35 Burst results for "Chilean"

Thomas wins 2nd PGA title in playoff after 7-shot rally

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Thomas wins 2nd PGA title in playoff after 7-shot rally

"Justin Thomas has posted a record equal income from behind victory at the PGA Championship a racing a 7 shot deficit at the start of the day Thomas fired a closing 67 to tie wields alla Torres at 5 under after regulation play and then the 29 year old won a three hole decider with a two under par total It was very calm in the playoff I was calm the last couple of holes I just I felt I felt like I could do what I wanted to do which is really all I could ask for Chilean mito Pereira led by one on the last hole but blew his chances of winning with a double bogey 6 to fall back into a tie for third It was a second major title for Thomas and his 15th career win on tour I'm Graham agar

Justin Thomas Alla Torres PGA Chilean Mito Pereira Thomas Graham Agar
PGA updates | Justin Thomas wins 2nd PGA title in playoff

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

PGA updates | Justin Thomas wins 2nd PGA title in playoff

"Justin Thomas has posted a record equal income from behind victory at the PGA Championship a racing a 7 shot deficit at the start of the day Thomas fired a closing 67 to tie wields alla Torres at 5 under after regulation play and then the 29 year old won a three hole decider with a two under par total Chilean mito Pereira led by one on the last hole but blew his chances of winning with a double bogey 6 to fall back into a tie for third It was a second major title for Thomas and his 15th career win on tour I'm Graham agar

Justin Thomas Alla Torres Chilean Mito Pereira PGA Thomas Graham Agar
Simpson's early 65 proved low score was possible at PGA

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

Simpson's early 65 proved low score was possible at PGA

"Mito Pereira is the surprise leader after three rounds of the PGA Championship the 27 year old Chilean firing at 69 to move to 9 under establishing a three shot blade of a will's ala tourist and Matt Fitzpatrick that on a cold and windy day the so many top players struggling Cameron young fired a 67 to move in a contention at 5 under Mexican Abraham answer is next at four under and former major champions bubba Watson and Justin Thomas still have a chance among those at three under the card I'm Graham agar

Mito Pereira Matt Fitzpatrick Cameron Young PGA Justin Thomas Abraham Bubba Watson Graham Agar
"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

01:43 min | 7 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Them, you help us offer the show for free. This is the final episode of our series Chilean mine.

