35 Burst results for "China Dialogue"

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:57 min | 2 months ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Thanks very much for the headlines page. Now, will she or won't she? As you just heard in the headlines, Nancy Pelosi speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and third in line to the presidency has kicked off a tour of Asia in Singapore. Other announced stops include Malaysia, South Korea and Japan, but the real question is whether this trip will include a visit to Taiwan, something China has expressly warned against. While joining me to discuss this trip and it's possible ramifications is Isabel Hilton founder and CEO of China, dialog is about welcome back to the show we're in something of a game of chicken at the moment it feels like what is your sense of whether Nancy Pelosi will actually visit Taiwan and how much China is paying attention to it. China certainly paying close attention again, particularly is a very good description. There have been a couple of reports this morning. Though unconfirmed that you will, in fact, visit Taiwan on August 4th, flying from Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines. And we'll meet with president Tsai ing Wen. Now, Chinese media is reporting this based on information they claim from Chinese intelligence. There's been no confirmation from U.S. sources, but one Taiwanese source is also concerned. Or also reported that she's expected to visit. So we are still in a kind of will she won't she, but I think the I think the inclination is that she probably will. So if she does, I mean, Pelosi would not be the first U.S. official to visit Taiwan. She would be one of the most senior, certainly in the last couple of decades, China always complains when these sorts of visits happen, but is there something different about this one and the tone of China's warnings to you? Well, the certainly something different in the sense that the long running rivalry between China and the U.S. has come to a sort of pitch of confrontation in recent years. So that any move on either side has a much bigger resonance and we've seen the Chinese rhetoric ramp up. Today is army day in China, August 1st. And we've had some very noticeable. Shall we say a live fire exercises around Taiwan, we had a little confrontation last week when an American warship sailed through the Taiwan straits, which the Chinese in June declared would henceforth be regarded as national not international waters. Do you see all these elements, if you like on the chess board? As far as the leaders go, the readout from Xi Jinping and Joe Biden's conversation last week with remarkable in that Joe Biden talks a great deal about Ukraine and not much about Taiwan. And the Chinese was in reverse. They barely mentioned Ukraine, but an awful lot about how she impended lectured Joe Biden about the folly of living. Those who live by 5 will die by fire and all that sort of thing. But the global times, which is perhaps the most nationalist newspaper in China, ran an editorial today which repeated all the threats. But ended with the thought that the author who is a senior academic at when men university believed in the ultimate strategic rationality of China in the U.S.. So I think that, you know, I don't think China is going to rush into a very, very risky confrontation. But there will be a display of force of some kind, which will play well at home and we'll have the sense of fulfilling the threats. Well, it's about interesting the way you describe the call between Joe Biden and Xi Jinping or the readouts. There is ambiguity on this visit from the U.S. from Joe Biden. He's been relatively quiet on it, but I do wonder about the broader U.S. commitment to Taiwan even if Biden didn't mention it as you say that much in his own readout. Do you think that China believes and is convinced that the U.S. would intervene if it made any move on time on? I think China does think that and I think that one of the calculations that China is making is, of course, in the military balance and China's invested very heavily in its military in the last few years and also it's still not on a par with the U.S. Military in terms of what would be a kind of local fight largely a naval fight. China has been putting a lot of, again, a lot of pieces on the chess board. So trying to get a security relationship with the South Pacific small island states, developing submarine capability very fast developing. Also naval missiles, which could attack American aircraft carriers. So all of that has been going on. And I think one of the calculations that Xi Jinping is going to have to think about is when is when is the moment when China has sufficient military capability to see off a U.S. response? And they don't want in my view to move too early because that would be that would have cash historic implications. It would have very damaging effects on China's economy, but also if they were in addition to lose, then that would be a political catastrophe for Xi Jinping. So although he has proved himself somewhat of a risk taker, it's been he's been taking risks within a relatively limited theater so far. And this is very much the big stage. Isabelle Hilton, thank you very much for joining us. You are listening to the briefing on Monica 24. You are back with the briefing on monocle 24.

China Taiwan Joe Biden U.S. Nancy Pelosi Isabel Hilton Clark Air Force Base Tsai ing Wen Xi Jinping U.S. House of Representatives South Korea Ukraine Malaysia Singapore Pelosi Asia Philippines Japan chess army
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:56 min | 3 months ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"This is the briefing on monocle 24 with me Andrew Muller and whatever struggles you or indeed anyone attempting to govern the United Kingdom or France may face in their working day today be grateful that you have not been professionally obliged to clarify that you do not in fact intend to conquer the moon, such is the position in which China's foreign ministry spokesperson zhao lijian found himself following a suggestion by NASA chief Bill Nelson that China plans to do exactly that. One joined with more on this bite Isabel Hilton founder of China dialog Isabel, is this not the kind of denial you issue if, in fact, conquering the moon is exactly what you do intend. Yes, well, it's probably worth bearing in mind that China denied that it was going to militarize the South China Sea, et cetera, et cetera. There are quite a long list of denials and Jodie jenn in particular enjoys making them with a particularly fine sneer, which is being developed over many years. The worry of about the moon is consonant, I think, with the U.S. quite long-standing worries about the Chinese space program in its entirety. And as it grows, those worries grow. I think they're concerned they talk particularly about access to water on the moon, they're worried that the Chinese would build a world station and declare it somehow a historic part of China. I'm not quite sure that that's likely to happen, but there's certainly a great deal more Russian Chinese collaboration in space than there was. And that in itself would be of concern. Well, if we look at the official line on China's lunar aspirations, what has China said, it wants with the moon. Well, it's planning to learn people on the moon. It's already landed a space rover on the far side of the moon, it is planning indeed to have some kind of settlement on the moon. So yes, I mean, they do have a big space program, big ambition. But the lack of, I mean, and the problem, of course, with all space technologies that they are dual use, they're both military and civilian technologies. So the satellites, the rockets, all of those, which are necessary for a peaceful exploration of space, are also part of military kit. And the Chinese space program is run by the military. So there are reasons to be concerned. But the United States ruled out cooperation with China in 2011. And that's one of the things that has obliged the Chinese to pursue very much their own program in space. So they're building their own space station because they're not allowed on the International Space Station. For example. So it is a it's one of those situations in which concerns about Chinese ambitions and perhaps transfer of technology and so on has probably made the space program run by the Chinese the stronger because it's more independent. They've had to do things themselves and now they've got the Russian experience on board. China has of course always denied any intention of weaponizing space at all not just the moon and again is that a denial it would be unwise to take at face value. Well, I don't think it's a denial you can take to the bank. Space, there is a convention that space is not to be weaponized, but as I say, it's very hard to tell. Another concern of the U.S., the next war, will definitely rely on space based technologies, communication systems, the Chinese are building their own communication systems. Again, cooperating with the Russians, and they have occasionally practiced to shooting a low orbit satellite, which would be one of those things that you would need to do if you were to neutralize the enemy's communication systems. So it's not necessary that that's the intention, but is there a capacity? Absolutely. And just finally does China regard the prospect of a lunar race with the United States as any kind of ideological contest in the same way that it was regarded when it was fought between the U.S. and the Soviet Union in the 60s and 70s or China sort of take the view that America has already done this there for we shouldn't make too big a thing of being seen to come second. It's a huge deal. And particularly when they do things that other people haven't done. They have actually mapped the whole surface of Mars at this point. And to build their own space station without any collaboration, it's hugely popular in China all the launches are on television, the astronauts are heroes. And the political discourse that goes with this is absolutely in line with China's earth based political discourse. It's talking about building a shared future for mankind in space and so on. As opposed to the United States, which they accuse of trying to create a NATO in space. So whenever the United States proposed its collaboration with other countries, its attempt by China as a kind of exclusive semi military alliance or military alliance, but when China does it, it's part of the comprehensive vision for the eternal welfare of mankind, which is so much at the heart of the Chinese Communist Party. As if there was ever any doubt that was Isabel Hilton founder of China dialog, and that is all for this edition of the briefing. It was produced by Rhys James A. researcher was Maya renfer and our studio manager was Chris a Blackwell. The briefing returns at the same time at the same time tomorrow, I'll be back with the monocle daily at 1800 London with the latest in what is likely to be a biggish afternoon in British politics, so do tune in for that. I'm Andrew mullett, thank you for listening..

China Isabel Hilton Andrew Muller zhao lijian Jodie jenn U.S. Bill Nelson South China Isabel NASA United Kingdom France International Space Station Soviet Union semi military alliance or mili Chinese Communist Party NATO Rhys James A. Maya renfer Blackwell
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:46 min | 6 months ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Its half at least of its reserves overseas, the fact that oligarchs are having their ships their yachts and planes impounded around the world, all that will have an impact and hopefully, as I say, is leading some to think that Putin is not the leader that they want for their country. Absolutely. Sarah Mark loyal grant, thank you very much for joining us today. It is 1210 here in London 8 10 a.m. in New York City. Here is Monaco's Carlo to rebel with a day's other new set lies. Thanks very much, Marcus. At least one person has died following a powerful tornado in the U.S. city of New Orleans. The tornado which destroyed homes and took out power hit areas that were devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Taiwan says it is considering extending compulsory military service beyond the current four months. The defense ministry is overseeing a modernization program of the armed forces in the face of continued threats from China. You can inflation has hit at 30 year high. The Office for national statistics says prices rose by 6.2% in February, which is the highest rate since March 1992. The UK government is facing growing pressure to do more to support households, and world number one ashleigh Barty has announced that she is retiring from professional tennis at the age of 25, parties retirement comes just two months after she claimed a third Grand Slam title at the Australian open. Those are the days headlines back to you, Marcus. Now China is seeing the biggest rise in its COVID caseload in more than two years, despite pursuing one of the world's strictest virus elimination policies, it has prompted many to ask whether Beijing could soon be forced to drop its rigid zero COVID strategy. Let's get the latest now with the founder of China dialog Isabel Hilton, Isabel good afternoon to you. Now, China is seeing a huge spike in COVID figures. Is it gradually becoming clear that Beijing's strategy is not working anymore? Well, I think the arrival of omicron has rather hold the strategy below the water line because it's highly infectious. They do point out that although there has been a very large rise in cases. The hospitalizations and the deaths are fairly small. And there's still a lot of people who are asymptomatic. Now they put this down to the success of their vaccination program. Other experts would say that the problem is the vaccination program because these are not mRNA vaccines and the Chinese vaccines have much less efficacy against new variants than mRNA. So China is a bit stuck. The didn't want to import mRNA or to license foreign vaccines, and so they have been waiting for China to develop its own mRNA vaccine and that has proved rather slow. So we're now seeing people very tired of lockdowns. We're seeing quite key concerns about economic impact at high levels. And we're beginning to see variations in how different cities are treating this. Now another large city has just gone into lockdown. Could you tell us more about that? Which large city are we talking about Shanghai or Hong Kong? We're talking about Shanghai and Hong Kong both. Yes. Well Shanghai, Shanghai is, of course, China's biggest city and is in lockdown. It's a relatively light version in that the I mean, it has the usual accoutrements of mass testing and so on, but it's not quite as severe in terms of quarantine. Hong Kong is an interesting case because Hong Kong tried to follow the mainland zero COVID policy. And it's proved extremely damaging to Hong Kong's economy. You know, Hong Kong needs both access to China because of the power of a delta. But it also makes its money largely as an international hub. And that means particularly bankers and businessmen have to travel. Hong Kong was running a three week quarantine program for anyone returning to Hong Kong, which may travel extremely expensive and inconvenient. And people were simply leaving Hong Kong. The business community was complaining furiously. And although Gary lam is under pressure, both from Beijing to follow the zero COVID policy, but she's also under pressure from her own from her own business people and from the rather dire warnings about simply loss of talent. Exodus from Hong Kong of international business people who are already a bit fed up because of the because of the imposition of the security regulations. So Hong Kong was beginning to feel as though it was going into a fairly steep decline. So some of the regulations have been relaxed. The quarantine period has come down quite dramatically. And there are promises that schools and other institutions in Hong Kong can return to normal in April. Now those are examples of the problems this zero COVID strategy is bringing upon. What is happening in Beijing do you think discussions are taking place over there to figure out the future of China and what it will do with COVID? I think discussions are quite visibly going on. Even Xi Jinping, who is not noted for backing off a policy once adopted, has been talking about balancing out economic needs and the needs of the pandemic. It's a slightly tricky one because the party has claimed that the way it has dealt with COVID has demonstrated the superiority of the Chinese system to western democracies. Because the death rate has been so low and because for a while, this very severe clamp down mass testing quarantine approach did, you know, it did limit infection. However, it doesn't seem to be holding up anymore. And the costs of course are mounting up along with the costs of the higher energy prices and the war in Ukraine. There is an accumulation of difficulties, and I think we're going to see a relaxation of the zero COVID policy. The difficulty is that there isn't enough immunity in the population and there aren't enough beds in intensive care. To cope, should there be a serious outbreak with a lot of people hospitalized. So it's going to be a combination of more vaccines. I think another booster dose, perhaps trying to accelerate a more effective vaccine. And then selective lockdowns when it looks as though it's going to become a serious and more serious outbreak in terms of fatalities. I do think it's realistic to think that China would streak to restrictions on international travel anytime soon. There's not much sign of that. Hong Kong has, but I'm not sure that China is quite as keen on seeing foreigners jetting in as Hong Kong is. Beijing is has been pursuing has been turning its back on the world rather. And also, again, the official story is that all infections come from abroad. So in terms of propaganda, it's probably not terribly high on the list of actions to relax the conditions. Beijing is likely to think it doesn't really need these visitors in the way that Hong Kong does. China dialogs Isabel Hilton there, thank you very much. You are listening to the briefing on monocle 24. We had two France now where the left wing firebrand Jean Luc melon show is enjoying a sizable pump in the polls ahead of next month's presidential election..

Hong Kong China Sarah Mark Beijing Shanghai defense ministry ashleigh Barty Isabel Hilton Marcus Office for national statistics Putin Monaco Gary lam Hurricane Katrina Carlo Taiwan Isabel New Orleans New York City
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:28 min | 7 months ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"But the fact that the ICC has opened and is looking into possible war crimes, the flow of information into Russia at the moment is rather broken. The Russian authorities are trying to clamp down on social media as much as they can. But the more that these get into Russia that actually thinking Russian people say, we've been accused of war crimes now. The UN has voted against us. The more that the western message gets through to them, look, what you're doing is criminal quite frankly. It's not going to foment a revolt on the streets of Moscow or in Russia, but it is a drip drip effect. And who knows what eventually might come out of that? Well, let's reflect on another aspect, but there's perhaps not dissimilar in its own way. Russian and Belarusian athletes have been banned from the winter paralympics in Beijing. The international Paralympic committee were initially heavily criticized for saying it would allow athletes to compete as neutrals under the Olympic Committee flag. Let's bring in China dialogs Isabel Hilton for more on this regular listeners will know Isabel's been keeping a very close eye on the winter games for Monaco 24. Good afternoon to you, Isabel. This is the right decision that's potentially been arrived at in the wrong way and with the wrong timing, right? Well, yes, it's hard to disagree with that. And I think that I think the decision may well have been delayed by Chinese hostility. The Chinese press are making much of the opening ceremony of the paralympics, which is coming up tomorrow, but they haven't actually mentioned that the Russian and Belarus athletes will no longer be competing. So I think China's not particularly pleased about this. I think they would rather go on spreading the platitudes about peace and love, which are very, again, very high in the official propaganda. Well, yeah, and just to that point, Stevens talked about the relative unanimity on the world stage, pronouncements from the UN and others. Obviously, China remains an outlier. Can you give us a sense as well? I don't know how to put this others in fairly crudely. How bothered Beijing remains about this invasion. One certainly gets a sense that they would not have felt the paralympics was an event that should have been viewed in an explicitly political context. Well, no, again, much, much made of keeping politics out of sport, but there are increasingly credible questions around how much China knew and whether Xi Jinping in that notorious meeting now between Xi Jinping and Putin in which they issued their 5000 word declaration of eternal friendship. How much did Xi Jinping know at that point, did he say to Putin don't do it while the Olympics are on? Because remember, this was launched what two days after the Olympics ended. Russia was able to move its troops away from the Chinese border and send them down to use them in this invasion. So certainly a high degree of trust, the question is how big a degree of complicity has taken place and therefore how much credibility one should give to China's professions at peace. Well, I appreciate you asking you to speculate that fairly fairly extensively here as well. But what's your hunch on that? I mean, is it expedient in some respects for Beijing to strike a level of active complicity? Or is it kind of expedient to say very little and sort of look the other way? Do you have any sense of what that agreement or discussion or reading the room nuance might have looked like? It is quite difficult. But it's very look if China didn't know that this invasion was imminent and what it was going to be like then China was deceived by Putin, which is a massive loss of face for Xi Jinping. If they did know and failed to use their influence to stop it, then they're complicit. And after all, the United States, as we now know, has been sharing intelligence with China and asking China to put pressure on Russia not to do this for months. China publicly mocked that intelligence, said the invasion wasn't going to happen. And interestingly, it made no provision for the evacuation of 6000 Chinese citizens from the Ukraine at all, unlike the 30,000 citizens that they promptly evacuated from Libya over the course of 12 days in 2011. So there are very, very mixed signals here. But China and Russia share a worldview, which is at the west is in decline and it is the moment for authentic democracies as they would put it. China and Russia to take the lead in the world. It may be that China is quietly benefiting from the from testing out the western resolve in the face of something quite as blatant as damaging as this. But in the end, it doesn't do China's image very much good and China has enormous economic interests in Ukraine. They are currently building or were until interrupted by war. Cubes underground line. It's metro line. They're rebuilt Black Sea ports. This is not a trivial relationship with Ukraine. So China is trying to have it both ways, trying to say our hands are clean. We will play the honest broker. Oh, and by the way, this conflict is the west's fault. The expansion of NATO triggered these tensions and we must respect the security interests of all sides. Well, clearly they're not respecting the security interests of the Ukraine because they have yet to condemn this action. So frankly, not something. This is not a position that is enhancing China's credibility in the world. Israel always great to hear from you. Thanks for that. That was China dialogs. Isabel Hilton. Steven Dell, who's still with me. What do you make of that? That dynamic is, of course, really, really fascinating. But I guess we take a step back, is sport is an event like this. You've already talked about the importance of symbolic gestures, even if they are only that. Is it the right forum to try and register dissent or criticism to involve athletes, you know? We said some of these people are apolitical or maybe an anti Putin almost, is it right to put them into the crucible of the global dynamics on this? There are two very different arguments in favor and against. Because by doing this, some Russians will say, well, look, that's just shows how the west hates us and therefore we need to think again about Russia. But there are other Russians who say, ha. Well, that's we don't care. We don't need the west, which is very much the Putin line. You don't like us. We don't care. And so I think it's inevitable to be honest. I mean, the only thing either the worst thing I think about it is the way that the IOC has handled this just as the way that UEFA and FIFA earlier in the week said, well, Russian football teams can play, but they weren't call them Russia and then the next day had to say, actually, we're kicking them out of the World Cup. And the women's Euros, this summer. They have shown weakness all along. I think one of the biggest examples just how weak and possibly corrupt. The football bodies have been, was that they've reached this decision after looking stupid for 24 hours. Reasonably quickly. But why was Russia allowed to host the 2018 World Cup, the attack on Ukraine came in 2014? That was the time when FIFA could have stepped down and said, actually, we're not what if Ukraine is qualified? Are they going to expect to go and play in Russia when there's a war going on in their country already? That was the time when that was one of the weaknesses that might have led to certainly paid into this. And it sounds may sound ridiculous. Oh, if Russia didn't have the world, I'm not saying Russian had the World Cup. There wouldn't have been an invasion of Ukraine now, but it would have had Russia thinking differently. The west was so weak in its response after 2014..

