24 Burst results for "Chinese School"

"chinese school" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:53 min | 2 weeks ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"I've shared before that my two brothers and I grew up hearing that we could one day become the president of the United States. Our mother Emily was the sole source of this recurring message. Not our father, not any of our teachers, and certainly not any other persons in our lives. Just mom. And given the fact that we were growing up in the 50s and 60s, I can't blame her for not saying this to our only an older sister, Melinda. And now that I'm thinking about it, I can't say for sure that she was saying this to my two younger brothers either. But she was definitely saying this to me. I remember that she would give this encouragement to me as a way of explaining some of her decisions or while she was validating some of my choices in school. For example, even though she and dad were second gen Chinese and bilingual, she never wanted me or my siblings to learn how to speak Cantonese, even though that meant we could never have a conversation with our paternal grandmother. She'd say, you're an American. So you don't need to speak Chinese. And if you're going to be the president of the United States, you can't speak English with any trace of a Chinese accent. Many of my Chinese American classmates had to attend Chinese school on Saturdays. I was thrilled that my parents didn't make me go to. When questioned by some of her friends, mom would simply say, well, he could be president someday. So why does he need to learn Chinese? When the principle of my elementary school selected me to voice a public service announcement that would air during drive time on local radio, monge reaction was, hey, that's good practice. If you're going to be making speeches one day, as you run for office, by now I shouldn't have to tell you what she said. When I later chose to run for various offices in junior and senior high school. While I've shared about mom's curious penchant for pushing me to become the president of the United States, I don't think I've ever spent any time wondering why she did that. She's since passed away. So I'm not able to ask her. But now I'm really puzzled as to why she had this fixation on my occupying the Oval Office one day. I don't think it came as a result of her upbringing. She was the only daughter a very poor immigrant Chinese parents. You'd think because she saw three of her brothers go on to become successful and respected medical doctors that mom would have pushed me to take that well worn path too. And yet she didn't. And it wasn't like she thought there'd be no obstacles blocking the way of a non white person to run for the highest office in the land. Don't forget why she was so concerned about me and my siblings speaking non accident English. I really don't have a clue. And if she only planted that unusual ambition in my brain and not my brothers, did mom see something in me that made her think this was possible despite all the inherent challenges? I clearly never pursued politics at any level after finishing high school. But my next brother, rob, did become a member of Sacramento school board, and then a twice he'd like to member of the city council, which included a stint as vice mayor. Mom was rightfully proud of my brother's political accomplishments. Now I want to ask him if he'd been planning political aspirations in his mind too as he grew up. Our mom was definitely an outlier Asian American parent back then, but assembly member low, Ronald Wong and I are all hoping that there are growing numbers of Emily's out there who believe it's critical for more qualified and capable AAPIs to run for office and to represent our communities well. Thanks so much for listening. Now we're ready you're coming. Back down to the first you want to explain. Listeners my guest today is California assembly member Evan low and he represents the 26th district, which for those of you who don't live in California is Silicon Valley. Given that location of your district, you have really been advocating to make sure that California remains at the forefront of technology and innovation. So you launch the California legislative technology and innovation caucus in 2015, but on top of that, you have served as the chair of the LGBTQ caucus witch last year's celebrated his 20th anniversary. Congratulations. And now you're the chair of the Asian and Pacific Islander legislative caucus. So I am honored and thrilled to welcome you to my podcast assembly member low. Can happy new year to you? Oh, thank you very much. Now do I remind you of my brother rob in any way? There are some unique characteristics for sure. In fact, maybe the two of you should think about running for a public service in public office. Charisma. Yeah, well, you know, he did that before and then he just kind of got burned out on the whole thing. But you know, I was up there for my 50th high school reunion and he was on the phone with you in the car, and I'm like, dude, you're talking to assembly member Evan Lowe. He's been on my white whale radar for my show, you know, forever, and then I got Ron Wang on about a month and a half ago who also works with you and rob. And so it's just like all the stars in our lining, it's time to reach out and see if you'll come on. So I know your time is valuable. So I wanted to jump right into it with you if you don't mind. Great. So you're the new chair of the API caucus. How do you think that we can grow the number of AAPI legislators? I mean, that's something that's on rob's heart, definitely on bronze radar. What do you think needs to happen more? Well, first of all, Ken, thank you very much for providing an opportunity to venue to have conversation and dialog about how we uplift our API community. Especially in a segment and environment in which many of us have not participated traditionally. Most of our culture and the focus has been to become a doctor, lawyer, and generic accountant, very safe occupations, not terribly visible, but what we realized in a democratic society and especially now in light of stopping AAPI hate, we realize the obligation and responsibility that we have to participate in democracy in our society. And so that's why I feel equally as passionate as you are about talking about politics, engagement, civics, especially with the AAPI lens that we need to own up to our rightful place in society and put ourselves up for public scrutiny and also to represent and reflect our societies.

monge United States Emily Sacramento school board Chinese school Ronald Wong Melinda rob California assembly Evan low Oval Office California assembly Evan Lowe Ron Wang city council Silicon Valley Ken AAPI
"chinese school" Discussed on Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

04:59 min | 3 months ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Crypto and Blockchain Talk - Making You Smarter

"Go to The Bahamas or some of the other islands, you will you know what you always will find is a Chinese school. There's going to be a Chinese school and maybe a new stadium that was paid for by the Chinese people. So the country itself China is promoting their way of life everywhere. If you talk to folks in The Bahamas, they will say just the very best thing about the Chinese. If you go to Africa, people will say the very best thing about the Chinese because they go there and they create schools, they help them, et cetera, et cetera, and they're promoting kind of like the Chinese way of life. The Chinese communist communist hybrid system that they have there. So and I think that's kind of like the U.S. is in decline, China is rising. And so China is probably going to make the way because we don't have our stuff in order. The United States is so bad right now that you don't even know where you would start fixing it. So I don't know. I would think USS in decline. That's why you see this. You see Saudi Arabia. You see Russia attacking the Ukraine. And then also we're looking at, hey, yeah, they want to get the land back or they want to free the people or whatever. But look at it, look at all the problems that we have since the invaded the Ukraine with our supply chain where we talk about weed, agriculture, all of the things that we rely on, there's a lot in the Ukraine, so this war might not be just about, hey, yeah, because they have 5 Russians and we want them to live here. This is about resources most likely. And remember, we have climate change too, which most people don't believe in, but there is climate change. A meaning when you do it when you have a farm, for example, people can talk to the farmers if they know somebody in their area, they will tell them gets worse and worse every year.

The Bahamas China Ukraine United States Africa Saudi Arabia Russia
"chinese school" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:37 min | 4 months ago

"chinese school" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"To solve the problem that people race they solve the people who raise the problems. That's why we've been careful to hide Ming's identity. I did the interview on an encrypted coal and recorded it on a separate device. The file is kept on a laptop that's never been connected to the Internet. These are the most extreme measures we've taken for any of our interviews for this podcast. But we've had to be careful throughout. We've hardly been able to talk to anyone inside China safely. Even outside China, a lot of people refuse to speak. Once they know our podcast is about Xi Jinping. I was hired as a China correspondent for The Economist in early 2020. I was supposed to be based in Beijing, but the Chinese government sat on my Visa application. So I waited in Hong Kong, hoping that eventually I'd be allowed in. It was an extraordinary time to be in Hong Kong. In 2019, millions took to the streets fighting for democracy. Then the government clamped down, turning the city into a police state. The Communist Party imposed a draconian national security law on Hong Kong, sending almost every prominent Democrat to jail or into exile. In September 2021, I got an ominous letter. The authorities wanted a list of every single story I'd ever written about Hong Kong, along with all kinds of information. It didn't feel safe to stay, so I packed one suitcase, locked my apartment door, and flew to The Economist's headquarters in London. I haven't been back since. Shortly after I left, the Hong Kong immigration authorities refused to renew my Visa. Again, no explanation. On The Economist magazine said the immigration department has refused to renew the working Visa, as China correspondent wants to learn, although other journalists tried to find out for me. I was kind of in recent years, has raised concerns from the Hong Kong's leader at the time, Carrie lam, answered the question at a press conference. First of all, the issue of Visa is the autonomy and the discretion of any government. For example, standing here as the chief executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, I've been denied Visa into the United States of America. And of course, we now have also the peace of law, or the national security law. So in all aspects of the government activities, national security is a clearly a very important consideration. I had nowhere to live. So I called my mom back home in Australia. I told her I'd effectively been kicked out of Hong Kong. Her response, that's wonderful news. So in my 30s, I've had to move back in with my parents. I'm learning how to make one of my mom's favorite Malaysian dishes. She can rendang. For usually it's just the meat, but since I've got carrots in the fridge, I can just throw in some pieces of carrots. You love to improvise. Let's try it. How do you feel? About the fact that I've basically moved back in with you and dad. Wonderful to have your company. Your present is actually too busy. Not that much company. Why do you have to work, mom? Of course. I know that. You think it's weird, I'm covering China from Australia. Of course. And especially I don't know what's the relevance of my cooking. My parents were born in Malaysia, but our family is originally from southern China. I was born and raised in Sydney, and in many ways, had a typical Australian childhood of long, hot summers and barbecues in the park. My parents also forced me to go to Chinese school on Saturdays, which at the time I hated. They still live on the street I grew up on, so I've been taking walks in the park I used to play in as a kid, reflecting on everything that's happened. My situation isn't unique. I'm pretty sure I know more China correspondents who aren't in China than who are. And I'm very aware of how lucky I am. As a foreign national, I was able to leave easily and I was never put in jail. More than a hundred journalists are currently behind bars in China because of their work. Xi Jinping has used his coercive machine to shut down NGOs, lock up activists and human rights lawyers and repress religious groups like Christians. Perhaps Xi Jinping is proudly staring in his wall of Jell-O now, laughing at how wrong Bill Clinton's prediction was. The system of surveillance, propaganda and censorship, combined with healthy users ideology to push party officials to comply with his orders, is like a ratchet. It only turns in one direction tighter. Nowhere is this more obvious than in China's northwestern region of Xinjiang. That's next time. The prince is produced by Claire Reed, Sam Colbert, Barclay Bram, and me. Our sound designer is weighed on Lin, with original music by Darren ung. Our executive producer is John shields. We couldn't have made this without the help of some very brave people we can't name. For more of The Economist China coverage, get the best offer on a subscription at economist dot com slash China pod.