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

08:18 min | 7 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"The San Jose. Yeah, The Rock is really, really hard to drill through, but it's drillable. The problem is that you have to drill down the length of this mine space that's essentially as deep as the tallest building on earth is tall. It's almost 2000 feet that you're aiming for a spot that's 2000 feet away. And you have very bad blueprints of the mine. And you're working against time, the mountain itself is very unstable. And so it's sort of like, you know, like when you I'm in California, so in California, we have aftershocks after earthquakes. And so after the huge collapse of the mine, there were all of these aftershocks, you know, the mine had these smaller collapses continually happening. And so there was this fear that even if they did manage to carve a tunnel down to the miners, which they, when they found them, they started to carve this sort of channel that that channel itself might collapse thanks to the instability of the mind and trap one of the miners inside as he was being pulled out. So nothing like this had ever been done before. You know, there was a similar rescue, for example, I think in West Virginia and a coal mine where the rock is not nearly as hard, but also it was just maybe a hundred feet or so. So having to drill almost 2000 feet through this hard rock, really, really difficult thing. And once they even started to build this bigger hole, sometimes the drills would break, you know, under this sort of pressure and the weight of what they were trying to do. And finally, you know, Chilean government has to come out with a way to get them out, so they contact the Chilean navy and the Chilean navy designs this capsule and they call it the Phoenix, right? Because rebirth and the Phoenix. And that's how the rescue ends up proceeding. When you see these Phoenix capsules, because the footage is all online. I don't know. My jaw dropped, honestly, because it looks just like a little bobsled or like a skeleton sled. You know what I mean? And I would imagine there's not even a centimeter on either shoulder and you'd be in that thing because the journey was 40 minutes to the top, right? Yes, at the beginning it was very, very slow, and yes, absolutely. That's a long time to think about everything they used went through. Yeah, and that was really, that was one of the nice, most remarkable things that I remember from my interviews was talking with a couple of the men who described how they had this moment of seeing their lives flash before them. So Florence two avalos, who was the first one out, said, you know, I remembered the day that I met my wife. I remember the day my children were born. I remembered all the things that happened to us in the mine. And it was like seeing a movie of all the things that had happened to us and to me in my life. And it was this rebirth. You know, and another thing too was that on the surface, you have mostly women, the women of the family, sort of organizing, you know, the families on the surface. And one of them told me, you know, I was really worried because I thought of the men coming out of that mountain. It was like they were passing through a birth canal, and anyone who's ever given birth knows that it's a dangerous and potentially deadly process. You know a baby can get stuck. It's a very, very sort of tenuous kind of moment. And so there was this sense that the mountain was getting birthed to these men. And so all of that, all of that was part of this sort of psychological experience of being rescued. Brought to you by Disney+ in the world according to Jeff Goldblum, an original series from National Geographic, now streaming only on Disney+. Join Jeff Goldblum for another unexpected and surprising journey as he discovers extraordinary wise behind seemingly ordinary things like magic monsters and her love of dogs. National geographics, the world according to Jeff Goldblum, now streaming only on Disney+. The 33 were trapped underground for 69 days and I read that gave them a Guinness World Record, right? Yeah. It was a world record of, yeah, absolutely. And what's the aftermath of something like that? How did their lives change after they exited the mine? I think that the hard part was dealing with the celebrity of it and dealing with the fact that you had a whole country calling you a hero when you in fact felt small and you felt crushed. Being buried alive for 69 days, it makes you feel almost as if you've been abused by nature. And so you had men who are recovering from this abuse and who have the psychology of survivors of abuse and trauma, which is a message that tells you, you're not worth anything. And yet you have the world telling you you're a hero, but you don't feel like a hero. One of the wives of one of the miners told me, that was the worst thing they ever could have done was to call them heroes. The Chilean Congress gave them a gold medal of Chilean heroism. And so that was very, very difficult for many of the men. Then you also have people asking them for favors because there was this movement around Chile to provide money to the miners, one Chilean entrepreneur said he was going to make sure that every minor had a $1 million, you know, to his name, didn't really happen. So suddenly, the rest of the world thinks that you're rich guy. You know, one minor told me I have relatives who I haven't heard from in years coming up to me and asking me for loans. You know, we're telling me, hey, you know, my roof is collapsing or my son is sick and I don't have money for the doctor. And to feel the pressure of that, you know, and not being able to help because you don't have that much money. I think they got the equivalent of like a year's salary is probably what they all got. But, you know, they had these expectations of becoming wealthy and rich that never really materialized. And many eventually realized I need to go to back to work. Fortunately, the vast majority of them found jobs in mining companies or other companies, where they didn't have to go underground, a few actually did go back down underground, which itself was its own psychological catastrophe for some of them to have to go back underground. So it was it was difficult. It was really difficult for them. And then, you know, in Chile, they became such objects of media scrutiny that to a lot of people, they became a joke. A lot of reaction was like all these losers. You know, these guys who get trapped and they think that they're entitled to to be treated like heroes. And really, you know, yeah, and they treat it treated them like reality television stars. You know, they had that sort of level of disrespect for them. Interesting. So while they're being called heroes, they weren't being treated like heroes. And for these men, even on a normal day, let's forget about the 69 days trapped, going from a minor to international celebrity without that experience in the middle would be a pretty sharp adjustment. But with this coming fresh out, you're born into the world again, and then all of a sudden you're thrown into all of this fame. No wonder you don't know what to do. I don't blame them. No, absolutely. And they did receive some attention to their psychological needs. A lot of them did group therapy sessions. And I remember one describing to me going into these first sessions and just getting extremely nervous when the therapist closed the door to the session room. Don't go. You leave the door open, you know? Yeah. That kind of level. You don't need a lot of his girlfriend, described to me him coming home and waking up in the middle of the night and putting on his mining helmet and the flashlight and just, you know, just having because he was having this nightmare that he was still trapped in the mine. So there was a lot of sorrow in a lot of suffering that they went through.

