35 Burst results for "Chin"

Carol Burnett Went Into a Closet Chinless and Emerged 'Determined'

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Carol Burnett Went Into a Closet Chinless and Emerged 'Determined'

"You and Jodi had dental surgery at the same time. Not the same time. I had my jaw done. Yeah. Okay. It was broken in two places. Yeah. I still have wires back here. They took out part of my bone here and lifted. Because wait, your mom had an overbite, and you had an underbite. No, I had a, yeah, my teeth met. And then mom had a slight weaker chin. Yeah, I had a weaker chin. Jodi got that, and so I went to the oral surgeon and I asked him about I said, but I don't want to go through what? He said, don't have to. Just kind of cut in here and pulled it out three millimeters. Wow. Is all. You know, so I just wanted to feel The Rain. You know, on my chin without having to look up. The awning. So now, we had done the easy street number. Before, and we'd wrap Annie and I got the operation. Procedure done. And now the easy street number when we first did it was overkill. It was 400 dancers in it. And in the street with a monkey grinder and it was just too much. And Bernadette Peters and Tim Curry and I said, this is very good, but you know, it should be just the three villains in the orphanage doing the number. So now I had the procedure, and I get a call from the producer, like a month later, saying, we're going to reshoot. The easy street number, and so bernadette is coming in from New York and Tim from England, and I was in white at the time. So we all went and I said to I said to the producer over the phone, I said, I have a chin now. And he said, what? And I explained it to him. And he said, oh, with all that miss hannigan drag, nobody's gonna know, you know, right. So okay, I just thought I'd tell you. So I flew in. Now we're in the easy street. We're in the office of miss hannigan. Right. John Huston says all right. And he said, I think what I'll do, oh, because ray stark said, you know, it won't be pictured a picture. It'll just be that scene. And nobody's going to notice with all that miss hannigan drag, so. Okay. So now we're in the hurt office. Bernadette Tim and I and mister Houston says, I think what our water do. Is take it from when Carol went into the closet to find Annie's locket. We'll pick it up from when she comes out of the closet. Pictured a picture at all. Yeah. I said, mister Hughes. Call me John, dear. John. Two months ago, when I ran into the closet, I didn't have a chin. Now I'm out of the closet. Right. Right. Thought for a minute and he said, well, dear. Just come out looking determined.

Jodi Bernadette Peters Tim Curry Annie Hannigan Miss Hannigan Ray Stark Bernadette Bernadette Tim John Huston TIM England New York Mister Hughes Houston Carol John
Timothee Chalamet Looked Like Someone's Aunt From an 80's Wedding

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:21 min | 3 weeks ago

Timothee Chalamet Looked Like Someone's Aunt From an 80's Wedding

"This shallow med kit comes to the Venezuelan vessel. He's wearing a red shimmering sleeveless backless halter top was matching, you know, tight fitting pants, a wrap around scarf, boy, but she was full of confidence. Let me tell you. It was designed by his buddy, hater Ackerman. It's just the guy that put him in these female looking clothes in the past and people of ate him up for this because he has this young. Is he trans love? He's a teenage idol. We used it. Some people don't see anything in them. And yet there are some directors who look at his face and go, oh my God, that face. Some designers see his face. He's got the cheekbones and the chin, they just think, oh, he could sell anything. Look, the kid blew up. I mean, he's absolutely blown up. But I can't believe it. He weighed D.C.. He looks like my aunt Joanne from somebody's wedding in 1982. Oh my God, so the and of course some writer, some pretentious writer from Vanity Fair, said he made the gondolas come to a stop. The gondolas come to a stop. I hope so the guy singing the gondolas could vomit.

Hater Ackerman Joanne D.C.
"chin" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

07:37 min | Last month

"chin" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Write about? Well, for us, we definitely want to write stories which haven't been done before and even though anime and manga is more popular than ever before. There was never a children's book about the history or how it came to be. And because I personally had experience working for a company and felt worked for Dark Horse Comics, which published a lot of comic books as well as his wife's Japanese. We had kind of a unique angle to share that with the next generation of kids who weren't even born at the time. So that was a case where it's a unique topic. It's interesting to kids and to parents, unlike maybe other inventions, which might be taken for granted, but really doesn't galvanize the imagination. And then it has to be a topic which really can be drawn in a dynamic and visually exciting way. And so with those three criteria, hopefully we can pick out something which really kind of drives the eyes as well as the mind and really brings kids along for the ride. Yeah. One of your latest series is Julie black belt. I think you have two books in that now. Tell us a little about a little bit about that and the motivation for writing it. Yeah, so when I was growing up in the 70s, my oldest brother was actually a stunt double on the TV show Kung fu. His high school friend was got a kid actor, one of David Carradine's sort of young charges in one of these episodes, and all the brother had to fall into a couple of times. But from that point, I realized that, you know, Marshall has just popular, but it was always male martial art. And we can list them because their iconic, but when I became a dad, you know, martial arts was really getting a resurgence and interest in kids and families who were enrolling their kids in all these various classes. So my son, he enrolled in martial arts. And when I was out in New York earlier than that, I had a friend and her daughter was at a taekwondo class. And she brought me along and I saw it for the first time that I had never really been in the waiting room looking at it before. So it was all kind of new to me, but I realized that, hey, families and kids are enrolling, there's something there. They're not being driven by the latest movie. So for me, I wanted to kind of subvert these historical stereotypes that I had grown up with, that it's all male, and then I wanted to really bring it to a level of reality where people who had kids who are 5 years old and they're thinking about it, but this could be useful for them. And it's not necessarily a primer, but it's really a way to get behind the psychology of the skill for me. Do I want to do it? There's a certain level of peer pressure. There's also a certain level of excitement because you can compare it to, you know, these movies and TV shows that you might have seen. So this is predated Kung Fu Panda and it predated 2020 twos reboot of Kung fu with a female lead. And so for us, you know, we don't necessarily want to be ahead of the curve, but we do think that we're at the right place at the right time to get this story out. So what's some advice you'd give to Asian Pacific islanders who are interested in creating more diverse representative stories through books and graphic novels. Well, I think today the floodgates have really opened at the landscapes entirely different from when I first began 30 years ago. I don't even want to use 30 years, but it's been that long. So the technology that enables people to make content is right there. People's fingertips before used to if you didn't work at a book publisher, you'd have to spend $10,000 a year on money for a vanity book. For you guys to make podcasts, you're reaching audiences, which you don't necessarily have to shake hands with. People can do the same through various other means of cartooning or getting books crowdfunded or other products. So I think that people have definitely been able to eliminate a lot of barriers to expressing themselves. But I do think that they still need to have something worth saying, something worth making. And it takes time to think about that and takes time to see how that plays in the marketplace of ideas of ten other people have said the same thing. Well, then how is your opinion or your packaging of that stance in different? So this still has to be the level of analytical surveying of the marketplace. Because we can definitely stand the repetition of an idea, but it has to be done in a way, which I think it's a somehow differently or more emotionally or personally than some other person who may have done it before. Yeah. We always like to provide a little time at the end for our guests to share any additional comments or ideas and so now's your chance. Thank you. Well, I think for a medium we've been around since 2005, we've made more than 50 books, most of them have been children's picture books. More than 40% of featured multicultural characters and themes. And now even now, 25% are bilingual. So we've really tried to address a marketplace where parents and kids want to see diverse representation, but also have amazing artwork, as well as different levels of meaning. So for our stories, we definitely try to appeal to Johnny or Sally or whoever, but we also want to appeal to their parents to have to read them a storybook at night. So it's been our pleasure to try to address both audiences simultaneously with what the art and narration and we definitely appreciate the opportunity to share these in a classroom and a school setting where a lot of these topics are addressed even for college aid students. Thank you so much for joining us on our podcast. I appreciate the invitation and we look forward to sharing new books with you guys. Thank you. We'll make sure that we link to the KickStarter for more awesome Asian Americans as well as to a medium. Yeah, so thanks and good luck to you guys. Thank you. Thank you. That's our show for today. Thanks again for listening to the Asian American history one O one podcast, part of the budding 1882 media network. You can add comments to the podcast directories or you can send thoughts questions or suggestions to our email at info at AA history one O one dot com. That's info info at AA history one zero one dot com. For links and info between podcasts, visit Asian American history one O one dot com. You can also find our social media links and press via our caspi located at CAS dot com slash AA history one O one. In our next episode, we'll be talking about the history of AAPI in professional sumo. Stay safe, bye. Bye.

