systemic racism. Is the N B a inches closer to the resumption of their season. Toronto entered the bubble in Orlando on July 9th, with three buses reading black lives matter, and people took notice. Team President Messiah Jerry spoke with Charles Barkley and Warriors forward Draymond Green on Thursday during an interview on TNT, where the latter made an incorrect assumption about the teams need for leadership and accountability. When it Claude comes, toh Black people in Canada. This was that exchange you guys have on your bus, black lives matter. And as a Canadian team, it doesn't directly impact your team because you're an entire different country. What made you guys take the stand and put it on your bus? I think one of 22 teams that actually went through with it. Where that idea come from. And why did you guys feel the need to push that through? Well, we thought thanks, Dreamin. You've been unbelievable to on this and on what you're speaking on on DH. I think that we just proud of you for us, Way said we were going to use the bubble as A statement, right? We say side. We're going to use this place as a platform on we thought that coming in here, you have to make a statement You have to for me. You have to create awareness what you guys are doing over there? Is creating that when we are talking about this, and We have to continue to do that. And we thought, what great away than to write through Florida for three hours on DH shows and show people you know, we know what's going on in the country. On. Why head into the bubble and what what is going on here? What Adam Silver has done here to get the league back who are excited about that? But there is something on our minds too on. We wanted to show people that as we come in, not just drawn around. Those were represent the MBA that there's something that's all on the minds of all the players. And all of the teams well, said the late David Stern will be inducted into the women's Basketball Hall of Fame. The long time eh? NBA commissioner was instrumental in launching the WN BA in 1997. Can't.

Lou Williams Orlando campus Laurin Duvernay Tartuffe Atlanta football Cholera Disney Kansas City Lakers Adam Silver Basketball Hall of Fame Toronto Raptors ESPN Clippers Ramona Shelburne David Stern Orlando Jim Basketball Tannenbaum NBA
"cholera" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:01 min | 2 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The house was talkin home repairs home repairs in the time of covert that was a novel wasn't was that a novel it is now as long as it was love in the time of cholera so today it's home repairs in the time of covert and even a better novel than that other one we got it all right so we are going to get back to you talking about US some electrical repairs this morning but first and far more important than that your calls let's go to the phones did did did did did did was talk to Gail Hey Gayle welcome home hi hi I got a problem with my shoulder and I felt yeah I thought that the solar gave me power when the Electric Company shot there did their system down I don't have it when they shut down I shut down that is true I'm wondering how can I fix this okay well here's the thing the only way to fix it it's actually it's it's not broken it is the way things are required to be in by the way that requirement is is something that the electric utilities actually put on to solar right now in other words what your solar is doing is the way that it is configured in in terms of the the electric grid is it feeds energy you know back out into the grid and it offsets of what you're pulling from the grid so in order to have your solar produced power directly for you you got to have a battery okay then your solar company then your solar array will be not only pushing back out into the grid during the day and so on but it'll also be charging up your home battery and then when the the way the batteries are configured with solar then when there's a brown out or black out in the neighborhood your battery kicks on like an emergency generator and it then powers up you know selected circuits that you've chosen now one of the things that a lot of people don't realize is a you know back up batteries are pricey they are but they're worth it in the sense that you know that you know it's it's a back up generator in ever renewable backup generator for the house up however you have to treat it like a back up generator think in those terms because if you wanted to have your entire home running per usual during a during the blackout you would need an array of batteries at this point you'd need several batteries okay so okay singled a single battery though can be really useful because you can hook up a number of different circuits like th four five maybe six the very important circuits to it for instance the circuit that runs the microwave and the refrigerator and keeps it going the circuit that obviously runs the television were the stereo for emergency reports and information and some lighting circuits and and so on it's getting easier to run the circuit these days because lighting is all LED and so we're actually using less energy and in those terms in our house than before but just so you know you're gonna if you get with your solar company and say Hey I want to back up battery than they're going to ask you okay then what all so do you want powered during that time another use by the way gale of your backup battery which is my favorite use of backup batteries is you know nowadays if you've got solar in California you're going to be on time of use billing from from the power company in other words your the money that we're spending on kilowatts in the afternoon is like ten times more expensive than what we're paying for kilowatts at four AM in the morning okay and so what impact a battery can do is your system can be configured so that the backup battery starts adding a little bit of powers that you start sipping off of it in the late afternoon and early evening when you need energy the most but your panels aren't necessarily putting out the most because the sun's get lower in the sky and the price of energy is higher and so it's a buffer in it mitigates the the use of kilowatts in the afternoon and so it again it's just another brilliant way of bringing the cost of electricity down in the system so that's what back up batteries are for know if you have a straight up solar like I don't have a back up battery for my house so yeah when the power is off it's off you can also just get a a a back up generator if you wanted to do the same thing but if you've got solar it's a great way to do it by introducing a but that's how your solar works it's not broken okay all right thank you thank you you're very welcome okay okay you know what when we come back let's take some more calls what do you say Tina are you ready to it she's buried in social media over there I can just see that you just I say I say her name and she looks up and she just says something ran out for fun okay you're listening to home a dean sharp the house was for more to come Layla Mohammed as.

