18 Burst results for "Chip Conley"

"chip conley" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:16 min | 9 months ago

"chip conley" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Transitions, practice mindfulness reframe their mindset on aging and re enter the workforce dedicated to enhancing intergenerational collaboration in an era. When for the first time we have five generations in the workplace, so there's a lot going on over there in the. Modern Elder Academy. The origin of it was I had four years of full time worked at AIRBNB and then with three and a half years now I've been the strategic advisor. On back in two thousand seventeen, when I started to write the book I had a home here on the beach in Baja about an hour north of Kabul San Lucas on the Pacific Ocean. And came back from a run on the beach one day and I just ask myself. Why is it I've been talking to so many interesting so many people in my life. I, hear, people, dealing it irrelevant, bewildered Reno that the AH suicide rate people at forty, five to sixty, five, actually increased by fifty percent in the last twenty years. So, what is it? What is what's missing here and? A friend of mine is a gerontologist said what's missing. We haven't as a society accepted that there's a there's an era of life, and it's not just midlife, but it's middle so middle essence is like the adult Koran to adolescents and adolescents. When you're in routine years, you are in a transition limited space between Charleston and adulthood. And you're going through emotional and hormonal. Changes similarly. If you're injured late forties fifties, you're going through emotional armor, hole and physical changes, and and frankly I think that as Carl young would say you're going to primary operating system change from ego to your soul, and in that process we have absolutely nothing in the way of public policy, government, spending, or even sir, social, understanding or schools are tools for that matter it help people in that era of. The core of Midlife and so knowing that we don't have rights, passage, rituals, or anything like that for people in this era and people going to all kinds of transitions during this era on Irena sidedly create a Beta version of modern elder. Kademi down here and that was really two thousand eighteen. And then we open to the public and follow two thousand Eighteen Renar. How'd Almost eight hundred people from twenty four countries. Come through the program, it's a social enterprise of over sixty percent of the people have been on some of scholarship. We've given them because we believe that wisdom isn't talk. It's shared, and it's been a fascinating experience I mean I really appreciate that after being a for profit, entrepreneurs withdraw even. At in home, sharing was airbnb that I'm a social entrepreneur. I don't make money. Built the campus that I just love the fact. We're helping people spying their sense of self, actualization and transformation at an era in people's lives were a lot of people feel stuck. And I you could have happiness DABID does show. People tend to bottom out with their happiness life satisfaction around forty, five, fifty, fifty two, but actually shows the people get happier with each passing decade after that and yet. BECCA LEVI's worked from Yale Sean that you help people to re shift their mind or Krim ranch shift on aging. At seven and a half years their rife, but we are very little. In the way of mainstream programs, schools tools to help people with this, and that's really a multi mission in my today to beautiful mission, I guess more selfishly. I have a question about how long the wait to come to this beautiful beachfront property in Mexico. Become teach me down here. Let's think of course with a pandemic were closed until October that. We have our October through July calendar. Calender and places we have all kinds a really interesting people are very subject, so our average workshop has about eighteen people in. It is a week usually week, Ron, although we have some five day programs as well, and it's really easy to get to those cops. Airport insisted power from us. There's something called NPS net promoter score. Way of evaluating customer satisfaction. About Ninety, seven hundred ninety eight percents of our seven hundred fifty. Fifty, two, eight hundred. We've gone to the program. Have given us a the highest scores nine or ten on a one to ten. Scale, so it's really clear. We've tapped into something. We like to call it long-life learning. We have lifelong learning long white learning. A. Slight shift on that it says yes, you're a lifelong learn, but the kind of learning that you need to do in Midlife later is to understand how live a life as deep as long and understand the stages of life. You're going through and so in many ways. That's what we help people to do is to shift their mindset on aging and really tap into that Carol. Concept of a growth mindset sounds really really awesome and I'm so glad. Glad you're shining a spotlight on this because you don't see this. The spotlight shined much these days especially in this time of Covid, you're probably seeing a lot of older people are even more willingly than in. Even they were before right so because we had the closed mid March. We have yet to serve not a cohort Erin two and minds, but what we do have is we have hundreds of loans and so what we have heard from them. They absolutely want to stay connected, and so when I when I cohort leaves on a Sunday stay connected by zoom for weeks months, and sometimes years to come, but what we see me more so is a desire for a weekly speaker, so we have a mastery our every week with speakers coming in to talk to our alums about various subjects that relate to midlife and aging, and it drives me. It's not it's not only about midwife it's it's or aging. Sometimes it relates to you know your relationship with money..

Midlife AIRBNB Elder Academy Eighteen Renar Pacific Ocean strategic advisor Kabul San Lucas Baja Carl young Covid Reno Erin BECCA LEVI Mexico Ron Carol Krim ranch Yale
"chip conley" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

04:41 min | 9 months ago

"chip conley" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"It's a funny thing I think being a writer and writing books is about being pregnant. He also true. It's impregnated with some idea, and it's just growing inside of you and you sort of can't ignore it. Keeping you up at night, kicking you, and of course you and I don't remember how experience with real child, but and there's then there's the sense that you really need to nurture it, and and then birth, and for me other than the last Brooke. At work my prior four books all took approximately nine months from the time I really started to build the concept of the book two when I finished the first draft, so it's actually even the time of the pregnancy was comparable. Last one was bachelor and I. Just I was so accelerated in my thinking that that happened pretty quickly so I don't know I'm right now what I'm doing is. That writing energy I have Is satisfied by writing A. Daily blog called wisdom well. That's out there in the world and I, it's that's a blog about. How do you actually cultivate harvest, wisdom and I love that I love the idea of writing short. Our blog post each morning on, although actually used to a lot of know in advance. As just a way for people have to have a real microdosing or snack of wisdom start their. Day Yeah I, Love Your blog and I noticed every now and then you have some guest posts as well. Love to have one from you. That was a that wasn't like my way of of. I'd be honored. That wasn't my. I was just I? Hope you know that wasn't my way of. As I told you your scientific American article. Just like blew me away. It's like Arthur article from Atlantic from last June blew me away and so Arthur just did a Q. and I on on our so I'd love to have you write something, or we can do a Q., and A. or whatever what I know is that? That's interesting Scott is. We don't really have a culture. In Work World or otherwise that is vested in the idea of cultivating harvesting wisdom. Me But it's not that we are a culture of knowledge. Pure truckers, the one who came up with the phrase knowledge worker in Nineteen fifty-nine, he said the future of business will actually be ruled by knowledge workers here we are sixty one years later and seven of the ten most valuable companies in the world today are in backed tech companies. But I. Really believe is that we've moved from a time where we need to retire the concept of the knowledge worker, because everybody has an iphone in their pocket, and a an increasing percentage of the population is what we might call knowledge workers, but I think what is when we're awash knowledge, what we really have scarcity for his is wisdom. Anything it's time for us to actually think about. What would a wisdom worker? And I know that sounds bizarre, but it's an interesting idea. Because Wisdom Ashley speaks to of what you've written about your book I'm a lot of it really speaks to. This idea of wisdom is about pattern. Recognition is being able to. Assimilate! or Cultivate. Some of the patterns. You've. Seen in your life, and then almost developed intuition such that you can see the future. Even before it happens, and I don't think that there's necessarily a direct correlation between wisdom in age I. Think someone can cultivate the rhythm very major be seventy five years old have cultivated noticed. But what's interesting to me is how to recreate. where? The future is. Partially defined by wisdom workers who are able to also understand emotional intelligence and understand people because one of the things that computers artificial intelligence will get better and better and better at data knowledge. And maybe even providing some insight, but understanding humans artificial intelligence will get there, but you know China, understand, creativity or intuition or Google great at at serving all the answers in the world, but not so great at at serving questions and a wise person like socrates on should have used to cry a socratic CEO. The world who is the embodiment of having questions and I think that that will more and more be How.

Scott Arthur Brooke writer A. Daily Google China Ashley CEO
"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"You became a positive as has clear more recently as has redneck rednecks own the word. You own the word you have power and so I guess for me because there's not a great word to describe a period of life when you actually are older than people around you But you're not elderly at all such modern elder for right now. That's what I'm working with them. We'll see we'll see where it goes More importantly the idea of helping people to understand that they can be both curious in wise at the same time is amazing because it allows you to open up the possibilities with curiosity and then distill down. What's really essential with the wisdom Help that was good. Thank you okay so i. I'm all into bumper stickers. Yeah but the holiday does not miss the the depth of insight there. Yeah okay so I want to say thank you I think Soren put us together. Yeah and I thought when you're going to talk about the retreating you know the the spiritual The mindfulness retreats that you've been to some of his John Cabinets and I have been to his loved ones with John kept scheduling hasn't allowed Right at the end of the NFL season. And so it's January Georgia right. Yeah Yeah it's an amazing we didn't get stuck with the No I'm a huge. So it's so funny. I love that. I'm a big NFL fan. So and like gay man. Nfl doesn't make sense. But I am and I have a lot of friends who are so I just you know. And I'm a big fan of the seahawks and love that New York Times article about the variability like the fact that like it's a very unpredictable theme in terms of scores. And just like you know like yeah and we've seen that we've seen that over and over again but Pekar. I never met Pete but Michael has mentioned Pete in board meetings before and I just have a ton of respect to offer him at. It was funny when Jim Harbaugh was Stanford. And Pete end like. What's your deal at talking about the game and those they don't think those two are like so different. I on a psychological perspective. And I'm happy to see how Pete has flourished and her body has not flourished quite as much still doing fine. Got A great job. But he's like Pete. Anytime you want to come up kind of take a take a look what we're trying to create. I mean I really. I've a lot of people have asked me about it. Because they think of me as sort of a a mindful as dude in the corporate world. And you know WHO's a practitioner? So I write books and but I'm not. I'm not consultant very much. I don't go out and help people to set that up. I don't have time to But people say you know. Have you noticed this company others the the the seahawks and what Pete Curl talks about talks like self actualization and stuff like that? Yeah Yeah I noticed that it seems to be working. It's it's been a great experiment like a grand experiment. Yeah in a rugged environment with Alpha males like Ken. We actually stripped down to the essence of the human experience again which is belonging connecting flourishing and having psychological skills in the cultural Environmental conditions to help people understand meaning and purpose and do their best work. You know. It's getting Aaron Taylor. I don't necessarily know until I was on the packers. You want a Super Bowl Ring. linebacker Think he's from Notre Dame. I don't remember where but He's under faculty as former successful pro football player in faculty at he's Great. He's awesome any is awesome partly because the identity challenge that football players go through or any professional sports athlete when they are actually moving out of their their radical is hard because it started so early in a No. And there's very little we've actually talked with Aaron about Aaron what we actually did like a tragedy this with the NFL with with retired players association. Do a program just for them privately to talk about. How do you get rid of these identities? And how do you actually shift into the next identity in a more conscious and intentional way and Aaron loves it but he said like? I don't know I think Aaron's right is that I think it has to come so you can have the the outside entity which is the badge the NFL and the player's association supporting that effort. However if it's not in the water that were swimming on a day to day basis and you've got the system meaning the coach in the coaches and the cultural attributes of you're just a number and you only matter if you can do your job. Well that anything that comes from the outside on a one hour basis. Whatever it's not it's not big enough you know what the big insight I think. A big insight is that the power of purpose and meaning it. There's some research that will support it and I'm sure you're familiar with some research but just as a as a case example is that every Sunday. There's a purpose. Yeah and then so every Wednesday Thursday. There's a purpose that lap latches to that. Yes Sunday purpose and when a person retires. They've had purpose their whole. Let's call it. You know young adulthood Yup for every Sunday whether it's footballer another sport fill in the blank. There's great purpose and there's meaning in the work they're doing which is supported others in that ended up after that. What's the purpose? Yeah now this this. This is part of the reason why retirement tends to increase mortality rates. It's exactly right and you know I mean but but you know who's going to write the book about that for professional athletes to be able to help them to see. Okay how do how do you create a transition that actually skirts that risk because that is a that's an occupational health risk it will eighty seven percent at one point. Were broke divorce. Both retirement suicide is a real deal. Depressions a real deal. You know floundering. Yeah you know like a tough tough. Go at the so yet. Who's GONNA write the book and Yeah maybe maybe United get number six on your thank you for sharing?.