Hong Kong China Chinese government Xi Jinping Economist magazine Visa Carrie lam Hong Kong Special Administrati Ming immigration department Communist Party Beijing Australia United States of America London government Malaysia Sydney Claire Reed Sam Colbert
"chinese school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:01 min | 7 months ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than a 120 countries. In the newsroom I'm Denise Pellegrini. This is Bloomberg. You're listening to Bloomberg opinion, I'm Bonnie Quinn, turning east now and specifically to China where president Xi Jinping this week criticized the impact of sanctions for causing global economic pain. Also this week, president Xi warned of hunger and he ordered more pro growth policies to boost China's COVID battered economy, shoot a ren joins now for some perspective on the Chinese consumer. Surely, president Xi sounds concerned about his people. How badly is the Chinese consumer suffering right now? I mean, if you just look at the youth unemployment rate at the periodic consumer sentiment survey, it doesn't lowest on record. Use an employment has already had 18%. 18%? Yes, it's going to take higher because college graduates are going to graduate in a month or so. Yes. So we're going to see basically one thing four or 5 young people aged between 16 and 24 unemployed. How can that happen? We know that inflation hasn't been a problem, but how is unemployment such a problem in China? Well, a lot of that was the big tack at the real estate developer crackdown. I mean, the tax factor employed a lot of people, especially young people, right? So that's a big chunk. And also because of the COVID lockdowns, I mean the big tech companies also hired a lot of gig economy workers who deliver workers drivers. And these people don't have any jobs right now. Do they have social security benefits or any kind of income coming in? Very little to be honest. And that's something very interesting about China, even though it claims to be a communist country. There is very little social security that and the president Xi Jinping is definitely not into this notion called the welfare state. He basically shares this ideology called production first and then living next. So what China has done is that they are giving subsidies to factories and say, oh, you know, like if you just keep those workers, we are going to give you some tax rebates. And they're not very many to be honest. So there is no talk of stimulus check. And there is very little unemployment check to be honest. I think in 2020 about 60 million people lost their jobs, only 2 million managed to claim unemployment. Wow, that is a serious serious black mark on the Chinese economy. Now, president Xi Jinping, he has an ego, he wants to hold himself upright in the world. How does he allow this unemployment rate continue to be the case if it's 18% for youth? What is it overall? Overall, urban and employment is a little bit shy of heaven. A lot of ways because if you are like 40, 50 years old, chances are your workforce stay over enterprises. And they don't lay off workers, right? So a lot of the tension is intergenerational. Young people are struggling, whereas you are 40, 50 year old that you are doing a little bit better. But still, you will have children who are young. So use unemployment is the biggest problem right now. President Xi has been talking about going easier on the tech sector and also FinTech reforms and reforms in other areas and that the economy is almost ready to incorporate those reforms and allow these companies operate again. Would that be a bright sign for employment? That will be. That's an early stage of perhaps unemployment recovery. We don't have a complete statistics, but just according to surveys, the tutoring sector used to hire about 17% of fresh college graduates. And that's actor was completely wiped out because of the tax credit. So the government is trying, but it's not going to be like where it used to be. No, you point out that a record 10.8 million college graduates will be fresh out this summer. And there are no jobs for them right now. I mean, that will lead to social unrest if it continues, correct? I think the government is surely very worried. The thing is, the way China sees unemployment. But migrant workers, they always feel like, okay, you can always go back to your country side and go farm. They will never that worried about migrant workers and employment they feel like you know the land is their employment ultimately. But for young fresh college graduates it's a problem because they're quite educated and they're frustrated and we have seen what happened in the Middle East and other parts of the world. China is very worried right now. And China has a great reputation in the tech sector in semiconductors and all sorts of areas and you would have imagined that China would be able to put them to work, tell us about what you call gold silver and copper babies. So Chinese schools can be very harsh. I mean, I went to the Chinese system from very early out. They ranked by our great and then divided into gold and silver and copper. So the gold babies there the ones who can go to chimpanzee university and they're the next generation engineers that can design China's world class chips or EV auto parts. And then the copper baby, they tend to be micro workers children. So they will do more gig economy work and perhaps lower manufacturing, construction work. The big chunk basically we're talking about two thirds now, because China's middle class is getting bigger. That's so close to a baby. They are okay students not stellar, but now most of those who have babies, they are getting college education as well. China college attendance rate is close to 60% in the U.S. is only 40%. And these two were babies. Yeah, they don't want to go work in factories anymore. Their parents did. And then they are not good enough to decide the next generation, the chips. So China doesn't know what to do with them. And all these silver babies, they want to go work for their own enterprises or work for the government. But the government is paring back. Its own employment as well. The government knows it's so easy uploaded to bloated. Everyone just sitting around doing nothing. And then the sewer babies, they used to go to the tech sector a lot. And now the tech sector is now hiring because of the crackdown. These are the big problems. Julie ran their stay tuned more on China's economy next, how COVID zero is impacting

China Bloomberg Denise Pellegrini Bonnie Quinn president Xi Jinping president Xi Xi Jinping President Xi government Middle East U.S. Julie
"chinese school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:53 min | 7 months ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm woody Cooper. You're listening to Bloomberg opinion. I'm Bonnie Quinn, turning east now and specifically to China where president Xi Jinping this week criticized the impact of sanctions for causing global economic pain. Also this week, president Xi warned of hunger and he ordered more pro growth policies to boost China's COVID battered economy, shooting Iran joins now for some perspective on the Chinese consumer. Surely, president Xi sounds concerned about his people. How badly is the Chinese consumer suffering right now? I mean, if you just look at the use and employment rate at the periodic consumer sentiments of the lowest on record, use unemployment has already had 18%. 18%? Yes, it's going to take higher because college graduates are going to graduate in a month or so. Yes. So we're going to see basically one in four or 5 young people aged between 16 and 24 unemployed. How did that happen? We know that inflation hasn't been a problem, but how is unemployment such a problem in China? Well, a lot of it was the big pack at the real estate developer crackdown. I mean, the tax factor employed a lot of people, especially young people, right? So that's a big chunk. And also because of the COVID lockdowns, I mean the big tech companies also hired a lot of gig economy workers who deliver workers drivers. And these people don't have any jobs right now Do they have social security benefits or any kind of income coming in? Very little to be honest. And that's something very interesting about China, even though it claims to be a communist country. There is very little social security that and the president Xi Jinping is definitely not into this notion called the welfare state. He basically shares this ideology called production first and then living next. So what China has done is that they are giving subsidies to factories and say, oh, you know, like if you just keep those workers, we are going to give you some tax rebates. And then not very many to be honest. So there is no talk of stimulus check. And there is very little unemployment check to be honest. I think in 2020, about 60 million people lost their jobs, only 2 million managed to claim unemployment. Wow, that is a serious serious black mark on the Chinese economy. Now, president Xi Jinping, he has an ego, he wants to hold himself upright in the world. How does he allow this unemployment rate continue to be the case if it's 18% for youth? What is it overall? Overall, urban and employment is a little bit shy of 7%. A lot of ways, because if you are like 40, 50 years old, chances are your workforce stay over enterprises. And they don't lay off workers, right? So a lot of the tension is intergenerational. Young people are struggling, whereas you are 40, 50 year old that you are doing a little bit better. But still, you will have children who are young. So use unemployment is the biggest problem right now. President Xi has been talking about going easier on the tech sector and also FinTech reforms and reforms in other areas and that the economy is almost ready to incorporate those reforms and allow these companies operate again. Would that be a bright sign for employment? That will be. That's an early stage of perhaps unemployment recovery. We don't have a complete statistics, but just according to surveys, the tutoring sector used to hire about 17% of fresh college graduates. And that's actually what's completely wiped out because of the tax credit. So the government is trying, but it's not going to be like where it used to be. No, you point out that a record 10.8 million college graduates will be fresh out this summer. And there are no jobs for them right now. I mean, that will lead to social unrest if it continues, correct? I think the government is surely very worried. The thing is, the way China sees unemployment for migrant workers, they always feel like, okay, you can always go back to your countryside and go far. They will never stop worried about migrant workers and employment. They feel like you know the land is their employment ultimately. But for young fresh college graduates, it's a problem because they're quite educated. And they're frustrated and we have seen what happened in the Middle East and other parts of the world. China is very worried right now. And China has a great reputation in the tech sector in semiconductors and all sorts of areas and you would have imagined that China would be able to put them to work, tell us about what you call gold silver and copper babies. So Chinese schools can be very harsh. I mean, I went to the Chinese system from very early out. They ranked by our great and then goodbye to gold and silver and copper. So the gold babies stand the ones who can go to qinghai and basically university and they're the next generation engineers that can design China's world class ships or EV auto parts. And then the copper baby, they tend to be micro workers Trojans. So they will do more gig economy work and perhaps lower manufacturing, construction work. The big chunk basically we're talking about two thirds now, because China's middle class is getting bigger. That's so close to the baby. They are okay students not stellar, but now most of those two are babies. They are getting college education as well. China and college attendance rate is close to 60% in the U.S., it's only 40%. And these two were babies. Yeah, they don't want to go work in factories anymore. Their parents did. And then they are not good enough to design the next generation. So China doesn't know what to do with them. And all these silver babies, they want to go work for their own enterprises or work for the government. But the government is paring back. Its own employment as well. The government knows SOEs uploaded to loaded. Everyone just sitting around doing nothing right. And then the similar babies, they used to go to the tech sector a lot. And now the tech sector is not hiring because of the crackdown. These are the big problems. Julie ran their stay tuned more on China's economy next. How COVID zero is impacting growth

China woody Cooper Bonnie Quinn president Xi Jinping president Xi Xi Jinping President Xi Bloomberg Iran government Middle East Trojans U.S. Julie
"chinese school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:05 min | 8 months ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg. You're listening to Bloomberg opinion, I'm Bonnie Quinn, turning east now and specifically to China where president Xi Jinping this week criticized the impact of sanctions for causing global economic pain. Also this week, president Xi warned of hunger and he ordered more pro growth policies to boost China's COVID battered economy, shoot a ren joins now for some perspective on the Chinese consumer. Surely, president Xi sounds concerned about his people. How badly is the Chinese consumer suffering right now? I mean, if you just look at the youth unemployment rate at the periodic consumer sentiment survey, it doesn't lowest on record. User unemployment has already had 18%. 18%? Yes, it's going to take higher because college graduates are going to graduate in a month or so. Yes. So we're going to see basically one thing four or 5 young people aged between 16 and 24 unemployed. How can that happen, surely, we know that inflation hasn't been a problem, but how is unemployment such a problem in China? Well, a lot of it was the big packet that real estate developer cracked down. I mean, the tax sector employed a lot of people, especially young people, right? So that's a big chunk. And also because of the COVID lockdowns, I mean the big tech companies also hired a lot of gig economy workers to deliver workhouse drivers. And these people don't have any jobs right now. Do they have social security benefits or any kind of income coming in? Very little to be honest. And that's something very interesting about China, even though it claims to be a communist country. There is very little social security that and the president Xi Jinping is definitely not into the notion called the welfare state. He basically shares this ideology called production first and then living next. So what China has done is that they are giving subsidies to factories and say, oh, you know, like if you just keep those workers, we are going to give you some tax rebates. And they're not very many to be honest. So there is no talk of stimulus check. And there is very little unemployment check to be honest. I think in 2020, about 60 million people lost their job, only 2 million managed to claim unemployment. Wow, that is a serious serious black mark on the Chinese economy. Now, president Xi Jinping, he has an ego, he wants to hold himself upright in the world. How does he allow this unemployment rate continue to be the case if it's 18% for youth? What is it overall? Overall, urban and employment is a little bit shy of 7%. A lot of ways, because if you are like 40, 50 years old, chances are your workforce stay over enterprises. And they don't lay off workers, right? So a lot of the tension is into generational young people are struggling. Whereas you are 40, 50 year old that you are doing a little bit better. But still, you will have children who are young. So use unemployment is the biggest problem right now. President Xi has been talking about going easier on the tech sector and also FinTech reforms and reforms in other areas and that the economy is almost ready to incorporate those reforms and allow these companies operate again. Would that be a bright sign for employment? That will be. That's an early stage of perhaps unemployment recovery. We don't have a complete statistics, but just according to surveys, the tutoring sector used to hire about 17% of fresh college graduates. And that's actually what's completely wiped out because of the tax crackdown. So the government is trying, but it's not going to be like where it used to be. No, you point out that a record 10.8 million college graduates will be fresh out this summer. And there are no jobs for them right now. I mean, that will lead to social unrest if it continues, correct? I think the government is surely very worried. The thing is, the way China sees unemployment. But migrant workers, they always feel like, okay, you can always go back to your country side and go farm. They will never stop worried about my workers and employment they feel like you know the land is their employment ultimately. But for young fresh college graduates it's a problem because they're quite educated and they're frustrated and we have seen what happened in the Middle East and other hearts of the world. China is very worried right now. And China has a great reputation in the tech sector in semiconductors and all sorts of areas and you would have imagined that China would be able to put them to work, tell us about what you call gold silver and copper babies. So Chinese schools can be very harsh. I mean, I went through the Chinese system from very early out. They recognized by our great and then divided into gold and silver and copper. So the gold babies they are the ones who can go to qinghai and Beijing university and they're the next generation engineers that can design China's world class chips or EV auto parts. And then the copper babies, they tend to be migrant workers children. So they will do more gig economy work and perhaps lower manufacturing, construction work. The big chunk basically we're talking about two thirds now, because China's middle class is getting bigger. That's so close to a baby. They are okay students not stellar, but now most of those two are babies. They are getting college education as well. China and college attendance rate is close to 60% in the U.S. is only 40%. And these two were babies. Yeah, they don't want to go work in factories anymore. Their parents did. And then they are not good enough to design the next generation the chips. So China didn't know what to do with them. And all these silver babies, they want to go work for their own enterprises or work for the government. But the government is paring back. Its own employment as well. The government knows it's so easy uploaded to bloated. Everyone just sitting around doing nothing. And then the sewer babies, they used to go to the tech sector a lot. And now the tech sector is not hiring because of the crackdown. These are the big problems. Julie ran their stay tuned more on China's economy next, how COVID zero is impacting grows with Tim Colton on Bloomberg opinion. You see the. These days it's