"cholera" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"About all the new reckon you haven't you haven't got a gale out airtime. Oh Gosh no couldn't find all these people are there city folks folks don't have girls accept what your moon city is already go to miss. You know for them down there and it'll help away the name of it a lot that you have a girl down there. Yeah had one down there. Is that why you came up here? What did you did pining down in the middle of the road highway? Yeah she might be. Don't hardly time so fixing to get a new business again throughout kind of an opportunity but you got a likely opportunity checks. Cholera was married plan. Your standards are too high by the way. Congratulations congratulations. George was voted the best announcer and television by one thousand five hundred newspaper editors and the recent fame poll and that is the real.

Cholera George
"cholera" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Is one of the biggest killers of children around the world in terms of infectious disease and then it like a caller I mean cholera has been just one of the most awful diseases in human history and it still kills tens of thousands of people every single year mean even today and it just generally is it's the pickle oral route of disease transmission is kind of gross talk about is but it's when sewage contaminates sources that end up going into people's mouths like drinking water like soil that you know that that ends up on food and so for this reason like I do you know who is reading this the thing by the United Nations about this sort of their toilet initiatives trying to get toilets and clean sewage sewage disposal systems to people around the world and and they say bluntly toilets save lives we should think about that because obviously the toilet is a nice thing to have it's a good convenience that makes life more statically pleasing but it's also like a life or death question right in and it is so easy to take it for granted just because it's this is this thing that we're we're grateful for it when we have it and we need it but we're also very willing to forget it and and and probably not plan our life around it too much unless we absolutely have to yeah and in one way to definitely no you shouldn't take it for granted is to think about all the people who are around the world who are deprived of these amenity like cording to the World Health Organization and UNICEF about sixty percent of the global population either don't have a toilet in their home or they don't have one that safely removes removes human waste of that might have one but it doesn't maybe it just goes into a place where it re enters drinking water areas and stuff among the fact the site also is that like almost nine hundred million people world I'd still regularly practice open defecation just out you know they they have to go wherever like in the training field or or something like that yeah just means somewhere that is not being captured or treated like if you had if you had a properly dug Hitler train that would not count but it so you're going somewhere in the open like an open pit or something and then that this was crazy so that the they think globally about eighty percent of wastewater generated by human civilization flows back into the ecosystem without being treated without being treated or leader sent while yeah now I mean it is just ramp around the world this obviously is going to have be having lots of negative environmental consequences but also negative health outcomes for humans and then another thing that we shouldn't take for granted is like just the idea of your people don't like the idea of fly is getting into their their stuff right so like if if people have an outhouse repeat latrine they tend to want want to keep a lid on and one thing that does is it helps keep flies from getting down in there and buzzing around and of course that would be an annoyance when people are trying to use these facilities but that's also not just in this is that a concern when when human feces are left on covered their breeding ground for for like the fly music historians known as the bizarre fly which there's some evidence for disease vector for the bacterium chlamydia trachomatis which can cause an infection in the eyes called trachoma which is a leading cause of blindness around the world it's it leads to a hundreds of thousands of people being blind worldwide so again we have we have real life consequences actual hygiene public health consequences to lack of efficient for the tree and sewage technology I can't emphasize this enough the toilet and I want to be very clear about this and not just the toilet in your house