Nfl Pete Curl Aaron Taylor seahawks Jim Harbaugh football New York Times Soren John Cabinets Georgia packers Pekar Stanford consultant Notre Dame Ken John Michael
"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"I love it every part of it. We've actually been influenced by many of the same teachers we've had different paths obviously but The books that you reference in the The theories that sit underneath of them have been influential as well. So when you're speaking I'm going out not good And then to know that you took Your Business Acumen. You took your insights. You took an. I don't say the slightly Wisdom to be able to shape something for the next generation the now generation. Meaning the baby boomers who are struggling to figure out like who am I I was on this. Chase and new wealth is not big house. Big Car big bank account. You know I'm not saying there's anything wrong with those. But new wealth is a sense of vibrance a sense of flourishing Dan. How do we skill and arm folks with those practices that help with that in that inner? Glow that people have and you have it. You know is not from surgery. It's from the working from the inside out. Like Hey I have what it takes to be able to adjust to the unknown the unfolding unknown you and not knowing is very powerful. Yeah so it's like I can actually just kind of flow. I can actually just be with it. And I love the challenge of figuring out like how I can be me said environment and those folks that have invested in that tend to look like they are in love with life and you glow that people talk about. Oh you're you're in a new marriage. Our new relationship flow glows really powerful. Thought and so I wanNA say thank you. I can't wait to get down the academy. Yeah at some point. Let's let's follow up figure out we. You'd be great coming to a mastery week like five days. It sounds brilliant and so where can people find? You were Canadian Wars the best place to get your books in learn about the academy so chip Conley Dot Com one place. Con L. E. Y. The KADEMI website is modern elder academy DOT ORG or Dot Com. I'm unlinked in a right a lot. I actually have a daily blog as well called wisdom. Well that is a little daily blog. It's like Seth Godin who was a great friend of mine From Business School. It's like him. It's a it's a daily email people get. I was inspired by souths like super-quick and pedantic wonderful and open and like concrete and like nebulous sometimes but the consistency. Yes I don't know how to keep it all I love it I love I love it. I don't I don't write it every day. I go and spend a whole do. Yeah last weekend. I did eleven in a weekend. And so that's basically you know. More than a third of a month and by people are really responding to it so sweet spot for number of words like fifty. I think is the right number but it doesn't I go above and below that depending on it but you know he's got like ten words. Yeah artichoke your way. I try I try to have at least one out of every five. Maybe one hundred fifty words July and yes I've had some less as littlest twenty words Okay yes people go to wisdom well which is on the modern elder academy dot Com website and Lincoln. I read a lot of Lincoln Almost all of my daily blogs go onto my Lincoln. I gotTa do this exercise. Yeah it's a good exercise. Yeah you know like okay. So it's like it's like a wisdom snack. That's how I think of it like it's a microdosing wisdom like how do you how do you cry? Come up with something. That is provocative but prescriptive and small enough so people can actually take the snack in the morning and somebody at one of the enterprise. Companies have spent time with Mike. We need snack insights from you. Yeah it's a good little phrase right in the way people look at it now as mystic monk mentally videos you know I. I wrote a blog post. It was funny. I saw Tim. Ferriss is a friend and we did a show last year and so two minutes or two hours videos have to be two minutes. But Somehow Tim took. I can do two hours. And it's like it's all context. Context generally prescriptive rules fail a little bit because they don't give the ability to understand context. What did we miss? You Know I. I've got fifteen other questions but I'm mindful of time here like yeah. I want to know what you're searching for and I didn't ask you that but like what did we miss? That is really important to So let's talk about the word elder and because the first time I was called the modern elder at Airbnb flip the person I said. Fuck you not modern elder. What is modern elderly? An elderly as less five to ten years years of your life elder is an as different term but one it has lost favor in the last hundred years a native term. Yeah Engineering turn relative term. It only speaks to doesn't stay with. Hr it says you are the older one around the people. You're surrounded by. I was fifty two at AIRBNB. A bedtime average age was twenty six so yes. I was an elder but I was not the traditional elder. The traditional elder was regarded with reverence. I was the modern elder who was relevant not reverend and is about learning how to be curious. Wise so yes. The word elder is problematic. Because we're trying to take backward but Malcolm X. took back toward black black was not a positive word in the south in the nineteen fifties and he connected blacks beautiful and black..

Airbnb Lincoln Conley Dot Com Tim Seth Godin Chase Con L. E. mine From Business School Malcolm X. Ferriss Mike
"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

10:52 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Of all where you prioritize and and you have an ice mixture I think for any kind of business it depends on what were they are in their life cycle the earlier. You on in your life cycle the more you have extreme focus you just have to have extreme focus because you gotta Does that mean you pivot at some point? No you can still pivot but focus and then pivot don't focus and pivot at the same time because focusing and pivoting at the same time you're not committed fully to the first thing and you got to commit. I mean like anything you have to commit to the first thing do it? And then if it's not working go to the second thing and it's good to have a second thing to to go to The you know the challenge for a lot of entrepreneurs to know is like is it time for us to go to the second thing or do I keep going on it and that. That's a that's a one. I can't answer sort of with a generalization but the blocking and tackling speaks to like okay. It's pretty simple you know. Who's you know what to find success? What are the KPI's key performance indicators? Are we all lions that those are them and that's frankly usually in a lot of companies one of the biggest challenges not everybody has a different definition of success once we get the KPI's riot of what's important than Who what each of us doing to impact that? And how are we monitoring that on a weekly basis and in many companies they do a huddle daily use a little sports terminology and it's a morning huddle especially in tech companies to sort of say. Okay what we all working on today and like and by the end of the day what we want to have gotten accomplished a love. Is that like a ten minute. Detect ten minute meeting at the start of the day you see it with product teams in tech companies all the time. I'd never had an experience with it in the hotel business But it tells us more and more you're seeing especially when they're doing big events you the huddle at the start in the morning at before the big event and huddle at lunchtime to say where we going. How's it going so far? What do we need to pivot for and And then something. At the end of the day to to look at lesson coach. The seahawks meets every day. First thing in the morning with his coaches they all have a moment to kind of get their stuff together and get an idea for the day they meet. It's a ten minute kind of Tone setting Issue raising moment. And then you know they meet throughout the day as well but it's a moment at the beginning it's a it's not a coach. Huddle. Yeah you're talking about happens and so you would do that with the executive team as well. Yeah I think you do. We tried doing that at every meal with executive team and it was hard. We did it for about two years At some point because people were on the road so much and people were trying to call in. And then the distraction of like. Oh they're not on yet and this is supposed to happen quickly huddle is supposed to be like a ten minute thing or may maybe up to a half hour if you're going through a particularly difficult time but It's meant to be just a check in and but it also meant to be substantive which sounds strange for ten minutes But it is substantive in the sense that it gets people in the same room and then the conversation that happens afterwards between two people who actually needed to talk is going to happen at the start of the day and so that ten listed at ten minutes. Is that something as simple as like? What are you working on? Today I would always doing goes round and says here's here's my priorities for the day for the super simple brief. Though yeah right you don't you. Don't go through your I meet with this person at eight o'clock eight forty five and then this person now it's like curing initial three. Maybe top three things that you're trying to accomplish that day really cool okay. So back to the wisdom piece is what you. How have you developed wisdom? And it's a really big question and I don't know if there's an answer to it but you have it. I can feel it. Looked clarity of Haifong that you have and the grounded nece in your approach in the the sensitivity to the nuances of things in the complication of things that life is multidimensional multifactorial in. It's organic and living and breathing like you have these sensitivities to The human experience ecosystem. That's always changing so like how well so that wisdom book I write in on. The weekends helps I think that I think when it wisdom is about pattern recognition so the question is how do you accelerate your process of recognizing patterns and I think for me you know? I'm with myself twenty four hours a day. I don't have a choice So recognizing my own patterns is I should be the expert in the world on Chip Conley in terms of how I tick now. The funny thing about us as humans is. I'm usually better at telling my best friend how they tick than I am about myself because I have the objectification you know which I I saw twelve years ago when I saw. Oh my God. I'm dead here. I'm like I have an I can sort of be in a room and see see myself in that room when I was near death experience but I could see with objectification of what's happening right here. I did actually. I was able to see at one point when I was in the emergency room. The doctors above me. You know trying to Paddles out I can see that. That was something I did see even when I have no no heartbeat So I think being able to to be brutal and beautiful in objectively witnessing what is happening in terms of your own life is a first peace and so I think that's why having regular check INS with yourself. Maybe every weekend of what did you learn this week is is a shorthand way of making sense and creating meaning at what's happening in your life and then taking it prescriptively forward it allows you to say okay in the case as a leader what it allowed me to do is to start seeing the patterns like wow for four weeks neuronal. I have written about this one particular direct report of mine and the fact that I just don't have confidence that they are Having direct conversations with their that person's direct reports and I feel like there's a disconnect because when I talked with their direct reports I feel like they are lost as to. What's going on? And the the the the the conduit here is is that person. Who's my direct report? Part of. What I've learned is is I was Mr candidate like the the book I gave away all employees like thirty five hundred of them at one. Point is like the little engine that could that children's book so my hope voice in my head was always can do it. I can do it. And in fact Our company the number one metric. We used for our employees whether they're doing their job while we did they square well for can-do attitude so I was all about can't do it. I'm now in a stage in my life where I'm a conduit and that's the big difference a can't do it to a conduit and that that change is when you realize that you have shifted your operating system your primary operating system you. You mentioned that that term earlier. I said I'd come back to it. Will the primary operating system from adolescents to middle essence and middle essence is midlife? It is basically when you have hormonal and an emotional and physical changes between forty five and sixty. The prime offering systems are ego and then the primary operating system around middle essence becomes the sole but we have absolutely no maps of life. That helped people to understand. You're on the road at age. Fifty two or forty eight on the metaphorical road of life. And here are some signs on the road to tell you you're about to change your operating system. And so instead what? We have is circumstantial things that happen. People's lives shock them into the pain and suffering that maybe makes them make a change but absolutely not have the language. I'm talking right now. Unless frankly it's religion or strategy that they go to and they start talking that but no one talks about the fact that there's a truly as I think a Carl Young said this very well in many different ways you move from that you know operating system of the morning to the operating system of the afternoon or evening and it's a different operating system and it is in many ways. My experiences AIRBNB took me out of chip the EGO. The sage on the stage to chip the conduit who is helping these guys make their company successful. And that was circumstantial way without pain other than the pain of feeling the fear of like. I don't know if I can do this to start realizing. Wow and that's what ultimately led me to create the modern academies I wanted to create a place where people can actually understand a new road map of life. We have midlife which was originally forty. Five to sixty five I think is now thirty. Five to seventy five because in certain industries people feel at mid thirties. They're over the hill. And a lot of people are gonNA work till mid seventies or later and therefore midlife is a marathon. And yet if you're running the marathon with all of your past mindsets identities responsibilities and stuff. You are not running the marathon running the marathon with all your baggage and what we have to do is a great midlife. Edit that helps people to let go of that allows them to have a school in a tool an an alumni system and I support network. That says yeah. You're going through navigating all kinds of midlife transitions from menopause. To Empty Nester to your parents passed away to changing recruiter getting divorced. But we have no rights of passage for these kinds of Traditional things that happen in mid life but we have rights of passage for people when they're going through puberty on some level. We have them at Adolescence to adulthood commencement ceremony graduation. We have weddings baby showers. We have funerals but between baby shower shower and funeral not nothing. So that's why I decided to put you know to build a campus to help people understand how do they make sense of a rather baffling period? That has a terrible branding because Fifty five years ago. Midlife crisis is the term that we define from midlife and use all this pop psychology. I've learned along the way.