China Bonnie Quinn president Xi Jinping president Xi Xi Jinping Bloomberg President Xi government Middle East Beijing U.S. Julie Tim Colton
"chinese school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:43 min | 8 months ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're listening to Bloomberg opinion, I'm Bonnie Quinn, turning east now and specifically to China where president Xi Jinping this week criticized the impact of sanctions for causing global economic pain. Also this week, president Xi warned of hunger and he ordered more pro growth policies to boost China's COVID battered economy, Julian joins now for some perspective on the Chinese consumer. Surely, president Xi sounds concerned about his people. How badly is the Chinese consumer suffering right now? I mean, if you just look at the youth unemployment rate at the periodic consumer sentiment survey, it doesn't lowest on record. Use an employment has already had 18%. 18%? Yes, it's going to take higher because college graduates are going to graduate in a month or so. Yes. So we're going to see basically one thing for 5 young people aged between 16 and 24 unemployed. How did that happen? We know that inflation hasn't been a problem, but how is unemployment such a problem in China? Well, a lot of there was the big packet that real estate developer crackdown. I mean, the tax factor employed a lot of people, especially young people, right? So that's a big chunk. And also because of the COVID lockdowns, I mean the big tech companies also hired a lot of gig economy workers to deliver workers drivers. And these people don't have any jobs right now. Do they have social security benefits or any kind of income coming in? Very little to be honest. And that's something very interesting about China, even though it claims to be a communist country. There is very little social security that and the president Xi Jinping is definitely not into this notion called the welfare state. He basically shares this ideology called production first and then living next. So what China has done is that they are giving subsidies to factories and say, oh, you know, like if you just keep those workers, we are going to give you some tax rebates. And then not very many to be honest. So there is no talk of stimulus check. And there is very little unemployment check to be honest. I think in 2020, about 60 million people lost their job, only 2 million managed to claim unemployment. Wow, that is a serious serious black mark on the Chinese economy. Now, president Xi Jinping, he has an ego, he wants to hold himself upright in the world. How does he allow this unemployment rate continue to be the case if it's 18% for youth? What is it overall? Overall, urban and employment is a little bit shy of 7%. A lot of it is because if you are like 40, 50 years old, chances are your workforce, they own enterprises. And they don't lay off workers, right? So a lot of the tension is intergenerational. Young people are struggling, whereas you are 40, 50 year old that you are doing a little bit better. But still, you will have children who are young. So use unemployment is the biggest problem right now. President Xi has been talking about going easier on the tech sector and also FinTech reforms and reforms in other areas and that the economy is almost ready to incorporate those reforms and allow these companies operate again. Would that be a bright sign for employment? That will be. That's an early stage of perhaps unemployment recovery. We don't have a complete statistics, but just according to surveys, the tutoring sector used to hire about 17% of fresh college graduates. And that's actually what's completely wiped out because of the tax credit. So the government is trying, but it's not going to be like where it used to be. No, you point out that a record 10.8 million college graduates will be fresh out this summer. And there are no jobs for them right now. I mean, that will lead to social unrest if it continues, correct? I think the government is surely very worried. The thing is, the way China sees unemployment for migrant workers, they always feel like, okay, you can always go back to your countryside then go farm. They will never stop worried about migrant workers and employment. They feel like you know the land is their employment ultimately. But for young fresh college graduates it's a problem because they're quite educated and they're frustrated and we have seen what happened in the Middle East and other parts of the world. China is very worried right now. And China has a great reputation in the tech sector in semiconductors and all sorts of areas and you would have imagined that China would be able to put them to work, tell us about what you call gold silver and copper babies. So Chinese schools can be very harsh. I mean, I went to the Chinese system from very early out. They ranked by our great and then divided into gold and silver and copper. So the gold babies stand the ones who can go to chimpanzees university and they are the next generation engineers that can design China's world class chips or EV auto parts. And then the copper babies, they tend to be micro workers children. So they will do more gig economy work and perhaps lower manufacturing, construction work. The big chunk basically we're talking about two thirds now, because China's middle class is getting bigger. All right, that's so close to the baby. They are okay students not tell us, but now most of those who have babies, they are getting college education as well. China and college attendance rate is close to 60% in the U.S., it's only 40%. And these two of the babies, yeah, they don't want to go work in factories anymore. Their parents did. And then they are not good enough to design the next generation, the chips. So China doesn't know what to do with them. And all these silver babies, they want to go work for their own enterprises or work for the government. But the government is pairing back its own employment as well. The government knows it's so easy uploaded to loaded. Everyone just sitting around doing nothing way. And then the similar babies, they used to go to the tech sector a lot. And now the tech sector is not hiring because of the crackdown. These are the big

China Bonnie Quinn president Xi Jinping president Xi COVID Julian joins Xi Jinping President Xi Bloomberg government Middle East U.S.
"chinese school" Discussed on Key Battles of American History

Key Battles of American History

05:39 min | 10 months ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Key Battles of American History

"So they do imply, so do little a given the teacher that's spoken English Chinese school teacher that is spoke English. They do imply that you're giving him a zippo a lighter and the Japanese have that. There's a shot of the Japanese with that as they're talking about all the Japanese, the Chinese people that are killed. However, that character that he plays zoo, she saw, was a real person and he visited the United States in 1992. So he survived the war. Yeah, that's good. Richard best is one of only two U.S. Navy pilots in history to hit multiple carriers in a single day. And sadly, that was the last time he ever flew was when he landed after sinking. Never flew again. And then the closing title, this film is dedicated to the American and Japanese sailors who fought at midway. So that's caused some controversy. It has, there's people that think the Japanese all Japanese are war criminals and should not be recognized in any way. However, if you watch storage or if you watch midway, the 1976 version, older films, if you even watch, have you been watching 30 seconds over Tokyo, they say the Japanese I'm sure they're not all bad. So this there's nothing wrong with dedicating with saying, you know, these men fought and died in this battle and they believe that they were fighting for their country. So what more can you say on that? And I got to say the soundtrack is amazing. I love the movie. It's really good. Terrific. All right, let's table our discussion of the 1976 midway in what we were going to talk about that, but we're going to probably do an episode where we just going to go bang bang bang. We talk about a bunch of other movies that we're not doing in great detail. So well, I like to story in the 1976 movie. And I like the stars. I think the story in this one, it's okay. The acting and the script are not good in this movie. In the 2019 person, they're just not. There's some good actors. They're given what they're given, but the accents really take me out. Some of the compression of the story takes me out. The Mandy Moore stuff. It gives it a people element that orator, for example, doesn't have. And it's not as egregious as the Michael Bay Pearl Harbor story, the romance story. But I can see why people don't like this movie, my critics didn't like this movie..

English Chinese school Richard best U.S. Navy United States Tokyo Mandy Moore Michael Bay Pearl Harbor
"chinese school" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"chinese school" Discussed on WTOP

"I might have gone and he's not going to be here today like he wasn't here yesterday The U.S. Navy confirms four people died in a contractor's helicopter crash in Hawaii still no word on why that chopper went down It was being flown as part of a training exercise Social workers in Texas are cracking down on families of trans kids The official position of Texas attorney general Ken Paxton is that sex change procedures and treatments performed on children can legally constitute child abuse under several provisions of the Texas family code That's reporter Chris Fox LA county has resumed its annual homeless count a year after concerns that the count couldn't be done safely or accurately during the pandemic It will take about three days to complete and determines how much the county receives in federal funding to help people get back on their feet This is CBS News You know the Washington Wizards are not just my team but they're on my team This is Dave Johnson and the wizards are helping to fight multiple sclerosis Sunday march 6th is MS awareness type with the wizards As I've shared with you my mother lost her battle with MS when I was a teenager Now I'm living with MS but I'm going to win the battle My mother lost to help go to Washington Wizards dot com slash MS awareness because $10 for every ticket purchase will go to the national MS society to fund research and find a cure But remember to use the link why should wizards dot com slash MS awareness Three O three Good Wednesday morning beneath 23rd of February 2022 morning showers will end becoming partly sunny breezy warm high about 70 today believe it or not it's 64 right now And being lame we thank you for taking us along through your early Wednesday morning ride topping the local stories where watching for you this morning as we head into this day together we begin this half hour with Maryland state board of education passing control over mask policies now to local school boards Maryland superintendent of schools Muhammad Chaudhry told state school board members he believed it's time to hand control over mask policies back to local school districts but he added he thought the initial mandate was the right move I would go back I would do it again because it did what it needed to do Chaudhry pointed to the reduced risk of transmission and the fact that no schools are currently closed due to COVID-19 the board voted in favor of shifting mask policies back to local control effective March 1st but there's one more step the regulation requires approval from a joint legislative committee in Annapolis Kate Ryan WTO P news News times three O four Montgomery county school says that if the state finalizes lifting the mask mandate it will make a decision on masks soon after However in a statement out this week MCP SS at this time students and staff alike are still required to wear those masks in schools and offices A final decision on masks is expected at a meeting set for February 24th On another front this morning prince George's county public schools warning of potential school bus delays due to truck convoys expected here in the area very soon Those demonstrations have been spawned by protest up in Canada you'll remember that blocked people and commerce there for weeks Stay with WTO one O 3.5 FM WTO P dot com of course on the WTO for the latest on traffic and whether on the 8s as we watched to see how traffic is affected by these truckers we've got you covered At three O 5 Turning the page this morning it's a story that has rattled people in our area Two children playing outside were hit by bullets this week after at least one person came out from a wooded area in Annapolis and as police described it this morning fired a gun indiscriminately We've now learned here at WTO P one child this morning is paralyzed And community leaders are demanding info in this case It's no way in hell in hell that we should be comfortable with 11 year old and 15 year olds being shot Annapolis police chief Ed Jackson spoke candidly emphasizing the importance for those who know who fired indiscriminately toward a group of children to call police We need to call on the faith based institutions We need to call on our schools It's everybody's problem They are Gavin Buckley says the 11 year old girl who was injured is released from the hospital but the 15 year old boy shot in the Robin wood neighborhood of Annapolis is paralyzed You have to help us find the sorts of people that would do these things Investigators say the shots came from one location but they're not ruling out the potential There was more than one shooter Meghan cloher WTO news Three O 6 On the day he was sworn in in Virginia Virginia attorney general Jason Millar's announced an investigation into how loudly county schools handled two sex assaults by the same team at two high schools Now we're learning that WTO from a former AG what the probe is all about here I'd be using the state police to get in there and figure out what actually went on Former attorney general Jerry kilgore was the transition chief for Jason Mira's despite governor youngkin and mayors campaign claims of a cover up and lying by the loudoun Chinese school system those allegations have never been substantiated kilgore believes that the investigation will be fair If charges are eventually filed and that would come in and you would see knowingly or willfully violated the law in this manner The law can stain double you TLP news It's three O 7 on your Wednesday morning The pilot of a single engine cessna made a crash landing in Ashburn this week last night Tuesday evening after reporting that his engine was failing The pilot who was alive and well that's the good news this morning.

