24 Burst results for "Chinese American Community"

"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:17 min | 2 weeks ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

"County Plumas. Pursuant to your question that's moving out of purple into the red tear. Today. I anticipate substantial number next week and even more and the subsequent weeks. Newsome made those remarks at the site of a new federally supported mass vaccination site in Los Angeles that opened today along with a similar site in Oakland. Both sites are intended to vaccinate people in communities hit hard by the pandemic. California expects to get about 6000 doses of vaccine a day for each site that's separate from the States. Regular vaccination allotment. Meanwhile, the third mass vaccination site is opened in San Francisco, the latest being in the Bayview District, KCBS his marquee Schafer reports from SF Market in the Bay View where the site will be able to scale up to handle 1000 vaccines a day the opening of this mass vaccination side at SF Market, A wholesale produce market is all about equity, explains San Francisco mayor London Breed. We couldn't just open mega sites at Mosconi and City college and places That the probably easier for people to drive to people in the Bayview Hunters point community needed us to be here to meet them where they are. There are plenty of people who don't have cars and this southeast section of town has been disproportionately impacted by covert 19, the city's other to mass vaccination sites are pausing vaccines due to lack of supply this week. But 200 vaccines will be given here today with supply from Sutter Health Center Health's Dr Rob Nordgren. The vaccine is the pathway out of this epidemic, and we will scale up as as vaccine supply allows. The goal is to scale up to 1000 vaccines a day at this site in the Bayview District of San Francisco, Marty Shay for KCBS. California lawmaker is hoping to do away with cancel culture into new bills. Melissa Melinda's a Republican out of San Diego County, has introduced the bills to try and ban discrimination over a person's political views. Senate bill to 38, also known as the Diversity of Thought Act, seeks to add political affiliation as a protected class under the Fair Employment and Housing Act. The other bill Senate bill to 49 with the men, California's education code to prohibit discrimination, harassment, intimidation. And bullying in schools based on an individual's political affiliation. Private school in Dan Bills. Virtual Lunar New Year celebration was zoom bombed by racist language and lewd images. Mercury News reports that Bay Valley Chinese schools celebration this past Friday over Zoom was open to the public, but the event was hijacked. When people using race people used racial slurs directed toward the Chinese American community and even exposed themselves as Children were present The events emcee was able to quickly log everyone off and staff was able to later continue the meeting without disruption. Just ahead on KCBS. I'm Jeffrey shall be in Sausalito after a confrontation with the homeless police back off on plans to remove their belongings. A CBS News time 808 traffic.

Marty Shay Melissa Melinda Oakland San Francisco Diversity of Thought Act Los Angeles Sausalito Fair Employment and Housing Ac Jeffrey Today San Diego County Newsome Rob Nordgren 200 vaccines Senate KCBS Bay View Sutter Health Center Health today Mercury News
How the pandemic has affected small business in New York City's Chinatown

Good Food

04:51 min | 2 months ago

How the pandemic has affected small business in New York City's Chinatown

"As the pandemic to called of the nation. One community in particular began to crack early New York City's Chinatown. Faced with the economic concerns and xenophobic fears, Chinese restaurants faced a sobering future author and culinary historian Grace Young Co. Created coronavirus Chinatown stories, which looks to share the narratives of those small business owners struggling to stay open in the wake of the pandemic. Hi, Grace. Hi, Evan. Last March, you spent a day filming the stories of mom and pop restaurants in New York's Chinatown. Many at that point we're still open. How quickly did things change after your visit? Well that day when we were interviewing the restaurant owners, one of them told us that 70% of Chinatown restaurant owners had decided to close the following day and I don't know how he knew that information. In fact, a few hours after we did the interviews On March, the 15th mayor, de Blasio announced that he was shutting all restaurants across the city except for take out So the day that we were in Chinatown was really on the last day that trying town was as we think of it, and we were recording living history documenting where everybody was at that moment. How many restaurant owners did you end up speaking with On that day, we interviewed four restaurants, a restaurant owners and one shop owner. And since that time you've interviewed quite a few more I have. One of the interviews was actually the follow up of restaurant owner that we interviewed on March the 15th May Chow, who owned a Malaysian French restaurant called was a piece. And we went back and interviewed her actually two more times because she closed for two months, and then she opened and lasted for one month. And so we went in and interviewed her as she was closing. I want to play a clip from one of your videos. And it's It speaks to the unique stresses and xenophobia that restaurant tours in Chinatown experienced in those very early days of the pandemic, And this clip is from That restaurant or May chow from the restaurant, Josie piece, a Malaysian French restaurant. We did a very good delivery, but we still have to shut it down because Would work up. I'm afraid of their safety because we have this still xenophobic, right? And they have to take the subway when finish work is about 10 11. They're just the fear their family are really worried about their safety like saying you go to work, You might not come back or something. You know that home. It's just maybe we think, Oh, this is hysterical. But it's real for us in the Chinese community. They're afraid of their safety. They're afraid. The virus. They're afraid this virus going to invest it in in their community, then is really the stigma and saying Look, Chinese have all the virus, right? We are afraid of our safety. Yesterday. My waiter Um, he lived in Queens. So you take the subway to come here to check on me, he say so afraid He was a young guy, he say's afraid because before this two weeks ago He got pushed by people. You got to push early on in the pandemic. We talked so much about the issue of xenophobia in Chinatown. But We haven't heard us much about it Since. Are your contacts in Chinatown reporting stories of xenophobia and racism Still I think it's less right now. I think back in January February March, it was at its height. I think it's certainly still exist now. But it's not as pronounced as it Woz, but it's certainly exists. And I was in China town recently when I saw somebody go up to a street vendor and just knock down their umbrella and cart. And, um, my husband ran after the guy, but, um I think people are subjected to a lot of abuse right now.

Grace Young Co. De Blasio Chinatown Josie Piece Evan New York City Grace Chow New York Queens China
"chinese american community" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:00 min | 6 months ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of Chinese companies. Tic Tac obviously gets the most attention. We chat, though, will be banned, effective Sunday. That is a big deal. We chat has about a billion monthly users worldwide. It's a staple as in fact, you just heard of the Chinese American community here in the U. S. Millions of people use it to stay in touch and also to buy stuff. Marketplaces Jasmine Garst reports starting Sunday. Users in the U. S will no longer be able to download our update, Tic tac and we chat. Also, they won't be able to make payments through we chat, which could be a big deal to many of the millions of we chat users in America who used the platform to send money back to China. Professor Dan Wang teaches at Columbia Business School. We Junpei is the world's largest Hayman's platform. This is so ubiquitous that if you're a visitor to China, and you don't have a wee chat account, it is very difficult to pay for anything. So for millions in America, we chat is the way to buy goods and send money to China. Professor Ari Lightman from Carnegie Mellon says. Now those people will have to find complete alternate ways. Associate ID with receiving renew Marais shin or or paying various different things, which is going to be very problematic and troublesome. William Wong in North Carolina is already trying to figure it out. He sends his family in China money for bills and goods through we chat sometime. We need to buy something from China to get a ship here used reach at the paid our friends or family. To make that purchase for a Wang says the band will be a headache. But he's more worried about how it will affect his parents, which had is the way they stay in touch with family back in China. My concern is for my parents that they cannot talk to. Their family or my extended family. I guess anymore. If we chat, then it's just cruel. Wang says he hasn't yet told them about the wee chap band. I'm jasmine Guards for marketplace..

China Professor Dan Wang America Jasmine Garst Professor Ari Lightman jasmine Guards Carnegie Mellon Marais shin Chinese American community William Wong Junpei Columbia Business School North Carolina
"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

09:15 min | 6 months ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

"There was organizing in the labor movement of the wage earner Suffrage League, organized a a float in the Labor Day parade and got Samuel Gompers, who was the head of the A F L, who came out To San Francisco for that parade to endorse suffrage. So there were many, many activists. Just wanna remind listeners real quick that they are listening to K CBS and depth are weekly, deep dive into the events in trend shaping life in the Bay Area and beyond. On Keith Man Cockney, joined by Melissa Call Ross and today on the program as we marked 100 years since the ratification of the 19th amendment, we consider the past present and future of women in politics. Our guest right now is writer Elaine Ellenson, the co author of Wherever There's a Fight, How runaway Slave suffragist immigrants, strikers and poets shaped civil liberties in California and Elaine. As we kind of hinted at the beginning of the program. There has been a little bit of a rethinking of the legacy of the suffrage movement, and we've seen a lot of Folks commenting on that so far this year, especially commenting on the fact that for a lot of women in 1920, just because there was this constitutional change didn't necessarily mean that they Overnight gained access to the polling booth. There was still poll taxes. There was still a ll manner of ways to keep women of color away from the polls. What did that look like? Here in California? I mean, much of the Jim Crow legacy was in the South. But were there barriers in California as well for women of color? There were, but I don't think it was as pronounced as it was in the East Coast. Largely because of the organizing of African American women. Chinese American women who played a major role in the suffrage movement, although not necessarily in the mainstream suffrage movement, so African American men in California who were organized into the franchise League and the colored convention. We're probably the strongest advocates among men for women's right to vote, and there were many African American women who organized in clubs and through their churches for suffrage, for example. Sarah Massey Overton organized both in the African American community and then organized in San Jose. An interracial suffrage league. Ah, Chinese American woman tile young. Who had been active in fighting the trafficking of Chinese women that I I spoke about earlier became an activist in the Chinese American community. Speaking at rallies in Cantonese and putting out leaflets in Chinese, she actually became the first Chinese American woman to vote. Another interesting woman is Selina Solomon's, She thought that the mainstream suffrage movement was to society led, so she opened the votes for Women Club where she served lunch, two waitresses and shop girls. And laundress is and then she organized them to what precincts with her and to go to the immigrant neighborhoods. She even lead a sit in in City Hall, San Francisco City Hall. So I'm not saying it was an ideal situation, but it was definitely not. It's polarized as in the rest of the country, where there were very deep chasms along racial lines in the suffrage movement. Elaine. Thanks very much, and along those lines were actually now going to bring in Amy Allison will bring her into the conversation. Amy's a political organizer and activist and founder of she, the people that's an advocacy group advocating for women of color and politics and representative Democracy. Amy Thank you so much for joining KCBS in death. Thanks for having me so let's talk a little bit about women in politics and engagement and women of color. How unfinished is the business of suffrage? Well, the reason I founded she the people was really that in the suffragettes movement that was really taken over and over, taken by white supremacy and racist who embraced fairness when it came to Two white women but really sold out African American women and other women of color who had really labored to bring the vote to to all women. And this betrayal of trust. Opened a rift between women of color and white feminists that persists to this day. Part of what is, you know that the goal in 2020 is to say look, because race defines how people vote. More powerfully than gender, and it has been that way for decades. There isn't like a women's movement and overall women's movement without really looking at The difference between black lead Latina, Asian American and indigenous women versus white women as political actors in the issues and what drives voters and I think that's where where we are 100 years later. That white women benefited from the activism of women of color in order to secure the vote. But it wasn't until the voting Rights Act and the immigration and Ah act in 65 that gave or guaranteed women of color regular access to the ballot box, And I think that's very important because women of colors voting and political work. Then, as of now and as is now is really deeply tied to the movement for racial justice for economic justice and continues to this day. And along those lines, just speaking anecdotally for a moment. My mother is an 86 year old black woman, and she was just having this conversation with her. She retired to Hawaii so around the time of Hawaii's primary, and she Said something striking to me, which is I would crawl to vote and she references the civil rights era and people like Medgar Evers and the fight for for the right for for black women and for people of color to vote. Um do you find that kind of engagement continuing among generations again? I'll mention my mother is 86. Do you find that younger women of color would crawl to vote? I so identify Melissa with with that? I remember my dad taking me To vote before he was eligible to vote. He says Amy, you will vote. Every time our people died for this right and first that that it was just my family or maybe something my dad said. But in my work where I talked to black women in particular all over the country, there's a commonality in terms of how seriously we take Our civil rights how much weight we put on it that from the very beginning, the quest for black women to secure the right to vote was deeply tied to empowering communities. To combat the racial terror that was directed at black and other communes of color in the wake of the civil war and the seriousness by which Black women in particular. Take voting still practiced persists today and I'll say in 2020 black and brown women are most likely to be targeted Voter suppression and that's in states where a little determine you know this the results of this year's presidential contest Senate contest and these air states with a long history of both slavery, Jim Crow. And civil rights violations. States like Texas, Arizona, Georgia, Florida and in those states, where there are active voter suppression practices and women of color have often been prevented, even after in the wake of the 65 Voting Rights Act in the wake of that still have challenges voting and getting their voting votes counted. What we hear from black women like us is I'm gonna crawl through glass. I'll do whatever it takes. I'll stand in line and we saw in the primaries in a state like Texas or ST like Georgia in the primary is just about a month and a half ago. You had women sitting in line for five hours with little Children. Because that's what they're willing to do. And I think that that's born out of both and understanding that citizen rights were hard, hard fought the rightest tenuous and you must show up. For the community. It's our greatest, most patriotic duty and it's ah, it's beyond like a political thing or a kind of a once or twice a year thing. It is deeply cultural for black women, and I think that that's something that you know was set in place 100 years ago that we could say is that the long Line of the activism to get the right to vote and.