EGO midlife executive Chip Conley menopause seahawks AIRBNB Carl Young
"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

10:51 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"What am I fantasizing about? And that's that is so different than what's going on here on CNN that there was that but beyond that I truly was I was never took place where I was suicidal. But I was GonNa say you went to some heavy places but I definitely went to a place where it was dark enough to sort of say this life that I'm living doesn't feel like it's the way I felt really dark I don't think I got took place where I was depressed. I did in college. You were not depressed. I was depressed. I was I was but not suicidal not suicidal. And how. How long was that depression? It'd be a couple of years that's a long time. So and the solution for that was to become an admiration addict achievement addict and be more successful and you just hit something that I think is at the center of many people that are part of this community and at the surface level driven by achievement. Which is a dangerous proposition. Life at a deeper level trying to figure out who they are based on what they do and that necessarily isn't a terrible thing but there's a potential cost if it's an obsession of the thing you do as opposed to really the true investigation of who you are and so this is like I need to do more to be more and that trump is very very dangerous that you live for a long time and we still. I still live in certain ways I the good news. Is that over time because I in my twenties really had to go through all of this. I started to realize that there were alternative paths that can go on and I started to say okay I can be an attainable or at a tuner and there's some sports that are may made for attaining and there's some sports remained for tuning surfing isn't the tune. Sport Yoga's Tune Sport and Oh wait. Hold on your book. I've never heard this because as you're saying that yeah it's right entertaining leads to atoning later and tuning leads. Leads to be feeling at one and so for me. I start to realize that the things that I need to do. I need to be able to have a lens that tells me. Am I in the attain mode perfectly? Fine for certain things but not find for other things or Added a tune mode. And and so yeah. I spent a Lotta time learning meditation. Meditation Enjoyed Yoga. I didn't why didn't I try yoga because that's always comparing myself with everybody else in the room? Why did I enjoy meditation? Because I close my eyes I couldn't compare And I could go within. Where'd you get that model tone on tone tune in that's your models me as a good model now Hichiara good? Yeah 'cause I appreciate both of those I you know I grew up surfing. Yeah when I was growing up I thought. Yoga was ridiculously stupid. You know that was super critical. Kid Yeah and I just thought the whole kind of thing didn't make any sense in. Yeah there's a lot of wisdom. In a Lotta weirdness in that community as well like I go back and forth about spiritual narcissism. Thank you like Yogi celebrity. Yeah no thing there but but that moment of being able to be connected to your body is a beautiful moment and then being able to find the strength and flexibility in your body to be able to sit for an extended period of time to get to the good stuff. Yeah you know like there's a deep utility not as a means to an end but a means in itself Is All about. Oh come on the love of practice and the level of practice being items yoga. The love of practice is definitely an attune is not an attain thing and so the love of practice allows you to learn because in the practice of it so a big George Leonard Mastery Fan. Oh you like his work. I was on the board of ESL. The ESL Big Surfer tenure. So Michael Murphy was on like. Oh we yet like Omega would alleged by how how is how is he? He's great he's eighty eight years old now and He's amazing he's amazing. I love him. I know he's been a father figure for me. Oh he bows and I think. That's that's how I met Michael Michael all coming together for me now because escellent so you were there for how long so I've been on the board. I was on board for ten years and I've taught there for thirteen years. It's amazing that's why you built the modern elder account any modern academy so s a great example echelon started nineteen sixty two and by nineteen. Seventy five there were thirty. One hundred a personal Centers around the US so it became a catalyst for the movement of Personal Growth. For folks. That don't know what Esselin is. Just give a quick. You realize it's a spectacular piece of land in south of big Sur California overlooking the ocean with hot springs. And it's a place where Basically people come teach personal growth Everything from learning your mastery to understand your emotions or being in a relationship. It was the epicenter of Personal Growth. Developments spiritual consciousness like it was the epicenter of the the US epicenter or it was global. I think it was global because people were coming from all over and teachers like a Maslo ends Dandruff and a lot of famous people Ida Roth who started roughing was actually living there for a while. Folks haven't read Michael Murphy's Books Yeah Dolphin the Kingdom. I mean you know like I read his books when I was in college and their massive. You got the body the body the first one I read like you gotta be kidding. It's like deep and rich and right and it keeps going and going and if you haven't read that folks that are listening to that. I think it's a it's a worthwhile investment but then also understanding escellent. So you're at the epicenter. I've been lucky. I been on the board of that institution as well as burning man from the founding of Burning Man's nonprofit and so I love transformational organizations that help people to transform themselves. That is part of the reason. Why a couple years ago. I started the modern elder academy which is the world's first mid-life wisdom school. We'll come back to that. You want to go there now. Not let's come back because the the fertile ground that we have right now around you figuring out you down and the courage to do. That is required. Vulnerabilities required but skills are also required to manage that vulnerability and sometimes what happens for people. Is that pain is the reason we change in. It's an axiom that I'm gonNA stand on the table for until I understand it differently but you had enough pain to change. But also people have that pain but don't have the skills to navigate the next step well and it's really hard. Some of US do have the skills to be able to manage it and it. It's a bit of more of an accelerated arc if you will or we have a teacher or a coach or therapeutic and word it can walk through the friends with you. It's like a borrowed skill. Yes and so. Did you have a pet all those yet? Although I had a therapist I had A somatic massage therapist. I had friends who were opened going deep with me. Tell me about your friends because I grew up in an environment. Where a lot of diversity? My friends have always been diverse so that was one of the things that was helpful for me in terms of coming out as a gay man. But I think it's racially diverse or just As someone who went to Stanford Business School? It was funny. I was surrounded by other Taipei people but my best friends were often poets and artists and writers. And frankly here's a great example. I Love Writing Michael. I love writing but at age thirteen. I had this feeling like My Dad said to me. Writers are either poor or psychotic or moster both but what he didn't say underneath that was like writers are effeminate which he did say. I heard him say to my mom once and there was an element like okay. I can't be a writer so in in high school I took English. Ap passed out. So I mean I didn't have to take English College. Not only did. I not take creative writing. I took no English not literature. Nothing so amazing. Hold on for a moment like the subtle non conscious installs. Yeah but people give us and it can be people that we care about our people in the street that just Kinda are passing by saying. Hey you don't look good purple and we adopt that for the rest of our lives or not even that you don't purple it's like they someone's having a bad day and they just sort of look at you wrong and you think all right man so that's shaped you. It did. My twenty s was a tough a tough decade. At when I think back because I was sort of on an accelerated path I did have some some guard rails of friends in and coach a coach and a therapist but I was also. I started my company at that time so I can reason I call it. Joie de Vive. Joy of life was because not only was it the mission of the company but it was what? I was aspiring toward. I didn't necessarily want to aspire towards just performance anymore I wanted to create an environment where we created Jawad Aviv including for myself and that was of course a terrible name. No one could spell pronounce it. Most people didn't know what the word means. So but it meant a lot to me and I do have French origins. I don't know in fact at Long Beach Poly High School. I took French. Not Spanish serve silly in southern California. Because it's like Spanish speaking people all around me But one payoff. Taking French. In High School was the name of my company When I started at age twenty six and became the second largest Boutique Hotel here in the. Us Okay quick. Break to talk about masterclass masterclass. Lets you learn from the best with exclusive access to online classes taught by people who are masters of craft. And whether you're interested in writing or business leadership cooking entrepreneurship sports or almost anything else. There is literally a masterclass for you in these classes. They're beautifully shot and their instructor roster. It's flat out stacked in it includes like Phil. Iv Bob Iger Malcolm Cloud. Well Ron Howard Serena Williams Frank Gehry Jimmy Chin Howard Schultz verner Herzog's and Bobby Brown. I really enjoyed that one. She teaches how she built her makeup. Empire you can also listen to her insights on the finding mastery.