Ken Paxton LA county Texas national MS society wizards Maryland state board of educat Muhammad Chaudhry Chris Fox COVID Annapolis Kate Ryan Montgomery county school Dave Johnson U.S. Navy Washington Wizards CBS News WTO multiple sclerosis
"chinese school" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"chinese school" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"A and M's partner. Craig, do you know Wang huning? Yes. Okay, not many people know about him. I've been doing my work on him. Is he in charge of this? I mean, because he's the big brain of China. Is he in charge of it? I mean, this is such a successful development of sources penetration of the United States society came here in 1989. Is he the architect of this? It's actually Xi Jinping himself. He's given numerous speeches where he has talked about this idea of military civil fusion. It's sort of the idea that you're going to China can acquire the world's cutting edge technology through the past to achieve military dominance. And that requires a heavy reliance on China's civilian universities. About 90 Chinese civilian universities have been tapped specifically by the Chinese government to support China's military buildup. Only 90 of 3000. So we're really talking about a scalpel, not a sledgehammer, but it is something that the Chinese talk about openly in their speeches and Chinese media. It's only a surprise to us because we're not spending enough time to really attract the issue. Today, your report comes out on an interesting day because The New York Times has a huge story on how China manipulates YouTube and The Washington Post has a huge story on how yay is a forward facing arm of the Chinese government. Are we at a critical mass moment where wake up occurs in the United States turns to itself defense? I would like to think so. I mean, we've given a lot of attention recently, I think, just as a society to understanding links between U.S. companies that may or may not be operating in parts of China where there are modern day slavery or other human rights abuses. The conversation hasn't necessarily focused enough on higher education. And that's just an area where I think some legislators, others in politics are a little nervous to sort of go against the higher education of lobby. It's very powerful. They have a lot of money. But I do think that reports like the one that we put out sort of shine a light and say, look, we're not saying that all academic partnerships are bad. But let's have some common sense guardrails. Should a U.S. university that receives millions of dollars from the U.S. government to work on classified research, also be able to have a research or academic partnership with the Chinese university that builds nuclear submarine. I think the average person the average voter would sit back and be like, no, that doesn't make a lot of sense. But I think we're seeing a lag between legislation and sort of the information coming to light about how China has weaponized our society. Your monograph, the middle kingdom meets higher education is by Craig singleton. That's what I'm talking with. And I'm sure Jim bank and others in Congress. I'll be talking about senator cotton about this shortly. I am curious, what is the reaction to the CCP to your report, Craig? They're not too happy. So she was surprised to write. They did issue a form of our view in global times, both of our report and our global chairman Matt ponder who I think you're listeners all know. So we are starting to see that we're obviously getting a little bit of their attention. Folks like senator cotton, one of the schools in the reports in his state and we've raised it with his staff recently and I think you're going to take some real action. But even at low stable readus on the show today, he's affiliated with tough tucks is one of those schools that maintains an academic partnership with the Chinese school that builds all of China's UAVs. So once again, I'm a tenured member of Chapman. How did we do? You're not on there, so you're safe for now. Okay, you know, I was worried I didn't get a chance to go through the whole thing. The middle kingdom me tire education is available at FTD dot org or you can just remember Craig singleton also on Twitter and I have tweeted out both his Twitter handle and the link. Craig, this is great work, may have traveled far and fast, we needed to..

China Chinese government Wang huning United States Xi Jinping Craig U.S. university Chinese university Craig singleton The Washington Post Jim bank The New York Times middle kingdom Matt ponder YouTube U.S. government Congress Chinese school Chapman Twitter
"chinese school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Over your Bloomberg type. Squawk ask you, you eight wk on your terminal. I'm Charlie. How about that? The Bloomberg Business Flash. Thank you so much for that update. Charlie Pellet quote. It's likely to lose money for black rocks, clients and more important will damage the national security interests of the US and other democracies. Those are the words of legendary investor George Soros. Criticizing Black Rock for investing in China in an op ed in The Wall Street Journal today, joining us now to talk all about it and more. There's pretty much no better person to speak to this than Andy Brown, editorial director of Bloomberg New Economy for him, although he spent years in China Today. He is joining us on the phone from New Hampshire. And we're certainly glad. Because if he were in China right now, it would be the middle of the night, Andy. Thank you so much for taking the time and joining us on this. What was your reaction when you saw that? What was your reaction when you saw that editorial from George Soros? Yeah, Look, this is pretty inflammatory stuff. I mean, he's essentially accusing Wall Street leaders of being on patriotic Fifth columnists. Investing as it were in the enemy at a time when the United States and China in his view a locked in this life, and there Struggles for supremacy, and his point is you've got to choose sides. This is a national security with I mean, certainly you've gone further in his criticism of people like You know, Larry think an and and Schwartzman John Thornton, the former Goldman Sachs. Senior executives and perhaps some any any public figure has before. Good afternoon, Andy. I mean, what is the concern here? Is it complete focus on the regulatory crackdown. Or is it the President XI economic strategy, which is which is largely a shift to industrialization right away from software away from Internet? Where is the area of concern for Soros? Well, no, I think he's looking at a much higher level. I mean, in his view, you now have two competing and incompatible systems buying for global supremacy. And on the one hand you have the Democratic free market system of the U. S. Europe and the West. More generally, and then you have China, which in his view is moving in and authoritarian. Even autocratic direction and doubling down on state capitalism. And that certainly is the way that he would interpret the latest ructions in China with the Jinping. Taking on the big tech champions. He would no doubt see this as being an effort to strengthen the state and tear down the private sector. But it's very interesting that you now have Real divergence of views within the investment community on what the on the significance. I mean, you have other people like Ray Dalio, saying Now's the time to invest. She didn't think I was doing exactly the right thing he's sorting out. Problems in the tech economy that problems that we all grapple with, including in the US You know, and that China and that in the sense she Jinping's actions should not just be supported their laudable they should be applauded. And paint us a picture of China today. China 2021. Where does it sit? Ideologically, Where does it sit in its economic story? Well, this is what's to play for. I mean, we don't really know. I mean you her who runs the Chinese economy, who came out just the other day, saying this isn't at all an attack on the private sector. The private sector is responsible for 60% of GDP and 80% of all new employment. This is all about rationalizing or this is all about getting rid of abusive in our system, leveling the playing field and making society more more equitable. And there are a lot of people as they say, including people like Ray Dalio, who take all this at at face value. And is he right in new economy Saturday what began as a regulatory takedown of Jack Ma, the flamboyant Alibaba co founder, it quickly grew to an assault on tech platforms, including those like Tencent. That offer online gaming. You ask the question Is this a new cultural revolution? Is it Yeah, well, you know, there is a very hard edged ideological element to all this. And what you're seeing. Are these really airy, rather sinister echoes all the cultural revolution, both in the language. There's a lot of talk now struggle. There's you know, a lot of talk about rectification. You know, these are these are words and concepts that were very calming in the early years of the People's Republic and of course, during the cultural revolution, and then you have this still been very powerful. Symbolism, the cult of personality and I was noting that you know, she Jinping's student being thought has now become a part of the school. Correct everybody from age seven up all the way through university. Is going to have to study she and as the Economist magazine pointed out the last time hundreds of millions of Chinese school kids had to read the thoughts of one man was indeed during the Mount era during the Cultural Revolution, and he just in the last 30 seconds we have. What is what is she? Jinping thought Yeah, that's a that's A That's a very good question and not having not having been through the syllabus. It's hard. It's hard to answer in a word. But we have to take this very seriously. This is not a temporary schools. Something very serious has shifted in in China something very profound and investors who think that they're going to play there, they might.

Ray Dalio Andy George Soros Andy Brown New Hampshire 60% Goldman Sachs 80% Larry Charlie Pellet Alibaba Soros Charlie Jack Ma today China Saturday President XI Fifth columnists Bloomberg
"chinese school" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

Reality Life with Kate Casey

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

"Welcome back to another episode of reality. Casey hope that you've had a great week this week. Marks the beginning of the elizabeth homes trial the case. Us versus homes began on tuesday with jury selection. One of my most favorite documentaries on my all time. Favorite list is the inventor executive produced by academy award winner. Alex gibney who also did enron the smartest guys in the room and hbo's emmy winning going clear scientology in the prison of beliefs this. Hbo documentary investigates the rise and fall of theranos the one time multibillion dollar healthcare company founded by elizabeth homes in twenty four elizabeth holmes dropped out of stanford to start a company that was going to revolutionize healthcare in twenty fourteen theranos was valued at nine billion dollars making her touted as the next steve jobs. The youngest self made female billionaire in the world but just two years later. Theranos was cited as a massive fraud by the sec and its value is less than zero so if convicted elizabeth holmes faces up to twenty years in prison plus two point seven five million dollars in fines as well as restitution to be paid out to victims drawing on extraordinary access to never before seen footage and testimony from key insiders. The inventor tells a silicon valley tale. That was too good to be true. It examines how this could have happened. And who is responsible while exploring the psychology of deception elizabeth group in unacademic home of privilege. Her mom noel was a congressional committee staffer and her dad christian worked for enron before moving to government agencies like usa id. She was a bright child. She had a competitive streak and early as age. Nine told relatives that she would one day become a billionaire in high school. She became a straight a student in started her own business selling compilers a type of software that translates computer code two chinese schools she went to stanford to study chemical engineering and while a freshman became president scholar and honor which came with a three thousand dollars stipend to go towards a research project as a sophomore. She went on one of our professors channing. Robertson and said let's start a company so with his blessing. She founded real time cures later. Changing the company's name to theranos she's soon filed a patent application for a medical device for analogue monitoring and drug delivery a wearable device..