Amy Allison California wage earner Suffrage League Elaine Ellenson Women Club Melissa Call Ross Jim Crow San Francisco City Hall Chinese American community Samuel Gompers CBS Bay Area Hawaii Keith Man Cockney San Francisco writer
Alice Wu: The New Queer Rom-Com

LGBTQ&A

06:28 min | 10 months ago

Alice Wu: The New Queer Rom-Com

"I grew up in North Carolina at no another gay person like in life in a new inside that I had attraction a man but I also firmly rationally just reasonably believe I would just never tell anybody for the rest of my life. I totally totally the same and be. I sometimes feel like that. Plays into what you just talked about that notion of being like you do feel alone because all around you. You're seeing signifier of people started to date when you already have that kind of charade setup you're ready used to having to be date boys and like yes. This is great it was like I don't know any difference like I got to date a girl on compare so somewhere in my head. I thought there's just probably something a little like not even aware the gay just somehow like everyone else is hearing one song the I do not here and I just have to dance as if I understand that song even though I don't know what the beat is and I don't know what the melodies is. I don't know you know like I'm just trying to like not stick out for sure. You mentioned coming out at the last year of college in your bio. It says that you realized you require at a gender studies class Zachariah enough feminist studies class. Actually I took a fantastic amazing professor stealth Friedman who's like one of the preeminent queer historians in the world and so at the time this is like an end of nineteen eighty nine racism very different era and I remembered her giving us the assignment like so there she is. She's like talking and she ended up coming out to us as a class. Which at the time. We're all like a little startled by. And then. She said she wanted us all to write a letter to our parents which we wouldn't send a coming out letter to our parents that we would turn in. I speak Mandarin of my parents night. Don't how reader right like. Why would never tell them something? This important English so the idea of writing a letter to them would have made no sense so I thought well I guess I could record this on a on a on a tape so what I did was I went out and borrow two tape recorders and extension cord Because I lived in a two room. Double where my roommate also spoken understood mandarin but now I was like paranoid. If is recording my room. She would hear me say this and think. I was gay so then I put one tape recorder. My Room started loudly playing Cat Stevens footsteps in the dark to tape. It was like literally playing that I listened to the wind the wind of my soul and then I talk like the other tape recorder and the extension cord into the walk in closet and shut that door and I proceed to record this thing. I'd say to my parents and there then. I had to write a thing in English. My professor to explain what this was. I'm like writing this thing very academically about like well. That was fascinating for one thing. I didn't know the word for GAY and Mandarin. And maybe if you don't know the word can you think what it is I'm going on and on and on finally I'm like well? I'm writing so much about this because I am gay so there I said it and that was the moment I came out to myself and I even remembered being like. This is ludicrous. I'm sitting in my closet coming out of the closet like that. This is such cheap symbolism that like if I put it in a movie people would back. That is way too heavy it. But that's that's what happened. I turned it in That'll happen and I know your mom originally had a hard time with that. How'd she come around your sexuality? By the time you didn't move back in with her in San Francisco Oh yes. She came around basically by the time. Saving face came out and remember this moment. So this right before due to shoot and she and I are drive Sunday. Where like in her minivan driving down highway one and I just I like the sun coming in. It was like very comfortable and then also I just kind of looked at her and I was like so mom. You know. You've read the script. Now you know us about is kind of like you do realize at the moment this movie comes out. All of your friends are going to know why I'm not married. And there's long pause and she was like yeah and then I was like what do you thick? And she thought about it for a really long time and then she said I'm not gonNA lie. It's GonNa be hard that this is what you want than this is what I want for you. I remembered in that moment. Just being like it doesn't like. I don't even need to make the movie anymore like this like that was the moment where I'm like. You know because honestly I also thought when that maybe came out I was like Oh God. I'M NOT GONNA be able to eat any Chinese restaurant again. It's kind of a disaster and the big surprise for all of us was much the Chinese community embrace that movie like the Chinese newspapers wrote about that movie for like weeks like we ended up winning the Golden Horse Audience Award and Taiwan. Just like the some ways it's like the Asian Oscars and And that was a huge surprise. Mom couldn't have known that at the point she you know accepted me. I mean I guess that's the thing. It's such a sacrifice to make a film it really is so I think you really want to think about what it is. You're hoping to achieve like what that sacrifices for I think you want your humanity inform formula art and vice versa. I know you're joking. The top the interview about like Hollywood always asks what what's next but we are at the end of the interview and I want to know. Do you know or have any idea like what is next. It's so funny because it's it's like I know. My agents are champing at the bit. Because there's all these things coming in. I actually just been like listen. I'm going to devote this month to to promoting this movie like this is like a child right then. I WANNA like unplugged disappear off the face of the Earth for like a few weeks in reality myself like I've three ideas of my own that I'd love to like one in particular. I want to start working on. If any of them comes to fruition in a way that I think is worth sharing the. I'm GONNA probably work like the Dickens to try and get that thing made if it doesn't I am reading things things and it's not like I'm not like know like I'm making twelve years a slave. I'm not a big important moviemaker. It can be something that just purely fun right. I think I just need to know. What personally is the reason why I think I'm the right person to make it. It sounds so grand when I say it this way but if you're going to put that much effort in anything then you WanNa feel like you've left something behind the world that you can point to and say okay. Maybe this help to these people right because otherwise I'm not sure it's worth it

Professor North Carolina Cat Stevens Oscars Zachariah Taiwan San Francisco Friedman Hollywood
Being a International Student During the Virus with Zeyi Yang

$6.99 Per Pound

06:29 min | 11 months ago

Being a International Student During the Virus with Zeyi Yang

"So did we miss anything? Is there anything else? The listeners should know blow introduction took. It's your fault because you made it long because you're involved in so many things So that's I mean it's so crazy. It's like a full circle because I think when we were researching on on what questions. We should ask her and everything when we first started the project by the way listeners. If you guys have been caught up check that episode out. You wrote that article and you know you interview these people who are from John who are getting ahead and thinking about. How do we rebuild this place? Could you tell us like the story behind that article how you pitched it Your involvement Sure I'll so I pitched it because of course I am. One always have a lot of connections. They're always looking at wore. My people are doing this and I know there are non loud but some will have people here in United States or vary warrior. Just like me and I try to do something for home. Even if we're just we're like miles away from so I connected to I v because I talk to a New York based organization. They're like comprised fully off Wuhan People Or It's a name. It's called Yellow Crank Club. I believe so. They were all like people from John or have connections to Wuhan der here. They're professionals and they tell me. Oh I these organizing this report project. It he she'll be the best person that you can talk to mark to know her. Howard to know her and also besides hurt because I went to school in John onto onto college so I have a lot of friends or like like school. Connections also here. I also talked to them of a hot. What they have done for the city and those are pretty much one made up Was in the article for self strain of morning. Post. That's crazy. So how long did it take for you to Pitch Shit and then for you to write the whole thing up where people really enthusiastic about helping you out? Yeah I think so. I pitched to the editor actually is through Nodar Hon. Journalists also here in New York also So that probably approved that a very soon like after one or two days because He saw veteran. And then I did an interview in like one week I think I can I can. I said I have a lot of school school friends from Wuhan. So it's really easy to connect to people from and there were I think was actually the last person I talked to. The article Easier to got to off today. I feel like okay. I got everything I use. Probably not a week to ride article and then shaky S. journalists to journalists. You know you have any questions for Zee on I mean I yeah so I think a quick question that I wanted to ask you know A little bit about South China Morning Post If you'RE A ASIAN-AMERICAN I'm not saying all Asian Americans speak Chinese but I mean especially if you are of Chinese American background south China morning poses kind of like the most relevant newspaper that covers Chinese American Chinese issues around the world can dumb. Can you kind of explain to the listeners? Like what is like a like. What is the American counterpart for like the South China Morning Post in like how relevant it is India and the Chinese community right? Well that's a big question I will say it is probably one of my most trusted publication that reports a lot about China though is English newspaper based in Hong Kong. So Iri but he really looks a lot of different regions like not just Hong Kong Bar. They have a lot of stuff in mainland China. They have a loan stuff in other Asian countries. They're looking at like the whole that. I guess Asian Pacific region so and also I feel like I do like to resuscitate him more money because they usually presented a very balanced views. A NAS saying they don't have like a Pro China China views. They do but then you kind of see a balance of all different. They're all diverse views injured. So that's why I usually have a US my go-to new sources for like English articles about China. I see I see so like I mean I think I think when when when lot of Americans when they think of Chinese media they have a sense of a skewed perception or I wouldn't set. Well maybe skewed isn't the right word but they have a preconceived notion that you know a mainstream media in China to be Control you know what I'm saying by the government to to to a massive degree I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with that point but Would you say like you know I just go off on what you just said earlier? Like you know if you are like a American of somebody who was not Chinese were living in China. Would you recommend like with south China morning? Post like the go-to newspaper that you would recommend for a Americans to Kinda get informed about Chinese issues. I think it's is a pretty hard question to answer. A first of all to is true. That most of the media based in China are heavily censored is that I didn't say a man I asked him to go back your hand. James Right yeah. Because it's true that Because Autumn Media Inge based in China are subject to kind of like the administration regulations about it slow either administering Goto Demonstrate Unique article. They have to comply with that sadly the truth but endure a lot of nuances in there is like it's not every single be censored in China