China Russia Xi Jinping Isabel Hilton Putin ICC winter paralympics paralympics Olympic Committee Beijing Isabel Ukraine UN Olympics Monaco Moscow Stevens Steven Dell Libya Black Sea
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:32 min | 9 months ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"We can help you contact us at UBS dot com. Now, the Winter Olympics will begin in earnest in Beijing in two weeks time, but only competitors and Chinese state officials will be allowed to attend the showpiece because of China's strict COVID rules. Monica's Olympics correspondent Kieran pender has been keeping a close eye on developments and sent us this update from Melbourne. A few months ago, with almost no domestic cases of COVID-19, Chinese authorities were hoping for a triumphant 2022 Winter Olympics. With strict bio security requirements for athletes and officials creating a seal Olympic bubble, the games were set to go ahead before packed crowds. Those visuals would have underscored the success of China's enduring zero COVID approach to the pandemic and notable contrast to the empty stadiums that define the summer games last year hosted by regional rivals Japan. No longer with rising domestic case numbers and an outbreak in the host city Beijing to get sales have been scrapped, not only a select few will be permitted to attend. Political issues also threaten to overshadow the games, the United States and Australia are among the nation's diplomatically boycotting the Olympics in protest over human rights violations, athletes have been told to bring burner phones to minimize the risk of state surveillance. Beijing 2022 will be an Olympics like no other. That was monocles Olympics correspondent Kieran penned a little sidebar here incidentally it's his birthday birthday Kieran. Now we're going to unpack this further with our regular monocle 24 contributor and founder of China dialog, Isabel Hilton, Isabel good morning to you and thanks for joining us once again. Kieran mentioned athletes having been advised to bring burner phones. Tell us more. Well, yes, this was after it was discovered that the app which athletes have been instructed that they must put on their phones by the Chinese authorities have some security risks. And so athletes were advised by international groups not by the Chinese not to bring their personal phones in case they in case they exposed themselves to Chinese monitoring in rather longer term ways than were planned. It's part of the general suspicion, I think, over the very, very heavy digital monitoring that China has put in place for these games. Allegedly or a sensibly, I should say, for COVID reasons. Now there's all sorts of worries about the right to protest Beijing has raised it, but also Human Rights Watch has said that if athletes want to do so they should wait until their return. So what's Beijing said and how are athletes likely to react to this? Well, if you remember when a country such as China is awarded the games, it all seems rather a long time ago now. But they have to make certain pledges about freedom of the press about the right of ordinary citizens to protest as well as athletes. Well, there will be no freedom of the press. And at least there will be foreign press, but they will that access to communications, their access to the games and particularly their access to non sporting aspects of China will be extremely tightly controlled and virtually nonexistent in if you look at the conventional behavior around Olympics. This is going to be very different. So that leaves only the athletes with the right to raise a voice or the possibility to raise a voice at all. But China is going to make sure that doesn't happen in so far as it can. And what China can do is to confine again to confine the athletes very closely or even to make it difficult to compete under the pretext of testing or biosecurity. So it's going to be, I think, the tightest Olympics ever. And the promises that China made when it, when it got the Olympics in 2015, I think it was. You know, which are all to do with human rights and civil rights and so on. And the standard suite of promises that Olympics demand if you think what's happened since then in Xinjiang in Hong Kong in the arrests of lawyers in the very, very general and comprehensive tightening of national security as China would put it. None of those promises have been fulfilled. So there is a frustration has built up in the groups that hope to use the Olympics as a means of making a point. It's been very difficult. If you remember also when China had the Summer Olympics, China launched the most ambitious international torch relay ever. And it was a strategic error because it simply attractive protest, mostly about Tibet, in those days. Well, you can imagine a similar torch relay internationally would have attracted terrible protests for the Chinese over Xinjiang, which has also been touted as a winter sports destination by China. So the torch really is strictly limited to China and is only two days programmed for two days. So the China is absolutely limiting the exposure of the Olympics to any form of protest. So this whole thing, the Winter Olympics is a giant exercise in soft power. Is it ultimately worth it for China? Might this backfire and what reputational damage could a lukewarm showpiece due to China's standing? Well, it depends who the audience is. I mean, certainly, I think internationally, well, winter sports have a certain glamour. The world's best athletes will be participating. So we're half the world's population will be watching the Olympics. How much of that resounds to China's credit is really the issue? But certainly for the internal audience which of course is China's big concern. It can be presented as a hugely glamorous show, the diplomatic boycott will not be mentioned. And if China could even win a few medals, that'll be even better. So for the primary audience, which is at home, then I think China can manage the manage the image. And actually, internationally, we've got in these Olympics, we have the usual tug between the size of the Chinese market, which is immensely alluring to foreign companies, including winter sports companies. And the general perception of China. I think no minds will be changed over this. And there has been enough trouble what with the punctual fair, what with the very, very public distress over Hong Kong and over Xinjiang, I don't think anyone who has followed that will change their minds. But it will go down in the rather insulated sections of sports fans who pay no attention to politics. It will have its usual effect. Domestically, China has a very little history of winter sports, but in the Chinese way, has expanded it fantastically since the Olympics were awarded. And China has now built 800 it's aiming to build 803 ski reports. And as ski resorts and has already built oh gosh, I think it was it's already built several hundred since the games have been awarded and is pushing Xinjiang as a major center of ski vacations. And you can see western companies following China into Xinjiang because this is simply the world's biggest market for ski equipment for snowboarding and for the whole business, the paraphernalia around winter sports. It's about thank you very much, indeed. That was the founder of China dialog Isabel Hilton. Now, here's what else we're keeping an eye on today. The U.S. president Joe Biden has said he thinks his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin will move in on Ukraine, but that he does not want a full blown war. Mister Biden, who was speaking at a news.

China Olympics Beijing Kieran Winter Olympics Kieran pender COVID Isabel Hilton Xinjiang UBS Monica Isabel Melbourne Human Rights Watch Japan Australia U.S. Hong Kong Summer Olympics Tibet
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:27 min | 9 months ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Since Lithuania allowed Taiwan to open a diplomatic office in Vilnius under its own name last November, rather than the Beijing approved Chinese Taipei, the Baltic nation, a member of the European Union and NATO and a close U.S. ally, has come under trade and other restrictions by China, but there is a plan to counter this. Isabel Hilton is the founder of China dialog and joins me on the line now. Isabel good morning to you, what is the Lithuania fund? Good morning. The Lithuania fund is a fund that Taiwan is setting up in order to compensate Lithuania for any economic loss that it might suffer as a result of the dispute with China. And this is Taiwan's effort to demonstrate the advantages of dealing with Taiwan. It proposes to be an investment fund into the Lithuanian economy proposes to have closer economic relations. And of course, Taiwan is a very advanced manufacturing economy, particularly of advanced computed chips that which Lithuania certainly interested in. So it's a positive move as far as Lithuania is concerned. And can Taiwan afford it. How will it be financed? Well, Taiwan is it's an investment fund. So Taiwan can't afford it. Taiwan's a successful and wealthy economy. And actually, if you look at Taiwan's global diplomatic record, it has full diplomatic relations with relatively few countries now. They tend to be very small. Caribbean. I think Central America is now defected except for Guatemala. And if you, you know, small African countries. But these are generously rewarded for maintaining their diplomatic ties with Taiwan. And there has been a sort of rather unedifying kind of process of China trying to buy them off and Taiwan upping the ante. So this is a game that's been played out, extensively, of course, Lithuania is a far more sophisticated economy than most of Taiwan's diplomatic partners. But this would be envisaged as a situation of mutual benefit after all. It's investing in an EU country. Now, China denies any sort of formal economic blockade, though it does seem that at least one shipment of rum from Lithuania is being diverted from China to Taiwan. This is actually a lovely story. What can you tell us about this? Yes, it's quite a lot of rum. So the Taiwanese government has been reportedly spreading cocktail recipes among the population because again it's determined to show that The Rain isn't going to suffer. In fact, Lithuania exports were in 2020 at exported about $350 million worth of goods to China. And it has a very negative trade balance. It imported about four times that value from China. So the fact is that Lithuania isn't going to suffer that much. But goods that were in transit, including large consignments of rum, were being threatened with blockade, not officially because China doesn't actually admit to interfering with trade which would of course be against WTO rules. But we're now seeing reports from other EU countries, particularly Germany, France, and Sweden, that components made in Lithuania, which are in their supply chains, are being blocked in China. And that is causing quite severe anxiety at EU level. Because this is really fairly unprecedented bullying on China's part, and the EU is now headed by France with a rotating presidency. So we're likely to see some effort at least at it at an EU level response, which the previous presidency Germany wasn't too keen on. And what about the United States? Are they involved in this? United States are definitely involved. In fact, the ruder versions of this dispute in Chinese state media refer to Lithuania as a mouse or even just a flea under the feet of fighting elephant. Now the fighting elephants, of course, are the U.S. and China. And the tone in Chinese media towards this dispute has pretty much been that Lithuania is a pathetic little country which is under the thumb of the United States and it has brought this upon itself. So the United States has given Lithuania, the accolade of being a fully democratic supportive country, China is rather sneering that this doesn't come with any finance attached, although it remains to be seen, I think the United States would certainly step up any assistance should Lithuania ask for it. And you know, Lithuania is important in the sense that the Baltics are important in terms of relations with Russia, which are as we know poor intents. It's a stalwart member of NATO, as you mentioned in the beginning. And in the EU, so it's not China stick to target that has quite strong connections and this I think this has now become a major geopolitical episode, which illuminates for many China's rather negative aspects of trying to bully small countries into line, or raise the price of its disapproval so high that bigger countries are going to have to take an interest. I mean, could the Lithuania fund model be adopted by other small economies who'd like to recognize Taiwan, but they're hesitant because of that trading relationship with China. Well, it's gone the other way lately. Because China can outbid. But certainly, where anyone to move in the other direction, Taiwan would be expected to step up. And to show the positive benefits of economic relationship. Because after all, what China does it enormous card is it's enormous market. And that is one reason why Germany has is relatively passive in terms of these disputes. But, you know, you can not play that card. And I think that there is sense that China has overstepped in the last two years. And there is, for example, the EU is now beginning to talk about an anti coercion legislation which will take some time to bring into completion. But France, in the meantime, as the new presidency is anxious to demonstrate some leadership in the use of, we may well be seeing measures before that. And this may well be the trigger finally that forces governments to find something more effective in the way of retaliation than just going to the World Trade Organization whose dispute resolution mechanism was paralyzed by Donald Trump and hasn't really recovered. Isabel, thank you very much, indeed. That was Isabel Hilton from China dialog. Now, here's what else we're keeping an eye on today. Russian led forces have arrived in Kazakhstan amid a violent crackdown on anti government protests. Officials have reported deaths of police and protesters after days of unrest, sparked by a fuel price hike. The UN U.S. UK and France have called on all sides to refrain from violence. Cambodia's prime minister Hun sen has arrived in Myanmar for talks with the country's military leaders. His visit is the first by a head of government since the army overthrew Aung San Suu Kyi's administration last February. Cambodia has been leading diplomatic efforts to resolve the crisis in Myanmar. And the UK armed forces have sent 200 personnel into NHS hospitals across London to help fill staff shortages. The Ministry of Defense will provide dozens of medics and more than 150 support staff over the next few weeks. Hospitals in London have been hit hard by staff absences. This is the globalist stay tuned..

Lithuania Taiwan China EU Isabel Hilton U.S. Taiwanese government NATO Vilnius Isabel Taipei France Germany Beijing Central America World Trade Organization Guatemala Caribbean Baltics
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:16 min | 9 months ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"A former justice of South Africa's constitutional court, will share his memories of Desmond Tutu. We'll also find out about new plans to teach Britain about the Holocaust and about the country's response to Nazi Germany, plus China dialogs Isabel Hilton explained Beijing's attempts to get Hong Kong's Catholics to tow the Communist Party line, and finally I'll be goring uselessly into my crystal ball to make some doubtless hopeless predictions about what fresh hells might await in the year ahead. That's all coming up right here on the briefing on monocle 24. Welcome to today's edition of the briefing with me Andrew Muller. The state funeral of archbishop Desmond Tutu will take place tomorrow at saint George's cathedral in Cape Town. South Africa has been mourning Tutu's passing since he died last Sunday at the age of 90. Church bells have been ringing across the country at midday every day and Table Mountain has been lit in purple. Will joining me now from Cape Town is someone who knew the late archbishop two two very well justice I'll be sax dedicated much of his life to the anti apartheid struggle after surviving years in exile and an assassination attempt by South African security services sax return to South Africa in 1994 and was appointed to South Africa's constitutional court by president Nelson Mandela. I'll be first of all, do you recall your first meeting with archbishop Tutu? He seems like somebody who would have made a failure immediate impression. I think I think I shared a platform with him in the antibiotic struggle days in London, and he was not very well known clinic, and I was a not very well known PhD student at Sussex university. And I remember, it's very clever, very thoughtful person, impressive, but not necessarily destined for the huge role that he was due to play. And then later on in the exile, I read more and more and more about him. So he became one of those figures that we knew about through the television through the stories through the legends about him. And they were all positive and good. And he occupied a very, very important space. He wasn't in the struggle. He's.

Desmond Tutu South Africa Isabel Hilton Andrew Muller saint George's cathedral Cape Town South African security service Communist Party archbishop Tutu Beijing Britain Tutu Hong Kong Table Mountain Germany China Nelson Mandela Sussex university London
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:27 min | 11 months ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"The conservative opposition, which was badly defeated in a presidential election two years ago, one almost all the key races and the legislative ballot. Thousands of people have taken to the streets of the Thai capital Bangkok to demand reforms to the country's monarchy. The protesters defy the court order to wave placards that read no absolute monarchy and reform is not abolition. The protests are the biggest challenge to the monarchy in decades. And the Spanish navy have been asked to help banana farmers reach their plantations on the island of la Palma. It follows a volcanic eruption which began on the 19th of September, and has now covered more than 1000 hectares of the island surface with lava. For more, head over to monocle dot com for slash minute. Those are today's headlines back to you, Chris. Thank you very much. The U.S. and China relationship has been anything but friendly in the past year even under the leadership of U.S. president Joe Biden. Last week, a joint deal on climate change showed that there were still some issues where these two superpowers could get long. And today sees Joe Biden and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping hold a virtual summit in a bid to iron out a few more of their differences. Beijing and Washington remain at odds on a whole host of issues, including trade, cybersecurity, defense, and Taiwan, so there's plenty for these two to talk about. Let's get the latest though now on this meeting with Isabel Hilton, founder of China dialog is about it's always good to have you on the show. Let's just start with what you feel is, I guess the top issue on your mind for these two leaders today. Well, I think the fact that they are talking is really the top issue. You know, I think it may be a sign, and I hope it is that the U.S. China relationship has actually hit bottom and is coming back up again. And the climate deal that you mentioned was perhaps an early sign of spring. I think expectations should be modest because the structural issues between them will not go away. But this could be a step forward in terms of managing them. So avoiding conflict trying to tone down the rhetoric on each side, which we've seen a bit of actually over the past few months. And to set up some working mechanisms that will really keep the relationship or keep the dialog open so that if something does go wrong, they have they have the means to speak to each other. And I think that's probably as much as we can expect. I don't think either side is going to back down on the fundamental disagreements, and that includes, of course, Xinjiang, Taiwan, Hong Kong, there's escalating military tension, but that can be managed. And there are outstanding issues in trade that could perhaps be tweaked a bit to improve to improve the mood. Well, so it does sound like from what you're saying. There won't be anything substantive, but perhaps that's not the point of this meeting. It is about this relationship and, you know, the rhetoric has been as you alluded to, you know, particularly tough from both sides, the relationship is at a low. What's your sense, I suppose of how Xi Jinping and Joe Biden might get along these relationships between leaders are always so key to unlocking some of the disputes between any country but particularly between superpowers?.