elizabeth holmes elizabeth theranos Theranos Alex gibney enron Casey emmy hbo Hbo steve jobs stanford usa sec noel channing Robertson
"chinese school" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"chinese school" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"Into a dirt. Turn out you know to get photos or whatever and the outer like two inches of the wheels died have no dirt on. We're just not even touching exactly find michael harley. No it's just michael. I believe In on instagram Yeah that's him. You should give michael harley follow. He's a good instagram. Follow go deep. Where's that picture it was there was part of a slide. Show yeah keep going. It's so dirty outside the so much camber like he drove it into a dirt lot and there's like tire shine two inches into the trials so funny titanium exhaust yes saves. It saves some weight. The is twenty four pounds lighter than a cayenne turbo. Yeah just that much. Twenty four that number to be honest titanium exhaust twenty four pounds. It sounds pick up in cova. Weight gain xactly. You know what i hate about it. It's not driving impression to the exhaust or in the center looks weird. We don't need to do that in an suv. You know pushing out. I'm standing there fucking with the cameras and the thing is running because ninety five degrees outside and it's just smoking my legs. I think it also looks strange senate. There's there's like a foot between them so they're just gonna centered like a. Gt three or something closer. It's kind of awkward middle ground. Stop wearing shorts. I'm sorry sorry where we live. Where door short that was assigned for you stop wearing she fashion critique saying on. He's up there with them. Burning your legs cars. It's like ninety five degrees there there. There's there's probably sell me. Parents youth culture for the day. Get some lesson. All the boomers will be forced to make comments on your were the kind of genes like a twenty-four-year-old four jeans back yes arabic. These genes thought them like this. Something really embarrassing. This is really embarrassing. High school my first tattoo is right. Here it's up. It's pretty good. It's an it's an awesome. I thought it's pretty good. Oh but i wanted to like show show it off but it was. You know under my clothes and i found a way to sort of strategically get a rip in my genes in that area. I didn't cut it. But maybe i did. It's not something. I've talked about really twenty five years but i but i did do. Was you know what it was i used to wear. One is a necklace on. So i've at for like ten years and i I had it done on egypt culture. No i don't even think i know what it meant. I think someone just gave it to me. And i wore it and then i lost it and then i wanted to get a first tattoo and thought about no shit and has the name of my first sailboat. Written in the in the thing. That's not just like your first sailboat. I've had many sailboats. I mean listen is part of white male culture. You must pockets of manhood. Here's your i mean. It wasn't my first sailboat. Was my was a bar mitzvah gift. So literally welcome to it was little. It wasn't like a fucking yacht. It was a little little slick. A sunfish was a little sailboat. That like kids sail. Board with the sale was still very nice. Gift doggy wrong. I was appreciative. It wasn't like extravagant. Just this big thing. That i'm imagining i. If you're here. I have the album i can show you but it was sailing. Themed i was. I was into sailing sailing famed and it was at a the country club as it were and it seemed pretty boss at the time though flipping through the album recently. I don't think it was all that boss. Dj in particular navy made the dj in particular was like a forty five year. Old white guy in a suit and very dark wraparound sunglasses. That found his way into the background of every single photograph on sailing theme involved with their ropes. Yeah fla- pennant flags You know the sailboat itself. That they got me was brought into the bar mitzvah. Thank equivalent of walking the pony in. Yes the mouse you gotta pony. Sister did oh my god. I didn't even. My sister was incredibly accomplished horseback rider with that horse. But she didn't squander the horse gift she makes good use of the horse gift. My gift didn't eat by give. Didn't my gift didn't eat for fifteen years and hers did a horse more maintenance or as a boat more maintenance a horse a horse horse a horse it hurts a hundred and fifty dollars a food a week but a sunfish is like a bathtub. It's not like a like a motorized yacht are definitely got. Look it up. Zac i got a laser was called a laser. It was it was a race. It's a racing dinghy. There's a spectacle suspect boat like spec miata. It was like the spec miata making this face. Because i like making fun of. Yeah that one right there right any one of them. I think that type of sailing is really cool. It looks really hard. And also i could never do it so first off you could not only could you do it. I could teach you how to do it in one day. Sailing is very easy even a person who gets as badly seasick as me. let's a whole definition itself. You could learn. In one day. I guarantee lean on either side. And you're the ballots. You yeah so in this picture. This girl's feet are under the strap. And she's and she's leaning out to counterbalance the the wind of the weight of the pressure of the wind. If depending on how strong the wind is you have to lean out more or less like this thing is. This shit was so fun. These really fast in a big win that laser would do like eighteen thousand nine hundred nuts. Like ma twenty miles an hour. That's mobbing was great really really fun. Was that your first foray into speed then with sailing. Go karting go. Karting acute was your force. I for eight to speed. Backseat of my dad's car. Did your dad like a real fast. Yeah he used to In the thirty to drive us to saturday school and he drove me my brother and two of our friends and we'd hit the highway and he'd hit one hundred and then my friends go to their friends. Their parents like mr early went hundred without cool to get phone calls. Oh yeah my mom would offer miles with someone else's kids in your car so finely tuned german automobile Do you have all kinds of rationale for it. So we had to get the chinese school on time in hindsight if you had a kid now and you had a press car like an m three press car like. Wouldn't you go one hundred for a second one kid in the car. Feel safe about it. I would just be like hey watch this. This do it really fast. And then he wasn't that cool. That's your moment if you drive extra slow with your kids in the car. You're hazard you're more than someone driving. A hundred with their kids in has an alpha juliet quad and he. He said he sort of raised the mclaren on the highway which means the.

michael harley sailing cova sailing sailing michael senate egypt navy Zac mr
"chinese school" Discussed on Bay Curious

Bay Curious

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Bay Curious

"When he was like three years old according to connie highland and his family faced anti-german discrimination while living in the mid west he had hired chinese before he leaves slanted the chinese in his other holdings so i can fresno in kings county months after the fire. News broke that heinlein had leased some of his land chinese residents who lost their homes and land. He was going to build a new chinatown. There was such an uproar among the citizens including city hall mayor and they said down with john hi inland. you know. he's substrata to his people. You know chinatowns applied on our population and here. He wants to rent to to lease land to the chinese members of the home protection association which was basically an early group of nimbies visited highland to make him reconsider his decision. The language and racist slurs exchanged in this contentious meeting were published by the san jose mercury news. You are cutting your own throat and you will find by this move. Your property will be greatly reduced in value. Would you mr high in like to live next door to a chinaman. Yes rather than next door to irish. I have lived in california for thirty two years in. Ms founded to hear such a remark made by one of the anglo saxon race. Despite death threats heinlein finished construction in eighteen eighty seven just months after the fire that destroyed the last chinatown angry locals called the new. Chinatown highland ville. Here's connie you again. They couldn't drive out. Chinatown chinatown was there to stay. And john heinlein actually to protect the chinese. You built a an eight foot high fence. The fence had a gate which was locked every night. While foot patrols provided security eventually connie's grandfather became a partner at one of the shops in heinlein bill and was able to settle in san jose. Hyman gave him a chance for a new life in san jose. He was a merchant and there was able to to send for his wife in china he had been separated from his wife for fourteen years. She came over in nineteen ten. They had their first son. My uncle mignon and then two years later. In june of nineteen twelve my father was born. Connie says highland ville was a thriving community about two thousand people live their newspaper accounts. Said the new schengen temple was the center of the community. A two story structure it featured a bright red door with golden pillars on the top. The upper floor housed an intricately carved and gilded altar with five deities. The lower floor was used as a town hall and as a chinese school for the kids. Who grew up in highland ville. Connie has some old newspaper articles from back then january twentieth nineteen fourteen and shows it by this time. Chinatown had some respect. The article is from the san. Jose mercury herald. It's titled chinatown celebrates new year. The article mentions you know how elaborate the festival was and how beautifully streets were mentioned that my grandfather was one of the men that were decorating the street so it showed something that chinatown was established and people realize that it was going to be part of san jose and it was for forty four years. Highland ville was san jose's longest established chinatown until nineteen thirty one the chinese exclusion act had been in place for almost fifty years. And because people couldn't come into the country easily immigration dwindled. Soon there weren't enough left in chinatown to keep it alive and the great depression took a real toll on the heinlein estate which owned the land. Where the chinatown stood in nineteen thirty-one. It went bankrupt and eventually island volt became city property and was demolished. When i first started working on the story. I wanted to understand where heinlein ville was located and it turns out. It's not too far. From where i live in san jose but walking around i wasn't able to find anything that marked this rich history. But that's gonna change soon. Connie young yu has been working with the city to build a park. Where the last. Chinatown once stood. She says it will. Commemorate highlands contributions to san jose and highlight the history of chinatown and the deep roots of the chinese community. Here to be called heinlein ville park. That was katie. Silicon valley reporter oddity moody astute listeners. Keeping track of all those chinatowns may have noticed that aditya only talked about four of them even though there have been five chinatowns throughout san jose's history. There was another small chinatown in san jose in the late eighteen. Hundreds called the woolen mills chinatown. It was owned by the san jose. Woolen manufacturing company and housed. It's chinese workers if you love bay curious. Tell a friend or family member about the show your recommendations. Go a long way and we really appreciate it. Bay curious is produced by susie rancho brendan willard and meek katrina schwarz. Our show is made in san francisco at number supported cake. Thanks for listening when police are called and something goes wrong like an officer uses excessive force or kill. Someone who's unarmed departments can launch an internal affairs investigations. Look into it here in california. Those investigations were secret until now we've sifted through. Interrogation tape can talk to witnesses to find out who does the system of police accountability really served. And who does it protect. Listen now to on our watch. Podcast from npr and k. Q. e. d..

san jose china california san francisco john heinlein thirty two years fourteen years Connie heinlein ville park forty four years two story january twentieth nineteen fou Chinatown Hyman first son irish chinatown nineteen ten -german two years later
China finance official executed in bribery case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

China finance official executed in bribery case

"The former head of the Chinese state owned asset management company has been executed on charges of taking bribes in an unusually severe penalty full of reasons corruption case lie Sharmeen is among thousands of officials said in a long running and G. Groff campaign others including Chinese former insurance regulator could be sentenced to prison now the government's announced by was put to death by a court in the city east of Beijing saying the harshest sentences was justified because light took especially enormous bribes to make investments on offer construction contracts most death sentences imposed by Chinese schools also suspended for two years and usually a commuted to life death penalties without the chance of a reprieve a rare I'm Charles through this month