Julie black Dark Horse Comics Asian Pacific islanders David Carradine Marshall Kung fu New York Sally Johnny
"chin" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

06:25 min | Last month

"chin" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Breville girls and that sort of led into people emulating that for African Americans, and immigrants and some other topics. But there weren't any about Asians, Asian Americans. They may have been one or two pages, but it was an illustration with the one page biography and we thought there was an opportunity there to tell stories that were more in depth and also not in this fairytale mode or there's a happy ending and everything's kumbaya. I think that for us, we wanted to recognize that's been hardship and travails and setbacks. And not everything's hunky Dory. And you can't tell that in one page. You can't tell that in 300 words. So we wanted to kind of expand the format and this was definitely a decision which I made in concert with my co author schiller on this school teacher in Boston and one calle the artist to do a 60 illustrations for 20 people. So it's a much bigger assignment than a 40 page picture book. And for us, we wanted to make it fully illustrated and make it like a movie or a dramatic show where there's a lot of cliffhangers and hooks and information coming at you from all sides. It's just not a linear linear chronology of that person's life. And I think by doing that, we're able to strike a chord and we got a great response. The first printing sold out, we printed a second printing. And that gave us impetus to consider some other stories because when people read the first book, they said, you know, why is it XYZ in there? Or why did you do it? Profile about a particular job of vocation. And so that guy is thinking, and we thought it was worth the gamble to try volume. Yeah. What's that process like in creating a book like awesome Asian Americans, how do you choose the different people to feature well, it's definitely a personal choice, but do you think it has to be a balanced choice? There is a formula for us and we want to be equitable. And diverse and inclusive and that's not buzzwords for us. The things that are sort of marching orders. So in the tales from the Chinese zodiac series, over 12 characters, 6 for girls, 6 or boys, they made friends with people 6 were girls, 6 for boys. So from the very beginning, we would have ended up on a consciously ignore part of the audience. And so for us, we wanted to do ten women ten men we wanted to do people from a range of countries of origin. A range of occupations and when you sort of put together that spreadsheet that matrix without Keanu Reeves in it, there's certain combinations which make sense, and even though you might feel partial to a particular person, we don't want to do 5 actors and we don't want to do 5 athletes. We want to mix it up and make sure that it's kind of this equilibrium there that everyone can see themselves or be interested in person. I love the intentionality that you just described because we go through that with our podcast because when you say Asian American history one O one. And again, it is Asian Pacific Americans, really. There are moments where we'll sit there and say, you know, we haven't done anything to talk about south Asians recently or Pacific islanders, or wow, we've been interviewing a lot of male chefs. I wonder if there's a female chef out there that we could interview. But it's providing balance and representation, even in a microcosm, even in within the group of Asian Pacific Americans. Yeah, and it's a hard thing to do. There's no one advising you to do that unless you're important directors. And even though you might have those people might not be representation of really conscious. So the push yourself at a comfort zone that you have and sometimes it's difficult and it's awkward, but you sort of have to keep pushing yourself to do that research that homework. If you can, could you tell us who some of the awesome Asian Americans were that you had to leave out? And whom we might see in a third book, possibly. Yeah, and the list is long. And there are a lot of famous names like Yo-Yo Ma and Christy, I'm a Gucci, and definitely they've done fantastic things. And they've been trailblazers. And we would definitely want to focus on them. But then for us, there are some names which are almost famous or who have famous faded over the decades. And we wanted to shine the light back on some of those people. And I think that for the people who are at the upper Strata of celebrity, they may not need us anymore to burnish their star. So there's nothing against them, but we do think that to make a more rounded and holistic type of view, there's no way that 20 people could do that anyways, but we wanted to take our shot and kind of spread the wall. Yeah. And this is a decidedly loaded question that we know the answer to already, but how can our listeners support the publishing of more awesome Asian Americans? Thank you very much for asking. So we have a current KickStarter on more awesome Americans, the SQL one two. And that's currently going until August 17th, 2022. But after that, if you don't, if you're not able to back it, we're aiming to publish it in November. So you're more than welcome to ask for it by name at your local bookstore or request it for addition to your local library. And we'll be sure to link to that in our podcast notes as well as we have this thing called cast pie, which is like linktree. And so make sure to put a link there so that people can easily get it. Very appreciate your help. Yeah. So Asians and Asian Americans have contributed so much to popular culture. And much like our podcast, you focus on a variety of things from ramen to fireworks to manga. How do you decide on a topic and what other things would you like to

schiller Keanu Reeves Yo Ma Boston Christy
"chin" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

06:29 min | Last month

"chin" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Your listening to Asian American history one O one, a podcast about Asian American history from generally known historical happenings to the deeper cuts that we don't hear about in school, where your hosts, Jen and Ted, the daughter and father team. Welcome to season two, episode 39. You can probably tell from my voice that this is not Jen. This is Zhang, Jen's mom. Substituting for Jen because she's busy being a real working woman on her first job. Ye Jen and thanks for joining us. I mean, the last time you've been on this podcast, you were a guest, actually. It's nice to turn the tables. Let's get to our episode. We're back with another conversation. We're both fans of books and have loved reading since childhood. For me, growing up during the 1970s, I can't think of any children's book authors that were of Asian Pacific descent. It doesn't mean that there weren't any, but the school library and local public library didn't carry them or feature them in any way. Yes, for me, it wasn't until I became a teacher and reading to our daughters that I discovered there were some books available, but books by API still weren't the universally available at the school or public library. Was pretty well established and he wrote children's books like junior thunder lord and some early readers and novels. Most notably his newberry winners dragon wings and dragons gate. There is also the calico winner grandfather's journey by Alan se, as well as so many books by grace Lynn, who wrote picture books, early readers, and novels. She's also an award winning author who is known for the ugly vegetables, national library award finalist when the sea turned silver, newberry winner where the mountain meets the moon and caldecott winner, a big mooncake for little star. But at the same time, it always felt like Asian Pacific Islander authors and representational stories about us were still hard to find. And there definitely weren't many publishers led by Asian Pacific islanders. If any, I can't think of any. That's why we're so excited that we were able to connect with Oliver chin. He's both an author and publisher, and has written more than 20 books, awesome Asian Americans is one of the many books he's written, and it's a critically acclaimed graphic novel on noteworthy AAPIs. One of his other books, the Asian Hall of Fame, explores the many cool things that were invented in Asia. He's also written tales from the Chinese zodiac, which includes 12 books, all centered around the various animals in the Chinese zodiac. Some of our favorite books of his explore diverse items that originated in Asia, but have become worldwide pop culture phenomena, like ramen, manga, and fireworks. Equally important, though, is his work as a publisher, dedicated to more diverse stories. Through a medium which he founded and leads, he's been able to publish books like the octa na series. By the writing team known as miomir, which really caught fire, and it's now an animated TV series. Oliver tin is making a difference for Asian Americans through his writing and publishing and we're so excited he's following up awesome Asian Americans with the book more awesome Asian Americans, which is available for pre orders, support through KickStarter. You'll find a link to it through this episode's show notes and through our cas pi. Please enjoy our conversation. Welcome to Asian American history one O one and thanks for joining us. Thanks very much for inviting me. So let's start with how you became an author. We've read that you have always loved drawing since childhood and that you went to Harvard to study popular culture and mass media. What was your journey like to becoming a published author? Yeah, I like most people who go to college. I was undecided, but I knew that I definitely loved drawing and cartooning. So I turned to school newspaper and I became the graphics editor and drew coaching 6 days a week, so I'm not sure if that really pleased my parents a lot. But at the same time, I was winding my way, seeing my path, academically, and I got attracted to learning about the role of mass media in American culture, which was definitely a new field of study for me. So combining both of those, I decided to get a job and publishing off the bet after graduating and then kind of went to try different other media, such as magazines, phantom and manga, and startups with the Internet. And so from those backgrounds and publishing and all forms of formats I decided finally take the plunge myself. And among your first books was the graphic novel 9 of one, a window to the world, which examined our world after 9 11. You ended up getting recognition for that from the library journal. Take us through what that meant to you to get that kind of acknowledgment for one of your first books, really. Yeah, separate here. And so for me, it was sort of the culmination of me trying to be a cartoonist. It was a 120 pages illustrated and written and it was sort of at the early first cycle of graphic novels out in American. So the big wave came later, but this was what they were called alternative comic because it was in a superhero comic. But for me, I had something to say, kind of had been balling up as I was working in my daily life. And to get recognition from library journal was definitely very important because even though it's a magazine read mainly by librarians, whether they're in public libraries or private schools, it did open a new window for me in the sense that I got to recognize the importance of libraries and librarians, especially for kids growing up. It's something to sort of take for granted just because you might pop into a librarian and check out a book. But there definitely are gatekeepers for education and a lot of ways just like teachers are. So from that point on top programs that every library system in the San Francisco Bay Area on comics and story times and I developed relationships with librarians at elementary schools and those have really been important avenues for me to get the word out about my future books. So you've written both fiction and non fiction work. What are aspects of each that draw you to tell those stories? Well,