Joe Biden Spanish navy Isabel Hilton U.S. China la Palma Xi Jinping Bangkok Taiwan Beijing Chris Washington Xinjiang Hong Kong
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:54 min | 1 year ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"President Joe Biden has said the U.S. would defend Taiwan if China attacked. In an apparent departure from a long held U.S. foreign policy position. However, The White House later said that his remarks did not represent a change in its policy of strategic ambiguity. Let's hear what mister Biden had to say. You know, you hear people saying, Biden wants to start a new Cold War with China. I don't want a Cold War with China. I just want to make China understand that we are not going to step back. We are not going to change any of our views. We have a commitment. President Joe Biden speaking a little bit earlier. Well, let's unpack this further now with the founder of China dialog Isabel Hilton is about good afternoon. Good afternoon. Welcome back to the briefing. What do you make of the president's comments? We talk about this idea of strategic ambiguity. He's talking about a commitment there. But it is all a little bit gray, isn't it? It has been gray for more than 30 years by design. If Biden means what he says, and the implication is, therefore, the U.S. would come directly to Taiwan's aid in the event of a military attack. Then he has just driven a coach and horses through more than 30 years of U.S. policy, because that rested on two relative unknowns, ambiguities, if you like. One was that the DPP, the Taiwanese political party currently in parent Taiwan would not declare independence, although it is a party that actually is premised on the idea that Taiwan is not a part of China. The second is that the United States is committed under the Taiwan relations act to provide Taiwan with the means of its own defense, but it's not committed, to defending Taiwan. And so the ambiguity has always been would the United States actually take military action to defend Taiwan or not. Now if Biden is tipping those scales in one direction, then that really does change the picture and it does ratchet up tensions. And I think that was why we saw The White House move very quickly to say, no, no, no change in policy without actually saying the president got it wrong. Well, you talk about the law and it isn't trying to U.S. law that they need to give assistance to Taiwan. But there's a big difference as you say to actually getting involved militarily. But with things heating up, that seems to be more and more likely these days. Well, let's hope not. Because I don't think it's in China's interest or the United States is interest to effectively to start World War three. One of the risks of this of this situation and of these rather confused signals is that this ambiguity, if you like designed to deter China from taking a risky course on the assumption that either they should do it soon before, you know, before the United States was ready, or that they could do it because the United States wouldn't move. Now, you know, the whole policy was designed to stop China having an adventure, thinking it could get away with it, thinking that it would be a swift victory and a major propaganda victory at home. And the other risk is that you know it might encourage Taiwan to take a bolder position Vis-à-vis independence. And it is under tremendous pressure from China. So maybe, you know, there are people in Taiwan arguing that, you know, we ought to declare our position because the United States is committed to defend us, and we should do it before China becomes militarily capable of taking Taiwan. So once you once you destabilize, you know, you open up all kinds of risks. The risks are there, but they're managed right now. So changing things is really quite it is a fairly rash thing to do. Is this what you expect from the U.S. and a week where we're seeing China show its nuclear arsenal testing new hypersonic missiles and really showing Taiwan that it's serious about its power. It certainly serious about its power. It's been showing that for some months now. And the hypersonic missile is not so much about Taiwan. That's really about the United States. But what is about Taiwan is, for example, and he ship missiles, you know, the U.S. Navy could be at risk from Chinese anti ship missiles. You can't defend Taiwan without deploying the navy. The aerial incursions into the air defense identification zone puts Taiwan's air force on its metal. And the defense of Taiwan depends very heavily on a functioning air force, so if we have to begin to think that that air force could be taken out, you know, it changes the strategic picture. So we have a situation in which the China has been investing heavily in modernizing its armed forces. In particular, strategic areas like submarine defense like missile like cyber, but the United States as Joe Biden said in that same event in that town hall meeting is still far and away the world's biggest and most powerful military that doesn't mean they always win the wars as we've seen. You know it's not necessarily a military that is that is configured to fight the kinds of military adventures that the United States has been getting into. But on a kind of muscle for muscle basis or a technology for technology basis, even with a disadvantage of operating very far from home. The United States remains an absolutely formidable adversary and China would be it would be a very, very high risk ample for China to make the first move. Now Washington is in the process of confirming a new ambassador to China. What is that job like now when we've got both countries saying very different things and Joe Biden, perhaps speaking out of turn? Well, on the upside, there's certainly a job to do for an ambassador right now between the United States and China. And I guess his main job will be preparing for what has been billed as a summit between Xi Jinping and Joe Biden before the end of the year. This is actually going to be another virtual event. And the two have had phone calls. But I think that, you know, all eyes will be on this meeting. The previous meetings earlier earlier this year of had rather, you know, mixed results. The meetings of the sherpas and the U.S. and Chinese officials, there was a terrible one in Alaska, followed by a rather better one since, and certainly on the climate diplomacy front, you know, things have been ticking along. But, you know, it has been built as an important meeting. Joe Biden talks to Xi Jinping directly. And let's hope that it is an occasion or that the new ambassador to Beijing can help make it an occasion in which things get resolved or at least mechanism safety mechanisms are put in place which could help to avoid direct military clash. Isabel, thank you for this. That is China dialogs Isabel Hilton. Now here is monocle's Emma searle with the day's other news headlines. Thanks, Daniel. Poland has been told to respect EU law at a meeting of member states in Brussels. The block is considering imposing sanctions on Poland over a ruling by a Warsaw court that some parts of EU law are incompatible with the Polish constitution. Poland has in turn accused the EU of blackmail. People in Melbourne celebrating the end of the city's series of lockdowns from today, more than 5 million inhabitants are now able to visit cafes and other households. Melbournians have endured 6 lockdowns and more than 260 days under pandemic induced restrictions. Buckingham Palace says Queen Elizabeth is in good spirits after spending a night in hospital for the first time in years. The 95 year old, who was the world's oldest and longest reigning monarch, canceled a trip to Northern Ireland earlier this week after she was told to rest by her medical team. And one of Scandinavia's most eagerly anticipated cultural attractions opens its doors to the public today, Oslo's edvard munch museum has rebranded as monk and moved to a new building on the Norwegian capital's regenerated waterfront. You can find out more by heading to monocle dot com forward slash minute. Those the day's headlines back to Daniel. Thanks very much, Emma. We had to France now where the country's presidential election is beginning to heat up. The national vote will take place.

Taiwan China United States President Joe Biden Biden Isabel Hilton mister Biden Taiwanese political party White House Joe Biden DPP U.S. Navy Xi Jinping air force Poland Emma searle EU Warsaw court Washington Alaska
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"More than an hour a day. The new restrictions were unveiled by the people's daily. Which is the official newspaper of the chinese communist party. Let's unpack this further now with isabel hilton founder of china dialogue. Welcome to the program. Isabel good you first. Tell us how these new rules were unveiled. What exactly did the people's daily tell well. The people's daily is joining the communist party the in the new war against spiritual pollution and moral decay of of chinese society and they see the potential addiction of young people to Online games as as part of this campaign. So it's not. The first time that that the party has has tried to limit the amount of time that young people devote to online gaming. It was three hours a day. It's now as you say more heavily restricted and it's up to the gaming companies according to these new rules to enforce them so a real identity checks and i i would predict now a war between the internet gaming companies and the young people who have greeted this new restriction on their activities with Loud cries of scorn and protests and. We'll be devoting their considerable talents to try and get round it. I suspect what do you think. Beijing is taking online games so seriously considering that there's no sorts restrictions in other countries. Well the i mean. There are restrictions on. Beijing would argue that censorship of gaming content is not unique to china. And that is certainly true there. Many cases of government censoring content but censoring the activity itself that that does appear to be a a china issue but this is part of a wider a push by xi jinping to re shape chinese society and it's a big cultural and political. Push that. I think we are just at the beginning of if you remember when deng xiaoping got power. Finally in china after mount doom china was economic basket case and deng xiaoping essentially said. It's okay for some people to get rich in some areas to get rich. I because this will help china society to develop. Now we're in an entirely new phase in which overall growth is slowed a middle class and and and and the the less well-off elements of society. Are really struggling. You know they work long hours. They pay too much for housing. They feel their children. Don't have a chance so she eighteen is trying to get around this by talking about socialist values talking about leveling society talking about removing obstacles to to venice really and and kind of moral rejuvenation of chinese society in that has seen attacks on for instance celebrities or accused of not paying taxes. It seen as it. You know the tutoring band was part of it. That was seen as unfair. And there are a whole series of of of moves that we're now anticipating which will be reinforcing. This online gaming the ban restriction on online gaming appeals exactly to those parents who were worried about their children wasting that time that worried about them not advancing in an increasingly difficult economic environment. So it's a populist appeal. it doesn't really have any major Economic impact except on the companies themselves in that doesn't appear to be that big but it has a big moral appeal to very worried population new field. They missed out on the golden years and and life is now getting tougher exacly. It's populist move. I'm wondering if you are reading the messages coming from beijing. I is is beijing suggesting anything else. Those andreessen should be doing rav and playing those online games. Well there's a lot of rather. I think probably unappealing messages about society becoming more masculine and more toughen and you know the kind of the kind of image of a populist nationalism that china is now trying to project and it fits again into larger picture. The young people themselves are complaining that you know you you can. You can have sex at fourteen and you can. You can work at sixteen but you can't play online games at eighteen. That is ridiculous and that these that these restrictions are are are just irritating to a to a generation that has grown up with a much greater sense of personal choice and personal freedom than older generations. Had and i think putting that genie back in the bottle could well prove quite challenging..

china chinese communist party isabel hilton deng xiaoping Beijing Isabel xi jinping beijing andreessen
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"China is to ban much of the profit. Driven tutoring has grown around its fee paying education system. Let's explore this further now with the founder of china dialogue isabel hilton. Thank you for joining us as always vo. Welcome pleasure as always good to have you know. This tutoring system in in china is an incredibly valuable and profitable industry. Isn't it well. it's around one hundred billion dollars a year so yes it's absolutely enormous and it was born out of the very fierce competition from A within china for access to very precious educational resources which are the key to future careers and as the middle class is grew more affluent and had only one child. That's what they've been spending their money on. Tell us why they have been banned. The for profit tutoring companies. This appears to have come right from the top. Xi jinping made some remarks earlier this year which in which he criticized the sector and he called it He called it out of control. He called it chaotic. And i guess a people then anticipated that. Some regulatory tightening would happen Some oversight but actually he's all but destroyed it and you know the data can catastrophic effect on on share prices. Foreign investors have lost a lot of money and it's very doubtful whether the sector can continue since it can't make money therefore can't get investment. This appears to be about ideological control. xi jinping is very keen on ideological control. He has got a strong grip on the former educational sector in china and repeated directives from the ministry of education of done. things like ban Any instruction on individualism values which are not seen to be Consonant with the party's values And indeed has banned the worship of foreign ideology. one brave professor said did that include marxism. But he hasn't really been heard from since but it is about it is about control and and the private sector it this. This crackdown on private. Tutoring comes the wake of a series of crackdowns on private capital which included of course ant financial in to shing and an an increasing move to to drive foreign investment out of sensitive sectors in china nonetheless. With all this band. The pressure will still be on chinese parents to make sure that their little ones achieve the most. We know grow brilliant grades as they possibly can they they do still get these great Bounds of achievement. Once i get extra tuition will these for profit organizations now be replaced by something run by the government. I think that's unlikely. The government already provides education. And what the tutoring. What the optus coaching has been about is getting an edge on your classmates and i'm not sure that the government is going to extend school hours in in any meaningful way to to substitute for this for this. I i can imagine individual. Private tutoring taking the place of these big platforms And and this very well organized commercial sector. And i don't think the middle class parents are going to give up on the ambitions that they have for their single child but there is a growing sense that this particular generation the younger generation in china is a little fed up with this constant pressure and the government has been rather worried about the growth of what's called a lying down movement in which young people say. You know really. We don't want to live like this. It's constant pressure. We work all the time and we really don't make any progress. We're only just keeping our heads above water so part of this. A part of this agenda is about equality to xi jinping has also a promised if you like leveling up agenda for for people who are left behind and private tutoring of course gives an edge to those who can afford it so you could argue that there is a there is a social message here. There's another bit of the government agenda. Which is the desire to raise the birth rate. One of the one of the powerful reasons people don't want to have more children in. China is the expense of education including this kind of extracurricular tutoring to people reluctant to have it particularly if the urban middle class young people. They're reluctant to have more than one child. At despite the encouragement that they have received lately simply because they can't afford it. It's interesting you mentioned this idea of lying down movement how powerful or how big a threat do you think this will be in the future of china when you do have a backlash against the highly pressurized upbringing that many children have the party. Certain sees it as a threat. We i mean the party is you know is holding china together with the message that the party has made china great again that the body is you know has never made a mistake that the party looks up to the people and actually you know the idea that that a rising generation which has had more than any other generation the benefits of the of the prosperity that the party is delivered. The idea that that generation is shrugging shoulders enrolling. It's is here's a real threat. I mean this isn't opposition. In a way that you can charge somebody with subversion of state power. This is just trying to get a teenager out of bed and we all know her. That can be so. I think as a national problem. It's a bit of oppose of the party. How'd you get people enthusiastic. When when they just don't re- doesn't resonate with them isabel hilton. Thank you so much for joining us on monocle. Twenty four novartis is proud to partner the briefing on monocle twenty. Four navarre's is a company that is committed to reimagining medicine. Global health care leader intent on changing.

china Xi jinping isabel hilton ministry of education of done novartis
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Well let's turn now to our panel and let's look first at the relationship between china and the united states who are still figuring out how to talk to each other again following the chest beating and or chest probing the trump years possibly to beijing disappointment while. Us president has been a lot less noisy. Where china is concerned. He has not been a great deal more friendly. Nevertheless high ish level talks between the two superpowers have begun in tianjin. China's vice foreign minister asia fong is hosting deputy. Us secretary of state. Wendy sherman a isabel first of all Vice foreign minister has said that relations between the two superpowers are at a stalemate. Is she right. Certainly not wrong I mean if you look at the list of of things that each is demanding of the other they made no progress whatsoever so the chinese would like for example like the tariffs lifted which quite a lot of people think is a good idea They would like the americans to stop trying to extradite the c c o of of They would like the sanctions against chinese officials over hong kong and xinjiang lifted. None of that is going to happen. Meanwhile the americans would like the two men who are being held essentially hostage for the hallway case to be released and they would like a whole series of concessions that the chinese and not going to grant and both sites are held in a trap of rising nationalism at home so that if the chinese were to back off any of the very assertive moves that they've made over the last two months there would be a. How outrage from nationalist citizens and if the americans were to back off the bye administration was to back off the republicans would shred them in congress. So i don't see it really warming up I think the best they can do is keep talking to each other rather than not

parliament hisham machichi tunis supreme authority army kaya rudy isabel tunisia union workers union Hilton tala china the times confusion andrew michael oscar tennessee Leyla
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"It is one hundred years today since the chinese communist party. The ep came into being. It was created as a result of ironically western influences from the likes of marxist intellectuals so what does today's ccp sand for and how does it influence. Play out in modern day china. Well it's tell us more. I'm joined by the ceo of china dialogue isabel hilton and sophia. Yan telegraphs correspondent in beijing to regular voices on monocle. Twenty four welcome back. Good morning tea both. Good morning isabel. If i could begin with you just explain to us how the communist party came about. Well the the first meeting of the communist party the one. We're celebrating although mao. Actually when he was asked couldn't quite remember the date so this date is slightly arbitrary It it was twelve people Twelve chinese delegates one soviet and one common tern representative who met in the french concession in shanghai for a few days until the shanghai till the french secret police took an interest. They then reconvened on a boat on a nearby lake and that technically was the founding meeting the ideas themselves had been swirling around pretty much since the fall of the qing dynasty which was not the ching dynasty that the the last imperial dynasty china Phalle as a result of quite another revolution which which the communists had nothing to do with But the the swirl of ideas. Since i guess about eighteen sixty in china about how china needed to reform amongst the many threads that were that was Was marxism along with ideas about democracy science. All kinds of different discussions were going on in china and this one Emerge with soviet assistance into the communist party.

china italy toronto north america british columbia canada saskatchewan donald rumsfeld london
Firmly in Control, China's Communist Party Marks Centenary

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Firmly in Control, China's Communist Party Marks Centenary

"It is one hundred years today since the chinese communist party. The ep came into being. It was created as a result of ironically western influences from the likes of marxist intellectuals so what does today's ccp sand for and how does it influence. Play out in modern day china. Well it's tell us more. I'm joined by the ceo of china dialogue isabel hilton and sophia. Yan telegraphs correspondent in beijing to regular voices on monocle. Twenty four welcome back. Good morning tea both. Good morning isabel. If i could begin with you just explain to us how the communist party came about. Well the the first meeting of the communist party the one. We're celebrating although mao. Actually when he was asked couldn't quite remember the date so this date is slightly arbitrary It it was twelve people Twelve chinese delegates one soviet and one common tern representative who met in the french concession in shanghai for a few days until the shanghai till the french secret police took an interest. They then reconvened on a boat on a nearby lake and that technically was the founding meeting the ideas themselves had been swirling around pretty much since the fall of the qing dynasty which was not the ching dynasty that the the last imperial dynasty china Phalle as a result of quite another revolution which which the communists had nothing to do with But the the swirl of ideas. Since i guess about eighteen sixty in china about how china needed to reform amongst the many threads that were that was Was marxism along with ideas about democracy science. All kinds of different discussions were going on in china and this one Emerge with soviet assistance into the communist party.