China South China Morning Post Pro China China Wuhan New York John United States Yellow Crank Club Hong Kong Bar James Right Hong Kong Nodar Hon Editor Howard Pacific India ZEE
Coronavirus fears are hurting Chicago's Chinatown businesses.

Steve Cochran

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Coronavirus fears are hurting Chicago's Chinatown businesses.

"Today Chicago health officials will seek to reassure the city's Chinese community that the risks from the corona virus are still very low city and county health officials will join the Chinatown chamber of commerce at eleven this morning at the public library twenty one hundred south went worth that but to Chinatown business owners say fears about the virus are already weakening sales there WGN's Pam Jones has that the streets and shops in Chinatown are normally bustling with air your residents and tourists but the area looks like a veritable ghost town during lunch since the spread of corona virus from Wuhan China some seven thousand miles away some restaurants here are reporting a fifty percent decline in traffic in some store managers say they drop in business is worse now than it was during the sars epidemic seventeen

WGN Pam Jones Chinatown Wuhan China Sars Chicago Chinatown Chamber Of Commerce
When the fear is worse than the disease

The Big Story

11:08 min | 1 year ago

When the fear is worse than the disease

"Are you scared of the corona virus if so what exactly are you scared of why. How does that fear show up in your life right? You do anything differently or do you just worry. Even if you're not really afraid how do you feel when you see somebody a couple of seats over from me on the bus where amass. What if they start coughing? And you see the latest numbers of cases and deaths in China and other countries. Who are what you blame why? This is all psychology but it is important because fear makes otherwise rational people irrational and it gives the ugliest impulses that people can have an opportunity to take the wheel and for the worst of us. It's not even even here. It's just an excuse. So how can we fight. The other. Viral infection at candidate is facing the one that is so far harming a lot more more people than a disease. That's almost exclusively on the other side of the world Jordan Heathrow this is the big story. Evelyn Kwong a digital producer at the Toronto Star. She also writes a weekly column about social media. Hello Hi how are you. I'm doing all right Before we start because we're going to talk about the real impact of the corona virus and Canada before we do that to give us some perspective. Can you give us an update. It is Monday afternoon as we're talking What is the scope of this worldwide? And what's the scope of it in Canada so right now in Canada as of Monday we have four cases in Canada One and BBC two in Toronto and one in London The latest one was the woman in London and she's in her twenties apparently because she's younger. She had like a you know the immune system is a little bit better. She's actually just home quarantine so they're think those cases are ones they can tackle and that could be solved by the Canadian health system. So actually here. It's not a crazy or like fearful kind of Epidemic or anything. That's happening right now. That's what we're hearing from the public health officials so basically. It's not something that we need to worry about that much in Canada and they didn't really have to suspend any flights or anything but Air Canada just one on their own to make their own decisions to suspend plates for a month from Beijing and Shanghai but they said that's on their own accord The world there are there have been three hundred sixty one deaths as has of Monday afternoon mostly from China and one being the first out of country one being from in the Philippines a forty four year old man just recently they add I think last last week they declared it a Global health emergency only for the reason that countries that didn't have as good as a health system as China wouldn't be able to handle that kind of situation so I think they're kind of seeing that with the person in the Philippines who just passed away. I think that was just on Saturday too. So it's interesting because you said that in Canada we don't have of a crazed fearful epidemic. We definitely do not and our officials are telling that straight to us to use the word fearful and there is fear here there are definitely is fear because a whole different thing. That really reminds me of the two thousand and three SARS situation. Why don't we start with that? Because I should note that you wrote your column on this you also so Spoken about it a lot on twitter. And it's why we wanted to talk with you so start with that. What do you remember about that experience as an Asian woman in Candida well? At that time I was only in grade three but you already feel that and I feel that when you're in when you're that young still to internalize that sort of every day kind of raises them. Which which does happen you know like before the sourcing people would ask me weird questions like if I ate dog but then in two thousand and three it would become this whole different thing where people friends ends of mind would actually start moving across the room and not sitting with me for lunch or really questioning what I was eating and it could be just something normal? Tofu and is Asian food. Because that's what my mom made a home right so it would just be something that I felt really embarrassed about and not understanding my identity fully. I would throw those launches out and not eat them because I just felt so so shameful of having them in front of me and just people surrounding me and other than my own experience I would see my mom kind of. She doesn't have like she can speak English but I think when she has to defend herself in that situation she someone who immigrated here from Hong Kong. It's not her first language so I didn't really know how to defend her being that young and she kind of just told me like let's just kind of void. Everybody if we can you know wanting to be invisible and when you started to hear the news of the Krona Virus Three weeks ago. It's out of China. Was your first thought I was already. I knew there was a huge backlash. GonNa come through not like not just in Canada but America in other Western countries. I I knew that it was coming and it was something that I think tweeted a long time ago even before we had one case here. I'm like I can't not I can't wait but I'm like I just know this is going to happen or something and that totally. Julio did take place as well and as much as we try to you know make sure the misinformation of like you know. Don't go to Chinatown like all that is not real and all. That doesn't need to be sad ed or it's actually not scientifically proven but to this day. We're seeing a lot of implications not just like for personal experience and of course that's important but a lot of small businesses in Chinatown in a town or in Markham to places where there's predominantly a Chinese community. They're feeling crazy impacts from this. Give me some examples so one example is that I mean. I don't know if everyone one knows what six buzzes but six buzzes kind of like I would say a Social Media News conglomerate thing that's four young people and as much as it is great. That young people have something thanks to look forward to. They're spending a lot of misinformation so one example is that they took a photo they were sent before took a photo of this noodle shop in Markham called Wuhan Noodle much is obviously horrified like for most people seeing that it's still going to trigger them to feel type of way. They put it on their instagram. They have one point four million followers and by no means no science behind it just saying like tag someone you would want to eat here or like tag the person that should eat here implicating like you're kind of finding one person you wanNA Wish some harm by eating this place but really when we we had a reporter go out from Toronto DOT COM which is kind of sister paper they went out and spoke to the owner and and they said they've lost two thirds of their business. which is I mean? That's just really sad for someone who said they came to Canada with the dream of opening their little business and you know making their life year. Now they're really feeling the repercussions which are not scientifically based at all. Like if you eat there is not going to change things. They don't have that soup and I think that was the first line that came out of that article. It was a quote by them. Saying we don't have perhaps soup we don't serve that so it's like all the stuff that you're the justify which kind of seems weird when you're in Canada and a lot of Asian people in Asian Jasper. Don't don't eat those sort of things but it's like now. We ought to kind of defend ourselves in that way. Can you explain a little bit about the role that Stereotypes from Western folks around Asian Food in Asian culture. In general play in this This treatment one hundred percent so it started back even like from inception of our country With the Chinese head taxes which basically started because they brought Chinese laborers from China and just use them as kind of like workers for the railroad and other things and if some of them mm died they'd just bring more of such a punishment or something like that and to deter them from bringing their own families to Canada. Because it didn't want Chinese people here they would put a fifty dollar head talks on them. So it's kind of like that kind of started that whole thing and it's been something that has happened in all Western countries but it's kind of overall fear or mystery around Chinese Chinese people or Asian people in general and then when the food starting cub started coming here and America's Wall N. in Canada. I believe there's a New York Times review that in in the sixties Caesar seventies that said Oh. MSG is really bad for you and also Chinese restaurants are really dirty. And that's where the whole notion came from you can obviously find. Videos goes of people eating different foods and different cultures. And that's all they know and of course. I wish that there was a way to show the different health implications of all these things but when it comes to that even to this day people still have that stereotype of you know. Do you guys eat dogs. Like I was literally asa question two years ago by a stranger. And it's like very strange to hear obviously for me But even for anybody because not many people do that and it's just like because you've seen one video on social media now you're going to expand it and say every Asian person does that. It's it's kind of sad so there's always been a fear around Asian food and this whole idea that the things that Asian people aren't really civilized and and gross. Honestly this is gonNA GONNA sound like an extremely white question of meat asks. But when you're speaking with other folks in the Chinese community and you talk about this virus and what you're experiencing in Toronto around it. What are those conversations like there? I mean it's really disheartening. And you can actually see it on social media the good thing about the fact act that we have social media now is that we have people telling their stories you know. Hey my mom just got yelled at by a person who's in a car saying you're infected or like different stories or is that people are sharing about what's happening in the situation. It kind of brings a human lens like how can you really tell someone how sad they felt about this or that because it shows you that this place can be crazy easy like we all like to talk about Canada's sometimes as a multicultural blanket and that's all it is but really there are things that happened day-to-day that and this is not just a just because of krona's ars but it's only elevated because of that so speaking to them I think what I've learned from them and what we have kind of come to realize that we kinda need to share experiences so staring that sorry experience of mine was something that people were like. Wow I can't believe that people who are Kinda confused about how this fearmongering really works. It was just like hey I'm a Girl was born in. Canada doesn't didn't travel anywhere but still I had to throw my lunches because I felt so embarrassed to be part of that or even linked to that asianise that I had so so I think right now all we wanna do is step up and mostly. It's it's angry. People are angry in the Chinese community. People are sad but the way to fight it is with also just sharing their own stories and also hoping allies step in as well. What do I need to do? I feel like there's a lot of misinformation and I wouldn't want I wouldn't wish wish it on anyone to just scroll all through twitter and report stuff and fight people. I think that doesn't work at all. I think one thing is just take it off social media and talk to someone in that community. It doesn't necessarily have to be you. Of course. The Chinese community is really reeling from this but also Asian communities are are as well because they are often mistaken as being Chinese. anyways doesn't like no one really kind of looks beyond the fact that you could look Asian and asks you where you're from so I think it's about speaking with someone in that community and understanding a human level of like. Hey what's going on. I wonder how you feel feel I think that would really change your mind and before for some people who are really active on twitter and just want to give their thoughts and just put their thoughts out there. I think it's good to just reevaluate and check with someone and who's going. Maybe he's probably going through it. You spend an awful lot of time on social media. The point of your column in the Star. was that when something like this happens it makes it worse.