Jen Ye Jen Alan se grace Lynn Asian Pacific islanders Oliver chin Asian Hall of Fame miomir Oliver tin Zhang Asia Ted library journal Harvard San Francisco Bay Area
Sebastian Is Joined In-Studio by 'Uncle Jimbo' Jim Hanson

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:19 min | 2 months ago

Sebastian Is Joined In-Studio by 'Uncle Jimbo' Jim Hanson

"He is none other than uncle Jimbo Jim Hansen. Welcome back in studio for one on one. Hi, good to be with you, Seth. All right, so we have to talk about this massive story that broke in which you are implicated as a co-conspirator as somebody who colludes colludes with those who believe that elections should have consequences. I think I heard a senator from Illinois one say that name was Barry Barry something. Anyway, let's put this story up. It broke last week. One of the longest pieces I've ever seen at axios with of course a rather unflattering picture of Donald Trump's chin, the presidential chin, a radical plan for Trump's second term by Jonathan Swan thousands and thousands of words. I don't know why I counted. I had 8 people who wrote this article. Jonathan Swan was assisted by 8. Have you ever had 8 people assist you write anything? I actually can write English myself. Okay. Okay, maybe it's the need another person to sharpen the crayon and choose the column. No, I'm not talking about marines behavior yourselves. The subject of this article was the discussion of what is it, two, three different new institutions, mega America first institutions that are planning for a second Trump term with the idea that there should be people in the government who do the job of the elected president, and that's the problem. Can you help me unpack that? Well, the problem is they've gotten used to the permanent bureaucracy, the deep state doing their bidding. So the idea is you come in and there's a certain top layer in all the executive agencies of political appointees that the new president comes in and replaces. The problem is everybody below that still is allegiant to the woke democracy and their socialist agenda. So now the left is figured out that during president Trump's first term, those people successfully undermined way too many things. He was trying to do. It's actually remarkable. Let me just interject here. Given that I witnessed the deep state in action, how much he achieved in those schools. Is it not? Oh, it's stunning. And that was just through sheer force of will. Yeah, that's the good thing about our team is we were motivated. Now we took that lesson and learned, we need a bench. We need a bench, who's ready to come in when we take the presidency in 2024, and we need to get rid of the people who are going to try and stop that

Jonathan Swan Jimbo Jim Hansen Barry Barry Donald Trump Seth Illinois America
Watch Sports in Person Is a Whole New Experience

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Watch Sports in Person Is a Whole New Experience

"I think I've talked about this on here before, but I'm gonna say it is for anybody who doesn't know it. There are different things about different sports that jump out when you're in person and you're up close that you can't get. For example, with hockey, you don't have a grasp on both how big and how fast those guys are. And they're moving on skates, right? You kind of got to get there to see that one. With basketball, what you're really don't get is how big those guys are. Like those dudes are built more like football players than you realize. We in this world where people act like somebody being like 6, 6, two out of ten pounds is small or something like that. These are big dudes with boxing. Ain't nothing more underrated than the jab. The jab is doing so much work. You just eat them cats out here with that right there. And you will think nothing of it because they'd be eating those jabs and keeping it going and then HD was like, oh no, look what happened when you hit this jab and you see the wave go across somebody's face, the jab doing work. The real punch, man, I watch triple G, knock somebody out with what appeared to be a body punch or maybe it was a body punch that turned into a punch into the chin, but I just remember seeing that and just being like, oh my God. I'm not a big fighter. Yeah, I'm not a big fighter, but I had somebody hit me with jab wants and that's when I decided we needed a hug it out. Whatever it was. Because it cleared my sinuses. You know, like, it cleared my ears.

Hockey Basketball Boxing Football
Bad Policy Begats Bad Results

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:54 sec | 7 months ago

Bad Policy Begats Bad Results

"Yesterday, the producer price index was released. It was up .8% from January up 10% year over year. Brian Westbrook joined me first trust portfolio senior economist. Brian, it just doesn't stop. They do not know how to stop this. Right. They don't. And you know, this is what happens. Bad? I mean, I know this sounds like easy to say, but bad policy begets bad outcomes. So you go back to the 1970s, we had higher taxes, more spending, more regulation, and we printed too much money. And the result was that not only did the U.S. economy take it on the chin with inflation we had stagflation slow growth plus high inflation, but when the U.S. economy takes it on the chin, the world takes it on the chin.

Brian Westbrook Brian U.S.
Costa Rica: A Place of Healing for Willy Mac

Fore The People

01:58 min | 7 months ago

Costa Rica: A Place of Healing for Willy Mac

"So what made you go down to Costa then? Obviously that's not cold. You just change a pace, just go and surf and surf instead of snow. Well, you know, I'd spent, like I said, my college career and big sky Montana and I had suffered a couple like horrendous injuries. My first one was, I blew my left knee up, like my first year, not that bad. But I blew up my medial collateral ligament. And that one healed and then maybe I had other injuries too. I broke my jaw like when you snuggled, if you land in a flat, you land and you hit your knee, you hit your knee with your chin. So I had that injury, which was bad. But then I had an avulsion fracture to my ankle, which is like a high speed like twisting and turning where you rip the ligament off the bone and it kind of splinters. And that one really sent me for a loop. Like I couldn't walk. I was in a straight cast for a while. And that one was that was hard to heal from, and I just needed to heal up. And I was like, man, you know, I used to surf a lot. Between high school and so I was like, man, I'm going to coast up, so I saved up some cash. We're down there for pretty relatively cheap, and you could stand on there for three months before you got whatever, go get another Visa or something. And so I went down there, I bought a ticket, I think it was like February to February March, April, may. I did a three month deal. And I didn't want to come home, man. I was freaking loving it. Hey, all you do is surf every day. And eat fruit, rice, beans, and fish. So you just get your shit gets tight,

Costa Montana
California Student Takes Stand Against Mask Mandates

The Larry Elder Show

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

California Student Takes Stand Against Mask Mandates

"Said it's mask or really uncomfortable. I'm here tonight to express how I feel about masks. Personally, I don't like them because they are really uncomfortable and hard to breathe in. Especially the paper ones. For example, whenever I come in the classroom after playing outside, my chin is really sweaty and it gets really uncomfortable to put the mask on. It is also hard to breathe when you just played for an hour straight, and it is even harder to breathe when you put the mask on afterwards. Another thing I want to mention is my skin breaks out and rashes because the mask irritates my face. Many students feel the same way as I do. Please hear our voice and give us the choice to not wear a mask. Thank you. Now, a Houston mother had a thing or two to