but the toilet paired with a waste disposal and sewer infrastructure that's really important those things together are not just a statically nice they save lives this is a life and death issue yeah and that just ran back to a joke this is exactly why the sign it I kia and the model apartment says do not use this toilet not hooked up to anything let's call it in and of itself will do nothing exactly we'll revisit this theme throughout these episodes of it so without a flush so I guess we should sort of consider the history of of toilet technology in in in consider some broad categories right so without a flush toilet connected to a safe disposal system like a sewer or US will contain septic tank what options do you have for disposing of human waste there are a few main categories in the pretty much all have some major disadvantages one of course as we've discussed is open defecation that's just anywhere in the environment we know now that's that's dangerous they can lead to disease risks another option is pit latrines the like an outhouse you on a whole you know and these these are better than open defecation because they can be covered up and they can keep stuff separating contained but also there outside your home you lose the convenience and the privacy if they're inside your home there can be problems with smells and exposure to waste so they they might be better from a health perspective than just open defecation or defecation industry water sources but they're also that their problems with them that make people not preferred them generally and then you've got like chamber pots in buckets historically these are very common these were often emptied by pouring the contents out of windows in the city streets which is obviously on sanitary even though it's more convenient like you do your stuff indoors the impact is sort of the same as like open defecation on city streets single and unsanitary conditions and disease and all that yeah like immediately right outside your your your building so ideally what you want given the limitations of all these things is some kind of appliance that allows you to do your thing inside the privacy and comfort of your own home and then removes the waste automatically to somewhere that it can be safely stored or treated that doesn't allow one pleasant sights and smells to bother you and doesn't allow the waste and pollute the surrounding environment or get into drinking water and soil the did you know the customers using natural gas can save up to hundreds of dollars per year and that natural gas costs less to operate than electricity oil and propane home with natural.

cholera
"cholera" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"What is cholera GOP congressman can box think about the proceedings in the Senate and would he like to see what this is called you'll hear from him coming up in the next minute or so first let's check that John Moore said what we had a lot of problems early really stacked in fact just not a lot of new problems in your drive and not a lot of big axes were used up around right now there is a crash on a hundred thirty six the highway eighty five north east side of town and the downtown you've got a crash being cleared spear and six them you do drive downtown though very heavy just getting into downtown south and I twenty five is loaded up at a hundred and forty four that's true that little construction zone there and then your sluggish from I seventy six into they'll jump out of downtown starting at center they always down in the tech center that drive out of bed was Kelly still pretty slow from Lincoln up past see four seven C. four seventy to a pretty good little bit soul revolution Broadway but that's about it for your ease bouncy for seventy drug typical for driving the war area southbound two to five every from Iowa northbound two two five is heavy right through the central part of a war past Mississippi in Alameda and then that I seventy drive really crash was bound by seventy deport that was pulled off onto the shoulder westbound I. seventy heavy front Pena Boulevard and that includes that ramp on the southbound two two five this report is sponsored by American but it's a refinance your mortgage and save a thousand dollars or more each month without restarting your term it only takes ten minutes to get started would you choose American financing three oh three six nine five seven thousand or American financing dot net analysts number one eight two three three four regulated by the division of real estate next update at ten minutes okay way eight fifty a a ninety four one FM your listening to Colorado's morning news later today at three it's big Alan Jo Jo on KO a.