Chinese Communist Party Isabel Hilton China French Secret Police YAN Shanghai Sophia Isabel Beijing MAO
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Is officially one hundred years since the founding of the chinese communist party and as we shall be learning right now we are bearing down on twenty years since the signing of the treaty of neighbourliness and friendly cooperation between china and russia. That actually what it's called today. President xi jinping of china was due to conduct a celebratory video. Chat with president vladimir putin of russia. Who has been in office long enough to recall putting his autograph on the original document. Lon joined with more on this by hilton. Founder of china dialogue is bill. Let us i look back through the swirling mists of time to july two thousand and one. How big a deal was this treaty when it was signed. Well it was quite a big deal. It was the end. Of a of a fairly protracted period of reconciliation following the very bitter sino soviet split. I mean if we go back. Even further into the midst of time mounted on always resented stalin's view of the chinese communist party is kind of little brothers who needed to listen to too big brother in moscow. You never really liked that. And when stalin was denounced by christoph the beginnings of a real split occurred with the chinese saying some very harsh things about renegades and traitors in moscow betraying communism and so on so the russians who had been all over china do building bridges and roads and and and and generally helping out with the economy all packed up and left leaving for example the nanjing river bridge unfinished and it took awhile after the collapse of the soviet union for relations to warm up so this finally the kind of the second version of the sino russian now not soviet treaty of friendship was kind of beginning of a new era in post mile and post and post communist era in russia. Did it specify specific things or was it. Just your sort of general blandishments and pablum and well if you think about what has happened in the relative weight in the world between china and russia since even since that treaty was signed. You know even then. They were more evenly balanced and russia. Although the economy wasn't so wasn't as impressive as china's was to become a bigger military power and there was some question about selling the most advanced weapons to china so the kriti kind of paves the way it also allows you know sort of quiet corporation to start going on inside the un security council for example vetoing resolutions which both sides regarded this obliging and essentially trolling the united states in very different ways. So you know keeping keeping the united states in its place or putting the united states in its place. There's one item of mutual interest. I would think that the other item of mutual interest is keeping Sort of peace in central asia which they both have an interest in both of them have had scared about seventy had alarms about militant islamism in central asia if you remember and the chechens attacks in moscow and certainly and xinjiang. The chinese would argue that there have been similar problems there if you think now if if when when nato troops and the us withdraw from afghanistan who is next door with the largest second-largest coporate concession in the world it's china and china has very little direct experience of stabilising security in afghanistan. So they're quite a few issues on which they can cooperate although they're not entirely aligned on methodology on the thought of them. Trolling the united states for different reasons and in different ways do they see their stories with the us as overlapping. Oh device regard the us as an adversary for entirely separate reasons. I think the slightly separate reasons. Though in both cases it's about power. Russia wants to recapture the dignity and the sense of being a great global power. But it tends to do it by by aggression as we know in ukraine. Or or or any. I sorta mischief-making that china has not so far indulged in for china and the united states is much more of a few cities trap argument where china argues and he dog is very strong if it internal purposes that the only thing really stopping china being great and dominating the world is that the united states wants to keep it down now. There is a slightly different focuses and china very much needs globalization to continue to prop up economy. So it doesn't really. It needs to limit the the expressions of hostility with the united states whereas for russia i think the more expressions of hostility the better. It is putin other any i mean. I live disputes territorial other or otherwise between russia and china that they were anxious to keep under some sort of control. Just wondering whether that was any impetus for drawing this treaty up in the first place was there have been tensions which are to do with pressure of population on that northern border. A if you go to cyprus hugo three siberia for example at in any of the inner could score novosibirsk keeps you go to the market. You will find lots of chinese traders. There was a proposition that china by land for agricultural purposes. That was that caused some alarm. So i think there is a historic sense in russia. That danger comes from the east beat mongol hordes or or china. There's that sort of cultural antagonism which is very hard to actually to identify but also to eradicate so. I think it'll never be an entirely. It'll never be the kind of embraced that that is without reservations But there isn't a present. A particularly live dispute. There was in the past. They came to blows over the over. The serie river for example in the contra revolution when the chinese and russian border guards engaged in other kind of low level and slightly comic operas standoffs. But that in. I think there's no great Border dispute of of tremendous importance of enough importance to to become contentious moment. Isabel hilton china dialogue. Thank you as always for joining us. You're listening to the briefing on monocle. Twenty four is is is proud to partner the briefing on monocle. Twenty four navarre is a company that is committed to reimagining medicine. Global health care leader intent on changing the practice of medicine. Novartis's being exploring uncharted frontiers and science..

Isabel hilton twenty years hilton ukraine central asia cyprus one hundred years Twenty four navarre Lon vladimir putin Russia today both sides afghanistan both china nanjing river bridge both cases russia president
Could We See a New Cold War With China

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Could We See a New Cold War With China

"It is perhaps difficult to altogether. Suppress an amount of derisive mirth. When the people's republic of china inveighs against the unfairness of a world subject to the whims of omnipotent higgins president xi jinping earlier made a series of statements to this effect also making some pointed remarks about the united states using its mighty commercial power to advance its political interests as such treachery obviously has never even occurred to beijing. G speech wasn't obvious enough. Challenge to the newish administration of president joe biden but what are biden's options for response joined with more on this by isabel hilton. Ceo of china dialogue is a bill. How reassured should we be at this point. The china does not it turns out which to become any kind of global amman. Heavens did really terrible source. china Which is to mark the end of the us reign as the global head. Jamin but isn't quite ready to step up so if you look at cheese speech what he what he made fairly clear was that because of geography china was an important regional power and that was a bit of a shot across the bows of japan and perhaps the philippines who've been making unfriendly noises and japan and the united states said had already just this week Agreed that they would work to counter some of china's behavior in the region but the idea that china is ready to take on the kind of global leadership in the way. The united states is exercised. It is is a little premature. I think so it. This is an exercise in containment. Cise in trying to discredit us. Leadership and to discredit the sort of values norms of a global order which china repeatedly claims were set up by just a few powers and china wasn't one of them at the time

China Higgins President Xi Jinping Isabel Hilton United States Joe Biden Biden Jamin Beijing Amman Japan Philippines Cise
China Sends 25 Warplanes Into Taiwan's Air Defense Zone, Taipei Says

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:40 min | 1 year ago

China Sends 25 Warplanes Into Taiwan's Air Defense Zone, Taipei Says

"Is very far from unheard of for chinese military aircraft to buzzed the skies around the time on yesterday. However the people's liberation army air force stepped such provocations up a notch. Twenty-five chinese jets a record number into taiwan's air defense identification zone. This hefty squadron included eighteen of china's chengdu j ten fighters and four nuclear capable h six k bombers taiwan's air force scrambled their own planes to shoot the intruders off. But it seems reasonable to suppose that they will be back on. Joined with more on this by isabel hilton. Ceo at china dialogue isabelle twenty. Five aircraft is a fairly significant gesture by china. But this kind of stunt in itself isn't unusual is. How often do they do this. Well particularly this year. They'd been doing it a quite lot. They've been doing it. You know several times a week in recent times and its its military chest beating over fairly unpleasant kind I don't think it means that an invasion is imminent but it certainly it. It has a lot of advantages from the chinese perspective. It keeps the population on edge. It forces the china. The taiwanese air force to respond in some way they got so tired of scrambling a late last year that they decided that they would just monitor from the ground but again you know if you step the pressure up again then then scrambling has to happen. So it it. It's a long campaign of attrition and it's also testing the biden administration so there's a lot of probing testing and chest-beating beating happening at the moment.

People's Liberation Army China Taiwan Isabel Hilton Chengdu Air Force Biden Administration
China Is Only Major Economy to Report 2020 Growth

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:34 min | 1 year ago

China Is Only Major Economy to Report 2020 Growth

"For reasons requiring no reiteration at has been a lousy year for the global economy one country however is claiming results which are not merely not dreadful but an improvement on last year ironically and arguably even unfairly it is china from whence the covid nineteen pandemic originated. China claims that its economy grew by a solid two point three percent overall in two thousand and twenty early backsliding counteracted by positively robust. Six point five percent in the last quarter and a thriving seven point three percent in manufacturing one joined with more on this isabel hilton. Ceo of china dialogue is about first of all the perennial question where the communist party's economic. Figures are concerned. Harold seriously are we able to take them salt you know. There have been many scandals in china's economic reporting because if you set targets and you make people's careers dependent on meeting them. They will meet them. They will find ways of meeting them in a way. This announcement is is just a larger version of this. What we're actually looking at is not economic growth but gdp growth. And that's not really the same thing shouldn't necessarily confuse. Gdp with economy lots of things make for gdp growth including earthquakes but then not signs of healthy economy to it is worth drilling down a little into what china was hoping to do with its economy and seeing where this has come from

Isabel Hilton China Harold Earthquakes
Trump's intelligence chief warns China is the greatest threat to US since WWII

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:25 min | 1 year ago

Trump's intelligence chief warns China is the greatest threat to US since WWII

"Outgoing us administration of president. Donald trump has thus far extended few of the traditional courtesies to the incoming administration of president elect joe biden. There has been no two of the white house no sporting photo op in the rose. Garden and little of the handover briefings from one group of officials to the next however director of national intelligence. John ratcliffe whether trying to help or hinder has passed along. His top worth to the next president in a wall street journal op-ed he has warned. President elect biden that china poses the greatest threat to america today and to worldwide democracy since world war two on joined with more on this point. Isabel hilton ceo at china dialogue. Isabel is the director of national intelligence entirely wrong here. We never entirely wrong but they do manage to you. Make a really terrible case turn radcliffe. I would remind you is director of national intelligence by skin of his teeth. When he was first nominated there was such a sort of howl of protest is lack of qualifications and the fact that he had falsified his own resume that that that trump at one point had to withdraw nomination before trying again. So you know as a kind of bond with the distinguished record nuanced analysis. I would you know maybe take it with a pinch of salt. That said clearly that the you know that china is a major challenge to democratic values of the united states. is meant to defend this. After a couple of problems with this framing one. It is clearly designed to To constrain at the incoming administration that is trying to take very different approach to foreign policy and the outgoing administration is trying to narrow the ground so saying that china is the greatest threat to freedom. Well you know okay It is true that china has indulged in ip theft. Absolutely true surprise just as the united states by the way did against the uk in the twentieth century. is it that may be ongoing espionage. Certainly and china certainly has nationalist ambitions. It certainly trying to bend the global rules to serve its own interest that is what big powers do including the united states. So the problem is is not the diagnosis. If you like. It's the reverend is that the trump administration has offered over the last four years which have simply made it easier for china to advance. Its case so the i think dangers here. One is the exaggeration of china's powers. And that's something we saw with the soviet union towards the end of the cold war. That if you have security agencies whose prosperity depends on building a threat they will big up a threat and so right to the moment when the soviet union collapsed we were hearing from. Us intelligence and security agencies that the world was about to be overwhelmed by soviet communism. And there's a bit of the same syndrome going on here but the second problem is the complete ineptitude of the trump administration encountering the chinese efforts to do that you have to build alliances not destroy them. And you have to make sure that your own offer has credibility. Most people prefer living a well-functioning democracy with personal freedoms trump has not been the best advert for that. At least for the trump's the united states is not the finest moment for democracy. And so you know yes. Of course there is a challenge here to challenge values challenge a political system but the way to country is with the integrity of our own political systems including that of the united states red cliff talks of china operating an influence campaign inside the united states. And on the one hand. That's a somewhat fatuous statement because everybody operates influence campaign inside the united states and indeed in pretty much every other country but is there anything especially sinister or dangerous about what china is doing. Ratcliffe also talks of them targeting members of congress. Well again no surprise. China has has done this an onion eternal lays it all out if you look at anything to do with the united front work department. Which is that bit of the party which has always existed which is intended to manage relations with non party elements. It used to be largely working within china building relationships or or not with religious authorities or with business. People are not in the communist party. Now that china's going global so has the united front work department and it has teamed up with a with the entity in the party that used to manage overseas chinese affairs so and it has put an enormous amount of money into this since the beijing olympics which was regarded as a pr disaster for china in so many ways Would've been the results. Well according to the pew survey in the last month china's reputation has never been lower so yes. China is putting great efforts into influence building and so far. They've been a terrible flop now. There is an element of this which is elite capture. Which again was going pretty. Well i think certainly in the uk for example in an example of elite capture would be the approach of the cameron government to china which you know proclamations of the golden decade. And so on. That's her you know very much again. If you look at elite attitude to china largely because of china's overreach there has been a big backlash everywhere from australia to the united states to europe. You hear the same message. so yes. they're making an effort but is it working. No it's not just one final thought and it's it's a concern that ratcliff doesn't raise for obvious reasons but is there any kind of danger of between now and january twentieth china just thinking there's nobody watching the shop if we're ever going to try and pull something big when never gonna get another chance like this. Well of course the big worry. I mean you might say. Hong kong was that the big warriors taiwan. And there's been a lot of jostling as you know in taiwan. I guess another option is the is the india china border again. We've seen quite a lot of live action there this year. My personal views. That taiwan is a step too far think china has a really a realistic understanding of what it would take not only to take taiwan but then to make that occupation work. And this you know. There are plenty of warnings about how difficult that is. And is this the moment to risk so much in pursuit of that. Of course the regime wants to recapture taiwa are how reunite or however they care to phrase it. But i think we've pretty much got twenty forty nine before that becomes acute in their many other Things that many other things that can be done to make taiwan life difficult short of a military assault isabel hilton front. You

China United States Trump Administration John Ratcliffe Isabel Hilton China Dialogue Soviet Union Donald Trump Joe Biden Radcliffe Biden Isabel Wall Street Journal United Front Work Department White House ED UK Ratcliffe Cameron Government
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Nando Augusto. Pecos fantabulous. Gary, shirts in musical form I'll be talking through the pop charts of. Algeria. In this week's global countdown, that's all coming up right here on the briefing on monocle twenty four. And Welcome to today's edition of the briefing with me Andrew Muller today October. I is National Day of the People's Republic of China Happy National Day, the People's Republic of China. The world's fastest nation has had quite a year of it albeit the kind that might cause much of the rest of the planet to be somewhat restrained in its congratulations what we've inadvertently exporting A. Global pandemic and pulling the plug on such democracy as still existed in Hong Kong Hong Kong has played host today to parades and other observances of national. Day with Hong Kong to the mall, not prompting not for the first time consideration of what China might see Hong Kong as a trial run for one joined for more on this by Isabel Hilton editor of China Dialogue. Isabelle, the celebrations in Hong Kong today will probably have been seen somewhat differently to these celebrations on National Day last year how big a thing does China appear to have made of them. When I think China seeks to demonstrate that the people of Hong Kong. Are United Behind the national. Security Law and unequivocal in their celebration it But I think also realistically, they know that this is unlikely to be quite as wholehearted as they wish I mean China can always count on you know the the people on the payroll with the I on the second chance to turn out and wave flags most people in Hong, Kong, though I think are celebrating. China is, of course, undertaking its first National Day celebrations since the beginning of the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic does it strike you that China is now behaving like it's a nation which has beaten at Concord Got Pasta or is there just an awful lot going on they're not telling anybody and I think they're pretty much behaving as the nation that has got past it and from what we can see of life and business and commerce and all those. Things in China have they're pretty much resuming the quarantine for to China remains in place. So if you want to visit China, it's two weeks on arrival and a further week audio of your own self limitation. So you know it's certainly the international traffic remains low but insight China The the signs are that that it's pretty much they feel and they have defeated it well, guess what we're looking at this national day though on top of the covid nineteen pandemic and the crackdown on democracy in Hong Kong where China thinks it's going with all this and how it sees its place in the world. Now, do we have a clear view yet? Of President, Xi Jinping's ideas about that in particular I think that you know it's it's been a pretty mixed year. If you were taking the a party, the optimistic party view, you would say that China has demonstrated the world how to beat the virus in sharp contrast to the bumbling democracies who was still struggling the United States being the prime example. But there are others perhaps closer to home that China could point to. which demonstrates to the party satisfaction and the satisfaction of a number of people in China quite a substantial number, the superiority of the Chinese system and I think that this has been a key message that China has been trying to sort of shout above the noise that say what you like about China. Democracies are in terrible shape and if you want results in if you want things to be delivered count on the Chinese system. In terms of how this message can be tempered and refined, I would look to Xi Jinping's appearances at the UN General Assembly last week where. He came up with climate pledge, which certainly got good reviews around the world. And and also a number of offers of aid and support to emerging economies so that on top of. China's conquest of the virus. Again, just taking the party line you have China presenting itself was a benign and concerned actor in the world in contrast to the United States, which again is breaking its international commitments sits you know pulling back from aid it's it's abandoning and confused about its in the world whereas China as it were is your steady friend. So that's kind of where the party is at in terms of image projection. Towards the end of of a rather complicated year. In does China think of its rivals on the world stage exclusively as the United States though were or does it also have similar feelings towards CH-? Russia in India would say the most obvious ones. Well India is that name regarded as as a reliable but I think that most Chinese people and certainly the government would regard China as a much more clear example of success than India is an again India is absolutely racked by the grown of. Right now Indian grows Indian prosperity even just provision of basic services like education and health. It's pretty easy for China to to point to India as an example of the failings of democracy whereas China as I said, delivers results, there's obviously strategic rivalry going on on the border there's a lot of tension a lot of incidents this year on the border. Bush. Have kind of sealed India as a rival which is likely to join China's enemies. Notably, the United States in any repositioning in Asia that is going on. US for Russia a again, you need to look I suppose at the overlap of interests between China and Russia, which is not by any means a complete over loud uncertain strategic issues they do. Find. Common. Ground and they find common ground in I guess challenging the Western assumption that there is one good model of governance which will eventually take over the world. I. Mean. That has been the western view pretty much since nineteen eighty nine. It's not looking great right now it's not looking great partly because it's been successfully challenged by Russia in a number of theaters but also because it's being challenged by China in a different way so not. Joining military conflict not in that shop strategic way that Russia's been undermining Western interests. But in the rather more subtle Chinese, way of becoming a very important economic player for the majority of countries in the UN General Assembly by presenting itself as a non noncoercive friend by presenting itself as a system that an emerging economy would do well to. Emulate if it wanted the success that China has had, and that goes with authoritarianism, it goes with support for Thawra. -Tarian governments and it just hollows out the idea that the endgame of any developing country is to become a stable democracy John Really Challenging Matt Isabel Hilton thanks as always for joining us you're listening to the briefing here is yelling gopher with. Guns. Thanks. Russia has offered to mediate in a bid to conflict in nagorno-karabakh. The has been heavy fighting between Azerbaijan and Armenia in recent days as they wrestle control of the mountainous region. A row has erupted over down in Madrid following a rise in the number of Gerona fire escapes as their lawmakers in the Spanish capital did not vote in favor of the restrictions and questioned their legality..