Chilean navy Jeff Goldblum Phoenix Disney California Chilean government Guinness World Record avalos earthquakes San Jose Chilean Congress West Virginia National Geographic Chile trauma
"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

07:57 min | 7 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Then also spirituality, you know, at least nightly prayers when they would share their thoughts, they would apologize to each other. And so that sort of that element of just spiritual unity really, really kept the men together. And then, you know, the other thing that was really important was just that everybody had these different skills. And everybody sort of contributed what their skills were. You know, there was one man who was electrician and he was able to sort of rig lights together down there, right? There was another guy who had been an athlete and he was sort of really attuned to the body and, you know, the injuries of the man, he sort of tended to people's injuries. He only arios very, very kind, you know, man. You know, he had experience giving shots to his wife. And so they appointed him to be the doctor. And there was another guy, you know, juana yannis, who was just an ordinary life, kind of a busy body and kind of, you know, someone who talk on end, but suddenly when you're trapped, the guy who can tell stories and wants to talk on, and that person's really useful, you know? So want to Yanis would tell stories about when he served in the Chilean army and then he would talk to them about Chilean labor Lion at law and say, look, if we die down here, men don't worry, which laying government is going to be obliged to pay all this amount of money to our families will be okay. So, you know, many different people step forward with different skills and I think that that in that situation just realizing that people are different and that everybody has something to contribute is really one of the most important things that you can do. And then, after 17 days of psychological torture, of drills just narrowly missing over and over one finally punches through, and then everything changes. Did the miners explain what that moment was like? A lot of the men fell to their knees. It was, you know, because first of all, the drill bit is this object from the surface with these teeth that are very fine. It looks like something like it looks like an alien. It looks like something from another world. And it certainly burst into their space where they've been trapped. And you know, many of the men fell to their knees and started praying. It's like, oh my God, it's happened. It's happened. And the man who had been leading the prayers, you know, the self appointed past. He said, the O 6 easting, God exists. And so was this a profoundly spiritual moment. And they all started to celebrate. There's a picture of them that they took of themselves underground in the moments after. They look like guy celebrating, like, you know, at some frat party, you know, they're all without their shirt Tom because it's so hot and they're all sweaty and everything. But they have their arms around each other and they're holding these bottles of dirty mind water that they've been drinking, but they are absolutely ecstatic because they they've been given another life. There was a lot of initial excitement when the drill did break through, but I think that excitement probably dwindled quickly when they found out that they're not getting out there getting back up to the service tomorrow. It might be months until they get out. What became their major challenge at that point? That was a cause of a lot of depression and anxiety among the men. The idea that they were going to have to sort of wait in this marathon. What happened is, well, first of all, the men start getting letters from their family members, which at first are very, very, you know, just their exhilarated to get these letters. But then they start hearing about the problems on the surface, and then they start getting newspapers. And so Mario sepulveda, for example, Marissa pulled with a film to video just to show kind of almost like a proof of life kind of thing to show the people on the surface, the conditions they were in and they're just sort of general state that they were in. So when that video comes out, Mario becomes a celebrity and so Mario is being celebrated as Super Mario and the men can see that Mario sepulveda is suddenly being touted as the leader of the miners and who speaks for them. And so there's this, you know, this real, you know, sort of animosity begins underground. And a lot of jealousy. And then there's a split between the Catholics and the evangelicals who had all been praying together before, right? But then somebody sends down a whole bunch of religious articles, Catholic religious articles. And the evangelicals, well, they don't believe in, you know, in praying to images. And so they're like, I don't want that. They all argue about that. There was a physical fight between a couple of miners over something where they were sort of, you know, hitting each other. So there was a lot of tension, attention caused by number one, the fact that they're still trapped and they can't get out. And number two by the fact that the whole world out there is going crazy over them and yet they're still trapped. And so NASA psychologists recommended that the men have a little bit of contact with their friends and families, but not too much. But these families did play quite a role in getting the men out, didn't they? Oh, absolutely. They were essential and transforming the story of the miners from a story of tragedy to a story of resistance. And so the mining families very traditionally whenever this is a mine accident, the families go to the mine and they wait and they conduct a vigil. And so when the Chilean government took control of the rescue, the family started pressuring the minister, the government minister, the cabinet minister who comes to sort of supervise the rescue, the minister of mine, Lawrence gold born. And so they pressure him and they tell him, you know, you can't give up. And, you know, and so minister gold born response to this by getting resources from all over the country and people from all over the world want to contribute things. And so, yeah, the family's really became the face of the disaster. There was one in particular who merged as a leader, Maria Segovia, who, you know, is this woman under 50? She's a great grandmother in her 50s, dark skin, street vendor, grew up very, very poor with her brother. She emerges as this powerful figure, the leader of the families. And, you know, just doesn't allow the government to give up. Doesn't allow the media and the world to give up on their families on her family and their families. And is a really instrumental in the rescue. Yeah, they called the camp Kemp esperanza and which is camp hope. It will be fair to say that without the pressure from the families it would have been easy for the government to say, oh, they're probably dead and this everything just dissolves. Right, I think that, you know, as those of us who work in journalism know, you know, stories don't really work unless they have people, you know, at the heart of them. And so with the miners trapped, they're an abstraction. Nobody could see them. But they could see the families. And so the families became the expression, you know, of these men, the symbol of these men. And we're on television, you know, composting was on television all over the world. They were, you know? There was coverage from all the continents of the world. And so absolutely yeah, that was they were essential to the dynamic that led the government into transforming this mine rescue into what they called the Chilean moonshot. So for the president and for the, you know, for his ministers, this became a way to show what Chile can do, you know? There's this whole sense in Chile because Chile is now one of the most developed countries in Latin America that we are becoming part of the first world, right? And so, you know, we're no longer in the third world between part of the first world. And so they would show the world just how badass Chilean technicians and miners were by rescuing these men. You know, this seemingly impossible task of breastfeeding has been. I want to talk a little bit about the rescue itself. Can you put in perspective for me and the listeners? What these engineers were up against when they were drilling down.