Canada China Toronto Twitter Asian Culture America Air Canada Sars Hong Kong Asian Jasper Philippines Chinatown Evelyn Kwong New York Times London Candida Markham
For Chinese New Yorkers, Talking About Hong Kong's Protests Is Complicated

Morning Edition

03:05 min | 1 year ago

For Chinese New Yorkers, Talking About Hong Kong's Protests Is Complicated

"Hundreds of thousands of protesters rallied in Hong Kong over the weekend and one of the largest marches in weeks to pressure the government to loosen restrictions on democracy the continuing protests have been complicating the relationships of Chinese New Yorkers WMI sees Katherine Fung says those who express their own opinions at rallies are online facing some kind of backlash of their own when Hong Kong started protesting their government we each had wanted to do something to support them she's lived in New York for more than twenty years but she was born and raised in Hong Kong and she says it's like her second home so on her day off she went to a rally in Manhattan's Chinatown but just want to be part of a and they smoke in you know Hong Kong we stand with you something like that she was shocked when people posted pictures of her at the event and we chat it's a popular Chinese social media apps the negative comments just kept coming they said I separate the community chan works as a liaison between Chinese New Yorkers and the city council part of her job is going to events hosted by local Chinese community groups but lately she hasn't been getting as many invitations is really hurting you know those people are used to be my friend we kind of your work in the community as well it's one example of how tensions over Hong Kong are affecting New York city's Chinese communities Justin you as the president of the Chinese chamber of commerce of New York he says the protests are polarizing some people believe the demonstration the Hong Kong our people's right but the other people think a law and order is above everything he's not surprised people are on opposite sides because Chinese immigrants are diverse coming from mainland China and Taiwan and other places that means lots of different opinions about China's sovereignty but there is also disagreement among people from Hong Kong Katie Wong grew up in Hong Kong and came here after college she manages a group on what's up for her former classmates who live New York she says protesters are breaking the law there is rules and I've pulls the what collisions an ordinance about all these rules and then people yell at me whenever she posed her views she got shut down people are killed you can not state this in this group so how do people deal with these differences one created a separate group for her former classmates discussed anything but politics Justin you says many people are reacting in a similar way some don't talk about Hong Kong in public and if they're with friends and family will change the subject to avoid arguing that is it doesn't mean you have to give up your opinions but family harmony coming into harmony they are the top priority for us and you size because many Chinese immigrants in New York City have other problems they should unite despite their differences we have jails issues in China right now we have special high school you shoe was short of housing let us solve our problems in New York City first but Sanders says when it comes to Hong Kong she just can't relate to other trainees new Yorkers I want to be a Chinese that in

Hong Kong Twenty Years
"chinese american community" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on KCRW

"His wife yen yen their kids brimming with excitement and my favorite is a tree with flowers and the flowers to really bring for yes well then other Chinese fast yeah so you guys got a lot of festivals and so whenever there's any kind of Chinese vessels we go and we kind of teach them as much as we can about it the history of it so yeah I mean and we have them in a dorm language school and so it's good for them to kind of be immersed in that it's very important because it's about our culture and you know just to learn the history where are people came from yeah we have it here you know we've been living here for over a hundred years at least my family has the Chong family but you know to be able to get back into our heritage and our culture and learn from where we came from and where we are now is huge especially for me my wife that attitude toward Chinese festivals especially traditional ones is common among Chinese Americans so says Lorene harm she's a professor Cal Poly Pomona or she conducts research on LA's Chinatown and the Chinese diaspora there's an importance of these ethnic festivals these cultural events for the community it's really a base to build community to maintain a sense of community maintain a sense of belonging and consider also with that kind of a mechanism to pass down across generations as well so for those in the Chinese American community were third fourth fifth generation these festivals and events help us to maintain and learn sometimes that does kind of traditional practices as well this may be a Chinese festival but the people.

LA Chinese American community Chong Lorene professor Cal Poly Pomona hundred years
"chinese american community" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on KTOK

"Filling in for bill O. Reilly the Riley update now brings you something you might not know so I've met a Chinese American woman living in Los Angeles and she told me something she was pretty sure that I would not know and she felt that many others too which is that boy babies are so much in demand in China today that when she went home to visit her parents still living there in China her son's feet never once touched the ground he was one and a half years old and she said he never put his feet on Chinese soil because she carried him the entire time two whole weeks that she was in China too afraid to let go of him and now that she has two children she hasn't been back for several years because she thinks it would be too difficult to protect them both and it's not worth the risk so why does she feel this way well she says it's a concern shared by many in the Chinese American community that she's a part of and she told me a story about another woman who went back a Chinese American and her young child was in the cart in Beijing she was in the Walmart and she reached over to the vegetables to pick something up it was just a few seconds according to her and by the time she turned around her child was gone in this case she could still hear the screams of her child and she chased down the woman who had taken her and managed to get her back but according to this woman this doesn't happen very often normally when your child is taken you never see them again boys are particularly in demand and why is that well China's one child policy which began in nineteen seventy nine and is now been abolished resulted in many people when they could only have one child they wanted a boy because like many other cultures in the world Chinese culture values boys over girls one reason being that the name is carried down from generation to generation and that's very important there boys are in the mind because Chinese families want them to race so even though the policy has been abolished this still takes place according to Human Rights Watch and other international groups in fact China today has a shortage of some thirty to forty million women so there are more men in China than women and women of being trafficked across the border to marry Chinese men and to bear their children so that is the legacy of a policy that still lives on today we'll be right back well you've been hearing about gold all over the news and prices keep going up experts warning a recession may be coming and it's time to prepare a recent Annalise's week says he sees goal going up hundreds of dollars per house to hit seventeen.

bill O. Reilly Los Angeles China Beijing Walmart Annalise
"chinese american community" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"That boy babies are so much in demand in China today that when she went home to visit her parents still living there in China her son's feet never once touched the ground he was one and a half years old and she said he never put his feet on Chinese soil because she carried him the entire time two whole weeks that she was in China too afraid to let go of him and now that she has two children she hasn't been back for several years because she thinks it would be too difficult to protect them both and it's not worth the risk so why does she feel this way well she says it's a concern shared by many in the Chinese American community that she's a part of and she told me a story about another woman who went back a Chinese American and her young child was in the cart in Beijing she was in the Walmart and she reached over to the vegetables to pick something up it was just a few seconds according to her and by the time she turned around her child was gone in this case she could still hear the screams of her child and she chased down the woman who had taken her and managed to get her back but according to this woman this doesn't happen very often normally when your child is taken you never see them again boys are particularly in demand and why is that well China's one child policy which began in nineteen seventy nine and is now been abolished resulted in many people when they could only have one child they wanted a boy because like many other cultures in the world Chinese culture values boys over girls one reason being that the name is carried down from generation to generation and that's very important there always are in the mind because Chinese families want them to race so even though the policy has been abolished this still takes place according to Human Rights Watch and other international groups in fact China today has a shortage of some thirty to forty million women so there are more men in China than women and women of being trafficked across the border to marry Chinese men and to bear their children so that is the legacy of a policy that still lives on today we'll be right back well you've been hearing about gold all over the news and prices keep going up experts warning a recession may be coming and it's time to prepare a recent Annalise's week says he sees gold going up hundreds of.

China Beijing Walmart Annalise
"chinese american community" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Reilly the Riley update now brings you something you might not know so I met a Chinese American woman living in Los Angeles and she told me something she was pretty sure that I would not know and she felt that many others too which is that boy babies are so much in demand in China today that when she went home to visit her parents still living there in China her son's feet never once touched the ground he was one and a half years old and she said he never put his feet on Chinese soil because she carried him the entire time two whole weeks that she was in China too afraid to let go of him and now that she has two children he hasn't been back for several years because she thinks it would be too difficult to protect them both and it's not worth the risk so why does she feel this way well she says it's a concern shared by many in the Chinese American community that she's a part of and she told me a story about another woman who went back a Chinese American and her young child was in the cart in Beijing she was in the Walmart and she reached over to the vegetables to pick something up it was just a few seconds according to her and by the time she turned around the child was gone in this case she could still hear the screams of her child and she chased down the woman who had taken her and managed to get her back but according to this woman this doesn't happen very often normally when your child is taken you never see them again boys are particularly in demand and why is that well China's one child policy which began in nineteen seventy nine and is now been abolished resulted in many people when they could only have one child they wanted a boy because like many other cultures in the world Chinese culture values boys over girls one reason being that the name is carried down from generation to generation and that's very important boys are into mind because Chinese families want them to race so even though the policy has been abolished this still takes place according to Human Rights Watch and other international groups in fact China today has a shortage of some thirty to forty million women so there are more men in China than women and women of being trafficked across the border to marry Chinese men and to bear their children so that is the legacy of a policy that still lives on today we'll be right back well you've been hearing about gold all over the news and prices keep going up experts warning a recession may be coming and it's time to prepare recent Annalise's week says he sees gold going up hundreds of dollars per house to hit seventeen hundred Bucks an ounce I recommend.