China Hong Kong People's Republic of China Hong Kong Hong Kong Russia China Dialogue United States UN General Assembly India Xi Jinping Isabel Hilton Nando Augusto Hong Andrew Muller Algeria Gary Kong Madrid
Friday 18 September

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:49 min | 2 years ago

Friday 18 September

"Now, as we just heard, China's navy is acting live fire drills near the Taiwan Strait. There's little doubt about the intended audience because in the slender credit, where'd you file of us? President Donald Trump remains his phone call shortly after his election to President Chang of Taiwan the first time the US president or indeed president-elect had spoken to the Taiwanese counterpart since nine hundred, seventy, nine, president trump clearly understands that there is no more reliable way of winding. Up China then embracing Taiwan, which may be why he has now dispatched the highest ranking American envoy in decades kaethe crutch on the secretary of State for Economic Growth Energy and the environment, a rank which seems calibrated to annoy China even more by making any overt rage on their part appears somewhat silly one joined with more on this by Isabel Hilton CEO of China. Dialogue is a bill first of all the the visit of chief crash and I've allowed time for everybody to furiously Google is just trolling on America's part. And Up to a point you you left often you know one elements in the winding up of list, which is that he's there to attend the memorial service for former president of Taiwan, Li dung-wei who has counted as the most hated Taiwanese in Beijing because leading Guay was the man who really lead Taiwan to democracy and was also an advocate of Taiwan as kind of independent cultural and political entity from China. So he's really not very you know he's definitely not on the Christmas, Card List for sheeting pin and to pay tribute to him is pretty certainly would be read in Beijing as a as a a further effort crime. So what degree of C- Will Beijing be at over this visit? Well I think we're seeing it now. I mean a great deal of of rather dangerous firepower is buzzing around at the moment An. We've seen really since June kind of escalating provocation from China, in sort of entering various kind of buffer zones which are pretty much being respected for decades you know around Taiwan that you can you can threatened and rattler cage but on the whole, it's been recognized that if you if you cross certain. Lines then you are risking at least an accident so. I mean the the the problem was that you know. In. The last well, just today actually eighteen Chinese bomas an and find the jets and Taiwan's advance buffer zone and that caused the cost Taiwan to scramble its jet. You had a lot of very you know serious. Flying around and I think that. Is and that along with the naval exercises and and a great deal of rhetoric is probably as far as it will go. But you know we have seen a prolonged campaign for the last three or four years of diplomatic isolation of kind of steady pressure on Taiwan from China, and certainly this doesn't help. You correctly observed that the US envoy is there to attend the memorial service for a former Taiwanese president. He will also be meeting with the current Taiwanese president is likely that anything of actual substance is being discussed between the president of one country and the Under Secretary of state for you know whatever from the other one or is this again? Largely. Theatrical. I wouldn't count on it being largely theatrical If you know we, we've wh as you know, we have a kind of dealing confrontation between the US and China and some alarming voices in Washington. Are, advocating, for example, the United States should supply nuclear weapons to Taiwan, which would be pretty crazy move in my view. But. There is a commitment from the United States to supply to Taiwan such a defensive Capability as is required now, it would be quite easy to argue that in a situation of enhanced tension greater a military supplies, more more military supplies. Packs more advanced military supplies were required and I would expect that to be part of the conversation I would also expect at least saying went to be exploring the idea of more formal cooperation between Taiwan and the United States last US official. To visit, which was relatively recently that produced an agreement on of collaboration on health I think timing when would very much like to see a free trade agreement with the United States. So again, I think this quite a lot to discuss an I would be surprised if this visit took place without some of them being on the table is anything really likely to shift in the near future though in any direction where this is concerned is everybody involved not basically biting their tongues and one hopes. Metaphorically as well as literally holding their fire until election day in the United States and certainly hope so you know the the US position on Taiwan, which is a it's a treaty obligation to to make sure that Taiwan can defend itself. This doesn't actually commit the United States to coming to the defense of Taiwan, but there is a kind of strategic ambiguity in in this treaty, which is designed to stop Taiwan declaring independence and therefore provoking China to stop China assuming that were it to. Stage a military salt. The. United. States would stand by and and not come to the defense of Taiwan. So the ambiguity in the US position is designed to keep both sides. Calm. Under a trump administration of calm is not a highly valued factor in Washington's calculations but I think. That the hope would be in Washington that enough kind of chest bearing and beating. We'll just keep everybody from doing anything too rash said, he don't think that China would relish an armed conflict, but on the other hand if the United States and Taiwan scenes to provocative in Beijing, in order to satisfy, it's increasingly nationalist domestic opinion and a PLA that seems fairly rested at the moment they might feel obliged to do something and as soon as you do something in a situation like this, then your provoking something very, very dangerous indeed

Taiwan United States Taiwan Strait President Trump President Donald Trump China Beijing President Chang Washington C- Will Beijing Isabel Hilton Google Secretary State For Economic Growth Ener Jets Under Secretary Of State CEO America President-Elect
At a Crossroads? China-India Nuclear Relations After the Border Clash

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:49 min | 2 years ago

At a Crossroads? China-India Nuclear Relations After the Border Clash

"We start the program tracking one of the most potentially SA- serious spot points globally the ongoing hostilities between the nuclear-armed countries, India and China earlier this week they discharged weapons that each other for the first time in forty five years as a four month standoff between their armed forces escalated into warning shots in the western Himalayas. The skirmishes worryingly reminiscent of the circumstances surrounding the beginning of a war between the two in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two. Yesterday. The foreign ministers of the two countries met in Russia in a bid to defuse the military standoff Jonah Slater New Delhi Bureau chief for The Washington Post and Isabel Hilton China dialogue join me on the line now. Thanks both for for joining us is about what was behind this most recent exchange of shots. That rather depends who you believe I mean one. Of the meeting that has taken place in Moscow, which has been some extent. Calming is that neither side will acknowledge any wrongdoing and indeed continue to blame the other. There is a very in general terms there isn't defined line of actual, control? The seem to be signs that the past three or four months across quite a a a length of it. So not just in one sector, China has been a pushing the actual you know situation on the ground by crossing the line of Control China, accuse his India doing the same thing in this most recent incidents and says that it had to fire shots in the ad to deter what was Indian aggression India has said over the repeated incidents over the past few months that China has advanced and then has not on a promises to retreat. So we now have quite an extended standoff which began in the in the West and sector. But has now extended to the eastern sector to what in your Natural Pradesh which to southern. Tibet. So it's a sustained standoff still during the what more do we know about the outcome of the meeting between the two men yesterday Well we know that they met for two and a half hours a lengthy meeting their first in person meetings since the crisis began Jason Curve India's foreign minister is a is a former ambassador to China. He has deep experience there. But in terms of outcomes, what we basically have is an agreement to continue talking it's not nothing but it's definitely not a breakthrough I mean Isabel do you think there's any real appetite for compromise and given China's current aggressive stance globally will one be trying to dial it down I think that I don't see very much appetite for compromise on either side we all you have is highly nationals governments which both. Set great store on territorial integrity and and then of course, you come to the sensitive point where the territories real defined and then you have a you know constant potential for confrontation. But if you add to that I mean what one thing that is very different from in in this border confrontation with other areas of conflict China like the South China Sea for example, where were you have because it's accessible and and territory marine territory that's used by lots of different kinds of people in people from from different countries, you can enact a conflict at a lower level if you like using fishing boats or or customs boats, and you don't actually have to use your main forces. But this is highly inaccessible territory. The only people who are out there really are our armed forces and they have increased. Both sides have increased the presence of their forces really dramatically in the last few months, and in the last few years, they have increased access to the border by building infrastructure building roads and railway building roads rather So you have the potential to mobilize both heavy weaponry and larger numbers of troops When you have a moment like this, do strategically, I would say that China is trying to discourage India from. Joining in a mall full blooded way any anti-chinese coalition organized by the United States so the has been quite a warm relationship between Modiin trump as we know, and and the question is how far India will take this because that could be a Catholic. And during this meeting, come about because the to happened to be in Moscow anyway or is Russia playing the piece Burqa. Well. Both of them would have been at this meeting, but it does seem that Russia is playing a little bit of a role of convener here as a country that. Ostensibly would like to see tensions reduce. It has constructive relationships with both countries there have been reports in the Indian media suggesting that I'm sorry that Russia was doing some quiet diplomacy behind the scenes earlier in this crisis but I think the these these two men obviously would have been there anyway just comes at a very. Sensitive, sensitive, and important time. It's about what's in it for? Would I guess it's less less difficulty in the neighborhood they do as we've heard have rush the Russians do have constructive relations Russia likes to be seen as a broker these days I mean the whole trajectory of Putin's kind of outward posture has been to assert Russia's important so to be able to mediate between a traditional friend India and. country. Rival with whom relations little complicate it China would greatly enhanced prestige. One of the difficulties is that what we know from the reorganization, for example, the Chinese military which is put sheeting. Very firmly, inconspicuously in command, we need to assume I think that decision is made about deployment of troops and our posture go very much to the top So you know without a signal from the tall, the foreign ministers of my decide couldn't actually resolve this. Yeah. How do you think this fits in with the the general foreign policy aims of India. I don't think expected crisis with China I. think that was not part of its. Foreign Policy Goals as Isabelle was speaking about no, India is. Wary of China's rise, it has been drawing closer to the United States and also to this grouping called the Quad, which includes the United States Japan and Australia this one of the interesting aspects about this crisis with China along the line of actual control is that India says at least that it's at a loss to understand why China is doing this it repeated that again today that. Shot, the tiny side has not provided a credible explanation for this deployment. Jay Shankar, the foreign minister a few days ago said repeated that India's is a little bit flummoxed here, and so if China is sending a message that it doesn't want India to draw closer to the United States, India's not really getting the message quite clearly So I think that's one of the strange parts about this entire episode, which is we don't India claims at least not really understand what China's motivations are for this. Quite significant deployment along the line of actual control which began in April and then Burst into actual skirmishes, skirmishes in May, and then the deadliest violence between the two countries and more than fifty years in June. I mean Isabel attorneys right WH- one can't really see what's in it for China I. Mean as you say, this is an area where there's really not very much. It's inaccessible the only people there are the soldiers. What's the point? I think the point is is partly to shore up she gene pins reputation at home is a vigorous defender of China's global position and Chinese sovereignty, and you might well argue that that sovereignty over a few miles of inaccessible mountain compass matter but they matter symbolically domestically in China. It also might be I mean, we've seen a passion of a very assertive behavior. Put it no more strongly from China pretty much since the coronavirus outbreak and a lot of you know if you look across the piece it what's been going on there had been provocations in around Taiwan with you with Chinese. Military flights crossing into Taiwanese airspace very recently and and we have you know I, think for the first time that I can recall in. Since the sixties we have on this board, we have confrontations in both the important western sector and the equally important eastern sector. Now, that's that's kind of unusual that does signal a much more firm intent to send a message even if it's not a message that India understand. So it may be a message that's being directed to the Chinese public that you know we can do this because we are bigger and stronger than India and we will continue to defend. China's position in the world.

China India Isabel Hilton China South China Sea United States Russia Jason Curve India Moscow Isabel Delhi Bureau Jonah Slater Natural Pradesh The Washington Post Tibet Taiwan
China's Xi vows unceasing fight against Tibet separatism

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:59 min | 2 years ago

China's Xi vows unceasing fight against Tibet separatism

"China's president has called for what's described as an impregnable fortress to stop separatism in Tibet Xi Jinping, speech, set out the country's policy direction intended to protect national unity, maintain stability, and educate the masses. Well, Isabel Hilton is the editor of China dialogue and has written extensively about Beijing's relationship with Tibet. Hello? Isabelle. Doing. Very. Well, thank you. Tell us what is this impregnable fortress. Well this is come out of the Communist Party Central Symposium on Tibet work, which is the you know the high level. It's the meeting that gathers together everyone who has anything to do with Tabet from security to economics to environment, and of course, the polit bureau is in attendance at the last one was five years ago. So it is quite important to understand the direction that things taking and I have to say it's not a particularly encouraging direction the the emphasis on a border security was not extensively publicized in China but I think that that is undoubtedly related to the continuing tensions with India, and we've seen a number of clashes along that border. But the other. Really important aspect of this statement is is really about hearts and minds, which has been a massive failure in terms of of Chinese occupation of Tibet and the the stress on patriotic education on the fact that monasteries must you know put put the party first and so on. All isses familiar but it's becoming more intense in terms of of of you know government propaganda and just simply failed over the years. So how does it intend to impose or bill this impregnable fortress to maintain not just stability but? Engage in those hearts and minds which which they find so important and what I think probably I'm sorry to say more repression it's. There is a relationship between what happens in Tibetan what happens in Xinjiang, which has lately had some more attention and but the body secretary who? Had A kinda panel up to consecutie system in Tibet then moved to Xinjiang to continue his work. So the security approach is very much the same and it is extremely tight security on on an absolute day to day level. So you know police boxes every few hundred yards kind of panopticon effect on on watching society for any kind of behavior that might be considered deviant. So that's one aspect of it and and the other oil done in the name of national security. and. Then the other aspect is the intense education and signification of Tibet. So it's been some years now since two Beden as a medium of instructions in schools was damaged and and you know there's heavy language pressure heavy cultural pressure on on Tibetans who are encouraged not to have a photographs of the delay in their homes but to her photographs of Xi. Jinping, instead to the the, it's really an an example of enhanced integration. Hitherto has been a policy in the People's Republic at least in name over SPEC for national minorities as they would call them. So Cultural Rights, language rights, and the idea that they could be in some sense autonomous and self governing. Now, that was never entirely implemented but at least it was official policy and that is now being abandoned really in favor of kind of. Han Chinese dominance in every aspect including culture and language, and how is that likely to be received in Tibet? Well. The evidence is that the more pressure the culture comes under in a way, the more people attached to it. So you know the most famous case was in nineteen eighty when when the reports from to bed to the center. Essentially said everyone's forgotten by the Dalai. Lama. They loved the Communist Party. It's all going swimmingly and it emboldened the central government to allow or to think about a visit from the delara sue the Dalai Lama sent. A representative. Group to inspect Tibet to see what conditions would like and as soon as rumors of these people's presence spread across to bet you thousands and thousands of people went to pay homage and his push notes into the hands and to weep and to go for the Dalai Lama. So you know the Chinese never been very good at reading. Tibetan sentiment and every time they criticized the Dalai Lama officially it sort of gives comfort to the Tibetans that. The Dalai Lama still matters and he still bad. So it's it's you know it's not a particularly helpful policy and the more that they cracked down on Tibet. The more Tibetan people feel more. They feel the difference and in a moment ago, you mentioned the fact that Tibet is stuck as well in terms of the relationship, the the very techy relationship that's being played out between India at the moment two degrees either side twenty used to bet. Well I think that this. That that's always I. Guess a problem you know the wasn't a border between India and China until the Chinese occupation of Tibet. So so now we have to Asian supervise and this border which is constantly disputed, which is unresolved and across which flow or manner of things including of course, people you know the flow of refugees to India from Tibet. has been a feature of the years the very large settlements of Tibetan refugees in India, which has given them pretty generous hospitality, the presence of the Dalai Lama in India. Then on the Indian side, you know there is anxiety about water supply because wall of. India's pretty much all of India's water supply comes from the Tibet Plateau, and there is constant fear in Indian security services that that the Chinese can somehow turn the top of which is unlikely but nevertheless it makes them deeply anxious. So there are any number of issues that that would need to be resolved in NFL comprehensive settlement. But at the moment you have to highly nationalistic governments each which is you postures vigorously over Tibet and I think that a settlement is not terribly likely Isabel. Indeed as ever for joining us on monocle twenty four, that was China dialogues is.