US Michael Murphy High School writer CNN Michael Michael depression trump Long Beach Poly High School California Stanford Business School Burning Man Bob Iger Taipei big Sur California English College Yogi George Leonard Ida Roth Omega
"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

10:42 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Blinking has quickly become one of my favorite APPs on my phone definitely continues to be on that kind of quick search mode. It's a resource that I turned to when I want to get ahead of some reading and so if there's a book that I haven't read and I WanNa get frame for just a quick pass at it. It's a great resource in if there's something in a book that I've kind of forgotten a textured nuance of the main points. This is also a great resource. So what they do. Is they take insights from over three thousand non fiction bestsellers twenty-seven different categories and they condense them down a fifteen minute blinks which are Texan audio. Explainers that help you understand more about the core idea of each book and this. It's definitely not a replacement for reading. You're you know how much I love reading. I'm sure you do as well. And so but it is a way to discover new books in. It's also great for getting this. Quick hit refresh irs books. You've already read so a few blinks that I've recently listen to include the book of joy by the Dalai Lama in Desmond. Tutu and I've also really enjoyed the art of logic by Eugene. Chang both awesome. I hope you enjoy the blinks and I hope also by the books as well definitely both worth checking out and right now blankets. They have a special offer for the funding mass. Retreive GO TO BLINK DOT COM slash finding mastery to start your free seven day trial and get twenty five percent off a blanket. Pre-membership analyst jump right back into our conversation okay. So sometimes being the other could lead to to have protection mechanisms so that you know you feel safer it being a minority. But you didn't do that. You you earned that curiosity white label and so you're curious about others. I was experienced and so did that translate to did that. Curiosity TRANSLATE TO COMPASSIONATE EMPATHY. Or does it stay purely as a curiosity approach definitely compassionate empathy. I mean I'd I'd say there's some parts of my life where I'm not so compassionate and empathetic but when I came to people who are from a different background than me. Culturally always has. It's been dyed in the wool in terms of how I am. I ended up my first hotel when when I started my hotel. Company in San Francisco was in the tenderloin. San Francisco's bought an old motel in a bad neighborhood very much like my high was. I got a foster son. African American foster son who I play basketball with. He was homeless because his parents were. You know drug dealers and they ended up jail and lobster. Short is it's my optum. I became his foster parents foster gnarliest. That's different than adopting. Yeah he's now an adult and he's still. I'm still as foster parents in terms of how he sees me And he has kids one of these kids now actually has a a a son so I am a great grandparent at age. Fifty nine eight and a five year old biological sons. So that's a complicated one but let's go back to your question okay. Well this is important because it's about family. Yeah How did your dad? No you know it's interesting question. My father so I'm Stephen. Townsend kindly junior chip off the old block chip Conley. My father and I went to the same high school. My father was my my boy scout leader. He was an Eagle Scout. Guess what I was to. My Dad was my baseball coach. I was the star Pitcher I went to the same high school played swim swam and played water polo. Just like my Dad. I went to Stanford just like my dad I joined a fraternity. Not The same fraternity that my dad was in this. Is your mom local by? But here's the interesting thing. Keep going on this so I broke away and I was in different fraternity but I studied the same. I got my dad's an economics major so I he ended up going to UCLA. Business School. I went to Stanford but it was in my second year at Business School Actually my summer between for secure business school when I was working for Morgan Stanley that I had my true break from my father. My father knew me well but he knew me as the little version of himself. That was going to be more successful than my dad. Okay so let me just pause for a moment. Does that mean growing up you were never seen? I was never seen and I didn't WanNa see myself and reason I didn't WanNa see myself was because from a young age. I knew this is interesting Luke. was going to get to that. I was gay and I. The last thing anybody about me was that. I didn't want them to know that my fraternity days didn't want that playing Stanford Water Polo didn't want them know. That might didn't want my dad to know. I'm the only son a two younger sisters. I'm Steven Junior chip off the old block. So when I did my dad did. My Dad Know Me. Not really what he knew is that there's this private part of chip that loved writing and was a bit of an introvert and I and it was sort of like a softer side of chip. But I was sort of. I was a type. A competitive athlete and I was somebody who is going to go out and be successful. Because that's what my parents expected of me. So when I came out between my first and second business school at age twenty two and this is a long time ago. This nineteen eighty three. It was not an easy time for some. It was right in the hysteria of age. Just getting off off off the ground in terms of people knowing about it When I came back and told my dad that you can imagine he just looked at me. Like what the hell you know. This is not who you are So I went into repair to therapy and You know and it had I was in for six months had a A surrogate a woman. Who was twenty fifteen years older than me who I was having sex with. You know. This is what I've been going further on this one but I'll what I'll say is at age. Twenty two twenty three. I had to learn who I was because I had been pantomime ing my way through who I was doing it really well. So this is a hard thing identity I've been a success. I went to Stanford Business. Go straight from UNDERGRAD. You don't do that. 'cause it's really impossible are hard back then especially in still but I was somebody who had to have this identity shift and basically take off the costumes. I was born on Halloween October. Thirty first baby so I was not. I knew what it meant to wear costumes. Chip my heart is pounding listening to this because The courage like I don't know what it is that I'm necessarily feeling right now but literally my heart is ticked up a little bit and the courage to be you in a difficult climate at that time at the same time to have that radical break and have this chip off the old block thing and then to know that even in this conversation. You've got the ability to carry yourself. We're GONNA when you said we're GONNA stop the conversation at this level. I I love every go and listen I mean I just don't know if your listeners WanNa hear it you know what I you know what I e? Yeah because this is about courage. It's about knowing who you are addressing. Accordingly yes in. That dress means it's an old kind of I do not wear dresses outlay but know that the idea noble you are. Just a courtly is from One of the STOIC philosophers which is like do the insight work in a Bu Well Oscar Wilde famous game analog yourself. Everyone else's taken young right so thank God I mean you know the truth. Is that I in my early twenties. I did have to have the courage and but I also had this weird sense that the path I was on didn't feel right and it didn't feel right in the sense that I don't think I could continue on the path. I it interesting that what would happen if you were. My parents met at Stanford and so my freshman year. I met my girlfriend who was very beautiful beautiful. She was like total marriage material. We went out for two years but I just could feel like there's an element I don't know if I can keep doing this and You knew you were. I knew I was gay but I'd never. I never had any experiences. Never I'd only. How do you know that you're what does that mean? It means that when I was playing basketball in junior high school and I was pretty good player I enjoyed hanging out in the showers. You so you just take shower. Their bills was like I was curious. wipe way. I didn't earn the right way because of hey chips looking at us and the showers but I earned it because I was just curious and I think the curiosity I thought initially it was just In other guys bodies growing into puberty and then over time in eighteen years I realized I fell in love with you know my best friend but never told him didn't feel any comfort in that we dated each other. We dated we. Both had girlfriends are funds or best friends. But I knew it inside but I didn't want to deal with it because I knew the consequences were dire. I sort of thought I would maybe grow out of it but it was in college where I realized. Wow I'm still trying to be my dad. Because like my dad met his wife my mom at Stanford and I've met Lynn and she's amazing appears lover and everybody loves her. Except I just don't think I can spend my life on the path that this is on which is basically a path where I'm going to get married and then I'm going to have this. I don't know if it's secret life because they didn't have a secret life at that point and I never did so when I came out I came out. When is like okay now? I've had an experience with you. Know the man as okay. Yeah that is more me. WanNa know about the tension that you're operating with was at a low level Was it a full blown daily crisis like when you're when you're with your Female partner and you know what was that like on a daily basis. I want to understand what led to you saying. This is this. I'm faking my way through this. Well you know when it comes to being sexual with a woman it faking your way through hard i. I didn't have to fake my way but over time I started to have to fake my way and I started thinking..

Stanford basketball San Francisco Business School chip Conley irs Stanford Business Tutu Stephen UCLA baseball Eugene Chang Oscar Wilde analyst Eagle Scout Steven Junior
"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"WELCOME BACK. Or welcome to the finding mastery. Podcast I'm Michael Javale and trade and training. I'm a sport performance psychologist as well as the CO founder of competes crate. Not The whole idea behind. This conversation is to learn from people who are on the path of mastery who have dedicated their life efforts towards understanding both massive self and master of craft and at the time of this recording. I've never experienced what we're experiencing nationally and certainly globally and I'm going to have more thoughts on this later but just a quick hit is that you know for the United States to be on a state of emergency. It's pretty radical. You know and I just want to put a note in there is that I know people are stressed. I know that times are challenging and I know that also some people are like what are you talking about? It's fine I just want to put a note in here that I'm recognizing and feeling the amount of stress that some of us are under and I just want to say stay with it now and also WanNa say I'm so happy that we're in it together and we have a community of people that are like minded and getting after it and have been down the path of understanding how to frontload work with one's mind to be able to manage high stress and high pressured environments. Because we're in. This is a test. How will will you be able to manage the unfolding unpredictable unknowing? Now we just happen to have a collective consciousness right now about what's happening in it's an unfolding pace like it's an unprecedent pace where information's unfolded. So I just WanNa take a moment before we dive into the wisdom of our guest today. just how much if you're struggling in your lonely and you're isolated and it's or you're anxious and you're really struggling stay connected you know. Get into the funding mastery tribe. You know get into places where you can be heard and felt and be part of something And one of the inoculations to struggling is to help others. Just want to say this right now. You can have your purpose today. You can declare it. It's okay you can make it up right now that your purpose is to be in the service of others not that hard you can do it. It's not that hard to commit to it. It's actually quite hard to do. So I'm here for you. You know in the best way that I can be from from a distance And also just recognizing the challenging time that we're in in the whole idea behind these conversations is so that we can learn and so that we can grow together and we've all got these unique independent paths This one of the reasons. I love the funding mastery tribe. If you're interested in if you're not part of IT PUNCH OVER CHECK IT OUT. You can go find him. Mastery dot net slash tribe. Totally free just a community of thousands of us to sort it out together. You know investigating how the mind works and how to get better at so. This conversation is chip. Conley couldn't be better really. He is a Boutique Hotel entrepreneur who helped airbnb founders. Turn THEIR FAST GROWING TECH STARTUP into global hospitality brand in. He started as a rebel entrepreneur at the age of twenty six in after settling. Joie de Vive the hospitality business that he built. It wasn't sure what to do next. And so he could have actually retired when he sold it as he puts it and that was at the age of fifty two but some young founders of AIRBNB called them up in chip eventually served as their head of global hospitality in strategy for four years while also being a mentor to AIRBNB. Ceo Brian Chessy and he continues today as strategic advisor to companies leadership is really cool story. Wait until we get into this and chip wrote about this experience in was Work has book and the subtitle is the making of a modern elder and that's where he shares his really unexpected journey at mid life from CEO to intern basically and so while he was writing. The book was Chip was inspired to also build the world's first midlife wisdom school and he's calls it the modern elder academy. He's got a three acre. Oceanfront campus down a Baja California in Mexico and from the looks of it in the sounds of Through special okay. So if we double click under why he wanted to build. The modern elder academy is because there is a few key points and chips life when something was eating at him and he knew he wasn't on the right path but he could have easily stayed the course so chip made the difficult decision but necessary decision in those moments to make a change. And that's at the heart of this conversation. If you are struggling with something or you're trying to sort something out at you know it's not quite the right path. The how in the why and the strategy behind how to pivot and go the direction. Maybe your heart wants you to go or you know the away from what isn't feeling right and it's really about authenticity. It's about being in touch with your core principles in ultimate about wisdom so chip seen it from every angle from an entrepreneur. Founder Mentor an intern and continues to make an impact on the next generation. Okay so we're talking about business is not easy right. It's definitely not for the fate of heart when certainly when it comes to running businesses and entrepreneurship so whether you're founder or someone who's tasked with helping build the right culture meaning finding the right people. It comes with a lot of responsibility. And that's why I'm stoked to introduce Lincoln. Jobs is one of the sponsors to us and you know finding that right higher in your business sometimes can take years and this is one way to accelerate the looks that you get with the right qualifications so when you need to find that right person to help grow your business or amplifier culture. You Know Lincoln jobs is working to find that right fit for him and so we're currently using it to help grow our team at finding mastery and also use it with compete to create. Both companies have used this service in. It's really an amazing resource now. So they look beyond the work skills and they put your job post in front of qualified candidates who match your unique business requirements and they have over six hundred seventy five million members worldwide and a screen candidates with their hard and soft skills and the soft skills that I'm looking for if it's used to is like somebody with a big motor internally driven big motor their creative problem solvers and they know how to play well with other people with the right vibe and so that's what I'm looking for right that culture enhancer problem solver and somebody's gotTa really big driver to go after the mission the like minded purpose if you will and those are the ones that importance may me so to find the right person for.