Reilly Riley Los Angeles China Beijing Walmart Annalise Bucks
"chinese american community" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Thirty seconds, yield two point oh, eight percent gold up six tenths of one percent. Again, the SNP up seven now are by three tenths of one percent. I'm Charlie Pellett. And that is a Bloomberg business flash. This is Bloomberg BusinessWeek with Carol Massar and Jason Kelly on Bloomberg radio. All right. Well, let's dig into this week's cover story. It's a good one and getting a lot of attention on the Bloomberg. And on Bloomberg dot com Waldman wrote it in. It's about Carol the US purging Chinese Americans from top cancer research. This is a new front in a way in what really is escalating into a decoupling feels like of the US and China. We talk about it in as it relates to trade. But now we're talking about it as it relates to science and research, and cancer research, specifically Peter joins us from our nine sixty studio in San Francisco. Peter first congrats on the story. It's a great read. Tell us how you got onto this in the first place. Sure a source out here in the Chinese American community mentioned that tensions were high that people were afraid of primarily FBI scrutiny that, that be I'd been poking around, particularly with scientists and engineers concern. Turned about filching IP and other sorts of proprietary information. And this individual said something was brewing at MD Anderson down in Houston. Yeah. And the Andersen obviously is a incredibly well, none. I mean, really the center of so much of this research, and so, take us there, help us understand this specific case sure, MD Anderson is every year, if not the top the number two cancer center in the United States, they do tremendous amount of research, handle, huge numbers of patients, usually very complicated cases, people who are going there, after perhaps, not having as much success closer to their homes at from all over the world. I mean, from foreign countries, you know, if you've got the money to get there, you're going there, because it's the best of the best it's premier cancer center without a doubt for that reason, they also have a lot of federal research dollars close to one hundred and fifty million dollars a year supporting their basic cancer research by scientists that Anderson just from the national institutes of health. Primarily through the through the NCI the National Cancer Institute. And that means the feds have, you know, a lot of influence there and throughout the academic research world, of course. But last summer, the national institutes of health director guy named Francis Collins very well. Respected guy started sending out letters to recipient institution throughout the country, saying, we're very concerned about people working in, in US academic institutions doing research taking federal dollars for their research and while doing research overseas or having undisclosed relationships with institutions overseas. He didn't mention China and his initial letter. But everybody assumed that, that was the primary target of this. And sure enough in the fall, and I started sending out individual letters to institutions asking about specific people that they had re learned did have extensive ties in China with research, institutions or getting dollars. From Chinese government, sources or wherever while working in the US on an I h grants, you know, I'm listening to I had a sister who worked at MD. Anderson also Memorial Sloan Kettering, you know, these are places that are known, and she was involved in research, and, you know, there's a flow of information, not just across the country, but across the world. And, you know, you think about the world we're living in data research, the outcome is only better by the more data, you have in the more input, you have right, that's crucial. It kind of can't have borders. When you're trying to find the solution to various ailments, certainly within the medical world and arena. So you do wonder about with these trade tensions, what that means for something like cancer research going forward. Well, that's a great segue into the actual focal point of my story, who's a, which is a researcher name, she phone. Woo Hoo was extremely accomplished epidemiologist for a while. She was the chair of epidemics, allergy at MD Anderson, and she was famous sort of in the world of cancer epidemiology for putting together these extrordinary databases, which they call cohort studies, which track a number of people hundreds of thousands of cancer patients with very specific information about them. So you could see, you know, what sort of DNA markers. They had how that responded with certain tumors to certain chemotherapies and these were gold mine, and she was famous for putting these cohorts together and the one of the reasons they were so powerful was because she had a huge context in China and work with a lot of colleagues, they're putting all this data together in order to study this stuff. So she was a highly accomplished epidemiologist at. MD Anderson, and she ended up resigning in January after this investigation launched by the NIH, by the way, it was through the FBI the FBI was the instrument of the investigation. We're speaking with Peter Waldman. He's got the cover story of this week's business week magazine. So what are the implications of this, where do we go from here? Not just in this specific case, but as Carol mentioned, me, this goes to the heart of how research is done globally play this out for us. Peter sure there are two levels. I think when we talk about where this is going. One is exactly the one you described, which is research, and particularly basic science, globalization of basic science, and how people are pooling ideas and data from all over the world. Scientists no, no international boundaries certainly with the internet. And when someone has a piece of the puzzle overseas. They want to work with them so that in this could well chill. That's particularly between the US and China without. Doubt this will chill collaborations. I had several people. Tell me about that. But the second thing I want to get to very quickly as overall civil rights picture for Chinese Americans in their concern about FBI scrutiny. Well to be fair. I mean has the government always kind of watched our India can keep coming after World War, Two in the Cold War, you know, in various scientists who come over from either Europe or so, and so forth has they're always been some oversight? Well, absolutely the that, you know. We have lots of adversaries and have historically in and the government doesn't want to share too much with them. Just look at all the export controls on the eastern bloc for so long and still today on Iran and other places. But none of those countries had more than five million people working, thriving, integrated into American society as Chinese Americans are today. Well, it's a great story and certainly poses a lot of important questions at a time where we are trying to figure out as a country as a world how this all fits together discussions here at being Mellon. Pershing's Insite conferences, this whole idea of open source and everybody's sharing information to really figure out solutions that you kind of need that it's a great cover to how not to cure cancer. Check it out. It's on newsstands as we speak on the Bloomberg. And of course at Bloomberg dot com. Peter Waldman is the author of that story. He joined us from our nine sixty studio in San Francisco, cutting up, we're gonna get into the. The world of high network. Yeah. Exactly. And how wealth is transferring from one generation to the next this is Bloomberg. Let's.

Bloomberg China Peter Waldman MD Anderson United States FBI Carol Massar San Francisco cancer National Cancer Institute Charlie Pellett Chinese American community Francis Collins Houston Andersen Memorial Sloan Kettering Woo Hoo Mellon
"chinese american community" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

07:49 min | 2 years ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Nuances of what these policies have meant for Chinese citizens, and yes, Chinese policy has affected us in America. One person who does understand those issues as veteran journalist, and now author Vanessa who are who was a river of stars uses fiction to deal with the reality facing many pregnant women in China policy that I began in nineteen seventy nine as part of China's efforts to limit birth. And in turn created a generation and coupled with that, there's a strong cultural preference for boys, and so if a family had a daughter in some cases, or through sex flushing tests, they might decide to put the Talbot per adoption. So that's one way the policy sort of rippled across the ocean United States, which welcomes the baby girls with open arms. But it also led to a generation a family who had to do what they could bend the rules in order to have report. Plead up. And so in some cases, that might lead to people giving birth overseas or going overseas have IBS so they can get kids in one shot while the American practice of adopting these Chinese daughters is nothing new who says she recently heard of a development that ultimately inspired her novel. I was living in southern California while I was pregnant with my twin sons and I began hearing about these maternity centers maternity hotels. They were just suburban homes that had been remodeled to fit in like a dozen pregnant women, and it just neighbors were complaining why we're all these pregnant women coming and going week after week sounded like a Bronco and reverse. And so I looked into it more. And it was intriguing to hear about how these women were coming here to give birth. And I thought about what was it like to be away from home and the most vulnerable time in your life. But what was it like to be among so many other pregnant women? Given that I was pregnant with twins. I was hugely pregnant and people were very kind to me they'd say like, oh, come to the front of the line or take the seat. But if you have a little sad who gets the sympathy who gets good wishes who gets to be be. And so I thought it seemed like situation ripe for drama, but also right for comedy, though. It has comedy throughout who has novel also gets to the real heart of putting yourself in the shoes of one of these young mothers to be desperate to do anything for their unborn child and the daughter of Chinese immigrants myself, I know has long been aware of the sacrifices that are made to come to new land leaving behind language culture, family, everything and sort of how to understand the rituals and ways of being in this country alongside with just trying to make a living economically or trying to understand how do you find a place to live or some kind of work where? Just things that are totally unfamiliar in this country and figuring that out while at the same time being a new mother, and in some ways people about motherhood like moving to another country in the way, it is you're passing from one state to another. And again, you have all these things that you're learning about yourself as my character is baseless moving to a new country and becoming a mother at the same time who associate was attracted to the idea of writing a novel about some of these modern wrinkles that have changed the immigrant experience drastically, our origin myth is that we are a nation of immigrants, so it feel historical. And yet I would argue that immigration the story is as new is the latest arrival at the fo. And so there is coming in today. So when I walk in immigrant enclaves often they made the working class, but also a sensitive by polity, right? There's a sense of driving and of trying to go. From this jumping off point and to build a life in this country for themselves and for their children. But that's in terms of the modern immigrant experience. I was just thinking about this used to be like say, for example, something like Ellis Island or even angel island out in the US wants, you came you stayed. It was like you might have dreamed of returning the homeland for a visit. But it was more difficult travel with expensive or might only go and one immigration that was it. But now with the internet and travel and changing diplomatic relations between countries and can go back and forth. And I think both countries can enrich each other Rubik investment that you bring knowledge or investment from here. There's a chance for sort of like, you don't have to necessarily leave everything behind tackling these complex issues of a foreign countries domestic policy, I ended its international impacts is of course, difficult who says she drew heavily on her experiences as. Professional writer. My two decades as a journalist has informed my fiction as well writing about the Chinese American community and about the diaspora done reporting from China and the villages, and then the factories, and I've heard the stories of women who has just undergone so much social and economic change within their lifetime. And so that's something also reflected in my main character Scarlett and the stories of other women in the book. Of course, the book is also about becoming a mother who says her experiences in this realm to our big dried into her novel because she began writing her tail just months after giving birth to twins mother myself. I had all the thoughts about how writing change I think in many ways, sometimes when you become a parent and you're starting to become a parent. You wonder, oh what all the ways? I might be limited time isn't going to be my own. When in fact, I found that when I became a mother those true, I do have. Less time now, but also becoming a mother has really expanded my view of the wall just in terms of thinking. The first time my twins, experienced rain. What a what am I glowing water and falling from the sky or thinking about the way I was raised. And how what would I would pass on to my kids? It could be frustrating. I think there were times where I would drop went on. And they'd be nursing. It'd be bouncing on a ball and trying to type over their head. And sometimes I feel guilty. The times when we had help a sitter or something I might be writing. And I'd say about them are working on a book about parenthood. But yet I was away from them. So that sometimes felt difficult in the end though, who has this finish novel. And she hopes her book conjoint, a chorus of other Chinese American and Asian American writers telling diverse stories in novels like Seles tings. Little fires everywhere. Poor Kevin Kwan's crazy rich Asian series. I think there is an interesting acknowledgement that there is a taking world and given that literature. That's such a wonderful job of, fostering, empathy. I think people are printing can be books as a way not only to be entertained and compelled and indeed we move, but also to as a way of understanding the world. And so I think that we're seeing all these American books coming out Asian American books coming out because we're. Coming of age novel or river of stars is available now for information on all of our guests. Visit our site at viewpoints online dot net..