Tibet Tibet Xi Jinping India China Tibet Plateau Isabel Hilton Communist Party Central Sympos Isabelle Xinjiang Communist Party Tabet President Trump Editor Jinping Polit Bureau Beijing NFL
"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Could Beijing finally getting it away and silencing Hong Kong's democracy protests once and for all the Chinese President Xi Jinping has signed off strict security laws, which critics say will place the likes of the right of free speech and an independent judiciary at risk. The law has already had an effect one of the leading voices in the pro democracy. Movement Joshua Wong said he's left. One protest group what I'm joined by Monocle Asia editor and Hong Kong Bureau Chief James Chambers by Isabel Hilton. The editor of China Dialogue Welcome both backed Monaco for twenty four at James, let's begin with you. You are in Hong. Kong whether has been <hes>. A marking of the twenty three years since British rule ended. What's the atmosphere like today? Yes, what was meant to be called establishment day a day of celebration for Hong Kong returned back to mainland, but for a lot of people here it's a solemn day to protest against. Beijing and usually there's a big march that takes place around three PM Hong Kong time in about an hour and leave from <hes> Victoria in Causeway Bay and on March to the government headquarters that hasn't been given permission to go ahead to see the police because of the COVID, nineteen restrictions <hes>, but there are people starting to gather in Causeway Bay. <hes> and the police have already made their first arrest under this new national security bill. On the question, we're all asking waiting to see how this bill would be enforced. And I guess the the worrying onset is. Enforced very harshly. The first arrest was a guy who's who had a flag that just said Hong Kong independence on it. So there's no doubt that <hes> the police are going to use their full powers under under this bill to dampen down any goals. For Hong Kong independence, and it's going to have a massive impact on the ability of of activists and pro democracy protests in Hong Kong. To to to operate as they have done. For the last twenty three years. Where unlikely to see a big march this year like we did <hes> in years before because the police on hand, the right police are on the ground and are very quick to <hes> to arrest people. Isabel. It's not long since we were all given the details of what's in this bill. Could you just summarize it for us? Please well indeed. I think almost nobody outside the National People's. Congress was given the details until after the bill was rushed through a rigorous fifteen minute session. <hes> it criminalizes <hes> any act of secessions, version, terrorism, or collusion with foreign are external forces. The problem with all of those is who decides Schwarzenegger as secessions, version, terrorism, glues, and and exchange, said the question of how the law will be enacted. Is ABS will be? We'll be applied is absolutely critical including which judges. How will the? How will the legal authorities in Hong Kong <hes>? React Carrie, Lam has the opportunity to appoint judges that she chooses. And the bill, also the acts now also contains a rather <hes> sinister provision. Which says that in got his described as complicated cases at Beijing can simply takeover the prosecution of the law now again. All of this is <hes> is. Subject to subjective judgment from Beijing, Beijing designs what collusion with Foreign or external forces Beijing decides. What subversion is and Beijing, can <hes> prosecute cases? There is no guarantee that they will be held in. Public is provision for them not to be and. Given the state of of the rule of law in China. I think this is really really serious concern. It's also we should remember the. Legal State in Hong. Kong has been robust and widely respected and indeed lawyers have frequently taken to the streets to defend their. That profession and the application of the law in Hong Kong in very large demonstrations when they felt that Beijing. was encroaching on it, and so the capacity to appoint different judges to these cases is signed that I didn't think Beijing trusts Hong Kong's lawyers who are after school didn't principles of rule of law and equality before the law and all those good things. To do it's will.

Hong Kong Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Hong Kong China Israel US Isabel Hilton West Bank Nichols James Chambers Donald Trump Bill Prime Minister prime minister Alison captains Lam Beijing Jordan River
Hong Kong marks handover anniversary under shadow of security law

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:58 min | 2 years ago

Hong Kong marks handover anniversary under shadow of security law

"Could Beijing finally getting it away and silencing Hong Kong's democracy protests once and for all the Chinese President Xi Jinping has signed off strict security laws, which critics say will place the likes of the right of free speech and an independent judiciary at risk. The law has already had an effect one of the leading voices in the pro democracy. Movement Joshua Wong said he's left. One protest group what I'm joined by Monocle Asia editor and Hong Kong Bureau Chief James Chambers by Isabel Hilton. The editor of China Dialogue Welcome both backed Monaco for twenty four at James, let's begin with you. You are in Hong. Kong whether has been A marking of the twenty three years since British rule ended. What's the atmosphere like today? Yes, what was meant to be called establishment day a day of celebration for Hong Kong returned back to mainland, but for a lot of people here it's a solemn day to protest against. Beijing and usually there's a big march that takes place around three PM Hong Kong time in about an hour and leave from Victoria in Causeway Bay and on March to the government headquarters that hasn't been given permission to go ahead to see the police because of the COVID, nineteen restrictions but there are people starting to gather in Causeway Bay. and the police have already made their first arrest under this new national security bill. On the question, we're all asking waiting to see how this bill would be enforced. And I guess the the worrying onset is. Enforced very harshly. The first arrest was a guy who's who had a flag that just said Hong Kong independence on it. So there's no doubt that the police are going to use their full powers under under this bill to dampen down any goals. For Hong Kong independence, and it's going to have a massive impact on the ability of of activists and pro democracy protests in Hong Kong. To to to operate as they have done. For the last twenty three years. Where unlikely to see a big march this year like we did in years before because the police on hand, the right police are on the ground and are very quick to to arrest people. Isabel. It's not long since we were all given the details of what's in this bill. Could you just summarize it for us? Please well indeed. I think almost nobody outside the National People's. Congress was given the details until after the bill was rushed through a rigorous fifteen minute session. it criminalizes any act of secessions, version, terrorism, or collusion with foreign are external forces. The problem with all of those is who decides Schwarzenegger as secessions, version, terrorism, glues, and and exchange, said the question of how the law will be enacted. Is ABS will be? We'll be applied is absolutely critical including which judges. How will the? How will the legal authorities in Hong Kong React Carrie, Lam has the opportunity to appoint judges that she chooses. And the bill, also the acts now also contains a rather sinister provision. Which says that in got his described as complicated cases at Beijing can simply takeover the prosecution of the law now again. All of this is is. Subject to subjective judgment from Beijing, Beijing designs what collusion with Foreign or external forces Beijing decides. What subversion is and Beijing, can prosecute cases? There is no guarantee that they will be held in. Public is provision for them not to be and. Given the state of of the rule of law in China. I think this is really really serious concern. It's also we should remember the. Legal State in Hong. Kong has been robust and widely respected and indeed lawyers have frequently taken to the streets to defend their. That profession and the application of the law in Hong Kong in very large demonstrations when they felt that Beijing. was encroaching on it, and so the capacity to appoint different judges to these cases is signed that I didn't think Beijing trusts Hong Kong's lawyers who are after school didn't principles of rule of law and equality before the law and all those good things. To do it's will.

Hong Kong Beijing Hong Kong Bureau Isabel Hilton Editor James Chambers Xi Jinping Causeway Bay Joshua Wong Monocle Asia National People President Trump Schwarzenegger Covid Congress China Carrie Victoria Beijing.
Coronavirus: Trump says China wants him to lose re-election

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus: Trump says China wants him to lose re-election

"The US President Donald Trump has said. He believes join us. Handling of corona virus proves it wants to make him lose his reelection bid in. November trump has been blaming China for the global pandemic since. The outbreak began to unpack all this. I'm joined by Isabel. Hilton the editor of China. Dialogue unto Bike Load Harrington who senior lecturer in American politics to Demonstrate University. Welcome both back to monocle. Twenty four glow. If I may start with you what is it? Trump is doing is trying to find someone to blame for his poor polling numbers and also for the difficult economic situation the. Us is facing. Now yes I think that would be a lot to do with it. M A as as I've been watching all of this unfold. I DID WONDER EM. You know how he would try to frame the blame. I suppose you could say because obviously the the party would be to deflect any blame away from himself and I I did think they were a number of options you know he could have gone for perhaps blaming the previous administration. That's always convenient 'em but that's a bit too historic. No so no and he could have blamed the the Democrats example or any of the Democrats would again that sort of puts attention onto opponents which you might not want to do and so the the the kind most substantial source of flame I suppose in perhaps the most obvious from his perspective would be to blame the Chinese and obviously U. S. China relationship was already A complex and and strange shall we say and but it's obviously gone to new heights. No but trump is you know looking towards Novembre realizing that you know this now is going to be the defining issue of his presidency or via four year. Or perhaps more and I'm he needs to start fighting back so he has now. I guess I have to ask this question from you. Do you think there is any credibility whatsoever to Donald? Trump's latest claim that he seen evidence corona virus actually originated in Chinese laboratory. Well all I can say is you know. I really moments of of of dangerous stress for for for the world like this. We can only listen to experts and scientists and you know people who who sort of this kind of thing for a living so I would be slow to take the president's words on board based on that and now code ninety nine deeds initially give Donald trump and approval bump but things have changed quite a lot sooner seventeen they have and you know. I suppose a very convenient response to that might be. You can say well I don't believe the polls which is a you know something that he came out with the other day now. Obviously you know. He's had his sorts of 'EM AUNTIE EM mainstream media platform since day one and his supporters at really embraced that I think it's part of his appeal that you know he's He's other he is outside that Sort of Knowing the news bubble if he kind of makes his own news and so so choosing to not believe the polls is very convenient. I do have to say though. I mean when you look at his daily pulled raising generally speaking. They're pretty consistent you know. He's in the low forty s all the time. This current crisis hasn't really moved out in in any meaningful way and I think you know He. He lost a little bit of support way back early on in his presidency near the start but ever since then his supporters have remained. I would say unconditionally loyal and I think things would have to change quite a lot between now and November. And maybe they will you know economically if nothing else am before his his his loyal and support base will step away from him and then obviously his opponents sort of has his own em issues and shortcomings so trump would probably be very very keen to get back on the campaign trail as soon as possible. Because that's where he really shines those rallies are wearing these people come in you know when they have a very sort of a A positive connection I suppose he's being deprived the moment

Donald Trump United States China President Trump Isabel Demonstrate University Harrington Editor Senior Lecturer
China expels American journalists from publications

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:02 min | 2 years ago

China expels American journalists from publications

"But I in a move which may have grim repercussions for the global health. Emergency China has expelled a number of American journalists from three major publications. This is the combination of the media. Row which has been brewing for some time. Isabel Hilton Editor China. Dialogue brings us up to speed. On the circumstances leading up to the current action is about. How did this begin a world? Good morning while the background is that under Xi Jinping in life has gotten steadily more difficult. It's an authoritarian regime and and indeed the Foreign Correspondents Club in Beijing Issue Report on on conditions in two thousand nine thousand nine hundred which which detailed how how very difficult to work but this particular row actually is triggered by a headline in the Wall Street Journal in February when an opinion column was published under the headline China the sick man of Asia which could use an absolute if furious response in Beijing and Beijing them promptly expelled three journalists from the Wall Street Journal Beijing Bureau. Those sweet journalist had nothing to do with the opinion piece or the headline. But it was signed. If you like of Beijing's fury and Beijing's desire not to be blamed for this global crisis. What then happened was that the United States responded and that's an unusual thing to a previous administrations have dealt with this kind of situation by taking the moral high ground if you like and saying well. United States believes in press freedom and we deplore China's actions of but the moral high ground isn't really familiar territory to the trump administration. And so they've gone for more reciprocal approach and restricted the numbers of journalists who could be employed in the United States by four state-owned media. So that would use the numbers from about one hundred fifty to around a hundred They will have to leave in the next few days and this final news of of closing down essentially the bureau of the US major newspapers expelling thirty journalists at once that is the latest move reciprocal moves by China. So here. We are now going dark in each in each other's countries. I'm sorry to use this word. That's so overused at the moment but this is an unprecedented move by China. It's a very serious move. It is a very serious move and I think that it's also a sign Really that China both feels confident enough that it is that he'd has the global story under control. I mean if you look at the other thing that's been going on in the last in last week to ten days. China has been making absolutely furious efforts to present itself to the world as the savior so sending medical teams to Italy and Spain. Coming across as the benign actor rather than the origin of over global pandemic where is of course in the United States trump calling this the China vice virus has has has inflamed the situation further China? I think in the past and under a previous party administration would have just written out the American The American engines because obviously there are bigger things at stake. Here this is. This is the next thing down from breaking off diplomatic relations. You know the United States even under the trump administration which routinely insults the press but the United States has traditionally taken the freedom of of its journalists to operate another country as a as a very important index of the health of of diplomatic relations. Because it's kind of built into the US Constitution that freedom of the press matters now as I say even under the trump administration this is not something that the US can take likely

China United States Beijing Beijing Bureau Wall Street Journal Xi Jinping Foreign Correspondents Club Asia Italy Spain
World Health Organization holds press conference on coronavirus outbreak

Monocle 24: The Globalist

10:47 min | 2 years ago

World Health Organization holds press conference on coronavirus outbreak

"World Health Organization has been meeting to coordinate international responses containing and combating the novell corona virus outbreak scientists. From all over. The world attended the Congress in Geneva this week but will there. There is consensus on the fact that science must lead the fight back. Diplomacy may yet get in the way. China analyst Isabel Hilton Who's editor of China. Dialogue joins me now to look at the detail of the story. Thanks for coming in Isabel. This row concerns Taiwan the island that the Chinese Communist Party seizes part of one China under Beijing's authority but officials in Taipei claims self-ruled democracy. And that of course is the heart of the problem it is and you know and the other part of the background. Is it for several years now. China has been building position in the United Nations and all its agencies and steadily chipping away at those Relatively typically small but symbolic countries that recognize Taiwan as an independent country sir. Taiwan got booted off the Security Council missile when when Back in the seventies when China entered this global diplomatic sphere now when it comes to the W. H. O.. This of course really really matters. Because you're dealing with a with an epidemic which affects Taiwan and the same thing happened with saws Taiwan when ruled by the Gorman in dengue which was originally a mainland party and loser in the Chinese civil war until nineteen forty nine when it went Taiwan occupied Taiwan one. When Gorman Dong is in Barron Taiwan then China relaxes its position in terms of Taiwan's participation in these bodies because the Gorman Don Also regards Taiwan as an integral part of China students the DP which is the Taiwanese part he gets elected. Beijing becomes much on hostile and starts starts to exclude Taiwan from this kind of participation. So in this epidemic for example the W. T. the WHO has classified assefy. Taiwan is part of China. Which means that it was subject to all the travel bans that China was subject to despite the fact that it had you know just to score of cases cases where China has thirty thousand currently And so it. It began to suffer from the same kind of exclusions without having access to the scientific typic- and medical exchanges that it would have needed. It does need In order to control infection. So it's a very very a bitter angry exchanges over this. Now there are internal ructions within China to the Chinese doctor who was silenced by police. Trying to share news about the virus long before the Chinese health authorities disclosed. It's full threat. died yesterday. Many including China's judicial title authorities have wondered whether the epidemic could have unfolded differently. Had He not been silenced that critical juncture ahead of the lunar year holiday. How rare is is it for the judiciary to rebuke? The police. Always seeing now major internal ructions. Well what you're seeing. Is everybody looking for someone else to blame. Because this man became I'm a hero quite rightly he was early on the case he was humiliated in called into the police. May disci- offer confessions saying let you know none of it's true. He then continues his his work gets infected alive social media feed then set up outside the hospital because he'd become known by by then hundreds of millions of people were following his condition as he got ill he was. He continued to give interviews from isolation so he became a complete eight national hero. The symbolic you know upright official. Who Speaks Truth to power and evil power suppresses now that is the narrative that's taken hold and that is very dangerous for China just to go back to the W. H. O. The? Who's pronouncements of Kitty. Kind of been coerced by China because W. H. O.. Director General WHO's an Ethiopian. The country heavily dependent on on on China. has has given extraordinary praise to the Chinese authorities for the speed be do their response in the scale of their response. He's pretty much alone in that judgment because it's quite clear that for the first four weeks the Wuhan authorities suppressed press the news so that they could carry on with activities being planned which included a massive banquet for forty thousand people in in the middle of you know when they epidemic was well underway and the WHO changed its its statement on human to human transmission. which is a key element element that Chinese authorities said at the beginning of this? There's no evidence of human to human transition which meet transmission. which meant that? You had to go to that wet market in order to catch. Gotcha this would evidently Andrew that. Who fell into line with the Chinese government on that. This huge party went ahead and the whole thing out of control where wait still is. It's out of control now. The the head of the. Who actually has form on this. I know that in the past. He has supported African dictators. And so on and in fact I'd like like to turn to Africa now because the fifty four countries collectively are home to one point two billion people of whom an estimated one million Chinese nationals. And yet so far when you see the map and it's all lit up about where there is a corona virus in the world. Africa is completely blank. There are no reported cases of it whatsoever with such large Chinese population. There I find it extremely difficult to believe Richie implausible and no reported cases is the key doesn't mean there are no kisses and and you know there. Is this concern that that a China can lock down the country every now for how long but you you know. China is everywhere. And because there's been so much movement because people want prevented from travelling Before the declaration of the emergency it means that almost anywhere where where Chinese have been coming going. You have a risk of of this of this taking hold in countries where there there were. Public Health is is is not up to dealing with a highly transmissible Disease so you you know. Pakistan is another case in point. Where where you have serious concerns very close relationship? Lots of Chinese coming and going and this this could be the next phase uh-huh and I mean we're we're looking at some African countries repatriating citizens others making a big show saying that they won't and that they have complete faith in the Chinese government. So once again you've got this kind of diplomatic failure going on and these countries accosted or not repatriation. Their citizens are the ones that can't afford to well absolutely can't get a plane they know or whatever but once again you're seeing China going global with its own internal approach which is essentially to suppress the news. You know it's it's it's in control of of public all as they would put guiding public opinion as being a key element in in the party's strategy politically to survive five. Of course it. Has You know rather bad effect on. Its its ability to manage the substantive issue which is how many people get sick and die in some areas of the world the virus also seems to be tapping into racist sentiment with Chinese people who may not have visited the country in years. If ever been criticized there was a horrible. The story coming out of Wales yesterday. Some children of Chinese heritage were prevented from going to school. And I think that's now being reversed but but this is a trend. We are seeing we are hosting it and we've seen a lamentable cases in Italy there was a conservatoire that that put up a notice saying it had suspended classes for quote quote Unquote Oriental Students. And these are people who are living in Italy however you should also look China because if you remember it. Five million people have Wuhan the week before the Chinese authorities admitted water crisis. Was this dock. They can't get back to hunt Khan and they are in places in China which treating them. Even worse had been cases where apartments it'd be nailed up to stop people from Hahn going out. They can't they can't find hotel rooms. They are being shunned and ostracized within China and they are completely in limbo because they can't travel econ get back home and they're very very unwelcome. Welcome where they are and very unwell. Some of the some of them may well be unwell but certainly the regarded as going to play Mary's wherever they go. And that's you know And the next phase as if this does it to incubate period so given that people did so many people did leave the area in advance at the little holiday I think that would the next phase in China will be to see a surge in infections in those provinces where people have visited and of course. There's a much wider panic. We're seeing shortages. The face masks globally in Hong Kong. I understand toilet paper now competitive bizarre. What quite why toilet paper that connects to kind previous story about science and not knowing where to buy toilet paper because she was so looked after by seventy seven so I think that may be more to do with politics of of Hong Kong than real showed his but I wonder how the authorities can best manage? What's not only a health crisis but also one then of of misinformation under fear and discrimination it's unfortunately that I think that horses bolted? You know there are there are kind of well. Established practices practises where you have an emergency. Be It a natural disaster or an epidemic and it's very important to establish trust with the public excited the public and have listened to you does what's necessary and it's extremely important. Basically it says you must be a very quick week in in terms of of distributing information and that information must be accurate and you must be responsive China. The party is already. He's at every level. Have broken those rules so trust has gone the public does not believe them. They're being caused as the villains in this Inside China and certainly in Hong Kong and in Taiwan and. I think it's going to be very very difficult for the authorities to to recover from that and what they're doing now is simply going back to repressing the news again. It's not going to work Isabel. Thank you very much indeed. That was Isabel Hilton. Still to come on the program. While Jerry is pardoning pardoning prisoners a flick through the papers plus subas