Houston
Doncic, Kleber lead Mavericks past Carlisle, Pacers 132-105

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 8 months ago

Doncic, Kleber lead Mavericks past Carlisle, Pacers 132-105

"Look look look look at at at at Dodger Dodger Dodger Dodger chin chin chin chin Reggie Reggie Reggie Reggie bullock bullock bullock bullock led led led led the the the the Mavericks Mavericks Mavericks Mavericks one one one one thirty thirty thirty thirty two two two two one one one one oh oh oh oh five five five five rather rather rather rather the the the the Pacers Pacers Pacers Pacers spoiling spoiling spoiling spoiling coach coach coach coach Rick Rick Rick Rick Carlisle's Carlisle's Carlisle's Carlisle's returned returned returned returned to to to to Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Carlisle Carlisle Carlisle Carlisle coach coach coach coach the the the the Mavericks Mavericks Mavericks Mavericks during during during during the the the the past past past past thirteen thirteen thirteen thirteen seasons seasons seasons seasons leading leading leading leading the the the the team team team team to to to to its its its its long long long long title title title title in in in in twenty twenty twenty twenty eleven eleven eleven eleven Dodge Dodge Dodge Dodge each each each each had had had had thirty thirty thirty thirty points points points points and and and and twelve twelve twelve twelve assists assists assists assists the the the the maps maps maps maps one one one one for for for for the the the the thirteenth thirteenth thirteenth thirteenth time time time time in in in in sixteen sixteen sixteen sixteen games games games games bullet bullet bullet bullet shot shot shot shot six six six six for for for for seven seven seven seven from from from from three three three three point point point point range range range range of of of of finish finish finish finish with with with with a a a a season season season season high high high high twenty twenty twenty twenty three three three three points points points points maxi maxi maxi maxi Kleber Kleber Kleber Kleber had had had had fifteen fifteen fifteen fifteen points points points points and and and and thirteen thirteen thirteen thirteen rebounds rebounds rebounds rebounds for for for for the the the the Mavericks Mavericks Mavericks Mavericks on on on on his his his his thirtieth thirtieth thirtieth thirtieth birthday birthday birthday birthday to to to to win win win win Washington Washington Washington Washington junior junior junior junior led led led led the the the the Pacers Pacers Pacers Pacers with with with with twenty twenty twenty twenty two two two two points points points points at at at at the the the the Monticello Monticello Monticello Monticello bonus bonus bonus bonus had had had had twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one with with with with fifteen fifteen fifteen fifteen boards boards boards boards on on on on the the the the ferry ferry ferry ferry

Mavericks Carlisle Pacers Mavericks Mavericks Dallas Dodger Dodger Dodger Dodger Chin Reggie Reggie Reggie Regg Rick Rick Rick Rick Carlisle Dodge Maxi Maxi Maxi Maxi Kleber Kle Washington Washington Washingt Monticello Monticello Monticello
The Market Can't Sustain Fictional Growth That's Not Anchored in Reality

The Trish Regan Show

02:00 min | 8 months ago

The Market Can't Sustain Fictional Growth That's Not Anchored in Reality

"As we go to air here, we've got a market that's been seen tremendous downside down roughly a thousand points there on the Dow, now down around 500 or so, we'll see how this winds up shaking out. But I think the reality is this Americans investors everywhere are waking up to the reality that you can't have this sort of fictional growth in the stock market that's not based on relevant growth within the rest of the economy. And as we increasingly look at a stagflation like environment, and that's what we're looking at right now. There are questions as to whether or not earnings will continue coming in with positive with positive growth. And we'll see how this plays out. There's been some big misses, right? You've got Goldman Sachs, which missed last week, you've got Netflix, which again took it on the chin today down about 5% in trading because it's not growing as quickly as people had anticipated all of this affect sentiment Microsoft Apple both which have earnings this week down about 2% Tesla down about 5%. Clearly, there's some jitters out there, and there's some jitters because you can't have such an inflationary environment without any growth. And that's the real fear right now. You got last week's jobless claims, which showed an uptick. You've got so many supply chain problems that are continuation of this whole COVID nightmare. And that's not going to change. Anytime soon, it's not like it's not like you can flip a switch and say, okay, the supply chains are back on. You still have ships on the West Coast that are struggling to offload. You've got a need for truckers to then take all of those products and get them out to Americans. I don't know about you, but every time I go to the grocery store, it's like you can't get what you need. Cream cheese for the bagels. Forget about it. I haven't seen you in about a month.

Goldman Sachs Netflix Tesla Microsoft Apple West Coast
Fox News Contributor Dr. Marc Siegel: 'There's Almost No Spread of COVID on Planes'

The Larry Elder Show

01:09 min | 10 months ago

Fox News Contributor Dr. Marc Siegel: 'There's Almost No Spread of COVID on Planes'

"Mark sego is the expert medical expert for Fox News. And on airlines ending mask mandates aboard flights hit what he said. First of all, this is happening Larry I bet because Southwest Airlines is down 16 points over the past month and American down 3% over the past day and they need to rally the stocks in the companies and they're probably down because of all the restrictions. Now, what is the science show? The science shows a Department of Defense study from last year showed that if a mannequin is wearing a mask, just the exactly the right way, it decreases spread on a plane. But the CEOs are making a great point, which is to help a filters take out 95% of viruses. That's right, 95%, and the entire air in the cabin recirculates every 6 minutes. The plane isn't where COVID is spreading. It's in the airport that it's spreading. And in terms of the masks themselves, have you been on a plane lately? They're wearing them off their chin. They're not wearing the proper mask at all. They're wearing a cloth mask, which has been proven not to work at all. I mean, if everyone was mummified and then N95, then they'd stop breathing probably, but that would actually work. So there's no reason that they're wrong about this. I don't see it.

Mark Sego Southwest Airlines Fox News Larry Department Of Defense
Oilers' Yamamoto scores in last minute in 5-4 win over Blues

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 11 months ago

Oilers' Yamamoto scores in last minute in 5-4 win over Blues

"Kalorama moto scored with just twenty eight seconds remaining to send the Oilers past the blues five to four we played a good getting them now she they came back in the third but on your chin and panic too much on the bench on there said stick to the game plan and I think that's what we did you know kind of stuck to it and you know found a way to win Edmonton wasted a two goal lead in the third period before Yamamoto notched his third of the season Ryan Nugent Hopkins and Ryan McLeod scored just eight seconds apart late in the second period to put the Oilers ahead forty two NHL points leader Leon rice at all netted his fifteenth goal of the season and added two assists Connor McDavid added a goal and two helpers Robert Thomas had three assists to coming on goals by Ivan Barbashev and Vladimir Tarasenko in the final period I'm Dave Ferrie

Kalorama Oilers Ryan Nugent Hopkins Ryan Mcleod Leon Rice Yamamoto Edmonton Connor Mcdavid NHL Robert Thomas Ivan Barbashev Vladimir Tarasenko Dave Ferrie
Smith's late goal lifts Hurricanes past Blues

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Smith's late goal lifts Hurricanes past Blues

"Brendan Smith's first goal of the season was the game winner with two fifty seven left as the hurricanes nip the blues three to two anytime you score your first with a franchise it's really exciting you you remember almost every play every who made the pass and I remember when my first one with the red wings and then with the Rangers in here it's just it's really it's really thrilling especially with the G. Doug Brady chance Sebastian I'll also scored for the hurricanes who avoided a second straight loss after holding a third period lead chase scored seventy five seconds into the game and our whole added a power play goal in the second Andrei Svechnikov for Tony deangelo both had two assists Alex Lyon had twenty seven saves in his Carolina debut probably Chevy chin Vladimir Tarasenko scored for the blues on the ferry

Brendan Smith Hurricanes G. Doug Brady Red Wings Rangers Sebastian Andrei Svechnikov Tony Deangelo Alex Lyon Vladimir Tarasenko Carolina
"chin" Discussed on Celtics Beat