China United States Chinese American community IBS America California Vanessa Ellis Island Kevin Kwan Scarlett angel island two decades
Trudeau says China not respecting diplomatic immunity

The World

05:55 min | 2 years ago

Trudeau says China not respecting diplomatic immunity

"So how off the rails are Canadian Chinese relations right now really off the rails. It's something that I think that Trudeau is really really sweating. This is a prime minister who has based so much of his foreign policy around China, particularly for trade and was pushing for a free trade agreement with China and China was was pushing for free trade agreement Canada. I mean Canadians already weren't really very warm to that idea in the first place and now all this. I think has really made it impossible for Trudeau to get something like that done. People are are pretty much outraged. Yeah, he sounds like he's in a hard spot right now. I mean, presumably under pressure to intervene on behalf of cover against bother. It's not just the pressure to. I think it's also like Canada has had a very long history of frankly, just naivety when it comes to China, the Canadian public and the Canadian government and Canadian diplomats even seem to think that all we have to do is play. Nice and we can get. China to open up when it comes to human rights and things like that. And that's just not going to happen and has been this very go along to get along attitude from the Canadian government for some time and Canadians have been kind of indifferent to the whole thing. But I think this is really woken up to how this regime actually operates. And I don't think that the Chinese government is going to be able to come back from this in the is a Canadian public. What do you know about the conditions of their detention of spe and covert? We don't know much about what's going on with covert and Spangler or but covert has had his second. Visit from a consular official just yesterday. So they had been visited by officials from the embassy. Yes, yes, they have. But the actual details of how they're being held have not been divulged by the Canadian side or the Chinese side. So there's covert inspirer. How many Canadians have been detained China's since the arrest and Vancouver of executive Joe altogether. It's thirteen but eight of them have been released a lot of it is just sort of very typical stuff at any given time. There's about two hundred Canadians in the legal system in China for various things, there's a lot of Canadians who live in China, particularly Beijing and Shanghai. And so people get into you know, they get into bar fights or just little things like that. And so there's always a certain amount of Canadians who are at some level of the legal system in China. Right. But of that number how many do you suspect are in retaliation for among long show? I would say that that cover against Bob were I think that those are probably the only two I think if there was any others the Chinese government would want that to be known as well with covert fabric of actually come out and said that. These two people are accused of endangering state security, whereas the other ones there hasn't been any kind of public announcement like that Jeremy I I know you're working on a report about China's use of soft power affecting Canadian attitudes toward China what have you found out and does that kind of trope of naivete run through your conclude? It certainly does because what we've had is does woman. Yes, you Chow who's a a human rights worker based in Washington who told me that Vancouver. Particularly is the communist party's headquarters in North America. And what she means by that is there are a lot of I don't wanna use the word agents, but people who who are very willingly doing the bidding of the Chinese government within the Kadian Chinese community in Vancouver, which is really hard. Isn't it very large? Yeah. There's hundreds of thousands in Vancouver alone. And of course, I mean, it's important to distinguish that a lot of them are not in favor of the Chinese government actions. They left China for a reason. However, the Chinese government makes a lot of efforts to try to control. All this group of ex patriots. They do things like try to get local think tanks on board with them. So sort of write papers that support their points of views on certain issues, these sorts of things, and they also try to cozy up to Canadian politicians at all levels and the prime minister himself was involved in a scandal. A few years ago, he's basically caught with Chinese government officials at a very lavish dinner for fundraising turned out that a lot of them had connections to the Chinese government, or we're also just sort of unseemly kind of businessmen. That was the first instance, I think we're we're Trudeau kind of got a bit of a up call on what he was dealing with. And it's kind of gone from there are the Chinese at all successful at penetrating Chinese Canadian media, either propaganda or fake news or anything like that incredibly successful. We've had columnists fired here in Vancouver because the Chinese government has told their publishers to to fire them we had. Oh, yeah. No. It's it's an it's an incredibly large problem. One thing that you have here. You're going on now. For instance, we chat, which is how a lot of Chinese Canadians. Still get their news is controlled, you know, more or less by the Chinese government. And so stories that are critical of China or removed from that it's actually quite difficult or can be quite difficult for Chinese Canadians to get news in Chinese that is critical of the Chinese government. Still a lot of the the media here. The Chinese media will just play ball because it's kind of essential to their business model to have the Chinese government. You know, have them as a trusted source because it's how they get invited to networking events. That's how they get advertising things like that. So yeah, it's quite a problem. Jeremy not all the lead investigator reporter for the star Vancouver in Canada. He focuses on the influence

Chinese Government China Canadian Government Vancouver Trudeau Canada Prime Minister Jeremy Spangler North America Official Communist Party BOB Beijing Washington Chow Shanghai
"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

"It's four fifty editing. The news this morning for any buyer. And Nick Palmer San Francisco's board of supervisors has three new members. And the new president KCBS a gentleman reports from city hall, the first job of the newly formed San Francisco board of supervisors was to elect a president just two members were nominated Hillary Ronen who's openly lobbied for the seat and whose supporters dominated two and a half hours of public comment and nominee Norman. And I love each other. We respect each other. And that's not going to change ever. That was Ronin before the vote went seven two four Inese favor. Supervisor office stuff I said, what weighed most heavily on his decision was the void and the Chinese American community since the deaths of Chinatown leader rose pack and Mayor Ed Lee, we were just little over a year of losing to titans and the Chinese American community here in San Francisco avoid that has not been filled yet and many people are are stepping up and leading and trying to fill that void yea- took over saying. There's more to bring this together then to keep it apart. I've been doing this work for a long time. And I feel an urgency to. Respond to crisis facing our city in a time of population growth and rising inequities, and it does have a progressive majority for the first time in many years at San Francisco city hall, general lame KCBS the interests of business and privacy advocates were discussed yesterday at a public forum hosted by the California Department of Justice KCBS is Margie Schaefer reports from the state building in San Francisco. California's attorney general is hosting six forums this being the first for the public to weigh in on the rulemaking process for the California consumer Privacy Act, which goes into effect in twenty twenty Julie charismatic as a technologist for the network advertising initiative, which represents companies in the online advertising space. She wants more guidance of how companies can be in compliance. If you're not exchanging information, and I just serving a targeted odd. If you're not collecting Email addresses or postal addresses because you're really. Trying to minimize what kind of down you handle businesses. Want loyalty programs to not be threatened privacy advocates including the ACLU and the frontier foundation. We're also represented Elizabeth Galicia is with common sense media gets important to clarify and to protect consumers when it comes to how their personal information is being used for advertising purposes media also wants to ensure there's enough money for enforcement of the laws once they take effect in San Francisco. Martin Shafer KCBS aquatic Orlando SeaWorld park will become the first in the world to be credentialed for visitors on the autism spectrum. The staff will be continually trained to assist guests and their families and the park plans to open a quiet room. With a justifiable lighting for guests to take a break from the main park. Another iconic restaurant has closed in the bay area. This time in San Jose KCBS has Mike Colgan says yesterday was the last day of business. For harry's. Hoffbrau very sad day the line stretched around the parking lot of the sheriff Joe avenue hoffbrau once word got out of the closure feed has been coming here for more than thirty years, especially after thanksgiving,.

Nick Palmer San Francisco San Francisco KCBS San Jose California president Chinese American community Mayor Ed Lee city hall Hillary Ronen Ronin California Department of Justi Mike Colgan Martin Shafer Elizabeth Galicia Margie Schaefer Supervisor ACLU
"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

"I'm John Evans will now the story of. And now to San Francisco the story of the San Francisco board of supervisors with three new members and a new president. Here's KCBS gentle lane reporting from city hall, the first job of the newly formed San Francisco board of supervisors was to elect a president just two members were nominated Hillary Ronen who's openly lobbied for the seat and whose supporters dominated two and a half hours public comment and Norman Yee Norman, and I love each other. We respect each other. And that's not going to change ever. That was Ronin before the vote went seven two four Inese favor. Supervisor Jeff I said what weighed most heavily on his decision was the void and the Chinese American community since the deaths of Chinatown leader rose pack and Mayor Ed Lee, we were just little over a year of losing to titans and the Chinese American community here in San Francisco avoid that has not been filled yet and many people are are stepping up and leading and trying to fill that void took over saying. There's. More to bring this board together then to keep it apart. I've been doing this work for a long time. And I feel an urgency to respond to the crisis facing our city in a time of population growth and rising inequities, and it does have a progressive majority for the first time in many years at San Francisco city hall general lane KCBS the interests of business and privacy advocates were discussed yesterday in a public forum hosted by the California Department of Justice KCBS is Margie Schaefer reports from the state building in San Francisco. California's attorney general is hosting six forums this being the first for the public to weigh in on the rulemaking process for the California consumer Privacy Act, which goes into effect in twenty twenty Julie charismatic as technologists for the network advertising initiative, which represents companies in the online advertising space. She wants more guidance of how companies can be in compliance. If you're not exchanging information and. I just serving targeted odd. If you're not collecting Email addresses or postal addresses because you're really trying to minimize what kind of data you handle businesses. Want loyalty programs to not be threatened privacy advocates including the ACLU and the frontier foundation. We're also represented Elizabeth Galicia is with common sense media gets important to clarify and to protect consumers when it comes to how their personal information is being used for advertising purposes. Common sense media also wants to ensure there's enough money for enforcement of the laws once they take effect in San Francisco Margie Schaefer, KCBS aquatic, Orlando's SeaWorld park will become the first in the world to be credentialed for visitors on the autism spectrum. The staff will be trained and continually trained to assist guests with autism. And of course, their families and the park also plans to open a quiet room with adjustable lighting for guests to take a break from the main. Park. KCBS news time to fifty three..

San Francisco KCBS Margie Schaefer president Norman Yee Norman SeaWorld park city hall Hillary Ronen Julie John Evans California Mayor Ed Lee California Department of Justi Ronin Chinese American community Elizabeth Galicia Supervisor ACLU
"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Got cut off. Poverty. Family. I hear so many here. He was skeptical of the mayor's outreach. But shaft says they want to get the word out that this is one of four areas in the city where more tuft sheds are coming in two thousand nineteen these sheds provide a safe place to store things twenty four seven and a place where people can go to bed at night behind a locked door with their partner and their pets. The city says of the homeless who moved into tuft sheds last year seventy percent moved onto permanent or transitional housing. It is working that is a phenomenal success rate in Oakland. Matt Bigler KCBS KCBS radio dot com or Facebook page to see a video that man put together on the homeless outreach. San Francisco's board of supervisors has three new members and a new president. He CBS gentlemen reports from city hall the first job of the newly formed San Francisco board of supervisors was to elect a president just two members were nominated Hillary Ronen, who's openly lobbied for the seat. And who supporters dominated two and a half hours of public comment and nominee Norman. And I love each other. We respect each other. And that's not going to change ever. That was Ronin before the vote went seven two four Inese favor. Supervisor office stuff I said, what weighed most heavily on his decision was the void and the Chinese American community since the deaths of Chinatown leader rose pack and Mayor Ed Lee, we were just little over a year of losing to titans and the Chinese American community here in San Francisco avoid that has not been filled yet and many people are are stepping up and leading and trying to fill that void took over saying. There's more to bring this board together then to keep it apart. I've been doing this work for a long time. And I feel an urgency to respond to the crisis facing our city in a time of population growth and rising inequities, and it does have a progressive majority for the first time in.