Sharmeen G. Groff Beijing Government Charles
"chinese school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"chinese school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Goodwill way. More than anything in the world. Eight year old Clementine's Wong wanted to be blonde when she grew up. Chinese school When she was supposed to be memorizing characters for dictation. She drew pencil Crown self portrait depicting herself as the puzzle Smurfette. Barbie. She was certain she would undergo a metamorphosis at puberty, her straight black hair with soften into blond curls like those of Amy March, who looked very pretty on the cover of little women. Her secondary desire was to get the attention of her older sister, Constance never wanted to play. To achieve this. Clementine's stood in front of the television, while constant studied a VHS tape of the 1988 Miss Hong Kong pageant. Constants believe she was destined to be Miss Hong Kong or at least miss photogenic. He walked around the house with a book on her head to perfect her posture and did aerobics while listening to Leslie Cheung albums on the families on Lee Cassette tape player. Moved. Constant said she was watching reigning Miss Hong Kong and Miss Chinese International Michelle Racist swimsuit interview mimicking the beauty queens and mannerisms. No, I like it here. Come in time. Put her hands on her hips, Move, dummy. I was in the living room first common time, said. I was in the living room first yesterday, constants countered. I was in the living room first last week. Was born before you so I was in the living room first. Take that second best Constance Hist. Come in time. Didn't know what to say. So she repeated herself. I was here first. Mom Constant shouted Lemon thyme didn't want to get in trouble. So she sat down on the floor to the left of the television and picked up a Nancy Drew book she had borrowed from the public library. Your mother entered the living room. Constant smiled. The good part's coming up, she said in perfect Cantonese. Clemen time pretended to read for a few minutes while her mom's out with Constance. Then she retired to her room to play with dolls. She had one Barbie, and she liked to make believe that the doll was a baseball player or detective or explorer. Constants also had a Barbie, but she had converted the doll and to miss Hong Kong, complete with sash and tiara. She had even colored the doll's hair with her mom's dark brown hair dye. This year. The doll's name was Michelle. Changed from pageant to pageant taking on the names of winners. Clementine's doll was called Barbie. Because that's her name. Each day, Clemen time brush the dolls blond hair 100 times she'd read in a book that it was the magic number required for a perfect name. When she was done. She brushed her own hair and counted each stroke with her eyes closed as if she is playing hide and seek. At the end of 100 strokes, she would open her eyes and look in the mirror. She was always disappointed that her hair remained black. During their common time played with a hole in the elbow of her expo 86 sweatshirt, a gift from an aunt who had visited Vancouver the year of the world's fair. Constance was sitting next to her. Back was straight and the hem of her dress film neatly over her knees, which she held tightly together. You're still holding your child. Six wrong, dummy, Constant said. Not see I can pick anything up. Clementine's picked up a piece of beef and stuck it in her mouth. She cute it with gusto. It's wrong. Your stupid because you weren't born in Hong Kong. You were born in Vancouver. Your stupid banana. We speak Cantonese without banana accent. Constant spoke softly so that their parents couldn't hear what she's saying. Shut up! Jerk face, Clementine's shouted, slamming her chopsticks on the table. Your parents for that. Don't talk like that to your older sister there, Mom said in Cantonese. I'm sorry. Come in time, replied in English that she didn't feel that she was in the wrong When your parents weren't watching. She showed Constance a mouthful of two greens and beef. My book, Constant said. Clementine's shut her mouth. He tried very hard to hold her chopsticks correctly so her parents would love her as much as they loved Constance. The girls at school didn't like playing with common time she rock house like a boy and didn't like to talk about clothes or horses. Sometimes you like to sit inside for the entire lunch hour and read a book rather than play with other Children. What are you doing? Amanda asked her one rainy afternoon. Reading, Clementine's said, reading what Chantelle asked Book, Clementine said. She disliked Amanda and show in town who both liked animals, princesses and the color pink. I know it's hard to read, Amanda said. Not really. It's pretty easy, common time, said. My dad says Chinese people have squinty eyes, Amanda said. It makes it hard for you to see You're our weird, Chantelle said. At least I don't have glasses, Clemen, time, said. Lisa don't have glasses, Shantel mimicked. Though she was wearing glasses. You do have glasses, four eyes, Clementine's said, but at least she's not ugly, Amanda said. And I'm not Chinese, Chantelle added. I'm Canadian, Clementine's said. My dad says you're not, Amanda said. Clementine in order..

Clementine Constant Constance Hong Kong Miss Hong Kong Amanda Barbie Constance Hist Michelle Racist Vancouver Chantelle Amy March Leslie Cheung Nancy Drew Mom baseball Clemen
"chinese school" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Take a nice deep breath in let it out slowly and off waco tonight. Let's kick off a relaxing year one of your favorites from the previous year. The book of tea but cacuso oak cora first published in nineteen. Oh six. let's pick up where we left off. Section three taoism and zen ism the connection of zana's with t. is proverbial. We have already remarked that the tea ceremony was a development of the central ritual. The name of loud sir. The founder of taoism is also intimately associated with the history of tea. It is written in the chinese school manual concerning the origin of habits and customs that the ceremony of offering t to guest began with kwan. Yin a well known disciple of louts. Who i at the gate of the han pass presented to the old philosopher a cup of the golden league sir we shall not stop to discuss the authenticity of such tales which are valuable however as confirming the early use of the beverage by the taoists. Our interest in taoism and zionism here lies mainly in those ideas regarding life and art which are so embodied in what we call t ism. It is to be regretted that as yet. There appears to be no adequate presentation of the taoists and zen doctrines in any foreign language. Though we have had several audible attempts translation is always a treason. And as a ming observes can at its best be only the reverse side of a brocade. All the threads are there but not the subtlety of color or design but after all what. Great doctrine is there which is easy to expound. The ancient sages never put their teachings in systematic form. They spoke in paradoxes for they were afraid of uttering half truths they began by talking like fools and ended by making their hearers. Wise allowed sir himself with his point. Humor says if people of inferior intelligence here of the dow they laugh immensely. It would not be the dow unless they laughed at it. The dow literally means a path. It has been severly translated as the way they absolute the law. Nature supreme reason the mode these renderings are not incorrect for the use of the term by the taoists differs. according to the subject matter of the inquiry loud sir himself spoke of it thus there is a thing which is all containing which was born before the existence of heaven and earth how silent how solitary it stands alone and changes not it revolves without danger to itself and is the mother of the universe. I do not know its name and so call it. The path with reluctance i call it. The infinite. Infinity is the fleeting. The fleeting is the vanishing. The vanishing is the reverting. The dow is in the passage rather than the path it is the spirit of cosmic change the eternal growth which returns upon itself to produce new forms it recoils upon itself like the dragon the beloved symbol of the taoists it folds and unfolds as do the clouds the dow might be spoken of as the great transition subjectively it is the mood of the universe. It's absolute is the relative..

golden league zana waco cora kwan Yin sir Wise
"chinese school" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:22 min | 2 years ago

"chinese school" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"See year veered into veered into veered interfered in a veered veered and veered again on declare your independence but the ernest hancock. Amnesty robert anderson sitting in for first our. Whenever you want to get bored or boring you know well you know In the second hour. We got caring. Catastrophe she's Retired lieutenant colonel from the air force so worked in the pentagon during the nine eleven hit and everything and she's she's a good friend and We're going to get caught up. She wrote an article She's she writes a lot articles. But i really like to get her perspective on all this stuff. We've been talking about the trump administration election everything over the years and She's she's someone i trust her. She writes a lot on lou rockwell. You know and. I trust her perspective a lot of stuff because she's intelligence you know she. She knows what's up. And this china thing i saw. I got as a publisher recommendation. I don't do that often when i do. It's like all right. Ernie says i should. I'll go bam earnings really good at that. He says i'm glad i did that. Well another glad you did. That is Patrick byrne Doing an interview with dr drone coursey and Of course he is kind of the calmer gentler. Alex jones conspiracy. You know they've there's always a conspiracy do it. But i mean the guy backs it up you know. He's like look so. Of course they you know. Try make fun of them everything. But it's a these guys Pay attention you follow documents and you go neo manner doing what patrick said I'm halfway through an hour and a half presentation and i'm looking forward to finishing it when the show's over and i do my editing because it really got me going and he patrick byrne when china started to open up. He had a couple of years. Beijing he. He speaks fluent mandarin. And so i did not know that unlike patrick on a bunch times yeah. We talked about is Education history and stuff and everything. But i forgot it is so. It's more than you speak chinese. You understand their culture their mythology their stories. You know kinda like You know a lotta movies or a lot of american culture or how we're seeing by different cultures. You know through there is and what the mythology that we've talked about and you know it's been example. Bob what's america. We'll give it a couple of decades in your kids will be learning all these chinese culture things like serenity firefly you know this is like the pilgrims coming over on the mayflower kind of stuff but i mean yeah mythology. You'll something like paul bunyan and blue blue walks into you. Know johnny appleseed that kind of stuff took rocket yeah killed them bar and he's only three. But i mean you know that these these kinds of stories that are uniquely american all cultures have that a one of them is called the sassoon's mace in china. And what it means. Is you know you have two kingdoms provinces there warren in china for dominance of we rule you and one of the king's sends an assassin to the other kings gets close to him or in his bedchamber. Something he beats him over the head with a club so he assassinated him with mace club. So as fastens mace. Though they're they're talking about you know foreign What do you call it. foreign policy. You know diplomacy whatever you go in and you say well assassin's mace well to them. That means have one hundred year plan that started after war. Too late forties with now comes in. Yeah take care of this. America thing even though Western culture america has been nice to the chinese. You know we were more revolutionary. We went and helped him defend against a jap. Japan you know. We had the flying tigers. That's where that came from forties went. And you know kick on zeros and saved a lot of you know their country and so. There's not teaching that in chinese school anymore. Like all evil. Mirka you know has awoken. Go do some aspirin so Their plan was one hundred year plan and twenty years ahead so he got twenty years near over going to take us. America take twenty years. Trust me so. So what they do is they. Have you know you know. We'll just do assassin's mace and understand their culture goes. I know exactly what they're thinking what they're doing i. There is a book that kind of described a lot of the culture. This and how they think their Education system and what they get their mind right and how they look at the rest of the world and the co author or mentor of that author or something one of the advisers to trump. So it's you know so patrick. not only knows. He knows he knows he knows. You know those kind of thing. So he's going. Yeah this is how he views. China they are the threat because they see us as the victim or the prey or something fans thought the same. Way steve steve bannon. He used the same way. Talking about it Yeah i can't hear myself in in headphone so okay over. Uh okay steve. Bannon has been saying all along that There the the existential threat that we really need to media looking at and dealing with to look up on existential. I go every keeps saying existential. What the hell's that mean existential means extinction of that. You know there will be more. Existential event is like asteroid. Hit or something like that. Now we are. We are countered the culture that they're trying to Institute and the only way you can deal with us make us go away. They that is the plan. So there is this. Assassin's mace thing is that you get next to the leadership or there the power whatever and then you just take him out. Well that's what's going on now. I sold thing. Antifa and and black is matter and all in the media and the hollywood and all. This is and everything. That's why avengers captain america winter soldier. We sold them the rope with which they're going to hang us. Exactly what khrushchev said. He was going to do that. Was the russians still the communists. Yeah no they they. you know. we'll just we'll take advantage of that. Which is America your greed your avarice your Your lifestyle you know. We'll we'll take an strangle you with your your own desires. You know that's executive done. Which oh babe. Chinese spy congress sleeping people is not like they don't have enough people who just payroll and they're just throughout society including academia. That's foul cheese all thing. Oh we'll just do all this and pay some money and get china do it. You know so. This is it's been really slowly you know. It's it's been it's been. It's been determined over a decade clinton's. They are all up in china. China's but you know he's nixon opened up a the with china they immediately went to taking basically they'll they'll fund our debt. They'll take our money. They save money by weapons with it. They use it to infiltrate us. I mean they're basically hanging us by our own With our own piece of rope you know that was one thing. They go the debt. I mean. you know. We could do this if people didn't buy our treasury. I've been saying for months. I mean way back early. On when this whole pandemic pandemic came.