Celtics Beat

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Celtics Beat

"Man, that was tough to watch last night to watch him hit like threes on dribble handoffs and just like, yeah, that's exactly what Boston needed to do. It was team for an Olympic fournier again. Yeah, and it's just unfortunate the COVID thing because I thought it was going to get there. And if he's like that, you don't need 9 straight threes before he went down with COVID. It was. I know. And it's like, man, it just didn't work out. And it's just the Celtics lock lately is just really unreal. It's just remarkable. I mean, between the Hayward, the Kyrie, the Horford leaving the canvas stuff. Now fournier on top that it's like, when will this end will they ever get a good break in their direction? Because it felt like there was a lot of positive momentum building up. And now it's just the other way. It's tiring. It's tiring to watch everybody else succeed off Celtics. It's just annoying. Everybody. But I will say Evan, coming into media day, you know, everyone is a breath of fresh air, fresh start for everyone. Al Horford literally bounced into the press conference room and it was just like, I am genuinely so happy to be back. What do you guys want to talk about? I mean, the happiest I've ever seen anyone on media day was Al Horford. And so it was awesome. And then jaylen Brown gets COVID, Al Horford gets COVID and Peyton Pritchard breaks his nose. And I was just like, oh, God, how did we get back here so fast? It's happening. It's last year on year. It started yet. What the hell's going on? So I'm hoping I'm just fingers crossed, gotta out of the way early. Maybe the timing is good. And maybe we'll just it's up from here. I really am eager to see not to spend too much time on him, but I am eager to see Al Horford back from not only because obviously of what he brings this team from defensively running the offense through them all sorts of look, we know who Al Horford is his basketball player. We saw it here for years. And I think most people, I know there was kind of a running gag about it at the time, you know, average Al versus all around Al versus all star Albers. Like, you know, people, no matter which side of that coin you're on and you see it through whatever eyes you want to see it through. Well, no, what Al Horford brings to the table and what kind of basketball player he is..

Al Horford Celtics Horford jaylen Brown Peyton Pritchard Hayward Olympic Boston Evan Al versus basketball Albers
In-N-Out Burger Clashes With San Francisco Over Vaccine Mandate

The Dan Bongino Show

01:45 min | 1 year ago

In-N-Out Burger Clashes With San Francisco Over Vaccine Mandate

"And all of a sudden in Al burger which is awesome by the way excellent is tasting a lot more awesomer And I just made that up That didn't work Here's the story It's from newsweek nonetheless San Francisco In-N-Out burger forced to close After not enforcing vaccination checks Don't get between people and their burgers You want to see a revolution grassroots organic coming tomorrow morning Get between a hungry dude and is In-N-Out burger Here's the quote from an In-N-Out burger This is great great We need more of these people We refuse to become the vaccination vaccination police for any government The In-N-Out burger spokesperson said we fiercely disagree With any government dictate that forces a private company to discriminate against customers who choose to patronize their business This is a clear government overreach Yeah Yes it is to all these other companies in America filled with patriots and liberty lovers Where are you on this We're all gonna take it on the chin a little bit Everybody we're all gonna have to give a little bit Doesn't have to be a pound of flesh Maybe a quarter pound I don't know but we're all gonna have to give something In-N-Out burger standing up I don't know their politics I don't care I know the burgers are damn good But what's gonna happen as these places say we're not doing it and all of a sudden they're dining room shuts down I think that's what I don't think the store shut down but I think the indoor dining room shut down You're gonna see as he's inconveniences pile up that even the most insane of Democrats is going to start to realize that it's their own totalitarian policies that do this It is going to take a

Al Burger San Francisco Patriots America
Jake Warner Describes How Alliance Defending Freedom Is Protecting America

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Jake Warner Describes How Alliance Defending Freedom Is Protecting America

"Sometimes we bring on folks from the ice spending freedom to help explain what it is that they do in case you don't already know. I have a with me, Jake Warner, who's a legal counsel with the alliance defending freedom and their client Scott chin. Guys, God bless you for coming on the program. Jake explain to my audience what this issue is about. Everywhere we look, there are issues like this. They're crazy. And if it weren't for 80, if the government would be getting away with murder, almost literally, go ahead and explain what this case is about. Sure. Thanks, Eric. A few months ago, the Washington Supreme Court said the state could punish a religious organization for declining to hire someone who did not share the religious faith of the organization. The Seattle's union gospel mission serves the homeless in the city of Seattle and they've done so for nearly a century. But back in 2017, a lawyer tried to apply for a position there, but he did not share their religious organizations beliefs. He didn't attend church. He didn't agree with the religious lifestyle requirements of the mission and he even applied trying to change the mission's religious beliefs to understandably the mission went with a different candidate. But this a lawyer turned around and sued the mission and the case went all the way up to the Washington Supreme Court and the Washington Supreme Court said that the mission could be punished for declining to hire this person. He did not share their beliefs. And we've now asked the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in and hear this

Jake Warner Alliance Defending Freedom Scott Chin Washington Supreme Court Seattle Jake Eric U.S. Supreme Court
Brooklyn Nets Ban Kyrie Irving From Team Over Vaccination Status

The Dan Bongino Show

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Brooklyn Nets Ban Kyrie Irving From Team Over Vaccination Status

"I'm telling you both something big is happening It's happening right now You're seeing Kyrie Irving a massive superstar in the NBA National Basketball Association The NBA is now saying hey guy can't play until we force him to get a vaccine You're seeing pushback everywhere It's happening right now Chest out chin up It's happening right now The beach ball of freedom can not be pushed underwater for that long It's natural inertia is to emerge from the crest of the water and express itself All right well a beach ball is not alive It doesn't have a will but you do And your natural will and inclinations to be free and to not be not to be told by a bunch of government swamp rats what to do with you and your body and the bodies of those in your family How long did they think this was going to persist Southwest the NBA Kyrie Irving you're seeing it now

Nba National Basketball Associ Kyrie Irving NBA
Parents Across US Revolt Against School Boards on Critical Race Theory

The Dan Bongino Show

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Parents Across US Revolt Against School Boards on Critical Race Theory

"That Biden and this entire administration and this whole leftist lurch we've taken as a society It's an embarrassing epic laughable fail And I'm thinking specifically the reason I bring this up is the growing national backlash to what's happening in front of school boards where parents are now in open revolt against their kids being taught to be racist by bigots who promote critical racism theory which is bigoted racist garbage It's overt racism It's out there in your face Judge people by the color of their skin It's over bigoted racism okay And there's been just a groundswell of support from parents to get this stuff ripped root and branch out of our school system and relegate it to the scrap heap of other horrendous ideas throughout history We are winning chest out chin up we are winning this battle It's not one but we are winning I can tell because the left is in a panic issuing statements upon statements retractions sticking the FBI on parents changing the name of CRT We have the left on the run The left knows they're caught We know they expose them They have no moral high ground CRT is racist It's for bigots We don't want it We want nothing to do with it They know they have no moral high ground and they are on

Biden FBI
"chin" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk: The First Season

"Or a two universes please tune in decide by talk because it's one of the last good things and is stupid tank there gene planet. Hi this is tony tomato. Welcome to this edition of sifi talk. I have a conversation with one of the actress from ghost in the shell. Chin-han wrongly during the beginning of the interview. I said i integrated for twenty twelve. Actually it was when he was on arrow and we spoke dark night at the time. That interview is available on his feet. If you want to hear about those appearances but this is mostly about ghost. The shell and an upcoming project he has. Let's go to my conversation. Coney hello we've spoken before a few years ago. We did we which movie was not for. I think it was for for a twenty twelve and we talked a little bit about dark knight to announce a lot of fun. Well gave us some great insights. Yeah yeah remember.

tony tomato Chin
Poland Imposes State of Emergency on Belarus Border

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Poland Imposes State of Emergency on Belarus Border

"A state of emergency has been declared by poland along its border with belarus. The government in warsaw claims that the belorussian authorities a pushing migrants in poland direction. There's also the added problem of upcoming military exercises led by russia but opposition politicians have pushed back against poland's move saying it's disproportionately tough joining me. Now from warsaw is johanna chin guy. Who's a political journalist for reuters. Good morning jonah. Morning just tell us. What's the situation. So currently poland had been well parts have been in a date of emergency since last thursday at the border right. Now there's a lot of military they're they're continuing to build a border fence And media and ngos are no longer allowed to be in that. Three radius of epa parts of the border. Do we know as a result of the fact that we have a media blackout on this but do not see what's happening. It's difficult to tell for that exact reason because there's no longer media on border her. Most of the time at there was basically ngo that was stationed at part of the border. Where thirty two migrants. Who are stuck. And they were giving daily reports about the situation and now that stopped so it's much more difficult to tell what's going