Chip AIRBNB intern elder academy CO founder United States Michael Javale founder Ceo Brian Chessy Joie de Vive Lincoln Conley Founder Mentor Baja California Mexico Boutique Hotel strategic advisor
"chip conley" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"You Know One plus one equals three and so I think I think we're in the early stages stages of this happening because there's a grow people now realize gosh people are GonNa work past age sixty five and so we have to figure out what we're going to do with these people not not just as a social you know policy of you know compassion but frankly as a means of actually being effective. Yeah I couldn't agree more and the other thing. I'm sort of interested to check in with you about this. Whole SORTA journey from up and coming Rock Star entrepreneur to been there? Done that guy you know from from the the player who has a hall of fame career goes to the hall of fame in his now. The coach right that that that journey the how how for me was during my player days I never thought about anything other than being a player and now when I look back act on it I go. Oh all of that. This is the reward for that has now you know what I am Nolde. masterson say I've been into the fucking show and I love nothing more than doing exactly what you described which is learning from the next generation and hopefully contributing adding to the next generation. It's a blast and it's something I never thought of until I got here. Yeah no I totally agree I. It's one of those unexpected pleasures of aging. This sense that not only are you. Some some time surprised surprised by the intuitive wisdom that just floated out of your mouth.

Nolde. masterson
"chip conley" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"Of what you have experienced. And what what wisdom. The wealth of wisdom that came from so that you could gain meaning from severe pain. is at least somewhat of comfort comfort while experiencing the severe pain. He asked somehow being tested. And I'M GONNA come out the other side of this thing a better person and fucking right. The the the biology lesson that we learned from when we were kids was the idea of the the Caterpillar to butterfly and imagine if what if our life was the Caterpillar to butterfly transformation. Any such that you know in their twenties and thirties were. We're that Caterpillar. On the leaf eating the leaf booking up getting plumbed and then around forty to forty five miraculously or strangely we just basically start spinning a Chrysalis and turn ourselves upside down and go into this cocoon. It's dark and Gooey. That feels. It's a really scary. And you know what's on the other side and that is forty five to fifty or Midlife to some of your early midlife and then on the other side ride. There is a butterfly now. Our societal narrative on aging is not biology lesson but euchre happiness happiness actually shows that it's true and there's a bunch of evidence now that starting to show frankly there's a there's a lot of unexpected pleasures of aging. How liberalism a bit? Let me a couple examples here. The thing that everybody knows is that as the brain ages it is not as good at memory or or as quick as it used to be the biology the brain speaking of job.

Caterpillar midlife
"chip conley" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"It's relationships that will really serve me anymore and in one day you can't just say okay. It's all changed. That's why it's a week long program but that's why we do the hard part at the start and in my book. There's four lessons in the book. In a lesser ones evolved lesson listen to learn threes collaborate for his council and to the first lesson evolve is really in essence saying in order to evolve. You have to edit some things you have to be willing need to let go of some things that are are really meant to they. Carl young two psychologists said long ago. You can't live the afternoon of your life. Based upon the the rules of the morning and this morning is pre pre forty forty five afternoon is maybe forty five to sixty five and then the leave your lady. Yeah I met fifty nine sort of the thing. That's interesting is actually. This is where the midlife marathon the evening of your life. Maybe has just moved from sixty five to seventy five because you're gonNA live ten years longer potentially and if that is true. What do you do with this era of life? Where your your sort of young old you might have been the old young at one place and then at some point it's flips and I'd probably probably flips around forty five or fifty again damn that forty five and fifty? Why isn't there a book that comes out just says? Beware of forty-five speed limit. Forty five. Something something sneaks to like beware. There's there's a I don't know about you because I grew up with the game of life. Remember that board game. Yeah of course negate the game of life you it had it had one past. There was a singular path. And if you get to the end of the game of life you had one path bullshit that is not. It's not how it works anymore. No and yet we sort of have a bunch of people sir living their lives as if they're still on that road map and no-one said slippery when in wet or you know there's a u-turn ahead or whatever well and look I think it's I think it's still a radical idea that you can design in your life that you can make choices and take a set of actions that materially change the outcome of whatever trajectory. Your life is on. Can you can could do that intentionally. Right and then the other thing of course we get to do is sometimes life profoundly only fucking stocks. His something truly horrible happens right and we get tested and then again we have a choice. Who are going to be right? who going to be when it's fucking horrible? And so the interesting thing to me about it. Is I think for a lot of people. It's a radical rely dea that we are more than just a reaction to something coming at us.

Carl young
"chip conley" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"Thanks for pressing play. This is Christopher lockhead. Follow your different. The number one odd cast for people who appreciate real different conversations shins about business marketing and life on this episode a super powerful conversation about life design and particularly midlife midlife design. And you know frankly wherever you are in life. I think you're gonNA find this a powerful fascinating conversation because we continue our run of legendary authors auto owners on this episode ship Conley. He was the founder of Joie de Vivre hospitality which is the second largest operator of Boutique. Hotels tells the United States. He started the company at Twenty six years of age back in nineteen eighty seven and he held the CEO position for nearly twenty four years until until Until he sold the company and then Interestingly enough after that you know what do you do as a second act. If you're a hugely successful hotel honor Berm. He ended up joining. What at the time was a pretty unknown? Startup called AIRBNB to help the young founders of AIRBNB navigate the gate their growth and create a whole new travel category. And of course that's what they were able to do on this episode. We talk about why chip thinks that people need a midlife reset. Listen especially for. What ship calls his emotional equation? And there's a ton more here based on chips new book the wisdom at work that I think you're gonNA love go to lockhead dot com. Check out the show notes and key takeaways for this episode and I also want to say a special. Thank you to my my friend. Sybil Klein Michael for connecting chip. And I- thanks so much symbol now. In Japan athletic brand a-6 needed ERP software system system to help drive growth throughout Asia. And that's why they turned to my friends at nets. We'd from Oracle you see six needed to move quickly to create a complete business system system for their sales operations in India in Singapore and they needed. ERP An earpiece suite that could be managed without the help of an IT department and an earpiece wheat was flexible enough to integrate with its corporate on premise financial software. And that's why they chose net sweet from Oracle Michael because net sweet is the number one cloud this business system. And that's we'd offers you a full picture of all of your finances in one place in real time.

founder Christopher lockhead midlife hotel honor Berm AIRBNB Sybil Klein Michael Oracle Joie de Vivre ERP United States chip Japan Asia I Singapore CEO India
"chip conley" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