congressman Senate John Moore Kelly Lincoln Iowa Mississippi Alameda Colorado Alan Jo Jo GOP
"cholera" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:45 min | 3 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on KCRW

"Him you can get cholera by drinking water contaminated with the bacteria what we're looking for in our device is the presence of a toxin gene that is associated with the caller that you see in really really big outbreaks that's Catherine Clayton she's talking about a device she and colleagues at Purdue University invented for rapidly detecting cholera bacteria in water the idea is to find potential sources of an outbreak right now most tests for cholera require time and a well equipped laboratory Clayton's devices small it's built around a smart phone but works like a portable laboratory it has heating units it has lenses and it has a phone to do a lot of image processing the many lab has chemicals that will make more copies of something and cholera bacteria called the toxin gene a process called amplification when you amplify the gene and makes a solution more viscous like honey so you take a water sample put it in the device and wait about thirty minutes if the sample becomes more viscous you found the harmful bacteria but cholera experts have pointed to issues with Clayton's device one is it only samples a tiny drop of water and it could happen to be a drop with no bacteria in it even taken from contaminated water supplies Clayton says they're working on what she calls a concentrator so that we can take bigger volumes of water in concentrated down making it easier to find the cholera bacteria even if it's only there in low levels another question some epidemiologists have raised is will it work in places where it's needed Clayton says they've done some initial field testing and bug what dash and more is planned for the fall and scientists still aren't sure how and when and whether contaminated water will actually lead to an outbreak Clayton says having a simple portable test could help explore that issue I think it's gonna start answering some of these scientific questions about how caller works and about how it's transmitted in about how it shows up in the water Clayton under colleagues have formed a company to develop the device but she knows making a cholera test doesn't put her on a fast track for financial success instead she says her background in engineering has made her feel a sense of obligation to help find solutions to global problems that's really what I enjoying knowing could happen and what the future could look like Joe Palca NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news this is Casey are W. I'm leery Parral Orange County Democrats are celebrating a victory that seemed almost impossible ten years ago today there are officially more registered Democrat voters that Republican in the county the last time that happened was a brief period in the nineteen seventies just after president Nixon resigned amidst the Watergate scandal so what's the tipping point of the switch this time around with us to sort that out is Mike moody and he is a professor at Chapman university professor thanks so much for joining us thanks so much for having me so Hillary Clinton beat Donald Trump in Orange County in twenty sixteen and all the counties congressional seats turn blue in twenty eighteen mid terms is it surprising to see that there are now more Democrat voters I don't think it's surprising I think the surprise though is the fact that it happened so quickly if you look at the history of weren't county as you mentioned all Republicans have held a registration advantage almost continuously since the county inception in the late eighteen hundreds of Republicans out a massive advantage in the early nineteen nineties are that started to decrease a little by little each year and I think a big reason there is that Donald Trump is very unpopular in the county even among county Republicans down in the changing county demographics really sped up this this dramatic shift in registration numbers I know you said it had happened rather quickly but why does there seem to be a delay in this trend among voter registrations I mean county residents have been voting in Democrats why are the registration numbers only just starting to reflect that you know it's it's a good question I think up a big reason is that the county Republican structure in base has been so strong for so many years and the Republicans in Orange County historically have done a very good job yeah getting Republicans elected school boards and to city council in into water district ultimately leading to your Republican victories in your state legislature and in our congressional races and and the Democrats still or catching up of Republicans still hold an advantage in boast our city council races but a lot of it goes back to the fact that the Republicans always had a very very strong face gotcha all right so the Orange County Democratic Party says they have seen a big increase in registration in the past years so what gives the combination of of the climate in in also in addition to that the changing demographics of the county it's the fact that the county changing because change is run in large part by a growing a Latino electorate also the growing Asian American population in the county and also the young if you look back in the early two thousands or carry voters between the ages of eighteen and thirty four one are aligned with Republicans about forty two to twenty nine percent that has flipped we're today those who are younger than thirty four hold registration advantage over Republicans scanned the black popularity of the incumbent president has that kind of put put the foot on the pedal to to make this change occurred will be faster rate hard to other than the political climate currently at hand and the demographic change your talking about do you expect the Democrats to have only a brief lead or does it have some legs as a possible at Orange County has turned blue for good I don't know for sure you turn blue for good there still is a very strong fiscally conservative our base that exist in the county so I would see a very strong democratic registration base a strong Republican registration based we also have more than a quarter of the county registered as a new party preference joke the smoke foreseeable future it's gonna be a purple county he technical public have a hard time given the lack of popularity of the incumbent president but depending on what happens the national landscape in the years to come that certainly might have an effect and registration trends in Orange County I want to see how it all shakes out Mike moody and is a professor at Chapman university Mike thanks so much for coming on always a pleasure thank you so much.