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee president Chinese American community Matt Bigler Hillary Ronen Oakland Facebook partner CBS Ronin Norman Supervisor Inese titans seventy percent
"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

"I'm Larry Sharoni. Here's what's happening. San francisco. Board of supervisors has three new members. And a new president KCBS gentlemen reports from city hall the first job of the newly formed San Francisco board of supervisors was to elect a president just two members were nominated Hillary Ronen who's openly lobbied for the seat and whose supporters dominated two and a half hours of public comment and Normany Norman, and I love each other. We respect each other. And that's not going to change ever. That was Ronin before the vote went seven two four Inese favor. Supervisor usher stuff I said, what weighed most heavily on his decision was the void and the Chinese American community since the deaths of Chinatown leader rose pack and Mayor Ed Lee, we were just little over a year of losing to titans and the Chinese American community here in San Francisco. Disco avoid that has not been filled yet and many people are are stepping up and leading and trying to fill that void Ye took over saying there's more to bring this together then to keep it apart. I've been doing this work for a long time. And I feel an urgency to respond to the crisis facing our city in a time of population growth and rising inequities, and it does have a progressive majority for the first time in many years at San Francisco city hall, gentlemen, KCBS in Marin county supervisor Catherine Kate Sears won unanimous support from her colleagues and has been named president of the board of supervisors they're serious has the major issues facing Marin county are inequality climate change and sea level rise. Crews have been evaluating eucalyptus trees around UC Berkeley's Greek theater after man was killed by a falling tree on Sunday. KCBS has Megan gold's reports from the campus and other.

San francisco KCBS Supervisor Marin county president president of the board Larry Sharoni Chinese American community Mayor Ed Lee Hillary Ronen Catherine Kate Sears Berkeley Ronin Megan gold Normany Norman Inese titans
"chinese american community" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"I think the difference with big trouble never quite a quite got the problem with with a big triple thing in the difference with the different that it seemed to be trying to to sort of on a some of these traditions city as Wasi seem to try to understand the fellowship understand the cultural side Ave ten site. The end of the hero is the Chinese going in the heat. He's the hero. He's going sites the dime. Whereas something ghost in the shell you fill. Mike is really shooting themselves in the fall, you know, because that might be something that doesn't culturally face that try to square peg in Ryan hall. I'm the results is something flatly stuff. The something that doesn't doesn't really work because he doesn't of the culture that it was knighted onto the source material. So I think there's a big difference. I think something triple I think the criticisms might be big to fair. Fair. I think to the style in one respect to conceal the main. But I didn't know that I'm trying to do the right thing where the criticisms after the film was made because I remember at the time when when the movie was being made there were protests from the Chinese American community. But I felt like that had a lot to do with another movie, which is this Michael Camino film called your of the trag in which I haven't seen in a long time. So it's really unfair for me to comment on. But I I suspect could be considered racist. Whereas again, I'm not someone to comment on this being white male. But but I never thought big trouble was racist in any way, quite the opposite. To me. It was like an entry point into the culture and made great efforts in very gracefully humanized, the Chinese community for mainstream American audience, whereas I think. Here. The dragon perhaps the opposite. And that's what people were at the time were really offended by. But I wonder was there a backlash against big trouble. After people saw the movie, I think it was all beforehand, and that they got it. I ran out before the movie came out not that that ended up helping things because, you know, carpenter talks in the commentary again about how little money there was behind the putting this out, and the thing that really surprised me was sandy talking about how basically the guy in charge of the studio was like, we don't wanna see any expletive deleted faces on this poster, you know, like there was an open hostility towards Asian actors from the head of the studio who was in charge when this movie came out, and it's just like. Wow. Okay. So they're going to you know, you can't necessarily market this movie any other way, then putting Kurt Russell on the poster and having him be. The big star. And then subverting your expectations. Once you get into the theater, but you know, so it was a little bit of a weird bayton switch type of campaign, but you really you have to sell it that way, you know, you have to say Kurt Russell as the hero. And then once you get in there, then you realize no he's not the hero that he is a second banana, even though he's the guy who ends up killing low pan. But you know, he is undone so many times that that famously that we talked about earlier of him shooting the plaster in that coming down on his head. There's another scene where weighing is just kicking ass of all these different guys. And Jack is they're trying to get his knife out. And he's just the whole time. He's trying to get his knife out of his boot. And it's just like, okay, you are completely ineffectual. And I can't even see like a second banana necessarily doing that. Like, I can see Sala getting scared of the ass in that kind of stuff, but solid. The end of the day is a really effective person in the first raiders not like the third raiders where he was a nincompoop. P-? But luckily, they had all that stuff worked out. But yeah, I think it was totally year of the dragon. Then it's weird because I don't remember that many protests around black rain, I don't remember that many protests around rising sun and rising sun to me is one of the most racist movies that came out that was really hard to watch..

Kurt Russell Jack Chinese American community Mike raiders Wasi Ryan hall Sala Michael Camino carpenter sandy
"chinese american community" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