10:48 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"V Audio experience. Hey guys about to go into really great interview with Chip Conley Create Entrepreneur hotelier. I think you'll notice. Is the episode back to my craziness. I literally had no fucking idea why he's on the show other than he reached down. I said yes. Because I know he's quality he goes into a subject matter around ageism and opportunities and and and quantifying time and I'm super pumped atom on Some and Value so sit back. Relax enjoy specially. If you're forty one to seventy three just really zone in here. But if you're nineteen pay attention thematic play everybody. It's scary banner chuck and I have a really special guest. I hear an entrepreneur that I've known for a very long time and I got an email. I got a lot of emails. I got an email either from him or his crew and like chips. Got Some stuff talk about. I'm like yes so he thank you on. Mlk Day we're filming and recording this Conley's in the building chip. Why don't you tell everybody who's listening a little little bit about yourself and then very frankly some of the things that you WanNa talk about? WE'LL REF so great to be here. And congratulations on the digs here. Thanks for the Nice thing Staying at the equinoxes hotel right nearby which is very very nice getting getting a massage tonight so I started the second largest Boutique Hotel Company in the US. When I was twenty six calls you oughta based in San Francisco all fifty two of the hotels were all in California sold it and then seven years? This is the first one star because I know audience when they hear that hyperbole. Everyone's like how yes. I was two years out of Stanford Business School. In fact I was hanging out with my friends. Seth Godin yesterday here in New York And business go with so I started the first one my buying a pay by the hour motel. Not Because I was frequenting there would have been fun because it was cheap. And how'd you have any capital. I raised about one point. One Million Dollars Twenty six I had gone to Stanford Business School Gun. Stanford Undergrad had a lot of friends. Who had my money? I was not from money family and I was. This was nineteen six eighty six eighty seven. So give me you know what's funny twenty. That's a little bit. Yes enough before my time that. I don't have a good enough read on. How ridiculously hard or ridiculously easy? Even going going to Stanford Eighty six eighty seven. I hear one point one. Yeah like I'm like. Oh that's a real accomplish now. Well I'll say this listen reason capitals its own gaming itself but you know today. You don't have to be that remarkable to actually be able to raise a million dollars for startup idea because what's happened. The last decade that's ignite painters for me. In one thousand nine hundred eighty seven in the Stanford world like was that incredibly difficult was that to families that had so much money that well give me a little context to make it was about twenty investors. All putting about fifty K. H.. In so it was it was like a syndication. That's what we used to call it. And then people think it was crazy to get twenty six hundred hotel experience again now. The twenty two year old getting a million bucks seems common them. It seems to me like on the `Nigma it was wacky and it. It was a things happening because stay and San Francisco was this was a separate schools. Not What it is today. Then lost short is it would be people. Were betting on me. Not on the business plan and not on the real estate because it was broken down motel in the tenderloin of San Francisco so and it became so I raised the money to three and a half years to to sort of get it to a place where it was clearly. A success story became the rock and Roll Hall San Francisco so everybody from David Bowie to Linda. Ronstadt we're saying there as this funky motel and how'd you get the I get the I get like the first percents great story because that became the domino to the investors know in terms of guests guests. It was all about the tour manager. Everybody thought it was all about going out and marketing to the travel agents know is actually the person who made the decision. What's the guy who's about five years older than the rest of the band wanted to make sure they didn't do an overdose or the groupie wouldn't like hijack them yes and so we gave that we did a deal where we said? We have a massage treatment treatment room. You can get a free massage if you bring us ten room nights and so the tour managers started talking to each other and next thing. I knew all the tour managers and the bus. The the bus driver like this because we had free bus parking too so at the end of the day. You got to determine like what are you have your benefit and we had a massage studio and parking lot and the manager bought it and next thing I knew we basically for thirty three years. Now that hotel it's called the Phoenix funky motel in the tender line. And then what are you there. Every day I was there every day in the early days. Yeah for sure I mean I was learning the business. I didn't know anything about it of course on Cornell Hotel school or anything like that. So why did you want to do it. I loved first of all. I had a lot of people staying on my couch so market research was like. Why are you staying in my house? Why don't you stay in a hotel? And they kept saying the hotels in San Francisco right either really expensive or really boring. Who are these people friends? Who are coming to visit San Francisco? So I grow up. I grew up in Long Beach. Snoop Dogg's high school LBC famous. I love it Long Beach Poly High School number one high school. Oh slightly different high school when they are saying about ten years younger than me but he's still my hotels which you need to know after snoop stays in your hotel room you've got. We had a little bit is because there's the weed but So yeah I was back there. Are they called me curious white boy basketball like you so last time. I think you're playing summit. At Sea top deck play Basketball Court basketball while he was in his sandals surprises his leg. I'm super high No but I had that company for twenty four years sold. It's now a high brand. And amongst amongst resort is I seven years ago was asked by the three founders of Airbnb to come help them grow their company into a global hospitality round. So I've spent seven years as Brian. Huskies mentor and it was the head of global hospitality and strategy for the company for four years full-time and then to the last three years. Just been like a strategic advisor to them. That's cool. Yeah so that the thing that party I'm here is because while I was there curious white boy when I was in high school. They called me the modern elder at AH AIRBNB and I did not like that but I was twice the age of the average employee NBA. I started when I was fifty two. I'm fifty nine now for abuse listening. My great run in the Silicon Valley investment world definitely was kind of like oh five to like oh six to like two thousand ten and what's interesting about hearing the story is that chip absolutely was in those circles with me and it was just like like there was a bunch was probably forty. Two hundred fifty people people who weren't hard core tack had come from different backgrounds. But we're kind of like in the mix one way or the other and so it makes. It's really fun. Hear that that's where you ended up and it makes so much fucking sense because the value prop on context and reps that you were able to bring that exact company is like the most logical shit I've ever heard well. It was so funny because when I joined first of all for the first five months. We didn't tell anybody I'd joined. We didn't tell the press wanted to see Brian. I got along because because obviously you meet Bryan Bryan just called me. He just called me. He said Percents Bryan Bryan Bryan. A lot of people think it's the Hubris that makes your you. It's actually the humility and in case of Brian. Brian's case he had the humility to say I don't know a bunch of stuff so I'm going to go out and hospitals. I'M GONNA go talk to this guy who's in San Francisco whose creative Boutique Hotel companies and entrepreneur in the mix with our community. He's in the matter that's true and it's always does but I remember it very vividly. Oh my God all the people who looked at me like what the hell are you doing. When filing was announced five months later said why would you my my old brethren the hotel had no detail what Airbnb so anyway? Long story short is it's been led me to becoming this modern elder. And what the Hell's the modern older so mm. The traditional elder of the past was all about reverence. You revered your elders. But a modern elders about relevance. And so you'd better be as curious as you are wise so I h fifty two hours joining Tech Company for the first time. I didn't understand the lingo but I had to learn and so what I had to do was be humble. I had to be open to so like saying. I don't know what you fucking mean by saying you're GONNA ship a feature explain that to me and I and so. I was the person who could come in and make the bridges and create the bridges to the travel industry. And I was Brian's mentor and helping him to look at leadership from the CEO's perspective but the problem in our society eighty today. And I think you've talked a little bit about this in the past is we're GonNa live longer powers moving younger and the world is changing faster and there's a collection of people in Midlife. Who who feel irrelevant and bewildered and have a ton to give do? But to your point and I'm sure my team smiled because it's a word I talk a lot about. It's GonNa take humility on both both fronts for sure. There are a lot of people who are forty five to sixty years old. Who just are complaining about millennials? And they're not actually asking how how they are getting back in the mix by becoming a beginner again and aren't being held accountable for parenting. Creating the millennials my favorite favorite dynamic to literally go to these dinners or whatever and like their shitting on it. And I'm like you're the parent of the one that created this entitlement because everybody nobody had have fucking trophy. Here's the thing I've learned. I had something to teach Bryan Bryan had something to teach thousand percent and I had one hundred mentors over my seven years now at Airbnb. Be An- An- each one of those hundred men. Tease Entree one hundred interesting. I said ads out one hundred mentors. Why did I say one hundred men teas but mutual mentorship is the future of learning and development in oddities? Such a fucking buyer of what. You're putting down right now. I think we're about to go through the golden era. We're going through innovator. Yeah I I I hired a new chief creative officer and I told him one of the things I want to do and twenty twenty is higher retired copywriters literally from the mad men era. They'll be there so much to bring to the table. Nobody looks at them as a viable option. I literally can't wait to hire them a a lot of more so financially sound on the East Coast here anyway. Like they'll be thrilled to work for minimum wage. Let alone something more than that..

San Francisco Bryan Bryan Bryan Brian Airbnb Chip Conley basketball Cornell Hotel school Stanford Business School Long Beach Poly High School Boutique Hotel Company Stanford Business School Gun Roll Hall San Francisco Seth Godin Snoop Dogg Stanford Undergrad US Long Beach California NBA
"chip conley" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"To make sure that there is a trusted relationship you could make an argument that this could go first but I'll tell you why think it needs to go second there is a question I think you should ask as a mentor or a boss if the relationship happens to be someone who works for you in either case it's a question GonNa impact has huge value and that question is this how can I support you to do the best work of your life here hat fill in the blank with me and Brian Chessy what I said that to him how can I support you Brian to do the best work of your life your airbnb it opened interesting conversation because when it led Brian to doing with the Serbs saying wow what does it mean to the best of my life first of all but actually when the relationship is almost a direct report relationship and you're doing this was someone who actually works with you but actually even for you when you say how can I support but you you're innocent saying to the other person especially if they are a direct report it you are there to support them a lot of people in the working world who actually see that the company is conspiring against them or somehow their boss doesn't want them to see exceed and that victim mentality is very prevalence as defined by the Gallup polls of our employees veal in the context of tation so when you say how can I support you you start by saying I'm here as your trusted advisor potentially as your boss to help make you successful but then when you ask someone to do the best work of your life you're really actually holding up a high standard that you want this person to aspire too you know the truth as often we stretch based upon what somebody else thinks we can stretch to now ideally we stretch to what we think we can stretch to if you have a mentor or a boss really thinks you can stretch even further you might even stretch just that much further so how can I support you to do your best work life what is interesting question especially if it's in the relationship between direct boss and the direct person who is reporting to them is that it actually forced is the person who is men tea or the direct report to come up with the answers which is what is it that I need to be more effective it could be something as simple as uh gosh I need instead of once a month in meeting with you I need once a week meeting with you or I the reduce my scope of work a little bit so that I can actually focus on this one particular project that needs more on my time or I need to go out and go to a conference it's twice a year in our industry to understand our industry better or I need to get paid in some cases the things that the person's GonNa say will be specific to a awesome relationship and just many but not a Boston does less relevant but you as the mentor could help amend t understand how they bring those subjects up to their boss the guy use of a mentor one of the values of this question is it really gets into some detail about doc the relationship this many has with their boss if you're not the boss and you can help your not just helping coach or mentor for the individuals sitting in front of you you're actually mentoring their relationship with Airbus and how they can be more effective and a lot of times mentors don't think of that they really it's all about individual but you know no one is an island and to be able to coach that person with respect to their relationship with their boss is a he coach Quattro benefit of mentor I see and that's an insight for me as well okay so the relationship between a boss in someone who works for them or relationship when you and your boss is different from the relationship between you and your mentor yes there's no doubt about that because the relationship between your in your mentor probably is less actional whereas less of a focus on what have you done for me lately in terms of how the boss thinks of that employee and this brings us into the third question just before you go to question okay so a quick recap so the first one is to listen is to truly listen what was that phrase you used to get appreciative inquiry so pushed.