Poland Warsaw Johanna Chin Belarus Jonah Russia Reuters EPA
Lt. Col. Stuart Scheller Responds to Relieve of Duty for Criticizing Kabul Failures

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Lt. Col. Stuart Scheller Responds to Relieve of Duty for Criticizing Kabul Failures

"Oh, that's been going after him. Lieutenant Colonel Stewart Sheller, Public Enemy number one, Whitman was their hero, by the way, Love. Veneman weren't even allowed to say anything about Veneman, which made me say, you know, talk about him even more. Who's ever the left tells me not to talk about anything. You have to talk about it more. You have talked about it double and triple the amount. That's what they do. They try to silence you. The best way to break through that wall of silence is to flip them the double barrel middle finger and talk about it more. So it's just not right. How the left never seems to have any principles at all. They really object to this Stuart Sheller, calling out our military leadership, political leadership and others for not taking responsibility for the disaster in Afghanistan. Call him out, making public enemy number one. Yet when Veneman called out President Trump in uniform up to Capitol Hill, he was a hero. It's almost like the leftist No principles at all right. Well, he followed that up Stuart Sheller with another video. Where he's not apparently backing down at all. I don't know Stuart Sheller again. I can't Can't vouch for him because I don't know him. I don't. But I know for a fact that he took it on the chin here, and it's not backing down one bit. Check this out. Money can make you a slave to the system. And it can make you compromise what you truly believe in Don't need a single dollar. I just need every single person that's willing to go back outside the wire every single day to wear a blue collar and just go in and work every single day and feed their families. Those are the people that I need. Follow me and we will bring the whole thing system down. I am honorable. You can ask any Marine who served with me for 17 years. I dare you to ask them all and find out what I'm made of. We're just getting started.

Veneman Stuart Sheller Lieutenant Colonel Stewart She President Trump Whitman Capitol Hill Afghanistan
"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Instagram twitter They know that you know social matters. Social issues are important to you. I was wondering if you could take a moment to talk to us about the healing collective and black mental health matters. Yes so black. Mental health matters Was a fund that or a fund fund that was started by the healing collective last summer in the wake of a lot of the Social social unrest surrounding. You know anti black racism on a systemic level all across north america. Yeah this group of therapists here in toronto. Were like every black person should be in. Therapy and therapy is not always accessible. So let's put together a fund for people to be able to access therapy. So i saw that and it was like yes one hundred percent. I am myself in therapy. And it's great a highly recommend it. My wife is also a therapist. And i was like yeah. This is very important. what can i do. What can i do to contribute to this..

Instagram twitter north america toronto one hundred percent last summer
"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Almost like the failure of not having new music out and it was something that i'd actively known that i was gonna work toward. I didn't know that this was going to be. I didn't know that this was going to be the thing. That i ended up making because again kind of talking about that nebulous period whereas i just need to spend some time making music in kind of a no pressure mindset. And that's really what i did. So the songs that ended up comprising that that ep were things that i was just making randomly check like one of them is challenging myself to to reinterpret or read do attract do a new track using a sample or like a a that. I'd written like years and years ago and it was just sort of like. Yeah as i've gotten older. I don't feel like this reflects me or my musical taste anymore. I feel like i could just do this better now. Another to one track and another beat came out of this writing camp thing that i was invited to. That was helmed by baby face. Another one was just this thing again. Just hanging out with another friend playing music for each other back and forth and then we realized that we had to have the of the same song and then we put those together and then yet the the last thing that came together i think was or the last thing not the last thing that came together but the last track that i that i made to kind of solidify the ep to the last thing that i made that where i knew it was like cool. I have enough music for this now. Was the track with shad and how to do because it was like. I know what all the other songs are. And i know what's missing. I know if i make this thing that's missing. I can give it to chad going to know what to do with it and it'll be. It'll be a wrap that that those were the various various disparate spaces. I was in when i made each of those different tracks and at some point sort of realized along the way. Oh these all belong together. Okay you said a while ago that you're working on a new ep..

one track one shad years each them
"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Are owned by promotion companies right like not individual promoters and venues don't necessarily have their own individual in-house promoters they you know. They and the promotion companies are essentially synonymous right. So you think about danforth music hall which is owned by embrace which is in turn now owned by live nation. That's a that's just three sort of parties or three degrees of the thing but that also that one venue accounts for so much money and so much activity and so much opportunity in live music in toronto. And then you multiply that by how many venues that embrace and or live nation owns and then the other ones that they don't necessarily own but obviously get i think priority access to And then you also in the same breath kind of have to put those up against individual venues that are like oh yeah like a couple of people who own a bar together and they're trying to get some dj's or they're trying to get some live acts in an all this other stuff and even before the pandemic migra. My greatest lament for toronto live music was the erosion of sort of like the middle class of artists. Because you know you know twenty thousand nine hundred if you were nobody just coming up out of your bedroom for the first time trying to get a gig. You weren't necessarily going to land at the drake hotel but there was like maybe a coffee shop somewhere or a small bar or some sort of diy. Venue that you'd be able to get into and do stuff and you wouldn't make any money you'd probably lose money but you know you're really only trying to get twenty people out at a time and and there's plenty of space for that to happen or you are ono. Push a t who is like one of the last shows. I remember playing at a danforth musical. Or you're flying lotus. And you're touring with Support so there isn't even any need for a local opener or your whoever right and you're playing these much larger shows or your the chain smokers playing the acc right. Like there's there's stuff way up at the top and they're way down at the bottom and those of us in the middle class we kind of have you know the same six venues to juggle between all of us and you know. They're closing by the day at or and or they have a very stacked schedules right. And it's very difficult to get into those venues. Even when you personally know people who book those shows or program you.

twenty people twenty thousand toronto six venues first time one three degrees nine hundred drake hotel one venue pandemic migra three sort of parties much couple of people shows lotus
"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Spend the time learning how to use twitch or learning how to use ob ass or whatever people will just do it and people will have a good time and it'll be a different kind of good time but people will do it and there's no there are just aren't any more excuses in terms of what's good enough so when we when we get back to like when we get past this The streaming stuff aside when we talk about live shows with the loss of so many venues. And it's just getting just gets worse by the day. It seems that's an it is what it is do you see. Do you see that level set happening in the live venue circuit. Or do you. Do you think it's going to become more of a challenge for up and coming musicians with with the with the loss of places to play. I think that we're beginning. I don't think that any one event is really going to be a sal- like i just don't like i don't see any of these. Even these unprecedented events actually doing much to move the needle when this is all over and we and we have the opportunity to go back to the way it was of course people are gonna go back to the way it was the vast majority especially those who wielded power over the situation before right like why would a like what incentive do they have to do anything differently or to approach things differently. I don't think there's anybody anybody any significant position of power in the music industry. That is doing things out of the goodness of their heart or doing things. I think it's it's it's good for the culture overall or it's good for artists or it's good for any of the that's not real like i cannot be convinced that is truly a significant enough motivation for people who are doing stuff like managing and balancing billions of dollars in raffin or lives so revenue and multiple venues or even one venue right like at the end of the everyone has bills to pay balance sheets to balance But what i think is going to come out of this or has at least begun to come out of this is.