19:12 min | 2 years ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"Point. Oh is brought to you by the international form for democratic studies the idea center the national endowment for democracy. I'm your host christopher walker vice president for studies and analysis us at the endowment recording from our studio in washington d._c. And i'm your co host sean colossal senior director of neds international forum for democratic studies. We're really delighted delighted to be undertaking this new podcast series which is an effort to share with you our listeners the conversations we're having here at the endowments international forum with some of the world's leading analysts researchers and democracy activists on emerging trends that are impacting democratization shanty. Maybe you can explain to our listeners. How we came up with title for the podcast sure so a year ago we launched a blog under the same name power three point. Oh it focuses on how modern authoritarianism utilizes globalization in ways that few anticipated so for example authoritarians now take advantage of interconnected financial systems communication technologies like the internet international norms and institutions institutions and the relatively open arenas of global media academic exchange and culture so in some ways authoritarian illiberal regimes have leapfrog the capabilities of democracies thus power three point. Oh the irony is that a key characteristic democracies hold dear. Their openness is also vulnerability that a liberal actors exploiting. It's worth pointing out however that democracies have at their disposal their own unique features that make them both more flexible brazilian and we hope to explore through our power three-point three point conversations how democratic societies can leverage their own competitive advantage and response on that note. It's a great pleasure to introduce as our very first guest on the show someone who can always find a reason for optimism about prospects for democracy. He's co editor of the journal of democracy and senior fellow at stanford university's hoover institution and larry diamond. Welcome to the show larry. Thank you chris. Thank you shanty larry together with orville schell of the asia society center on u s china relations nations. You've organized a working group of china and foreign policy experts and just published a report titled chinese influence in american interests promoting constructive vigilance the report primarily delves into efforts by the chinese communist party to influence american institutions including state and local governments universities think tanks media corporations uh-huh and the chinese american community. I'd like to start by asking you to give a sense of why you felt. It was so important to organize this effort in democracy terms. What's at stake in the current earned environment. Well ultimately what's at stake is the future freedom in the world <hes>. I think that one of the most shocking aspects of our report is the revelation of how much freedom of expression freedom of information and freedom from fear and intimidation are being compromised promising-looking in the united states of america particularly among chinese americans the chinese american diaspora and among the chinese diaspora communities and other democracies most notably <hes> but certainly not exclusively <hes> australia new zealand by the massive <hes> relentless and increasingly sophisticated united united front and other influence activities of the chinese communist party <hes> and so if we can't even preserve the freedom freedom of our own people in our own country something very very grave has happened and something very profound is at stake in one of the places where this really was in view at the outset was in australia. I'm and i know that there were <hes> australia was kept in mind during the production of this this report maybe you can say a few words about how that informed the thinking for this effort well <hes> chris i think both australia and new zealand and have been kind of the canaries in the coal mine here in terms of western democratic consciousness of the risks and the steaks <hes> it isn't surprising that they would be first or earlier in the trajectory of deeper penetration because they're they're closer asserted china <hes> and <hes> so perhaps easier to penetrate australia new zealand heaven had the kinds of laws on foreign agents registration <hes> the we have in the united states under the so-called fara foreign agent registration act <hes> they hadn't until very very recently banned foreign contributions to their political campaigns and so one of the things that happened in australia was a scandal <hes> where a backbencher in the australian parliament was found herd revealed to to have given a speech <hes> in which he was basically reading from the chinese communist party line on the south china sea and basically saying hang us is reasonable. Australia should just accept this and someone made an audio recording of it and it became a scandal candle that an australian backbencher would have said this basically sounding like toady for the communist regime amen china. He kinda survived the scandal and then you know some and and returned to his role in parliament and then some months later it was revealed to things nearly simultaneously number one that he had taken money from a chinese businessman for his this campaign and number two that there was a video showing that he acts this wasn't an off the cuff statement. These were prepared remarks he had made and since this became a kind of metaphor. There were many other instances in australia. <hes> of you know blinking red lights in terms of very very deep penetration of australian society <hes> by <hes> the chinese vast influence bureaucracy. I'll just say they briefly there had been an accumulation of a number of studying incidents in australian universities of chinese overseas students being intimidated monitored followed and of australian professors being monitored and harassed for making statements about china that <hes> overseas chinese students were probably induced to protest so you brought up universities around the world and their unique role in trying to preserve some element of openness and academic freedom <hes> and that can be <hes> one of the first lines of <hes> and <hes> of defense against authoritarian interference but by the same token it can also be one of the first places that authoritarian regimes try to undermine or influence fluence <hes> at the launch event there was some discussion of ways that universities should rea- to things like confucius institutes for instance and mention pay who was part of the working group noted at the launch that he wouldn't recommend banning the confucius institutes <hes> but that rather there should be some kind of transparency around them and you you referred to <hes> and almost <hes> classified information like environment surrounding the contracts accident struck between universities and confucius institutes what can be done than about not just confucius institutes but other forms of chinese government influence within universities democracies around the world so i think we have to take apart the different influence activities seventies of the different potential forms of influence and <hes> we need to address them as a whole because i do think there's a chinese strategy strategy there but we also need to disad aggregate them because they have different implications the view we have taken in our report which i do believe elicited very broad consensus among the members of our working group is a little bit different than what some of the politicians auditions <hes> have suggested namely that the confucius institutes in themselves <hes> do not not necessarily represent a threat to academic freedom as long as they are transparent in their agreements and as as long as they are not banning or preempting or eclipsing discussion of certain subjects now. What are these institutes mainly. They're teaching chinese language and <hes> <hes> a couple of the members of our working group have examined the pedagogical instruments they use is the language instruction materials and they're not full of propaganda the they were not found to be intrinsically trend sickly objectionable so there are other aspects of the confucius institutes that present problems for academic freedom. The most serious areas one is that the agreements are secret and even the faculty <hes> typically on most university campuses. <hes> don't no of them. A second is that <hes> in some colleges and universities they may actually preempt discussion discussion of set sensitive subjects like tiananmen square two batters what's going on now in xinjiang province and if they veer into into programming <hes> that given the fact that the chinese government is paying for these pro these programs <hes> in different universities as if they veer away from language instruction to programming about current events and so on that is deeply troubling so we need transparency a and we need faculty governance. We need autonomy. We need <hes> democratic control and as long as the confucius institutes. I have these <hes> then you know they just add to the resources for language instruction personally. I strongly a doubt that the chinese government would agree to these terms and i think if they don't that should result in the cancellation of all of these contracts. I mean i think that's that's an interesting point that the transparency is not just there for its own sake but it's also to cause a discussion around what is and isn't permissible spell in these environments correct and it's just a basic principle of democracy and accountability and we have found shanty across the board <hes> <hes> in terms of think tanks <hes> corporate relations a relations was crucially state and local governments and sister city and sister interstate relationships as well as universities that transparency is key and that <hes> sharp power control control is very difficult to sustain an an aps in an atmosphere of transparency and so you just named a host of institutions in sectors that are grappling with the challenges that have emerged that are laid out in the report. That's just been released. In many ways <hes> democratic society societies society's haven't been oriented towards dealing with these kinds of problems in essence the challenges that are presented <hes> to free expression academic expression media the expression within democratic societies instigated imposed from the outside <hes> into the extent this has happened in the past it it wasn't done on with the same degree of integration intersection which makes it much more acute much more <hes> thicken sense what needs to happen and within democracies in the coming term <hes> you've just explained the university challenges but going beyond the university and some of these other sectors what needs to happen within the democratic context to ensure that there's an adequate response on the one hand but that the response itself is consistent with liberal democratic values cracked. Yes thanks chris and that the response is not hysterical that it doesn't <hes> <hes> breed kind of generalized is d- suspicion of <hes> <hes> chinese americans chinese australians or chinese overseas students and businessmen who were doing thing <hes> and women who were doing legitimate work in other countries. I think the most important thing or the beginning point is information formation. It's education. It's understanding it's awareness. I have become convinced as a result of my involvement augmon with this project that there is simply breathtaking ignorance in naievety in western democracies about what's going on here <hes> that china has a vast leninist communist party influence bureaucracy that centrally coordinated the top stop and that has as its mission and raise on debt the projection of sharp power <hes> some of it is the projection action of soft power through traditional means of <hes> you know who <hes> articulating their views and building relationships and so on that all countries <hes> do as particularly when they kind of reach a certain level on the world stage but a lot of it is sharp power and to put added another way in the way that former australian prime minister <hes> malcolm turnbull put it a year or two ago when he launched australia's elliot's <hes> very historic effort to finally push back against those activity that is covert <hes> <hes> coercive and corrupting attending <hes> and this is what we need to guard against <hes> so the covert is clear. We need transparency in all aspects of these relationships gifts gifts grants donations the terms for a conference <hes> the conditions for an exchange all of this needs to be disclosed and if the chinese interlocutors think tanks <hes> friendship associations and so on are not willing in to have the terms disclosed that in itself should be a breaking blinking red light that something is wrong here <hes> beyond that that <hes> we recommend consideration of i would put it stronger. I recommend creation of of federal government office where universities universities <hes> think tanks ngos local governments and other other american actors can go when they're approached by chinese <hes> potential you know exchange partner or to potential investor potential donor whatever it might be to just say you know we don't know much about this person is there is there are are there other aspects to their organizational ties their persona that that haven't been disclosed that we should know about before we make our own decision about whether we want to accept this donation or pursue you this exchange relationship or something like that and you know what we have found is frequently. You don't have to look very hard to find that the person who wants <hes> to have a cooperative relationship with the research institute and university is doing cutting edge research that could have military applications at a university affiliated with the people's liberation army or that another person is actually a part of the apparatus at the united front work department of the chinese communist party. We should note this stuff before we i pursued these relationships so <hes> are actors in the united states. Another democracies need help. They need places where they can go and they need to understand or stand. I hope they'll read at least parts of our report to educate themselves on mention one other thing that i think <hes> non-governmental organizations and state and local governments need to do they are frequently being played off one against the other by the divide and rule tactics of the chinese communist party. You know i can take my money elsewhere a we can take this exchange relationship elsewhere. You don't wanna come here. We'll get delegation from one of your competitor institutions and that game has to stop they need to develop a common base of information and a common code of conduct so they all have the same certain minimum standards and principles in terms of how they're going to relate to their potential interlocutors china and larry you mentioned the <hes> week knowledge that is possessed in many democratic settings about china and the way in which the system operates beyond its borders and engaging being democratic institutions places like africa latin america parts of europe. <hes> one of the problems seems to be structural which is that you have china experts who focused on china who may not have knowledge of the regions in which china today's deeply engaged at the same time. Many any of those regions may not have the china expertise in the policy community in the news media editors and so forth who can put china in context in a way that at their own societies can come to their own conclusions about the nature of the relationship they have so what do we need to do in the coming term to bridge those gaps and to make sure that the knowledge gaps that now exist in so many places are not as large in her shrunk over time well i i i hope that our report <hes> on chinese influence activities in the united states will help <hes> but we need the help of the media and organizations like the national endowment for democracy to defuse an <hes> to also kind of distill the knowledge i into into more bite sized chunks..

china chinese communist party australia chinese government united states larry diamond christopher walker chinese american community washington journal of democracy neds international senior director orville schell vice president asia society center xinjiang stanford university editor
"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on KCBS All News

"KCBS Manzini Sleepworld, six day forecast for you. Now, we're expecting things to turn out to be very nice this afternoon. The fog pretty well burned off around the region, or if not just about there, and we're looking for sunny skies, sixty eight for San francis-. Hi today. Seventy eight and San Jose a few low eighties farther inland. Pretty similar story tomorrow including the morning, overcast period and then expecting slightly warmer conditions on Friday and Saturday, maybe the mid eighties inland before a little bit of cooling on Sunday and Monday, those two days probably will not see anybody hit the eighties in the bay area. Traffic and weather together on the eight. So an all news one zero six nine AM seven forty KCBS KCBS news time eight fifty to a San Francisco state university professor is producing a documentary film to tell the story of a cultural enrichment program that for several decades served as sort of a rite of passage for many Taiwanese American youth. KCBS reporter Keith men Coney says the film explores how a serious minded cultural excursion came to be known as the Taiwan love boat. Well, that's just the story you'll get from the promotional material for this Taiwanese government program. In fact, it could get a Little Rock as rowdy as one former participant quickly discovered. Apparently, it's not really cultural beast, it's really for finding your on your significant other. So that's why it's called a love. But that is unofficially filmmaker. Valerie, so is a professor at San Francisco state university. She says officially the program brought Taiwanese heritage you to Taiwan to participate in cultural enrichment activities like Mandarin language study martial arts and brush painting, but many students had other plans they stopped having the wrong in part because it became it. Just got out of hand the program reached its peak between the eighties and the early two thousands. Now professor so says it is broadly remembered in the Chinese American community either nukes someone who went or you went yourself or your cousins went professor so is raising funds on indie. Gogo. Complete the film Taiwan love boat by twenty nineteen Keith Makoni KCBS mega millions jackpot. Nobody got it last night. So the next drawing on Fridays going to hit at least eight hundred sixty eight million dollars. Boy, there was a close call right in the bay area in San Francisco. Somebody bought a ticket at the marina Safeway had five of the six numbers that according to California lottery, which says that it'll be worth around a million dollars wouldn't know whether to be happy for the million dollars or distraught that I lost out on eight hundred more of them. Yes. Since my all tied lottery winnings are like seven dollars. You know, never been this close. The jackpot Friday would be the second largest lottery grand prize in US history. If the numbers continue to add up the way, they look like they will second only do a massive one point six billion dollar Powerball drawing in January twenty sixteen KCBS news time eight fifty four now from a small business pulse. Bay area have career conversations with employees talk about what they've done where they wanna go and set them on. On that path real talks become real action. For more tips. Go to small business pulse dot com slash bay area. Sponsored by Comcast business. KCBS news time eight fifty four. We're checking in with Jason Brooks and not the same kinda day. We had yesterday on Wall Street. No, not quite Susan. But we have seen investors.

KCBS San Francisco professor Taiwan Valerie San francis San Jose Manzini Sleepworld Comcast Jason Brooks Safeway Keith Makoni Gogo US California Coney reporter Chinese American community million dollars
"chinese american community" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"chinese american community" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Than than chinese influence i mean decades of anti soviet hysteria in the united states is part of it i'm it was well founded obviously the the especially during the stalinist period there was there's a there's a lot of evil regimes in the twentieth century but that certainly is not i mean it's not i money among equals up there and i think that there is just a longer there's just a more deeply embedded anti russia with the villains in movies for longer than the chinese have highly development in hollywood movies was i was thinking too you know look there's this this level of which this this chinese stuff because it's confined to the chinese american community because it's confined in many cases to overseas communities abroad it doesn't feel like it affects most people there's a sort of 'isolation about it was the russian stuff because it hit upon you know also the the us is decision to cover it self in petrol and set itself light democratically because it headed this moment that that touches everyone you know everyone saw got involved in these stupid online fights and memes spreading and all this sort of thing so isn't a sense in which the russians have touches our daily life in china stuff doesn't i think that's that's true or now i think there are two things first of all china has been much more successful at serve tissues ly doing that kind of perception management and in ways that i think the russians have been quite.

united states russia china hollywood