"chip conley" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

11:22 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"This episode of the Mind Body podcast I'm so excited about today's guests ship Conley now if you have not yet chip Conley you have being the first step of the four steps going to outline of how do you become a great mentor is remembered Jimi Hendrix who knew that I was GonNa talk about Jimi Hendrix when I talked about mentorship but Jimmy Hendrix has a great quote from long ago he said knowledge speaks and wisdom listens so a great mentor is somebody who is a great listener a mentor can actually be on either side in terms of age wise mentor couldn't a younger than you doesn't have to be someone older than you I was called the modern elder at Airbnb because frankly as an elder elder is a relative term and so when you're an elder you're actually older than everybody arrangement as the intro I was twice the average employee but to be a mentor just means you have a special focus and who have something that you can offer it's knowledge-based that you can actually offer to the other person so you couldn't be younger and beat him enter as well but the key is you need to listen as the mentor why partly because if you start dispensing wisdom or knowledge quickly what you've done is you haven't actually created context context basically means that you have to understand what this person is facing and how you can customize advice and counsel to them one of the things I've learned in becoming a modern elder is that a modern is different than the traditional elder traditional of the past was in essence focus purely on dispensing wisdom but the mom auburn is as curious as they are wise so a mentor needs to be both curious and wise because actually without the curiosity or the ability to listen and you will just start giving advice without understanding context and context is key so the first step for any great mentor is just knowing that asking great questions is a really key part of that there's actually a whole theory of asking questions that you'll find Google at called appreciative inquiry also known as a I not artificial intelligence appreciative inquiry an AI appreciative inquiry is a way of asking a question that can be catalytic so if you ask a question and it has sort of yes no answer that's lik that's closed ended and open question is when you ask a question with genuine curiosity this is meant to serve the other I could you give us an example of such a question so let's say a company is losing market share and the leader goes onto the person who's running a department and says to them you know we're losing market share WHO's to blame now that is not exactly in open ended appreciative inquiry kind of question and that's certainly not the kind of question would ask a better question would be we've actually lost market share what are the reasons that we might be actually not as competitive as we used to be what can we learn from our competitors and what are the three steps we can take right now to actually start focusing on that so f very action oriented it's not trying to prescribe blame to someone it's actually giving the other person the opportunity to outline some solutions one of the challenges with a mentor relationship especially if it's your boss it is that may become a prescriber the mentor actually tries to prescribe what is the right thing to do and I would just say that the best mentors I know actually take their men teeth through a process where the men t actually feels like they're solving the problem themselves or by asking great question nations this guides mnt into the right answers I would highly recommend people live you appreciative inquiry obviously can read about in my book wisdom at work okay so that's step one in depth call be an active listener okay so step one is being active listener and the protocols you said we can look into his call appreciative inquiry appreciative inquiry and that's something we can google to learn more about phenomenal now what is step to step two is.

chip Conley
"chip conley" Discussed on Midlife Mixtape

Midlife Mixtape

12:54 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Midlife Mixtape

"Reading your wonderful book wisdom at work and learning more about your musical background. I'm thinking you have a really good answer to our are icebreaker question on the podcast. which is what was your first concert? And what were the circumstances you know. My first concert was a band called bad company time. We're on the same age range. That's not that's not a new name to me. We know bad company. It also defined the kind of guests I had when I first opened. My first hotel is probably fifteen years old in my my mom Giovanni and a couple of friends to the concert picked us up afterwards you know don't you love how in the olden days the MOMS with the MOMS and DADS would drive and drop off and leave and you know I always say in our generation ration- were like well. I WANNA STAY WANNA go to that concert too. So it's a big generation divide and you write in your your book. Your first hotel hotel property when you started Joie Eve was in San Francisco and that you it was kind of a rock and Roller Hotel. You baby set Sinead O'Connor's Kit. That's a full service hotel yeah yes I did. I served limited breakfast in bed. I was I was twenty. Six years old start critical issue out of US destroy of life and it's bootie took nearly fifty two zero tells over the twenty years that I was CEO and that first one was just a broken down motel. The tender blinded I just said okay on the Phoenix rising from its own mythical ashes and we we got pretty quickly as the crossroads for creative people who Kim Team San Francisco visentin motel everybody hanging out by the pool in the center so yeah I've been able to have great stories over the years that's really cool and as you've moved to a different work environment we're. GonNa talk a lot about your move from Schwab Vive to serve as the head of global hospitality and strategy at AIRBNB. Ah Very different company. I wanted to mention one of the things that Airbnb does that I absolutely love is the experience program where you can sign up to do. Different things not just get your your room but also really get into the community and in particular. There's a great menu of music experience as you must have been involved in setting that up. You know what we decided it was that we are going to be more than just a home sharing company we wanted to be almost like a lifestyle curator so if if you're going to. Peres in you've stayed on airbnb before we know what kind of homes you might. WanNa stadiums will curate and say here's their ten or twenty. That might be best for you. We also would loved to knows like okay. We know what you liked to do. Based upon you might have taken survey with answer. You have actually done expensive as we can get to the place where you're going to Paris I were we not only. Can we tell you where to stay but we can serve almost critic customizing cheery for you which would include these experiences or what we have is these adventures as well let feature multi-day experiences in in a place and it's such a nice way to to get to know the local community and get to know a place in a deeper way and I just I'd glanced before we talked. You know one of the things you can do. The AIRBNB right now is hike to a sunset concert into Panga Canyon if you're in the La area there's a live five jazz and good chocolate in San Francisco experienced so if you're doing airbnb make sure you take a look and see that there's a lot more they are than just the just the place you're staying yeah we did my family and I were in we were in Ireland and the UK at Christmas last year because our older daughter was studying abroad and I signed us up for a really cool walking tour her in London through Airbnb but it was on day nine of an eleven day trip and my family revolted and said we are not watching. We can't another ten mile day and I was like okay did make you go on a forced march through Windsor Castle yesterday understand so you sound like a great. I'M GONNA go traveling with some dance. That's another great you'll wave the white flag by day four now no more activities while I was thrilled to get you on the show because in fact listener Larry reach out and said I'd love to hear what Chip Conley has to say because chip has written this is his fifth and most recent book is called wisdom at work the making of the modern elder which of course when I read the Title I was like I'm going to like that book and I love this book so the book talks about chips transition from being a CEO of Joie Aviv hotel chain at age fifty two. He decided he was gonna try something different and went to work for AIRBNB. Obviously we're talking about at that and your book talks about that transition and it talks about the way you had to really reassess your fit in terms of the corporation. You're working with you. Point out that with current life expectancy is a lot of us at age fifty have a solid twenty or thirty or forty years of work left in US So how does how should that change the way we look at our careers and we look at our choices in this in this phase that I like to call eight years between being hip and breaking one. I love that show that I had an unstaged quick story. My father is eighty one now to eighty next month. Happy Birthday thank you. I'll tell I'm he started wearing scuba dive at age sixty. He's gone now on twenty seven Scuba Guy. Since then just the twenty a year ago we were in Indonesia Scuba Scuba diving in before we went out in the morning I had read an article about the fact that at this time the average age of longevity expected for people being born unionized. Is that the one hundred four so I said how long how long are we going to live online putting a bunch of information and after fifteen minutes of time on the site. It's that back and said okay. You're going to ninety eight so went down to go scuba dive with my dad that morning didn't tell him identities longevity quiz and I said dead however when you live and again this is the last time you said ship age ninety eight officers say I describe the Master List and then we did the now. Here's here's the new Math Nancy so I said dad think about that for a moment. If we start counting at age eighteen because that's where we really had to choice northern to become an adult right you are barely at age in your barely into your fourth quarter of your life me at age fifty seven thirty nine years of adulthood behind the I have forty one years ahead of me if I lived in ninety eight. I'm I'm not even at half time right and I think that's really sort of the premise of your show. That's the premise of my book supremacy modern older academy which will talk about the idea that that math half we've used in terms of how we think about our lives has been based upon the tyranny of precision life. You'll learn till twenty or twenty five you earn till sixty five in you retire not die and that that model doesn't really doesn't mean much to people anymore because we're not so linear you might take a sabbatical for six months in your forties or you may go back to school in your fifties. The idea that these three stages in their sort of age segregated doesn't define how we see our lives today and we're. We're GonNa live longer so yes. It's likely that you will work by choice or necessity much longer than your parents did so you better you better love what you're doing and you better be open open to try new things right well. I think there's a fear a lot of us at this stage feel like we'd love to do more meaningful work. Maybe we're ready for a big change. Maybe we've been in a career for twenty five years. It would like something different but the problem is were holding up our kids and our parents and it feels like you know half. The Sky is in our hands so you you were able to make a really dramatic change but what I loved about the book is that you also talk about ways to adjust that are less less dramatic. You talk about Rian tension rather than reinvention so you can you talk a little bit about what people who may be in this phase of Saint. Oh my gosh I really do have another other twenty-five thirty forty years of work she go. I can't imagine still sitting at this jazz desktop. How do we start figuring out what we would like to do how we can sustain that curiosity acidy in that engagement with meaningful work so I think one of the challenges we have you know when we're when we're in our teen years go through adolescence. We get a lot of support. We have schools rules. We have tools and with counselors help us to try to understand who we are what we do well talents are and then we go into middle essence which is the era of Midlife and it's it's a word that's it's just starting to get some popularity to it by the way adolescence has a word is only one hundred fifteen years old. We need to have a word to describe in essence so we can make middle lessons happened. Make Melissa's happen. Are we already have it. Lets analysts ellison's existed but until this guy came along and adolescence the period of time from twelve or thirteen the age eighteen was a period of time where people thought thought to be an adult. She went straight from childhood to adulthood. You didn't have any sort of transition period and then once we knew there was a transition positioned period. We gave adolescents a lot attention for them to actually formulate their process to becoming an adult. I think the same is true for middle and middle essence is longer is it's elongated elongated through the timing just like adolescents where you're going to puberty and going through her mental and emotional changes and trying to figure out who your art same thing in essence the thing is that most people are not all that clear on where they've developed mastery often biggest mistake people make is if mastery in their industry. Yes you have knowledge in your industry. May Have may have a lot of perspective and a lot of know-how. I know who often the master. You have is actually beyond industry. It's functional and it actually may have something to do more things. You don't even see as master elite emotional intelligence how to actually lead people are how to run a meeting. There's a variety variety of things that you pick up along the way you don't actually value and so two back. Bring it back to the urban this story. Brian brought me in for my hospitality knowledge my leadership knowledge and experience and yeah that was really a lot of it a little bit more entrepreneurial background as well but what he said three into it as he said a chip we brought you in for your knowledge but we really are gaining here is your wisdom and I said so defined wisdom for me. Your wisdom is about your intuition. You're now head of strategy the company that was not part of the plan two months ago when we hired you but it was so clear so quickly you know how to connect the dots. You're thinking you'd think holistically and what I've learned since then Nancy is that yes our brain as we get older isn't as fast as it used to be and it doesn't have the recall the memory but actually we're nothing's better at as your brain ages is you do the left brain right brain tango and what that means you're able to actually adeptly in fluently moved from the logical to lyrical and allows you to think holistically collect determine crystallized intelligence which means that you could actually you actually get the gist of something you connect the dots and so. I would say on average. All of us have gotten better at that. We've gotten better at our intuition. Emotional intelligence is a skill that you build over time your I q may not grow up but you're hugh may your ability to actually really coach people and collaborate and understand how to create a team so what I would say this is we'll talk in a moment about the models academy. This is part of what we help people people in midlife feeling many more irrelevant than they expected to because the world has changed so quickly so much of the power has moved to people with D Q now. Acuna digital intelligence right which is often not always but often people who are younger than us and as such helping people to mind their mastery to actually three use it in new ways possibly in different industries is part of what we need to do in a world. That's changing this quiz and you talk in the book about one of the keys for being a successful modern elder in the workplace is maybe pairing up with some of those younger co workers who have the d q the digital intelligence intelligence but have not yet developed the emotional intelligence in Tradenet back and forth so how how does that look in practical terms how do you how do you see that working on a team team or or you know in an office setting recall. This mutual mentorship and mutual mentioned basically means that are you're in a reciprocal relationship with someone else with whom you're learning together. Sometimes you're curious ones. Sometimes you're the wise one and often it's with someone who's younger or a different generation. So this is the executive relationship I had with urban. They still have a relationship O'Brien Chelsea. I was brought into his in house mentor but what I learned very quickly. Is there a bunch of subjects everything from technology to how the software application work on our website what makes a good user experiences not on how to raise in Silicon Valley Alley. What's the what is the Silicon Valley world like how millennials either lives. How do they curate the travel..