cholera twenty nine percent thirty minutes ten years
"cholera" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Died of what they think now is cholera he got sick and they kinda denied it was cholera but he was surrounded by people with cholera but they were like no you don't have cholera and he was like I'm pretty sure of cholera because everyone around me has calories and no it's not cholera not you James but I think it does that's kind of widely believed to be his cause of death today well the first place he was interred was the Nashville city cemetery with the cholera victims yeah it was a legal thing it wasn't called the National City cemetery back then but the the way I saw it was basically like if you died from infectious disease infectious disease you had to be buried there yeah it's close to the ground water as possible yeah so that's the first place that is buried we need like a dang or something here because he's been entered one time manage a dang let's let's hope Jerry so he's he's buried there in the again the National City cemetery like a common caller victim and somebody said well what this is no place for a beloved president to to be buried we did it we need to show some respect and also more closely follow the as well the wishes of as well yeah keep because he said that he wanted to be met buried at poke place which was his mansion where he and his wife lived and they they moved in there they actually built in like a pretty sweet little memorial on the front in the front yard you can see drawings of it there's the house there's the Memorial like right there in this little front yard is pretty cute yeah and his wife Sarah thank you for for remember your name I was like frantically searching for it could find yeah his wife there I guess you know she was like well let me just live for another I don't know forty two years I read that I was like is that a misprint no in this article but it's not yeah exactly according this article he never died oh my god so yeah she lived another forty two years which is outstanding great look great long life and once she finally died there was a bit of an argument over the ownership of Paul place and kind of like it where they should be ultimately in there whatever what they thought was our final resting place whatever else is like but we're sure they're real final resting place to be right well I think it they they would technically be there but he in his will had had left the stipulation that big state of Tennessee could take Polk place in and own it as long as a poke would be allowed to live there forever right and definitely said that's an improper to eighty which is illegal was so this call is this part of your will is knowing void left it open to his heirs to do what what they wished with this place which was turn around and sell it to a developer because he didn't have any children these were all relatives who didn't give us a bit about what happened to this to his beloved home yeah I can't believe that was sold by developers in nineteen hundred and they demolished it they demolished in this is like this they were Tennessee was thinking of turning this into the governor's mansion in preserving this and they said no get rid of it so they actually disinterred him to the state of Tennessee this in turn he and Serra and move there remains to the state capitol in you think okay that would be the end of the story the guy's been buried two two two times now no one two three times been buried three times let him rest in peace right but it's not a buried and then was it three times it was buried in the city twice yeah right I know it kind of concern to me too so I'm trying to understand economics yeah that's the old saying buried no never mind very thrice removed only twice that's it.

cholera forty two years
"cholera" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now, there's another threat cholera health officials in Mozambique say more than twenty four hundred people. There have been infected by the disease so far five have died since Wednesday health officials have raised vaccinate as many people as possible earlier today, we read Dr illeg, Johnny. He's director general of the National Institute of health in Mozambique, and he's helping coordinate the campaign. All our nation is eight hundred and seventy thousand. So we are distributing the vaccines held securities in some ends where the people and the ocean. Organizing more by genes that go around. Markets that people got there, and he's he can do that. Because the vaccine these. Auto space. So vaccine is being designed these gency relation. I want to jump in here. You have this oral vaccine what's been the reaction. Have you had a great many people taking part? Yes. Caller, knocking unknown disease in Mozambique. We have had out fakes caller, many years. So people know what probably new he that cholera is a deadly disease. We had expected in the tunnel ended yesterday, we've had vaccinate two hundred seventeen thousand people cheese about a Coulter. Well, I'll nations if he should really see many people and one into the action.