ernest hancock china lou rockwell dr drone patrick America robert anderson Patrick byrne mace club patrick byrne Mirka Alex jones pentagon Ernie paul bunyan air force sassoon steve steve bannon Beijing johnny
Author Chat With Katie Zhao

Books and Boba

06:01 min | 2 years ago

Author Chat With Katie Zhao

"Katie. PODCASTS, we're happy that you can join us. Congratulations on the release of your second book, the Fallen Hero is the second book of Your Series started with the Dragon Warrior. That came out last month So yeah, congratulations on that. Thank you so much. So just to start off I, know you're from Michigan but did you grow up there your whole life? Yes I grew up in Michigan so I was born and blend and Then I moved to another area in the Metro Detroit area and I grew up in Michigan I went to school at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor. So then spent another four years of my life in Michigan. and. Then in nineteen, I actually moved to New York City for. A little bit over a year, and then like back in Dundas may early June ish like when I realized this pandemic isn't GonNa be over anytime soon, I moved back to Michigan. So I am back home with my family. I don't really know much about like the Asian American community in Michigan I know that there's a pretty good like Korean adoptee. Population there. But like I'm not so sure about like the. Asian. American community there. So did you grow up around a lot of Asian Americans so I think Southeast Michigan which is where I live has one of the bigger populations but like it's still absolutely nothing compared to east coast or west coast like my school was probably five to ten percent Asian but I did grow up going to Chinese school. So that was nice. And I don't know about Korean adoptees let the area where I grew up actually has a big Japanese American population Oh yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Because I mean it's like Detroit promoter city right so like I think a lot of them would like their families will come from Japan to work at You know un-american Automotive Company for like maybe one to three years or something, and then it was really sad for me because I would make friends with them and then they would move back But yeah, that's like probably like the extent of the Asian. American community around here it's. it was a real shock for me moving to New York and just being so overwhelmed by all the Asians everywhere and like Asians, who are like like really Americanized Asians who are also like kind of fresh off the boat. Yeah I mean if you head to Chinatown, it's you know a totally different world. Yeah. Yeah. So I heard through the grapevine that you're pretty well known what? Pad Author. So I'm guessing that you have been writing since at least highschool I'm probably younger, right Yeah. We're civil. What Grapevine was there? It was just it was just like floating around. Okay. Interesting I have talked about it. I've talked a little bit too much about it I like. I like a joke that like I want to like block out that part of my memory but no walked had was like like I might thoughts on that website but. It was a good starting block for me to like really get used to like getting like writing a novel length story and also because it's so interactive I could get like reader comments on every chapter uploaded. So that was like really encouraging and for me when I started writing novels on what Pat I was in high school. So you know I was still dislike learning how to write a novel. So like honestly other writers and readers encouragement meant the world to me back then But yeah, I have been writing for a very long time I started out writing short stories when I was like seven or eight years old, I remember. my teacher gave all of us an. To write a short story and Lake. I. Still Remember that moment very vividly I like was running the story and I was like this is so much fine. I don't think you know had so much fun doing anything yet before I always was still very young. So I didn't know this is what I would want to do for the rest of my life. But then my teacher also praised me and was like Oh, this is like such a great short story, which is probably what she said to everybody back then but. I thought I was like the greatest writer ever so. In this industry, it really is everything but not like being overly competent just like. You know just having enough confidence to continue like pushing through rejections and putting yourself out there I think is definitely key but yeah, and after a very long writing journey I'm publishing novels now. Yeah. Do you remember what story got you that that key praise? I remember we were doing a on legends and myths I don't remember what like I think it was just like a different American legends like like big foot or. I'm blanking now but you know like the kind of and talking about and I wrote about a river but I don't remember like what river now but. Yeah. I just like surprised that I still remember that moment. So vividly because it's been like many many years. But Yeah I i. think that was a key moment for me is a writer.

Michigan University Of Michigan Ann Arb Asian American Community American Automotive Company Detroit Dundas Southeast Michigan Katie New York City East Coast West Coast UN Japan New York PAT Lake
Back-to-school season kicks off this week, but laptops are sold out

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:50 min | 2 years ago

Back-to-school season kicks off this week, but laptops are sold out

"Looking at the challenges of distance learning as the pandemic rolls on, and this week is kind of the official back to school kickoff for families and school districts getting ready for school has meant scrambling to find laptops kids to use at home, and there is a major shortage of low-cost laptops like chromebooks. It's a combination of the trade war with China and supply chains that have been disrupted by the pandemic but with millions of students starting school without the tech, they need to learn at home an education system that was already unequal is even more. So Jay Ganders, an analyst at Forrester. Here's for now it has been a case of delays especially for educational institutions right who have been told in some cases that they were going to receive models. And we're talking about thousands of laptops. By the beginning of the school at home period, and now they're saying, well, you may not get these until later in the school year and that's very problematic if the school district is expecting to supply the laptops to their students because then you're kind of stuck with what you have at home and not all students can afford or have access to a computer, and so when do we think this shortage might end if at all wonders? Well, what will happen next year you know is, is it? Going to go back and return to normal levels. So I think there's GonNa be trouble on the horizon as the companies that produce this try to reevaluate their Chinese supply chain can they relocate to other places or will there be new administration? For example, that makes that easier figuring out what they expect for demand what the budgets look like for schools there's so many variables at play and I would just say much like with toilet paper, right it was took some time to sort out the supply chain. A much more complicated supply chain well, and I want to get back to this idea of future demand because if we really do see a scenario where education changes in the long term. Then, all of a sudden schools become an even bigger market for portable devices. Right? Then they have been before. I. Think that's right. I mean I think The the proliferation of these devices on an individual basis for every child is not universal. We have a lot of classrooms where students actually share devices, which makes sense but when you have to send them home with the child, then that becomes a larger market. A. Lot depends on the course of the pandemic and how safety goes and how the numbers look, and of course, I'm not an epidemiologist. So I won't even try to figure that out. But let's say if we're persisting in a high state of pandemic. It means that there would be increased demand even into next year for new laptops because the schools simply don't have individual devices for every student, we've sort of honed in on laptops for the purposes of this conversation. If we start to see sort of like permanent remote become a reality will other form factors all in one PC's or just even desktops start to make a return. I think they could. Part of the issue though is that our houses have been filled with lots of remote people, right? So maybe parents. Maybe. Grandparents others simply a surplus of people in the household, and that means that a laptop has the advantage of flexibility being able to move to a different room I. Know a lot of the business meetings I have. You'll see someone's bed at background because they've been sort of banished to a bedroom. And the other problem here is that schools aren't going to be providing something like a desktop, right they need to provide something that's all in one very reportable and very easy. To use. Getting back to this idea of the inequality and that you know lower income students who can't afford a more expensive last because that might be available are being left out. What are the other devices if any are are filling the void? SMARTPHONES can fill part of the GAP certainly in Asia, we find a lot going on in this space where Chinese school children will get certain lessons over mobile. You can certainly do a zoom meeting over a mobile phone so you could participate in the classroom creation of content however, as opposed to consumption is going to be more challenging on a phone. There are schools that use tablets particularly ipads, but they will then require in cases for older kids an external keyboard and a stand, and that sort of thing. So the economics are not that easy. The bottom line is I think. For children who have less income in their families. The schools need to try to equip them with everything that they need on a turnkey basis.

Jay Ganders China Forrester Analyst Official Asia
Leading Ladies: Anna May Wong

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Leading Ladies: Anna May Wong

"Alot from wonder media. Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manteca. Today we're talking about the first major American movie star. She openly criticized racist typecasting her accomplishments were groundbreaking and many of her critiques still. Ring true today. Let's talk about the prolific Anna. May Wong. Anna was born in Los Angeles in one, thousand, nine, hundred, five. Her birth name was Wong lead song. She initially attended a majority white school but transferred to Chinese school to. Escape racism she. From her classmates. Anna often skipped class to check out nearby film sets pushing her way to the front of the crowd to get closer to the cameras. She came up with Anna May Wong as her stage name by age eleven. And she was fourteen when she appeared in a silent picture, caught the red lantern. At Seventeen, Anna played the lead role in the toll of the sea one of the first movies and color. Anna's most notable early role was in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, she played in the hit movie the thief of Bagdad. Though. This part was a stepping stone for her career. It's also emblematic of the problems with Hollywood casting that Anna would soon after vocally advocate against and interviews. In the thief of Bagdad, Anna played a treacherously in a subservient role wearing very little clothing. Anna appeared in more than fifty films throughout her life and she often struggled with subservient. typecasting Hollywood also repeatedly granted lead Asian roles to white actors and cast actual. Asian. Actors. As villains. After working in the United, states for several years, Anna had had enough of Hollywood's biased casting. So she moved to Europe. Europe was more receptive when it came to Anna's acting ability. She started films throughout the continent with reporters praising her transcendent talent. One notable appearance was in the British movie. Piccadilly in nineteen twenty. Nine After a few years in Europe and a decided to give Los. Angeles. Another shot she appeared in the famous nineteen thirty two movie. Shanghai Express opposite. Marlene Dietrich. I must confess I. Don't quite know standard respectability that you know newborn how But Hollywood hasn't really improved. It's racist casting methods. Anna, auditioned for the lead role in the gutter. A film based on the novel about a family of Chinese farmers despite Anna's film

Anna May Wong Hollywood Europe Jenny Kaplan Bagdad Marlene Dietrich Manteca Los Angeles Chinese School Shanghai United LOS
Complicating the Narrative Around Issues of International and Transracial Adoption

They Call Us Bruce

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Complicating the Narrative Around Issues of International and Transracial Adoption

"If can give us a little bit more background on yourself and how you got to. The position of being kind of an advocate for a fellow adoptees Wait on US share. So I was adopted from China in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, seven, when I was three years old, and I was adopted by two wonderful. White adoptive parents and raised in the Midwest And my parents I. Give them a lot of credit for. Really trying to keep a lot of my cultural roots I went to Saturday morning Chinese school with my dad for language and dance and I. Remember growing up. My parents subscribe to women of China magazine, so that I would see women who looked like me in the media which does not happen that much in mainstream US media. But it was really in college when I started to process my racial identity and adopt the identify more I took a class taught by an adoptee professor my first year. That really turned everything. I knew about adoption upside down I think the the common narrative that we. Like to believe about adoption. Is that Adoption provides homes for children in need and gives children, too loving people who can't have children or don't yet. Have Children But. In my class, we really talked about the history of transracial and transnational adoption, but Has Roots in Australia and an attempt at cultural genocide and. Just a lot of the different layers of trafficking and coercion that happened to frequently and so when I was processing districts like how I bring this troubling history of adoption and merge it with. My experiences and what it means to be a part of this system in have my family created in this way I really I really feel lucky that I was in Minnesota when I was doing. All of this processing, because Minnesota has one of the highest number of adoptees per capita in. The country and I learned a lot from. The Korean adoptees of The generation before. Mine and I started looking at adoptee blogs and. Fila even all started looking at Asia angry Asian man just A. Really trying to piece together how I fit in Asian American history and adoption adoption, history and After I had really grappled with a lot of the hard things I think that. I really wanted to become a voice for adoptees who are often silenced and when they. Give voice to some of these more negative sides of adoption and. Bring to light. The issues of. Trafficking or just complicate the narrative that sometimes it's not this heroin decision that a birth mother makes to give their child better life. Sometimes they have no. And what it means to. Have that. Profound loss. As a starting point in life, and what it means to carry that loss of family country, language culture. Throughout the life course and so I think that I think yeah, my my goal. Is Not to like add manish adoption and condemn it and people who've been involved, but just to bring him or nuanced and complete picture to adoption than currently exists.