Mario sepulveda juana yannis Yanis Chilean army Mario Lawrence gold Marissa Maria Segovia Tom Chilean government depression NASA cabinet Chile Latin America
"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

08:13 min | 7 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Mario sepulveda now takes his turn inside the Phoenix. The retrieval team members opened the door of the capsule for him and guide him into the harness, snapping the clamps, snug beneath his armpits. So pull it out waits, feeling like a caged animal. He wants to be Super Mario to spring into action to be a hero. But now he's just a passenger. Lead rescuer, Manuel Gonzalez gives a thumbs up to the live feed camera. The Phoenix gently slides upward and supported his journey to the surface begins. At first, the claustrophobia of the space gets to him. He felt trapped before by the mine, but this is like being packed in a sardine can. There's nothing he can do. He must fully trust the rescuers. The Phoenix josses as it navigates a slight curve in the tube. But the rubber wheels smooth out the transition. The capsule's faint interior light globes on the boreholes wet rock walls as they slide by. Sapur that breaks into an ear to ear smile. He did it. He survived. Below him is the devil, the heldman captivity for 69 days above him is a nation that will greet him as a hero. The temperature in the borehole drops. He can feel cool air on his face. Light pours down on him from above, like a light from heaven. The sound of the mortar lifting the Phoenix to the surface grows louder in his ears. He shouts, unable to contain his excitement. Hurry. Peals of laughter, echo back at him. It sounds like a lot of people up there. This is it. His moment. Then he's on the surface. The instant the rescue team opens the door, sepulveda bursts out like a superhero. He finds his wife in the crowd and wraps her in a passionate embrace. Then he runs to the president and opens a cloth bang to present him with a souvenir. The crowd begins to chant his name. He steps forward, wraps president Pinera in a hug and hands him a chunk of rock from the refuge. The president erupts in laughter and draws him back in for another embrace. As the crowd chants on. 21. Long hours later, Louise Ursula waits at the base of the borehole for the Phoenix to return. He's all alone now, except for the members of the retrieval team. All 32 of his fellow miners have been successfully delivered back to the surface. He is finally fulfilled his obligation to make sure every man on his shift is safe. The Phoenix touches down on the floor of the ramp, or zoo takes one last long look around him at the craggy walls that were his home for the last two months. Often, they seem to him like the walls of a tomb. Today, they're simply a sight, he'll be glad to never see again. The retrieval team members open the door of the Phoenix. By now, the capsule's red, blue and white paint is scuffed from all its trips up and down the mountain. Or zoo steps inside and the rescuers harness him in. On the way up or sue doesn't really reflect on what he's been through. He's had plenty of time for that. Now, he looks forward to eating a home cooked meal with his daughters and son, listening to his wife or site poetry on their porch beneath the stars. A warm shower. Soap, a pillow. Never again will he take a single moment of it for granted. Before he knows it, the Phoenix is nearing the top. He slips on the dark sunglasses, the rescuers gave each minor, preparing himself with a glare of the floodlights. The first person he sees through the Phoenix's metal grate is his son. The rescue team opens the door and he carefully steps