Mozambique director general cholera Dr illeg National Institute of health Coulter
"cholera" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Or what else was taken one drastic action against illegal immigration and threatens another President Trump has moved to cut US hate to three Central American nations whose citizens are migrating north and declared he is likely to close America's southern border next week unless Mexico halts flow of migrants, his administration has moved to cut direct aid to El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Correspondent Robert Francis. A work officially kicks off his twenty twenty democratic presidential campaign better known as Beto the former congressman represented El Paso for three house terms until a failed Senate bid last year addressed about a thousand supporters in his hometown Saturday before campaign stops in Houston and Austin a work enter the race March fourteenth and had already visited nine states but had promised to return to El Paso for an official watch. Correspondent Rhonda rockstar? The number of Mozambique, cyclone survivors who have contracted cholera has risen dramatically. Authorities say the number of cases zombie has jumped to more than two hundred and seventy needed twice the amount recorded the day before a group Doctors Without Borders says is seeing some two hundred likely cholera cases per day in the port city. Bayer alone where relief workers a hurrying to restore the damage water system. The Portuguese news agency LUSA says so far no cholera deaths have been confirmed. But the group is pushed up the death toll in central Mozambique from the cyclone to just throw the five hundred in general authorities have warned the toll is highly preliminary as flood waters received reveal mobile, I'm Chelsea with asthma. Voters in Turkey began. Casting ballots in Sunday's municipal elections which are seen as a barometer of president air to watch popularity amid a sharp economic downturn of the nation that straddles Europe at Asia. Aired one has campaigned tirelessly.

cholera El Paso Mozambique President El Salvador Trump US Doctors Without Borders Robert Francis Rhonda rockstar Guatemala Turkey congressman Mexico Honduras America Senate
"cholera" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Cholera minding his colleagues at the controversial deal all began with the most radical farther is left members of the new House Democratic majority who I posted then quickly spread from the internet southern. That's most radical proposals not exactly an auspicious start. The democratic leader Chuck Schumer of New York complained for five years. The leader hasn't brought one Bill to the floor which will deal with the issue of climate change, the green new deal does have the support of all the Democrats senators running for the White House by new Capitol Hill. Congress has just handed the president a big victory an immigration mailing to override his veto of a Bill that would have blocked his declaration of a national emergency at the southern border. Oregon democrat Peter defazio calling it nothing more than an end run around a majority. Bipartisan majority of both the house and the Senate in complete disregard of our constitutional system of separation of power Republican Sam graves, keeping our nation secure should be this presidents, very highest priority. And it is this president's very highest priority measure was expected to fail. Although Democrats say it shows the intent of congress and provides ammunition in upcoming legal cases, Capitol Hill. Correspondent Wally is more than a million private wells. That supply drinking water and mostly rural parts of the midwest could face the risk of contamination from floodwater posing a health concern, they could linger long after the flooding subsides. I was Senator Johnny earned says her state will need long-term help after spring flooding inundated. The southwest part of the state. Levy, south of council bluffs has been compromised. And so we'll have to work with a corps of engineers US. Army corps of engineers to one understand why we're seeing river management slip away, and what we are going to do to recover those levees stagnant. Water could linger for days or even weeks is flooding starts to subside. This is townhall dot com. The tradition..