United States Minnesota Midwest China China Magazine Manish Professor Fila Heroin Australia Asia
The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts by Maxine Hong Kingston

Books and Boba

04:45 min | 2 years ago

The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts by Maxine Hong Kingston

"I've never taken in Asian American Literature Class I've I barely read books spy asian-american. In in high school, and also in college. And I. Really didn't know what to expect. I just knew that it was a classic. It inspired a lot of Asian American writers specially today. maxine is a is a writing professor at Berkley so she's taught a lot of Asian American writers But From what I had gleaned was okay. This is a memoir. I'm expecting it to be about generational gap and culture gap. This was written right after a Vietnam and I wonder like if it's going to be about like pacifism. And I. Start Reading The book and I'm like honey. This is not this is not a memoir. This is not a memoir or traditional definition of memoir. I know back then in the seventies. Memoir was still a new genre, so there wasn't like the conventions of. Of like a memoir like we have today with like a bunch more linear. Yeah, yeah! So I was really surprised by the structure, and by how it blurred nonfiction with miss and folk tales and talk stories but I remember you telling me that this is like a typical thing in in Chinese storytelling. In terms of like I think. And, maybe this is something that. Resonated with because my grandfather was a storyteller, he liked the talk. He couldn't see or hear very well. All we can do is talk, and so he would just sit and tell stories and we would you know listen because we? There's there was nothing else to do. but I think in terms of like. Like I feel like in especially in Chinese culture. History is told through story Ray. A lot of the histories that we learn isn't really through text, or at least in my experience, and maybe it's because I didn't go to a Chinese school. like I went to Chinese school to learn Chinese, but that was like in the states and. I I was educated in like a Chinese or Taiwanese system right so I never had a academic. exposure to how they teach history, so a lot of my history came through story read like the the legends of you know, lose hin, or the three kingdoms or like. Stories from like the civil war. Things like that like it's. It's all through oral aural tradition. And so I thought that was. That was something that I found was interesting is allowed. This book is kind of that still onto the page right like. It opens with a secret, a family secret tothrough through story, but never like written down until I guess or until maxine wrote it down in her in her book, and I'd be interested. I don't know if there is like an interview of her like talking about how what her family thought about her like airing her family's dirty laundry to like the mass audience, but like. those stories of like hidden hidden family members who are like quote, unquote chain for like loose face. is something that's really. It is something that happens in Chinese families like there are relatives that like. Either we don't talk about or I don't talk to. Because something that's happened the past. Right and Like for my specifically like I know because of the civil war because of our relocation to Taiwan. There's a whole side of my that i. have no idea about like my. My family goes up to my grandfather, and that's it I don't know about his brothers and sisters and. His. we just kind of lost contact and they don't talk about it, and at this point, the only way I can learn about them is through my dad because my grandparents are gone right so. I don't know just something about that. Got Me Thinking about my own family histories and like stories that we don't talk about because either. We're ashamed or they're ashamed or. Is just not something like you know you don't want to. You don't want to take up. Go Right. That's a big A big theme in this story is like the concept of ghosts and being worried about what they're doing what they do. What they here and like. How goes can still cling to, even though they're gone in even though they're not Caprio, immigrant parents love secrets

Maxine Caprio Asian American Literature Clas Chinese School Professor Berkley Vietnam RAY Taiwan
Harvard Professor's Arrest Raises Questions About Scientific Openness

Short Wave

10:37 min | 3 years ago

Harvard Professor's Arrest Raises Questions About Scientific Openness

"So it's May of Twenty fifteen. And a researcher named Chichaou. Shing is at his home near Philadelphia. She is a physicist at Temple University who studies SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SPECIAL MATERIALS. That can sometimes lead electricity flow through them with no resistance. There's a ton of applications for it and all of a sudden there's a knock door very very loud and urgency rental open the learns Esau arm agents outside and pointing their guns to my wife and daughters into an Tokyo in Hong Cups and I had absolutely no idea why okay. So why was he arrested? Like what was going on what the. Us government accused him of sharing a special piece of equipment with researchers in China. But here's the thing he did. Do it prosecutors. Were confused because well it turns out. Superconducting technology is just really complicated. But what about the idea that he was helping? The Chinese developed superconducting technology. Just in general. Well Dr she says sure. He works with scientists in China all the time and sometimes he spent summers over there doing research with them. But as you know Mattie one of the basic pillars of fundamental research is openness nothing. He shared was classified or restricted in any way. Qadam ICK espionage. It's a contradiction me. Everything we are doing is fundamental research. There's nothing to steal can. Just sit there and read your paper and sure enough about six months after this whole thing starts. The charges are dropped against doctor she. The government admits he's done absolutely nothing. Wrong I mean honestly it sounds like he just had collaborators which is like a major thing in science unless there was some weird money. Thing being exchanged or going on this is what scientists do. Yeah I mean. They're technologies that are restricted for example stuff to do with rockets that could be used in missile development say. The government has very strict rules about sharing that kind of information but generally scientists open collaborations. Happened all over the world. The thing is China is getting a lot more scrutiny. These days so fast forward to twenty eighteen attorney general. Jeff sessions is really concerned about the theft of scientific knowledge and intellectual property by the Chinese so the Justice Department launches what it calls its China initiative the goal is to crack down on the transfer of US knowledge to China and in the academic community the focus. False really quickly. I'm one program in particular. It's called the thousand Talents Plan. So our understanding is that originally. The purpose of the thousand talents program was to reverse the brain drain. That's Michael Lower. He's deputy director of extramural research at the National Institutes of health. And he's the main guy at NIH dealing with thousand talents. When he says brain-drain an example of that is like scientists. Go abroad to study and then end up staying in whatever country instead of coming back home. Exactly the Chinese government wanted to bring back outstanding scientists to China so as to develop their science and technology and the way the Chinese government does is by offering money so researchers set up labs in China and they spend at least part of their year over there Doing their work in exchange for grants and expenses paid and the program grew pretty quickly to include non-chinese scientists as well right and I think there are these kinds of programs in other countries to yeah. It's not uncommon. Canada had something called the one hundred fifty research chairs. I mean. That's kind of the less ambitious Canadian equivalent. Chevy Sega but with lower says is the thousand talents program has gone too far in the real problem from his perspective is that in a number of cases researchers are not telling their home universities or the. Us government for that matter about Chinese funding and not disclosing that Chinese funding. That's what's actually against the law. Exactly the types of behaviors that we are seeing are not subtle or minor violations What we're seeing is really quite egregious and that brings us back to Charles Lieber. The Harvard Chemist We were talking about earlier. Who is arrested back in January the complaint alleges Doctor Lieber signed a contract with the Chinese University in Wuhan and was paid to fifty thousand dollars per month plus up to one hundred and fifty eight thousand dollars in living expenses and awarded more than one point five million dollars to set up a research lab at the Chinese school and work there on researching nanotechnology that is a lot of money. Jeff that is like ten post docs full of money. At least I love that. Your brain calculates prices in post is seen but the bottom line is. It is a lot of money in the criminal complaint. Alleges not only did he get all this money. Lieber lied about being part of the program to Harvard to the NIH in the Department of Defense. Which together we're also giving him many millions of dollars in research money. I should say Lieber attorneys declined to comment about this case. They didn't WanNa speak to me but Mike clower from the NIH says there's a larger pattern here other scientists have done the same and it's a real problem. Collaboration does not involve offshore offshore bank accounts. collaboration does involve undisclosed cash payments. It does not involve undisclosed employment agreements or undisclosed contracts. It does not involve double dipping. Where a person is being paid salary to work in China and to work in the United States at the same time several scientists and other institutions have been fired over this he says the NIH is currently investigating around one hundred eighty other scientists. He thinks this is a systemic problem. So if these cases involve lying failing to disclose information which we do know is against the law. Why are scientists doing this? It's a really interesting question and I don't have a great answer as I said. Liebers attorneys have declined to speak to me In other cases other scientists who've been fired don't talk to the press generally now lower says. In some cases the thousand talents contracts scientists sign actually come with a nondisclosure agreements. So they're actually told by the Chinese not to say anything which is illegal but there's also more going on I mean it may be then some cases they fear if they disclose money from the Chinese. They are going to get more scrutiny on their work and then something else to consider is the possibility of just plain old greed the criminal complaint against Charles Lieber alleges and I should say alleged here that he was receiving cash payments from the Chinese. That some of this money was just coming straight up cash. Okay so the sounds problematic for sure but is it espionage. Maybe I have like an outdated old timey spy version of espionage but it doesn't necessarily feel like that to me no I mean. It isn't really espionage. I think it's really important to say that. Lieber isn't technically being accused of espionage. The government this is about the money and I think it's very telling the US government's going after the money rather than transfers of technology like you remember that superconducting case earlier. It's really hard to tell of. Someone's doing something illegal when they're collaborating scientifically and that's also got some people wondering whether these sorts of cases really deserve criminal treatment so frank who is somebody I spoke to. He's a professor at the University of California Hastings College of Law and he tracks these espionage cases and says arresting people for issues around what they disclosed for their grants. It just feels heavy handed to him zone. The past if there was a problem somebody would talk to you. Maybe you would face disciplined from your employer but you wouldn't face being fired and going to prison and having your name dragged through the mud as a spy in fact the same day. Lieber was arrested the Justice Department announced the arrest of two Chinese nationals. They say had lied on visa. Applications and illegally transferred biological samples. These aren't exactly the same kind of case. But you know it's the same general flavor. It sounds like a lot of people who have been accused are Chinese nationals or ethnically Chinese. Does we think that racism plays a role in this well would midst. There are some real espionage cases that involve Chinese people and they have been convicted. But they're sort of larger tone around all this. It sounds very familiar to him. No matter how assimilated. You are no matter how much you think yourself. I'm an American just like any other American winner of Chinese background. There's that risk always that people will look at you and suspect you're actually communist agent now. I should say. Us officials categorically denied. This has anything to do with race. I interviewed Andrew Leveling the federal prosecutor. Who ARRESTED LIEBER? And he said this if it was the French governments that was attempting to steal. Us technology in a massive decadelong campaign. We'd look for French people. But it's not it's the Chinese government and he actually points to the Lieber case as an example of how they're willing to prosecute anyone they think is broken the law by lying but even if the government doesn't think it's racial profiling it's definitely having an effect on the Chinese research. Community your remember. Chichaou shing the researcher who was falsely accused that we talked about well. I asked him. Does he still work with colleagues? In China. The short answer is yes but the more Ah Longer answer. Is that to my research. Now is much much smaller than used to be. And that's because he doesn't want to apply for federal grants anymore. He's afraid he'll do something wrong so every time I do all this conflict of interest floor alright to all these Grant applications and check boxes and also I I I I shake I I. I'm scared that if anything I didn't do exactly accurately I could be in

Charles Lieber United States China Researcher Chinese Government Chichaou Shing NIH Esau Justice Department Philadelphia Chinese University Superconductivity Special Mate Chinese School Physicist Hong Cups Canada Temple University Tokyo Mattie