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"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:51 min | 2 years ago

"china dialogue" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"China has repeated. Its Promise to regain regain control of Taiwan after voters reelected president sighing. When Chinese state media said the president resorted to cheating repression and intimidation to get votes? Were joined in mischievious by Isabel Hilton editor of China Dialogue. Good to have you back in this year is this was a very convincing. Victory for her wasn't it. I could hardly be more convincing. And not they need to cheer chief record. Numbers of votes For any Taiwanese politician She also won a convincing victory in the Congress winning twice as many any seats as serious. Rival Gorman down and what is it that brought this. This huge victory is pretty much. Hong Kong You know the the the example of Hong Kong the the failure of One Country Two Systems in Hong Kong the Kuomintang have traditionally being the Party. Reunification the Kuomintang are the the the The relic of the Chinese civil war which was between the Kuomintang and and the and the Communist Party. They agree that China is one country in Taiwan belongs to it they just disagree about who should run it so the Kuomintang's historic position of being there the rightful ruler of all of Hong Kong. Where saying when is a Taiwanese politician politician and takes different view of history in a different view of democracy in a different view of of Taiwan role in the world? And that is is what particularly the young voters in Taiwan and they came out in record. Numbers Dave look at Hong Kong. They say well. You can't trust China. It breaks its promises what we have is freedom and democracy here and we wish to defend that that's what it is seen as a steady pair of Hanser. She's pretty steady. There were where to other parties that did rather badly One one is one was a a much more radical independence party and that Did very badly. So she's seen as somebody who defends the status quo essentially. She's not going to declare independence because that would be that that would trigger a global crisis But she is going to resist pressure from Beijing to talk about the the future of a close future with with with the People's Republic. So I think you know like a number of international crises. The best solution certainly for the time being is the status quo for Taiwan. He mentioned the idea ever close future with the People's Republic China's reaction promised to regain regain control of Taiwan. That doesn't necessarily time. We've what you've just said I'm but Kennedy genuinely says it we could have react. We could have expected that reaction yes she didn't for Xi Jinping to acknowledge it this is. This has been a very embarrassing victory this gala victory has been very embarrassing Xi Jinping because it it it is rebuked not only to his approach to Taiwan but to Hong Kong and You know unless Beijing finds a way to modify its. It's policy in Hong Kong. This will go on feeding into the Taiwan political situation and and entrenching Taiwanese view of the mainland so so that puts Xi Jinping and rob difficult position of having to acknowledge that he is wrong. Whereas you know Xi Jinping thought invincible in and cannot make mistakes so so I think what we're looking at is what is the? What is the tone scale of the response given that China is not going to reverse its policy? Xi Jinping Champion has declared in the China dream. China's May he's making China great again. The reunification with Taiwan is they would put. It is a key part of that and the it's it's kind of shared for the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic which is in two hundred forty nine so there is time on the other hand any any move to kind of slacken off the pressure on Taiwan would be viewed as weakness on the mainland. So I think what we'll see is a certain amount of low level harassment Rasmin so where China has had a number of successes in other in other Fields if you look sad Chinese see for example the kind of sub military pressure of water essentially armed fishing boats taking on for example Taiwanese fishing boats off yet news fishing boats there are fifteen very small countries. It's still recognize Taiwan As as the Republic of China we will see increasing pressure on them to switch to the People's People's Republic We might see some harassment of extensive trade and business relationships which exist between Taiwan and China neurotic Taiwanese unease doing business on the mainland. We've already seen a cocktail moment of tourism to Taiwan from the mainland. So you know there are a number of ways in which which Beijing can express its displeasure short of precipitating further confrontation Anita. How much is this actually high on? Its list given the fact that that China has has an awful lot more than it has to concentrate on the moment. We Got Hong Kong as you've mentioned which played directly into the hands of signing when we also have the US trade trade war we have in. China is busy with stuff can actually afford to put Taiwan on the back burner little. Yes I think it can. I think you're absolutely right. There are immediate crisis and there will go on being meet you crisis. It's you know th the economy's not going very well. There's some troubling signs in the financial sector that we might be in a in for a few bankruptcies and there's very limited trade deal is about to be signed the United States. I don't think China wants to jeopardize You know a kind of calming down of the. US China trade war. So do any move on. Taiwan would obviously do that. And so far we've seen or other muted reaction as you said. They accused diving when of dirty tricks describe. This is an anomaly. There was a wonderful phrase from Shinwari which said You know these temporary versus A. They're just a bubble in the tide of history. And you know she shouldn't count on this being a kind of permanent state of affairs so they're standing back and saying well you know these things happen but we can get over it and our long-term policy history is with this. That's that's interview that said we had trump making positive notes about Taiwan for quite a long time right from the beginning of his presidency. And yes you say that. The number of Countries now fifteen who who actively recognize Taiwan as a state and large companies such as airlines have now diverted their attention to to Beijing. But if you you have this state or this place which is allowed to just take along quietly. Is there a chance as a little bit of soft power will allow Taiwan to actually bring a few more countries back into the fold really curious you should say that because the because prog recently Decided to twin with with the Taipei rather than Beijing which is fanny kind of substantial. Move for the for the Czech Republic And and a bit of a rebuke. I think it was so one. Shouldn't underestimate the quiet soft. The effect of the quiet soft power of Taiwan inside China there are a number of of individual visitors from the mainland. Who made a point of going to Taiwan to observe the elections? Because you know they're curious about the only real substantial elections take place in the Chinese world and that will you know that one shouldn't underestimate the quiet effect of that It it's quite. It's quite the powerful thing Talking of quiet. Donald Trump has been unusually quiet on the subject of the Taiwanese elections but the people around him have been pretty robust in their supportive. Talion when so you know the US representative in in In Taipei met very quickly There have been you know it'd been in using language like no shared values of democracy and freedom the kind of thing honestly that one hadn't heard from trump for quite sometime but you're hearing from his officials officials and there have been hints from the US military that their commitment to the defensive Taiwanese as robust as ever last year saw a large number verve of quite significant arms sales and indications of military cooperation. So there were. There are lots of reasons China to sit fairly quiet Wyatt on this one. I think his Bell Hilton. Thank you very much indeed for joining his monocle. Twenty four still to come on. Today's globalist. We Northern Ireland to us. How to rebuild? When you haven't haven't had an organized government for three years I want to urge all political leaders and their teams to grab this opportunity and get back to work in multi party executive? Forget the language of win and lose. That's all to come on the globalist..

Taiwan Beijing China Hong Kong United States Republic China China Dialogue Republic of China Xi Jinping Isabel Hilton harassment Kuomintang Taipei Congress president
China Promises To Regain Control Of Taiwan

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:27 min | 2 years ago

China Promises To Regain Control Of Taiwan

"China has repeated. Its Promise to regain regain control of Taiwan after voters reelected president sighing. When Chinese state media said the president resorted to cheating repression and intimidation to get votes? Were joined in mischievious by Isabel Hilton editor of China Dialogue. Good to have you back in this year is this was a very convincing. Victory for her wasn't it. I could hardly be more convincing. And not they need to cheer chief record. Numbers of votes For any Taiwanese politician She also won a convincing victory in the Congress winning twice as many any seats as serious. Rival Gorman down and what is it that brought this. This huge victory is pretty much. Hong Kong You know the the the example of Hong Kong the the failure of One Country Two Systems in Hong Kong the Kuomintang have traditionally being the Party. Reunification the Kuomintang are the the the The relic of the Chinese civil war which was between the Kuomintang and and the and the Communist Party. They agree that China is one country in Taiwan belongs to it they just disagree about who should run it so the Kuomintang's historic position of being there the rightful ruler of all of Hong Kong. Where saying when is a Taiwanese politician politician and takes different view of history in a different view of democracy in a different view of of Taiwan role in the world? And that is is what particularly the young voters in Taiwan and they came out in record. Numbers Dave look at Hong Kong. They say well. You can't trust China. It breaks its promises what we have is freedom and democracy here and we wish to defend that that's what it is seen as a steady pair of Hanser. She's pretty steady. There were where to other parties that did rather badly One one is one was a a much more radical independence party and that Did very badly. So she's seen as somebody who defends the status quo essentially. She's not going to declare independence because that would be that that would trigger a global crisis But she is going to resist pressure from Beijing to talk about the the future of a close future with with with the People's Republic. So I think you know like a number of international crises. The best solution certainly for the time being is the status quo for Taiwan. He mentioned the idea ever close future with the People's Republic China's reaction promised to regain regain control of Taiwan. That doesn't necessarily time. We've what you've just said I'm but Kennedy genuinely says it we could have react. We could have expected that reaction yes she didn't for Xi Jinping to acknowledge it this is. This has been a very embarrassing victory this gala victory has been very embarrassing Xi Jinping because it it it is rebuked not only to his approach to Taiwan but to Hong Kong and You know unless Beijing finds a way to modify its. It's policy in Hong Kong. This will go on feeding into the Taiwan political situation and and entrenching Taiwanese view of the mainland so so that puts Xi Jinping and rob difficult position of having to acknowledge that he is wrong. Whereas you know Xi Jinping thought invincible in and cannot make mistakes so so I think what we're looking at is what is the? What is the tone scale of the response given that China is not going to reverse its policy? Xi Jinping Champion has declared in the China dream. China's May he's making China great again. The reunification with Taiwan is they would put. It is a key part of that and the it's it's kind of shared for the hundredth anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic which is in two hundred forty nine so there is time on the other hand any any move to kind of slacken off the pressure on Taiwan would be viewed as weakness on the mainland. So I think what we'll see is a certain amount of low level harassment Rasmin so where China has had a number of successes in other in other Fields if you look sad Chinese see for example the kind of sub military pressure of water essentially armed fishing boats taking on for example Taiwanese fishing boats off yet news fishing boats there are fifteen very small countries. It's still recognize Taiwan As as the Republic of China we will see increasing pressure on them to switch to the People's People's Republic We might see some harassment of extensive trade and business relationships which exist between Taiwan and China neurotic Taiwanese unease doing business on the mainland. We've already seen a cocktail moment of tourism to Taiwan from the mainland. So you know there are a number of ways in which which Beijing can express its displeasure short of precipitating further confrontation Anita. How much is this actually high on? Its list given the fact that that China has has an awful lot more than it has to concentrate on the moment. We Got Hong Kong as you've mentioned which played directly into the hands of signing when we also have the US trade trade war we have in. China is busy with stuff can actually afford to put Taiwan on the back burner little. Yes I think it can. I think you're absolutely right. There are immediate crisis and there will go on being meet you crisis. It's you know th the economy's not going very well. There's some troubling signs in the financial sector that we might be in a in for a few bankruptcies and there's very limited trade deal is about to be signed the United States. I don't think China wants to jeopardize You know a kind of calming down of the. US China trade war. So do any move on. Taiwan would obviously do that. And so far we've seen or other muted reaction as you said. They accused diving when of dirty tricks describe. This is an anomaly. There was a wonderful phrase from Shinwari which said You know these temporary versus A. They're just a bubble in the tide of history. And you know she shouldn't count on this being a kind of permanent state of affairs so they're standing back and saying well you know these things happen but we can get over it and our long-term policy history is with this. That's that's interview that said we had trump making positive notes about Taiwan for quite a long time right from the beginning of his presidency. And yes you say that. The number of Countries now fifteen who who actively recognize Taiwan as a state and large companies such as airlines have now diverted their attention to to Beijing. But if you you have this state or this place which is allowed to just take along quietly. Is there a chance as a little bit of soft power will allow Taiwan to actually bring a few more countries back into the fold really curious you should say that because the because prog recently Decided to twin with with the Taipei rather than Beijing which is fanny kind of substantial. Move for the for the Czech Republic And and a bit of a rebuke. I think it was so one. Shouldn't underestimate the quiet soft. The effect of the quiet soft power of Taiwan inside China there are a number of of individual visitors from the mainland. Who made a point of going to Taiwan to observe the elections? Because you know they're curious about the only real substantial elections take place in the Chinese world and that will you know that one shouldn't underestimate the quiet effect of that It it's quite. It's quite the powerful thing Talking of quiet. Donald Trump has been unusually quiet on the subject of the Taiwanese elections but the people around him have been pretty robust in their supportive. Talion when so you know the US representative in in In Taipei met very quickly There have been you know it'd been in using language like no shared values of democracy and freedom the kind of thing honestly that one hadn't heard from trump for quite sometime but you're hearing from his officials officials and there have been hints from the US military that their commitment to the defensive Taiwanese as robust as ever last year saw a large number verve of quite significant arms sales and indications of military cooperation. So there were. There are lots of reasons China to sit fairly quiet Wyatt on this one. I think his Bell Hilton. Thank you very much indeed for joining his monocle. Twenty four

Taiwan Beijing Hong Kong China United States Republic China China Dialogue Republic Of China Xi Jinping Isabel Hilton Donald Trump Kuomintang President Trump Czech Republic People's Republic
New EU chief takes helm amid rising suspicion of China