president Congress White House Cholera Chuck Schumer Peter defazio New York Oregon Army corps Sam graves Senator Johnny Wally Levy Senate five years
"cholera" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"How about crab horror? Yes. So we we've mentioned I think on the show before the invasive European green crab, the car carquinez main ass-, which is an invasive species in North America thought to be spread by ships being carried across the ocean. And ballast water. Yeah. Belly we touched at least briefly on the fact that they're too small to eat. But if you have the. Proper equipment and methods. You can kind of process them down into a rather. Tasty. Broth of this been one of the crab stock. Yeah. Crabs doc. Yes. Sensually this is a course has been one of the solutions or attempted solutions. Dominion invasive species problem can we figure out a way for us to eat them. And then we'll certainly come back to another invasive species for which we often try and enroll out this this option the rat. Well, man, the rat is the rat is certainly showing up and even the finest restaurants in in the world, but usually not on the plate at least not while in. But he's looking right. But this isn't the only invasive crap. Oh, no, no. They're a bunch of other species. I think we may have also mentioned the Chinese mitten crab at sprint spread far outside. It's original range. Not look nearly as interesting as the name makes it sound. It's kind of like it's kinda white claws. Maybe little bit mitten. Any not just like full on mittens. You know now now that would be cool. But but it's not like, the boxing crab that has the pom-poms right or it doesn't look like the Hoff crab, and the hydrothermal vent lobster that kind of kind of looks more like it has mittens at least to my. I know I guess comparatively. This is a relatively boring looking grab, but it is a harmful invasive species and brought from one place to another by the discharge of ballast water. Probably. Now, there's also they're even more tragic examples like cholera, so cholera is a diarrheal disease caused by infection with the bacterium vibrio cholerae, and according to the CDC there are an estimated two point nine million cases of cholera infection leading to approximately.

cholera North America CDC
"cholera" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:10 min | 3 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Editor Fergal, Keane. Reporting from Ethiopia to Yemen, next one of the Arab world's poorest countries, which has been devastated by civil war with the widespread food, insecurity and disease is now one of the world's worst humanitarian crisis and part of that onslaught is the worst epidemic of cholera since records began with over one million people affected and almost two thousand five hundred deaths in total. But now scientists say they've discovered the source of the caller a cholera epidemic within the country. So what is color Newsday's, pull Hawking's has been speaking to doctor, Daryl domain from the Wellcome Sanger institute in the UK? One of the scientists involved in the research, cholera is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium vibrio cholerae in which people unfortunately can die rather quickly. If not treated by a loss of fluid via dehydrating. Diarrhea? Right. And spreading the ball says that right? Exactly. So it's it's one of your classic waterborne diseases. So people ingest food or water that's contaminated with the bacterium. And then we'll subsequently get cholera. Yeah. So where do you think that this strain in Yemen came from? Yeah. So we I see the strain that caused the Yemen epidemic. Appearing in South Asia around two thousand six and then we see the strain pop up a few years later around twenty teen causing outbreaks in East African countries like Kenya. Uganda and Tanzania, and it's these strains from eastern Africa that the Yemen strain is most closely related to right? So it started in South Asia it then migrated to east Africa. And then it's ended up in Yemen. Exactly. Yep. So that's that's pretty much the path. And so from the strains that we analyzed it. Seems that Yemen strains are most closely related to those from Kenya. But that just means that we're confident that the strain was present in the East African rea- Iranian prior to its appearance in Yemen. But we don't have enough samples from other places, but then eastern Africa to more precisely track how the strain moved through the region before it got into Yemen. Yeah. And is it a particularly variant strains, this is a tough strain to shake off. Yes. So at the beginning of the epidemic. Many people thought that we were dealing with this a new sort of super bud type strain of cholera. But when we analyze the strands in the lab, this just simply wasn't true at all. And so there's really nothing spectacular about the strain that would suggest that it's special in its ability to cause to widespread epidemic. But the study does highlight really is that caller remains a significant public health threat in some of the world's most vulnerable populations. Right. Can we say that it's quote unquote, success in Yemen is down to the country's civil war, the lack of sanitation, the lack of any sort of health system in place, then. Yeah. Absolutely. So as as we were talking about people get cholera by drinking, contaminated water and in Yemen. You know, there's something like nineteen million out of twenty nine million people without access to clean drinking water or adequate hygiene and sanitation, and it's precisely and these sort of situations where cholera can really spread like a forest fire and tragically. That's what occurred in Yemen. Yeah. I mean, it's a it's an epidemic. Can it get any worse than that still? I mean, so I think the major phase of the dynamic. We saw in twenty seventeen I believe the WHO has reported around three hundred thousand cases this last year in two thousand eighteen so evidently caller remains a significant health threat in Yemen. And we should absolutely be vigilant in in Yemen with regards to cholera, but this is helping us forecast future. Outbreaks elsewhere, this kind of research. Yeah. So I think the real Trump's of the study is that we now have the tools that allow us to understand how caller is spreading across the globe. And with that knowledge, we can really do two major things the first is that we can provide better predictions on where the next caller outbreak Medicare and the second is that we can design rational evidence based interventions to stopping cholera in afflicted regions like Yemen. Doctor Daryl Dolman from the Wellcome Sanger institute. Speaking to Newsday's pulled Hawking's. You're listening to Newsday on the BBC World Service shaima in Kearney with you this morning. A reminder of our main headlines China says it has successfully landed a robotic probe on the far side of the moon the first ever such mission. There's been a sharp fall in apple shares in after hours trading after the company said its latest sales figures will be worse than expected and talks between President Trump and congressional leaders have failed to resolve the budget row, which has shut down parts of the government. Let's get the sports bulletin now. Michael liam's? Thank you,.