AIRBNB San Francisco US Midlife CEO Nancy Sinead O'Connor Giovanni Windsor Castle Chip Conley Indonesia Joie Eve Schwab Vive Roller Hotel Peres Kim Silicon Valley Alley Paris Tradenet
"chip conley" Discussed on Midlife Mixtape

Midlife Mixtape

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"chip conley" Discussed on Midlife Mixtape

"Facing retirement within last weekend. It was a huge thrill of so excited and if you're a new listener to the show after reading that article let me say welcome and hey if you're nervous about retirement. I'll take it off your hands for you. I feel like I'm going to be very good. Eh Bingo nights and five o'clock dinner hours seriously. I'm very glad you're joining us. As we find whatever laughter we can in this era of waking up more tired than when you went to bed ED and finding gray hair in all kinds of places that you never expected it to flourish the other great piece of news I had while I was out on vacation is that I found out my publisher plans to to do an audio version of my book. The thank you project cultivating happiness one letter of gratitude at a time. I am so excited. They're moving ahead with that. I get to record it sometime sometime this fall so if you like the sound of my voice on the podcast just wait till you get one hundred eighty seven pages worth of it with my book the launch date is now less than three three months away it comes out on December third but Priori Wide Open on Amazon Barnes and noble inbound and I definitely recommend that you ask your local independent bookstore and even in your local library whether they're going to stock it ask them to that'd be great so we are getting back to business here at the PODCAST and coming in hot with today's guests chip Conley rebel Hospitality Entrepreneur in New York Times bestselling author chip Conley is a leader in the forefront of the sharing economy at age twenty six he founded Joie de vivre hospitality haliti transforming one inner city motel into the second largest Boutique Hotel brand in America after running his company. CEO for twenty four years he sold it and soon the young founders of AIRBNB asked him to help transform their promising startup into the world's leading hospitality brand chip served as Airbnb as head of global hospitality and strategy for four years and today acts as the company's strategic advisor for hospitality and leadership chips five books include peak and emotional equations and in his new book wisdom at work the making of a modern elder chip shares his experiences as both mentor an unexpected intern at AIRBNB and why he believes this intergenerational original exchange of wisdom is critical to.

chip Conley AIRBNB New York Times Amazon Barnes Boutique Hotel publisher CEO strategic advisor intern America three three months twenty four years four years
Dozens shot across Chicago in spate of overnight violence

Morning Edition

09:27 min | 2 years ago

Dozens shot across Chicago in spate of overnight violence

"Which Norman Lear produced and wrote Charlotte Rae in a documentary about the facts of life a spinoff of different. Strokes railroaded giant befall. And a rice sense of humor to both shows which helped revive the flagging fortunes of NBC at the time Charlotte raise last screen appearance. Was in the movie Ricky and the flash When she, was nearly ninety shortly before she was. Diagnosed with bone cancer net Libby NPR. News police in Chicago say at least forty people were shot there over the weekend at least four people died the Chicago Tribune, reports the largest single shooting came early Sunday, morning when gunmen fired on a group of people standing in a neighborhood Chicago police chief Fred Waller link most. Of the shootings to. Gang violence I'm korva Coleman NPR news in Washington Support. For NPR comes from tirerack offering a tire decision guide to help customers find tires that fit their car and, driving conditions with, a network of more than seven thousand independent installers tirerack. Dot com helping. Drivers find deliver install You're hearing morning edition. On k. q. e. d. public radio little later this morning on science will hear about the first pharmaceutical drug derived from marijuana which may soon be coming to drugstores near you it's a medication to reduce, seizures in. Epilepsy patients, a Berkeley teenager was the first patient to try the drug, after his. Mom went to extraordinary efforts and risked. Arrest to get it, for, him here, more on science during morning edition this morning at six twenty two. And again eight twenty two here on kqed public radio. After morning edition it's forum this is. Michael Krasny today on forum in our second hour Airbnb strategic advisor chip Conley joins us to discuss his new book wisdom at warp it's all about how to stay relevant in the workplace as you age join us for forum, it's nine to. Eleven here on public radio Hot and dry weather is forecast in the, Sacramento valley with smoke from wildfires affecting air quality. Today's forecast high in Sacramento is, ninety six degrees with very light to westerly. Breezes this afternoon in the bay area sunny warm day is forecast well hot and dry in the inland valleys of the bay area morning clouds along, the coast should burn off by noon today's highs. Will range from the mid and upper sixties at. The coast to the seventies and eighties around the bay eight upper eighties and low nineties bay area inland seven and a half minutes now past four o'clock morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene in, Culver City. California and, Noel king in Washington DC good morning what exactly was the, nature of. A meeting between Donald Trump junior and. A Russian operative at, Trump, Tower in, two thousand sixteen the White House I said that meeting was about. Adoption policy but the president has described it in other. Ways and then yesterday he tweeted quote. This was a meeting to get information on An opponent he said in that same tweet that it was legal but he also. Said, that he knew nothing about it the president's, also been tweeting about his former, campaign, chairman Paul Manafort Manafort is back. In federal. Court this week he's on trial for Bank and tax fraud, his trial comes out of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference Chuck Rosenberg. Is on the line with me now he's, a former federal federal prosecutor he worked in the. Eastern district of Virginia where manafort's, trial is taking place Mr. Rosenberg good morning Good morning well all right so. This isn't the first time that the, president has acknowledged that this meeting. Was affected Lee an attempt to get dirt. On Hillary Clinton President Trump of course. Was not at that meeting why do you think that President Trump is bringing. This back, up now See'ums mightily concerned about it and perhaps with good reason if, you look at the indictment that the Muller team lodged against the Russian military officials. From the GRU we know that in, March and April of two thousand sixteen so prior to the meeting and Trump Tower the g. are you already started to hack into the emails of, the Clinton campaign the Democratic National Committee and the, democratic congressional campaign, committee fast forward to that meeting I. Think, the operative question Noel is what did the US persons Trump, junior Manafort and others attending that. Meeting know, about what the Russians had already done and did? They joined. That, conspiracy even. After it began with the president has said said on Twitter that this meeting was quote totally, legal also though made an attempt or made. An effort, to to, say I didn't know anything. About it I mean could this particular meeting cause legal trouble for president Trump Quite. Possibly it certainly seems like it could cause legal trouble for the Americans who attended the meeting at the very least meeting with a. Hostile foreign power with the Russians should trigger counter intelligence concerns among any sort of savvy political. Person first thing you do is pick up the phone and call the. FBI they don't seem to have done that could cause legal trouble for the president quite possibly as. Well particularly if having heard about the meeting getting the readout from his son about what happened at the, meeting he tries to cover up the intent of the. Meaning he tells false stories about what the meeting was, four and as we know dictates a statement on Air. Force One, concealing the purpose of the. Meeting that's an obstruction of, Justice quite, possibly and it could land the president and others around him and quite a bit of. Trouble let's talk about one person who formerly was around the president who is potentially in quite a bit of trouble palm Manafort since we last talked to you the trial started the government is laid out some pretty powerful evidence for. The jury do you think prosecutors are in a strong position heading into week two or how. Would you characterize your position no I think that's exactly right I think. It's a strong physician and here's why these cases paper intensive document cases tax fraud and Bank fraud. Tender run according to script there's somewhat formulaic the government introduces income they introduce expenditures they put on accountants, to show that the accountants didn't know that Mr. Manafort. For instance had foreign Bank accounts or that he was, concealing income and then unwittingly these accountants help them prepare. Tax returns, that he files with the. IRS which understated income and, omit the, fact that he has control over these foreign Bank accounts all of that is formulaic and. All of that is precisely what's happening in a courtroom in the eastern district of Virginia manafort's case are testifying to These things yeah That's exactly right and so what I expect you'll see in the coming week is a little bit more. Of the same there'll be some summary witnesses from the FBI who will total up the amount of money in the Bank accounts and ultimately will tie those accounts to Mr. Manafort directly will show that he committed income from his. Income tax returns then I expect we'll hear. From, Mr., gates well. Yeah that is that is that is the big, question? This week right manafort's Paul, manafort's longtime deputy Rick gates expected to. Take the stand how does he fit into the? Prosecution, strategy here well criminals tend to. Run with criminals so Mr. gates. Isn't admitted criminal Mr. Manafort is. An accused criminal it shouldn't surprise the jury very much that these two guys plotted together conspired did much of the same thing tax fraud and Bank fraud to fat in. Their own waltz I think the government will put Mr. gates, on the stand they'll they'll have him. Admit To all his wrongdoing that's fairly typical to and then they'll take him step by step through. The indictment having him explain each of the. Things, that, he and. Mr. Manafort did together to cheat the IRS and, to? Fraud banks and just briefly, how do you see Mr. manafort's defense. Lawyers countering the government's case what's your strategy here? Well, they're gonna try and do two. Things one they'll try and say. That Mr. Manafort lack the intent. To defraud the IRS or the bank's perhaps if his income tax returns understated income they'll say it was an accident because he was a very busy man and second I. Think they'll try to pin as much of this on Mr., gates as they possibly can The real one at fault took Rosenberg, was a federal prosecutor in the eastern district of Virginia thanks so much Israel passed a law last month that continues to cause controversy the, nation state law defines Israel? As the, nation state of the Jewish, people critics say this? Law, discriminates against religious minorities like Muslims and. Christians. Who make up about a fifth of the Israeli population as NPR's Daniel estrin reports from Tel Aviv this law is sparking protests, from religious, group that's one of Israel's staunchest supporters the Druze religious minority in Israel. Held an, unprecedented protests this weekend thousands gathered in Tel Aviv's main square chanting the Hebrew word for quality She The you are religious group and shoot of, Islam their ethnic. Arabs but unlike most other Arab, citizens they've committed to serving in the Israeli, army they.

Paul Manafort Manafort President Trump Fraud NPR Virginia Chuck Rosenberg Mr. Gates Donald Trump FBI IRS Trump Tower Coleman Npr Noel King Bank NBC Chicago