billions of dollars one venue one event so many twitch
"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Experience of being able to do that from the comfort of my own home and and you'll still have like an audience who comes back for that and have you know people who continue to seek that out or discover that and validate that and be like. Oh this is such a cool thing. You're doing it's it's great and now i'm just like yeah i'll never go back. Why would i do anything else. So it sounds like you know once you know oh it is not a thing as large as it is now you know. Bunch of people are getting vaccinated. It sounds like you'll probably do more shows like you did at the shop where it's maybe invite only it's a it's a it's a pop showed you know you're not advertising it all over the place versus you know you're you're part of a bigger show you're one of maybe a few other people you're playing at a place that people know and go to for a certain types of music it sounds like you've you've figured out what you what you wanna do. It sounds like this pandemic has really helped you that way. Yeah i mean. I don't necessarily know that. I'm gonna continue to do like secret. Shows or whatever like that all the time because it is still a bunch of work and especially like if i'm not getting to do other kinda shows elsewhere. Where tour or anything like that. But it's nice to know that. I now have the option to do that. And now also have a year of credible evidence to validate houses and things. Because now i can just be like. Hey you know. I wanna play this show where i wanna play this way or this is what i wanna do. And you know. I can pitch shows or try to work with a motor venues or whatever to do a certain type of show. And if they're not feeling it then i can just be like well cool. I didn't need you for a whole year. I don't really need you now. i can like i know what to do otherwise alternatively this is this is fascinating. Greg i don't know what you think. Paul i'll be honest with you. We've spoken with you know almost on a weekly basis we're talking with musicians and a lot of are just you know are are just not playing are are longing for when they can go live. They're you know they're some livestream stuff you know here and there but it seems you've really leaned into this and greg. I haven't. We haven't really spoken to a lot of people that i agree. I agree it's a it's been a fascinating chat with you because Yes cream said like so many people are ted. They're they're nervous of temptation about it or whatever you just really even braced him in. It's awesome. I i mean i don't really mean to come off as like An anti live show person or anything like that..

Greg Paul cream greg Bunch of people
"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Welcome welcome. Welcome thank you for joining us. Really appreciate the time. Yeah thanks for having me. it's Nice to talk to people who don't live in my own house. You have a lot of people there that live in your house that you're sick and tired not a lot. i mean. I'm not sick and tired of any of them and my best friend and that's cool but it's also just. They're still the same people they were a year ago. And i'm all out of variety can't believe as soon as you said that it has been almost a year up on our one it is. It is nuts. So let me ask you this right off the bat. Then how how have you been keeping. This becomes a surprise to literally anybody. But i'm good. I'm good. I'm built for this life And all it took a global pandemic to allow me the luxury to live with it. Yeah i mean this even before this. My my whole ethos has gradually become one of our really. Wanna leave the house. Unless i'm going out to get paid or going out to get my friends paid You know. I'm just trying to have a good time and then come home and just make stuff that i like and yeah now i have every excuse in the world to do that and i get to look sponsoring kind and caring human being doing so did you. Did you have your your like. Did you have your whole setup in studio in the house before we went. Got into all this. Yeah not on the level it is now because as you faces and glowing sony a seven three camera acting as a way overpowered webcam and if the gopro behind was back i could hit a switch. And then you'd see that. Yeah it so. Everything was in the house and i finally just had an excuse to spend the last little bit of money just kind of pulling it all together so that i never have to leave ever again once one incredibly antisocial i realize but it's just i don't like a lot of stuff. I just really liked the things that i like and now i just had to find that enthusiasm for things that i like inside my own house. That's what i'm doing now. Fair enough fair enough are you also. You've sort of spruce. Stop in spiced up your setup there. Are you also one of those people. That's looking for a bigger places. Well i mean who can afford to look for any other place than the ones they're the pandemic was going to finally lace of justice to the real estate market in toronto. And no it only exacerbated thing. So i don't know i mean in general i'm not i hope i never have to move. Been at the place i've been at was like two thousand and twelve and we're very happy here. You know. my wife also works from home a lot of the time as well. We have the space in the freedom and the flexibility to do that..

toronto a year ago sony two thousand and twelve one three camera gopro seven
"chin" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"Made <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <hes> <Music> a playlist <Speech_Male> songs <Speech_Male> that reminded <Speech_Male> me of <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> past year. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> And i <Speech_Male> talked <Speech_Male> with a playlist. <Speech_Male> Was locked down <Silence> by anderson pack <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and i forget. The <Speech_Male> kids need me did that. I just <Speech_Male> wanna live song <Speech_Male> and on top <Speech_Male> of that. <Silence> It just <Speech_Male> went <Speech_Male> all over the <SpeakerChange> place but it <Speech_Male> was just <Speech_Male> really tied <Silence> into <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> him <Speech_Male> sauna freedom. <Speech_Male> You know those kind of things <Speech_Male> like uplifting <Speech_Male> songs <Speech_Male> are white reinspired <Speech_Male> me <Speech_Male> and then on top of that <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I've been really. <Speech_Male> I've <SpeakerChange> been really <Silence> <Speech_Male> checking <Speech_Male> out. <Speech_Male> Producers on twitch <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> watching <Speech_Male> disclosure. A lot <Speech_Male> is a producer <Speech_Male> in banker named <Speech_Male> almo. <SpeakerChange> I was watching. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I watch this <Speech_Male> thing on a <Speech_Male> clive davis the other <Speech_Male> day and <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> i think <Speech_Male> i wanna make a playlist. <Silence> Clive davis play list. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And that <Speech_Male> would include everything from patti <Speech_Male> smith to <Speech_Male> whitney. Houston <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> bruce <Speech_Male> springsteen to the <Speech_Male> grateful dead to <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> luther <Speech_Male> vandross busta <Speech_Male> rhymes <Speech_Male> for all williams <Speech_Male> to out. <Speech_Male> Can you know like so <Speech_Male> much. There's so <Speech_Male> much <Speech_Male> Am i listen to <Silence> anything. That's new <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not actively <Speech_Male> but fairly <Speech_Male> new <Speech_Male> right <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Male> really like some <Speech_Male> of the new taylor swift <Speech_Male> action. She's incredible <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> constantly. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm constantly <Speech_Male> on the hunt for good rock <Speech_Male> music. <SpeakerChange> I don't <Speech_Male> know any right now <Music> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm sad that there's <Speech_Male> no such thing as alternative <Speech_Male> anymore. <Speech_Male> You know 'cause like i would <Speech_Male> love to hear somebody that <Speech_Male> likes cocteau twins <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> I listened <Speech_Male> to all be opposites <Speech_Male> rap music all the <Speech_Male> time because i'm always <Speech_Male> working in that medium <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> zappa <Silence> sometimes. <Silence> <Speech_Male> Have you seen <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> now. I can't <Speech_Male> wait. Alex <Speech_Male> winter <Speech_Male> on my god. It's so <Speech_Male> good it is still good. <Speech_Male> You got. <Speech_Male> I'm going. And then <Speech_Male> i wanna watch the bbc. I <Speech_Male> wanna watch the. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> i've heard the beaches <Speech_Male> one. A lot of people really <Silence> love that. <Speech_Male> Yeah i mean. <Speech_Male> They're incredible <Speech_Music_Male> yeah. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't know man <Speech_Male> that's a hard question <Speech_Male> for someone like me because <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you know it's always interesting <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> because you get <SpeakerChange> a very <Speech_Male> different <Speech_Male> answer. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's not just <Speech_Male> what they do <Speech_Male> for a living as just everybody's <Speech_Male> got a different view on <Speech_Male> what <SpeakerChange> they are and are <Speech_Male> not listening to you so i appreciate <Silence> that thank you <Speech_Male> <Silence>

"chin" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"To some unlike drake or the weekend as much wrap as it is or rb as it is if you listen to the weekend you hear susan badchi's sampled in their music or you could hear drake did a whole record based on liqi lee samples. You know like not everyone knows that. Oh oh toronto. Toronto musicians know that. I remember in toronto hanging out with a group of us and i'd like to think a lot of us were like pioneers of what's going on in that city now because those same postal in may and present company included are responsible for some of the cool things that are happening our city. You know so. It's pretty cool ahead. I was going to say. I think it was reflective in. I think back to the eighties eighties in the nineties. Like our our live. Music seton are live. Music scene reflected that as well. I mean you it go to lee's palace and you'd have you know a skull band open up for funk rock band in the closing band a folk. It was just a real mess and then did you remember in lease pal. They had a place called the tunnel and there was a dance club after a punk show. You know it's it. I don't know how to describe revoked. I don't know how to describe it but it's it's I remember listening to motorhead. And then being okay to listen to us know trump ques- or grandmaster flash or dale. You're listening to fishbone and then listening to joy division and being okay like i didn't have to belong to one thing and acting go and i can tell you these stories. I can go on and on now. I'm not saying that everybody was like me right. But there is a group of people that are like me and mostly in the creative people most creative Were as eclectic as i am if not more and some of them even were able to like. We have a band in toronto while the statics. And they're like there. Were like our david. Byrne david bowie. Are you know the wonderful project a whale music. We were opening up for them..