Yemen cholera Wellcome Sanger institute South Asia Kenya Newsday Africa waterborne diseases Editor east Africa Diarrhea Ethiopia Fergal Hawking UK Daryl Dolman
"cholera" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"cholera" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Add won't believe the economic environment in China has been further impacted by rising tensions states for the financial markets. This is likely to asphalt of the fire after another whipsawed day that saw the name US indexes. Swing back and forth negative into positive territory. The US secretary of state Mike Pompeo has said he's deeply concerned about an increase in the production of coca leaves the Roman for cocaine in Colombia. He raised the issue during a visit to Colombia Leonardo Russia has this report. The United Nations has reported an annual increase of seventeen percents in the amount of cultural land use for illegal coca crops. The news is worrying both of the US which is the biggest market for illegal drugs and for Columbia, President Trump's main ally in South America. Mr. Pompeo said the two countries would continue to work together to try to reduce coca production by fifty percents over the next four years Columbia says it intends to step up its coca eradication programme Brazil's new economy minister, Paulo gettys has said that the government will start an ambitious privatization program, which would include the mining and energy sectors Righetti said that he would. Produce stereotype measures and cut taxes to encourage economic growth. The main stock exchange index in Brazil has risen sharply. This is the world news from the BBC. The government of mesia's says the army has killed more than two hundred eighty Boko haram militants in days of Landon air raids near the border with Nigeria that events ministry said most of the jihadists had died in airstrikes. Zimbabwe's biggest drinks company. Delta has announced that from Friday, it will only accept payment in hard currencies such as US dollars. The government has condemned. The move as illegal grandfathered reports in a letter to customers delta said it had been forced to act by shortage of foreign currency needed to pay its overseas suppliers. He said some hadn't been paid for months. The problem is one facing many companies in Bob we have to pay suppliers in hard currency that charge. Their products in local bond notes, the value of which is fallen dramatically, but the industry and commerce minister Mangaliso says charging in US dollars is unfair and are acceptable. He said he hoped to meet. Notre executives to discuss the new pricing policy, which he said could not be allowed. Scientists say they've discovered the source of a cholera outbreak in Yemen, which has become one of the worst epidemics of the disease in recorded history using genomic sequencing British and French researchers have identified the cholera strain as one that originated in eastern Africa was probably carried by Yemen to Yemen by migrants. There have been more than a million cases of cholera nearly two hundred thousand of them fatal since the outbreak began in two thousand seventeen police in Britain have arrested two men suspected of arranging the illegal movement of migrants across the channel the man one British the other Iranian were held in the city of Manchester in the past two months, more than two hundred people have reached the southern English coast in small inflatable boats. Those are the latest stories from BBC World news. The new year.

US Mike Pompeo Yemen Brazil BBC Mangaliso cholera Delta Colombia Leonardo Russia Columbia China Colombia United Nations Zimbabwe South America Paulo gettys Bob cocaine Manchester