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:09 min | 3 years ago

New EU chief takes helm amid rising suspicion of China

"New president of the EU Commission also funded lion will have spent her first night in office last tonight. Having already we think held urgent telephone call with Beijing. The expose last week on the existence of Detention Kemper Muslim leaguers has brought China's track record on human rights right to the top of our funding lines to do list. Let's look at what she in. The Commission can actually do. Let's hear from Isabel Hilton. The editor of China Dialogue. Welcome back the studio Isabel. Doing no of this phone call to take place between Oslo Funder Lion and Beijing yesterday. We don't although she did she has made Much of Saying that it would so I imagine it would also imagine she'd get pretty dusty response from Beijing. What was the intentionally the? The purpose of the phone call was literally. That's really her first day in office yesterday on the Sunday indeed. I think that there is a feeling in Europe That China has been. It's sort of general after say trend against China in the last few months in in a concern in Europe that China has too much power and abusing its power to undermine global norms including on human rights and that Europe needs to take more bust view. So I think that what we're seeing in that commitment over these really appalling abuses That you know that's what we're seeing. A new commission come in with the determination to stand up to China just remind us of what was said what was revealed last week in this expose. On the treatment of weakened Muslim there was a cache of documents. Som Four hundred which went to the New York Times A further batch that went to an international consortium of Investigative Journalism Journalists and although Ah the existence of the camp said being extremely extensively documented for more than two years now the detail of the organization and including many a a personal and telling details which included in. What do you tell a university student going home for the summer? WHO finds that? He's Oh her entire family his disappeared so it was the kind of meticulous rupp very chilling planning State directed absolutely top down To to to lock up one in ten or as far as we know of the weaker population so although the camps were known about. There's something about you know the revelation of the of the of the bones of this policy that that made people deeply deeply uncomfortable and actually highlighted the degree to which China has go away with this so far. Is Anybody greatly surprised. However about these great revelations I think many people suspected that there was a but the fact is as you say as you've been saying continually there is this buildup of evidence against China that it is Going against the beliefs Explo- uh ex- exploiting the global norms. It's sort of surprises. That surprised me that as underline sort of took it upon herself to make a fresh. I should tempted something that everybody sort of knew about anyway. Well it's true that the camps were known about because they say that the detail of the documents Really confronted Particularly Europe actually with them with the inaction although we have in fact through the year Seen a growing effort particularly by Europe to confront China over Xinjiang at the The Council on Human Rights the UN Council Counseling Human Rights Meeting in Geneva There was a letter signed by more than twenty countries calling for China to release the detainees China has put in an enormous effort in the last few years to undermining the principle of universal human rights and particularly at the UN. So for example China has been trying to advance the the premise that notable rights to equal and the right to development and state sovereignty so victory entry trump's individual human rights and that goes directly against the universal principle. It it implies that poor people Don't have rights or or don't don't desire rights which is which is nonsense and that that's completely any it's an important breach and China has managed to mobilize countries search which have An economic dependence on China to support them in Geneva in mounted very well documented campaign trying to shut out civil society actors NGOs who might criticized trying to put in a government sponsored NGOs who would sing the praises raises of China's policies and explicitly saying two countries which Had any kind of economic dependence on China there quite a lot now that if they showed stop and criticized then you know deals would not go well if they showed up and praised then they would benefit so you know. There is no doubt that China has managed to Marshal Marshall a lot of opinion on its side in the has been remarkable silence for example or endorsement for many Muslim countries. They have not criticized at China. I know I on on locking up a million Muslims for being Muslim and that's pretty remarkable So you know. We are confronted with with the situation situation in which if these rights are defended. It's come down to the European Union Australia and Canada and even the United States is not reliable ally in this so I think that for the new commission the European Union. It's a bit of a moment saying do defend the system or not. What does the e you you do? Though in terms of concrete action I mean we've seen a trade war bursts out between the United States and China and neither side into becoming coming out well from it now. The European Union's Heft when it comes to trade is enormous but you can see immediately the any sanctions that you might put on. China will be met with equally tough measures. I think that I doubt that we would see a trade war. Exactly I mean it's true that the European European Union has is an enormously important trading block for China's largest trade partner but European Union. Although doesn't speak because one over trade Except for you know the kind of You wide regulations but individual countries tend to make their own make pursue their own interests with China But the fact that the e U is willing publicly to criticize China the e you could for example push at the UN. I'm for sanctions against individuals. Who are involved with this trade? It could name and shame companies that are dealing That are installing technologies in Xinjiang And in fact it could under the principles of of human rights and business. It could sanction companies over human human rights abuses. So it's not without weapons and and I think you know put China China very much dislikes being called out on human and rights abuses in a moment when it's trying to present itself as the benign actor On the global On the global scene so simply having you who are being vigorous in terms of its criticism changes the atmosphere and gives cover to some other countries which might wish to but don't quite have the courage ridged criticize China. Finally we have the member-state ambassadors who already in Beijing being invited to Xinjiang which is where the majority if we miss them live at the beginning of next year can anything be settled on then. yes Although these visits of course are heavily managed and it wouldn't be the first time time we've had official visits to Xinjiang in which The visitors the official visit confronted with people who sing and dance and say that they're happy to be there so I didn't think anyone. Anyone has enormous illusions about about what you're seeing And I think the you made its point by By giving the Sakharov prize the alarm toady a who is a weaker intellectual as an economist at a university in In Beijing who in twenty fourteen was sent to in jail for life had all his assets confiscated leaving his family destitute in a in a savage sentence against a man who had always been of voice of reason and moderation and who was well known to journalists and indeed to ambassadors and human rights workers So I I think that you know laying down these markers important The visit will you know I. I don't know quite what such visit will achieve except that it's important wouldn't go on insisting on visits but I think that as I say The ambassador isn't Aachen have many illusions that the people that they speak to a free to speak Or they will uncover any great surprises. It will be very very carefully prepared

China China China Beijing China Dialogue Europe European Union Xinjiang Isabel Hilton UN Geneva Eu Commission President Trump New York Times European European Union European Union Australia Investigative Journalism Journ Editor Rupp
Chinas surveillance state

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:48 min | 3 years ago

Chinas surveillance state

"One of the crucial stories of the last few decades has been China's extraordinary surge to catch up with the rest of the world in manufacturing technology. And in economic military and cultural power, one of the other crucial stories of the last few decades has been the erosion of privacy in the online era and on that front China is pulling a distance ahead. China is in the process of assembling an immense and pervasive apparatus of surveillance, which will monitor and punish and reward, the most every day of behaviors and interactions of more than a fifth of the world's people, the prophets of doom of the pre computer age. Imagine that any such system would have to be imposed by a dictatorship even George Orwell did not envisage that the population of airstrip one would voluntarily surrender personal information to the state, the communist party of China is assuredly a dictatorship. But has it also understood that a great many people below? Leave privacy to be over rated. What is the reality of China's surveillance state how might develop in future? And is it a case of today? China tomorrow, the world, this is the foreign desk. They intend the system to record every single action transaction by each Chinese citizen, whether it's economic transactions social actions are moral behavior. And then in the end create the system that ideally, in real time can sanction you and censor your or reward. You also, we've known for a long time that Goodland Facebook's business motor profit revenue has come from essentially selling our attention and that requires having a sense of what we interested in also kind of maximize the value of our time spent on decision. But I think maybe we just the fact that for all the convenience truly the enjoyment, we might get from these services. There is a price to be paid into the day some. Oh, my friends, when we want to talk about something that we think, well, public Ed attention from the police, we tried to, like, okay, let's meet offline less meeting cafe. And to have a discussion more and more. I don't want to talk about. Real issues out, like we had wayball. You're listening to the foreign desk on monocle twenty four with me, Andrew Miller on today show on joined by Caroline can and keisters matter, Caroline can is an editor a China dialogue, and the author of under red skies, memoir of growing up in China. Caroline joins us here in the studio in London and Kayce strip matter is a journalist and the author of we have been harmonized life in China's surveillance state. He joins us from Copenhagen welcome both KAI. I'll start with you. Just so we can define some terms here and make it clear. Exactly what we're talking about. China's surveillance state as referred to in the subtitle of your book is a common phrase. I suspect it's one of those, which is rather more talked about than understood. So when we talk about China's surveillance state. What is it exactly? We are talking about. Well, actually we are talking about a whole youth thing now. China was always the dictatorship. It was always a civilian state, but what heating paying. The communist party's doing now that they're basically re inventing their dictatorship with twenty-first-century information technology with artificial intelligence, and with big data and stuff. So basically we're going to see something developing their that the world has never seen that before. Caroline, what's your sense of it as somebody who lives in Beijing? Because a recurring theme of your book, certainly in the time you've been alive since one thousand nine hundred nine is one of state intrusion into people's lives, which would be regarded as extrordinary in most countries. Is it your sense that it is exceleron getting exponentially, because of the technology and the way that Kyd describes? I think when I was younger, there was a time when there was more and more freedom, and especially with the development internet. But then clearly like since the year two thousand twelve or two hundred thirteen I could feel that freedom has been shrinking. And now as kaija said, almost every street in Beijing any city. I you see the sec- TV's cameras catching any images of people whatever people are doing. I also have the fear that Wease the big data technology like people would ever they do Welby, so closely monitored. And to me, that is quite worrying, Koi, again, to return just to the basic idea of how this actually functions. We're not talking yet. Are we about one immense, centralized technological panel to knishes still a, a mishmash of overlapping dot networks? It is at the moment. Yes. Very much. So. I mean, a lot has been written, for example, about the Social Credit system, which is part of this whole effort, but it's only one piece of the puzzle, and there are many, many other different pieces of the puzzle and of course, the central government tries to sort of get a grip on all of this, and maybe especially the state security apparatus would like to have in the end one big database. But of course, the big question is like in all those used bureaucracies, will they actually be able to make it work exactly in that way? But even if they won't I would say there is enough to be worried about Carolina Social Credit system, which is something which is attracted a lot of attention in the last couple of years in particular, again, I think the some of the reporting of it may have focused perhaps overly on the lurid science fiction imagination of it, as Chinese citizen, who lives in China. How does it affect you on a day to day? Level as you go about your life. It is not like something that you see every day. Oh, you feel like getting so close to your every day. Maybe there's something that you don't have access to review your own Social Credit. Like the only thing I noticed in my life, a kind of, related to sort of crowded is, there's alipay like an app by Alibaba and there's a function of borrowing money. And if we repay back the money in time that you cried you score at rising. So that is the only thing I see so far about it about, of course, I heard stories about people who don't pay money in time, and they got the candle blocked from going to buy a train tickets or of flight tickets. And this kind of like being black list, and I don't know how was you up, like least how do you get rid of that list? So that is something that I, I think that will affect the people's live. Corey, how does that differ, though, or how might it different future from credit writing systems that you have in any developed country, really whereby an frankly, not unreasonably if it becomes the case that you are a credit risk? If you have a history of paying back, things late or not at all, then it does become increasingly hard for you to borrow money or get a mortgage. How different scale we talking about here in, in the Chinese experience. Well, the interesting thing is that actually Allah systems, probably were sort of starting point for the Chinese system, but the main difference, of course, is that it doesn't restrict itself to financial transactions the aim of the government in the end is they intend the system to record every single action in transaction by each Chinese citizen,

China Communist Party Of China Caroline Beijing George Orwell Facebook Andrew Miller Alibaba Carolina Communist Party ED Copenhagen Corey KYD Welby Kaija Editor
Hong Kong shuts government offices due to mass protests

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:43 min | 3 years ago

Hong Kong shuts government offices due to mass protests

"We begin today's broker in Hong Kong, where a number of government offices remained closed following yesterday's mass protests. It was the most violent today. The city state has witnessed in decades, as anger plans to allow exhibition to mainland China spilled out onto the streets of one of the world's most affluent cities, Hong Kong's leader, Carrie Lamma, so far refused to withdraw postponed. The controversial proposals for under Jong, who is a member of the legislative council doled monocle twenty four that it is unclear. Why lamb is rushing to pass the Bill? I don't see any point there's no reason why we have to rush it doesn't benefit any Hong Kong people. It only if another taste, surrendering Hong Kong people to the mainland regime. So as far as I can see only the mainland Jim, the communists would benefit from this Bill. I'm now joined by Isabel Hilton who is the editor of China dialogue, welcome to the program Isabel. So shall we recap a bit? I what brought about this. Controversial Bill in the first place. Well, it depends who you believe any Marcus. I carry lamb says that she had received several letters from murder victim, who is a Hong Kong citizen, murdered by her Hong Kong boyfriend on the island of Taiwan. The suspect then fled back to Hong Kong. He was arrested on another charge, and is shortly to be released from a jail sentence on that charge. Carry lamb story about the, the haste and the urgency, therefore, is that before this man is released from jail and manages again, to escape Justice. They need to rectify a deficiency in the traditional, which means that they can't extradite to Taiwan. I have to say the Taiwan us ROTC absolutely reject this and say they wouldn't you. Use this new facility anyway, because it would mean that Taiwan citizens who were in Hong Kong could be extradited to China, which they regard as a greater evil to carry lamb story doesn't really hold up. But now that she's gone this far of course, Beijing has weighed in on her side. And now everybody is in the kind of we can't back down situation. It clearly serves Beijing's interests. They've, they've kidnapped people from Hong Kong repeatedly in the last five years. You know it's bad for the image. They would quite like to have a semblance of legal process, but Hong Kong has risen as one against this would it benefit. Hong Kong in any sense, and housing, -nificant Lee wooded, erode Hong Kong's, tissue independence. I can't see any benefit for Hong Kong. I mean what what home comb has a has had going for it in the years since the handover is, if you like the legacy of a system. Which which had rule of law, which doesn't exist in China or relatively honest judiciary, which doesn't exist in China and, and reasonably, you know, honest and and, and moderate police force and and. Hong Kong regard, these fundamental. They're also fundamental to Hong Kong's position as a place where people do business. You know, we, we've had alarmed comments from, from the United States in the last twenty four hours Nancy Pelosi points out that eighty five thousand Americans live in Hong Kong, and given, again, the recent track record of China responding to the to the quality extradition case by arresting to Canadians in China charging them with, with espionage, with, you know, huge consequences for these individuals to other Canadians who've been retried on, on on charges that they'd already been sentenced for. And they're sentenced in, you know, up to a death sentence. There has been such clear evidence that China is prepared to use it, it's very, very inadequate to digital system as a political, too. So of course, that means that anyone who lives in Hong Kong. Mm or anyone who passes through Hong Kong still happens to become a victim of a larger dispute between perhaps, you know, his or her government and the Chinese government, is it risk. Now that means that Hong Kong's position, as you know, major international center is also at risk to there's a lot at stake here and the organizers of these protests say that the demonstrations have been the largest in Hong Kong since the territory was handed over to China in nineteen ninety seven. Do you think there is a Jones that these protests?

Hong Kong China Taiwan Lamb Beijing Isabel Hilton Jong Carrie Lamma Chinese Government JIM Marcus Jones Editor Nancy Pelosi Murder United States Twenty Four Hours Five Years
Hong Kong protests against Chinese extradition bill drew 1 million demonstrators

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:45 min | 3 years ago

Hong Kong protests against Chinese extradition bill drew 1 million demonstrators

"Around a million demonstrators took to the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday to protest against a proposed law, which they fear. It's China the power to target opponents of its government the controversial extradition. Bill would allow Hong Kong to send suspected criminals for trial in China. Critics say the Bill has no written guarantees that the trials will be fair, and they believe that China which rules Hong Kong onto the one country. Two systems principle will use the Bill to undermine the territory's semi autonomous status. For more on this story. I'm joined by Isabel Hilton who's editor of China dialogue, and our Hong Kong bureau chief, James chambers. He was at the protest James. I'd like to start with you first because they're all different reports on the size of this protests. So what did you see when you were there and would you say that around a million people, perhaps more or less will take into the streets that time? Happens every time as big protest in Hong Kong, the police come out with their figure, and the organizers of the protests, come out with their own figure, and as always a huge difference between those two so is interesting this time to see what number the police would would come up with, and then perhaps multiplied that to see what the real figure is the police saying about two hundred and fifty to three hundred thousand and us we're in the protests. We've got that figure while we're still marching and so you, you, you could tell if saying it's around three hundred thousand they actual number is going to be huge. And it really did feel like an extra extra special extra huge March because I, I was in it for for four and a half hours. Crawling through the center of Hong Kong. So I wouldn't be surprised if it's at least over seven hundred fifty thousand and there's a chance, it could be indeed a million. But how unprecedented is a protest of the scale in Hong Kong protests, like that, of that size this decade, you know? It'd be even bigger than the famous umbrella movement, or the central moving two thousand fourteen you'd probably have to go back to two thousand three was the beginning of the century when there was a another huge March against a similar of proposed legislation, which got hundreds of thousands of people onto the streets and ultimately saw the, the government back down from the perspective of the governing. Authorities they're probably concerned about the facts that all society are United in their opposition to this Bill, even conservative professions like the legal profession. For example, again lawyers judges coming out. Yes, you go to the government should get worried when they see the lawyers marching because every they don't come out all the time when they do come out profession. It usually means the government should stand up and actually take

Hong Kong China Bill James Chambers Isabel Hilton Bureau Chief Editor
Does China Have What It Takes To Be a Superpower?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:37 min | 4 years ago

Does China Have What It Takes To Be a Superpower?

"Join us state run media reports that the country's military is in the process off a major strategic shift. The navy and air force are both being given a boost. But it's a land-based armies being downsized in an attempt to transform the People's Liberation Army. Let's get more on this with the editor of China dialogue Isabel Hilton Isabel, welcome to the program. So first of all, what is the backdrop do this shift? Well, the People's Liberation Army which actually belongs to the party rather than the country and Google out of guerrilla warfare people's wall. So under under Mao and right through to Deng Xiao, Ping. You know, it was very large pretty ineffective. I mean after after the winning the civil war in nineteen forty-nine. It didn't even win a war of to that lost Vietnam, for example in a border skirmish. The most recent wards fought so it was a large expensive, correct? Optic running hotels brothels, all kinds of things the modernization was long overdue, but the modernization also reflects the fact that China went from being a very kind of enclosed country to being a global trading nation and increasing the with our missions to be a global superpower. Now, every global trading nation has long supply lines to defend it, it has fears of interest to build, and that's what China's been doing. So China has identified some years back, you know, the areas in which it would invest in the included cyber warfare included space, and the included crucially a navy and that so we see them acquiring. I an second hand aircraft carrier. Our second one is coming up and quite a large submarine fleet about which we hear rather less. So what what is the goal what what is the Chinese invasion in the end? Well, you know, as I say there are there are supply lines to defend so if you see what's happening in the South China Sea, you know, huge amount of global trade goes through the South China. To see and China has built military installations on on essentially on coral reefs on on what they call islands, but they weren't recognized as Ireland's because they're covered at high tide. So China's been putting military bases. Not only in its near abroad said the South China Sea blows across the Pacific. And if you look at the belt and road project the road part is a maritime project, and that is included heavy investment in all kinds of you know, in Pacific islands, for example, and in port facilities humble tutor in in Sri Lanka allows them to take a very close interest in in the Indian Ocean. You've got one in a Gwadar in Pakistan. You know, you if you see where they're placed you can see that China is is strategically placed now on on several major global supply routes so in the event of a conflict, China's Innova strong position the Pacific islands. You know, if you're going to run, for example in nuclear submarine fleet constantly it see as as the US does and China has said it is Myers to you. You'd need to fair number of friendly port facilities, and these islands are pretty much there for the taking. So if you look at the islands in the western Pacific, which include Guam for many years and US military base and still use military base. The Chinese of very active there, they run a, you know, they have big investments they run a casino. They take students to China for education. You know, you can see that that the US is losing this battle insurance out of neglect largely in China is very much establishing a potential for future

China Pacific Islands South China Sea People's Liberation Army South China Navy Isabel Hilton Isabel Deng Xiao United States Vietnam Guam Editor Google Pakistan Sri Lanka Pacific Indian Ocean