susan badchi liqi lee drake toronto lee's palace seton Toronto Byrne david bowie david
"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"chin" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Go man ever going to get hired. You go like admit not that. I'm dying to country record but there's never a rock wreck. There might be a rock record. That i wanna do. But i won't get it will you know. And that's been the story of my musical life as a producer. I just do what i do. And people don't know where to put me but now that actually works in my favor. Because an artist i love just like that so the reward is work getting to work with the people that i want to work with. That's the reward. It's not the other stuff. So jim one of the questions i would like to ask. Our guests is around. What what's what's earbuds lately like. What are you listening to I've.

jim
"chin" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"chin" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Chin in her late twenties newly released video of a police shooting in Pasadena shows the man who was killed had a gun and fired at officers through his windshield the shooting last month happened when officers tried to use a pit maneuver to stop the man's car and then crashed head on into a police car the video also shows the man get out of the car and files several more shots officers fired back a federal investigation has disrupted the LA city council just before councilman Jose Huizar his initial appearance before a federal judge on a racketeering charge the council voted unanimously for a suspension we saw was arrested yesterday morning this is the first time a Rico charge has been used with respect to the city council US attorney Nick cannon says weeds are is the fifth person to face charges in an investigation of city hall that he calls on going and we're gonna follow the evidence wherever it leads and we're gonna bring everyone to justice that we can identify and it's as weeds are greed to accept at least one point five million dollars in bribes from developers to push through projects in downtown Chris and Carla okay fine New Delhi school board has voted not to cut the school police department's budget by ninety percent a board member had proposed the cut to help fund programs for black students advocates for school police say officers got one hundred thousand calls last year including major incidents like shootings and bomb threats and sexual assaults LA county sheriff's deputies will soon get body worn cameras county supervisor mark Ridley Thomas says the money's there all thirty five million it is a bit of an embarrassment that it is taking the county of Los Angeles so long to get to implementation there has been some back and forth between share Vienna wave in the supervisor but Ridley Thomas told me that's because the sheriff was new and didn't understand how to roll out such a mammoth project I'm pleased that now it's position to roll out in the next three to four months and that's the responsibility of the sheriff's department to do so Steve Gregory KFI news and for a deeper dive into this topic join KFI Steve Gregory this Sunday at four PM for a two hour special on policing LA mayor Garcetti says he and stands the role of police unions even if they're critical of him there said he was asked during a panel discussion yesterday if you supported a ban on union spending money on political campaigns that I had at one point five million dollars spent against me by police union when I ran for mayor I think it's tough to outlaw that given the first amendment but I think it's not bad discretion given this moment Garcetti was part of a group of lawmakers who are promoting the George Floyd justice in policing act which would federalize portions of police training and disciplinary action Garcetti says police.

Chin Pasadena
"chin" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"chin" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Chin on zoom and the man creating date nights outside of his pregnant wife's hospital window that story about twenty minutes from the tech world there are three things that may result in a better post pandemic world one is video conferencing another is robotics which is getting a ton of attention right now and a third is three D. printing here's what to watch for from rob Enderle founder of the Enderle group rob your take first thing I picked was video conferencing and M. Porter conferences we were being asked to work at home and now we're discovering all the shortfalls of bitter video conferencing tools either this is the technology out followed since the mid sixties when I first came to market at that Disney world after that the world's fair in New York and be up and the problem is that most of this is going to be that the standard way of of doing calls and it wasn't about bands course your state was until I think the nineteen eighties only next had a pop up or we're going to try to do it deployed inside companies backed but while I was involved with was with apple and employees were so convinced that their CEO was spying on them that that that that though they taken their apple had to put the mobile all the cameras on their desktop you refuse to use the blood work in week a week after the seventies and stuff it was very hard to use did not operate we got to the eighties we had system and the dog is made up we read up in the nineties I did operate a puritan operate great problems to get the two thousand and and up but then that we have things like these five pop up but a family worked on apple so it was just very odd to me that at this particular point hundred we've kind of figured out the phone stated to work with other phones we couldn't figure out the teleconferencing systems needed to work with other teleconferencing systems and now because of this critical need without starting to drive an interoperable at least one system can have contact another and of course we had zoom pop up out of no where it kind of takes your car industry by storm just by making stuff easy and by not being tied to a particular platform now they but now there's just a ton of work going on we speak with rob Enderle principal and founder of the Enderle group we're talking about a piece he's written for tech news world entitled three improvements the cobit nineteen pandemic may for stars references via video conferences also tossed in their reconsidering robot robotics yeah well it's because you know a lot of the issue with regard to this call but if that is that although some of the people that you absolutely need are at the forefront of the of the of the panel recyclables that risk of getting sick with that first responders could be receptionist but it's the it's the people that you have that are facing other people because of how you're going to catch the disease as people that can't work remote but we're today we could actually replace a living people with robots that are remotely controlled by those people and so and so now suddenly rather than waiting for a time to meet up whatever race it's wonderful headed a performer place but there are short cuts that we can take we can use robots but but we use robots to disarm bombs they those are you know a ton about vehicles those are controlled remotely by a specialist to that goes in and deals with the bomb from a safe distance as it goes up it takes out the robot but it doesn't take out the employees so that so that kind of effort as well as really stepped up and we're certainly seeing the factories that are highly automated where the workers are at least partially spread are doing far better to say packing plants finish up with the three D. printing what three D. printing it really comes down to it and it ended up and three D. printing is is designed to kind of report revolutionize manufacturing and if you think of a big manufacturing plant in a way it's up to the three D. printer with people at that right now if you take those people out and you had a baby factory plant were robbed reels came in with three D. printers are being seen as a way to reduce substantially the the the incidence of of infection because what a three D. printer does rather than having to do a lot along logistics chain any one of which could have could be affected they manufacture the part right there on site raw materials and thus reducing the number of people that have to interact with that particular component and reducing the potential for that for that infection to spread into the plant and so it really providing a way for three D. printers to have another reason to justify their existence and that there are far safer technology than other forms of public supply is rob rob Enderle principal and founder of the Enderle group it's twenty one minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend okay.

Chin
"chin" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"chin" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Chin it's a stunning reversal for that signature case brought by special counsel Robert Muller at the time in court documents filed today the justice department says it's dropping the case quote after a considered view of all the facts and circumstances of this case including newly discovered and disclosed information about scores wanted George runs on eight also would tell hold out come the Supreme Court of Texas has ordered a Dallas salon owner to be released from jail after she was found in criminal contempt of court the announcement came shortly after governor Greg Abbott said Jackson's cannot be jailed for violating state wide executive orders as some businesses are allowed to reopen there's a sharp divide partisan divide in the Senate over what should be included in the next coronavirus relief package barbecue has more in this report minority leader Charles Schumer says thanks to covert nineteen we are looking at what seems to be the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression Republican Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says that's why Congress has been quick to respond our nation is poured on president of resources and defending Americans health and blotting the damage to our economy but before doling out hundreds of billions of dollars more Republicans are seeking an accounting of the nearly three trillion dollars already spent but like new capital hill governor Andrew Cuomo is extending new York's moratorium on outbreak related either chins that moratorium is now extended until August twentieth on Wall Street the Dow had two hundred four points the nasdaq.

president executive Dallas Supreme Court of Texas special counsel new York Andrew Cuomo Robert Muller Congress Mitch McConnell Charles Schumer Senate Jackson Greg Abbott George justice department