out. Aware that his whole country is watching. He hugs his boy. Then he turns and sees the president who pulls him in for a Titan brace. Or zoor leans close, so the president can hear him over the cheering of rescue workers. Mister president, as the supervisor, a hand the shift over to you. And with that, he takes off his white helmet. For the last time. Of all the miners Super Mario sepulveda has been the most active after the rescue. He worked with Hollywood producers on a movie about the miners lives. He started a foundation to build homes for victims of a Chilean earthquake, and he fathered a third child, a healthy baby boy. Sepulveda still bears grudges against some of the men in the mine. But not Luis ursua time has mellowed his animosity towards his former boss. To any who ask, sepulveda will declare that he respects and admires for sua. A man who did what was necessary and got the job done. Following the success of operation San Lorenzo, mining minister Lawrence gold born was promoted to the minister of energy, and then the minister of public works. Less than two years after the rescue, he broke ranks with president Pinera and declared his candidacy for the Chilean presidency. But he had to withdraw when he was prosecuted for tax offenses. In 2018, with goal born out of the way, Sebastian Panera reclaimed the presidency after four years out of office. Andre cigarette continued his career as a lifelong minor, continuing to work his way up the corporate ladder. In January 2021, he was appointed vice president of Chile's state owned copper mining company. Cadel co. The same company he worked for when he was tapped to lead the rescue at the San Jose. Two and a half years after the rescue, Luis or sua joined the miners to announce the creation of a new nonprofit to aid the poor of the Atacama region, where the San Jose is located. Many of the 33 attended the press conference in copiapo near the San Jose. The men's lives took many different turns since their rescue was watched by 1.2 billion people worldwide. Some like sepulveda and sua used their fame to launch new careers. Others went back to mining work. But they all still share a bond from those 69 days spent together trapped beneath a mountain. After the press conference in copiapo urzua and a handful of the younger miners drove out to the San Jose mine again, they approached the entrance, still covered in chain link fence and safety netting. Then they picked up stones and hurled them and the dark mouth of the San Jose, shouting curses at her. For many, it was a satisfying release. A way to cope with unprocessed traumas. But as one of the younger miners walked away, he confided to his old boss or zua that the San Jose still holds him in her grasp. He said, if the mine wants to kill me. It.

Phoenix Mario sepulveda president Pinera Manuel Gonzalez heldman sepulveda Louise Ursula Mario Chilean earthquake Luis ursua Lawrence gold San Jose Sebastian Panera copiapo Andre cigarette sue Sepulveda Cadel co sua San Lorenzo
"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

02:53 min | 7 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Lawrence gold born's palm sweat as he watches Manuel Gonzalez. The first member of the retrieval team opened the graded metal door of the rescue capsule, climb inside. They've dubbed the capsule. The Phoenix. The blue red and white cylinder was made at the Chilean naval shipyards in consultation with NASA. Its sides have rubber wheels to help smooth the ride up to the surface, and its curved steel top should deflect any falling rocks. The retrieval team hitches Manuel Gonzales into the interior harness of the Phoenix. The straps pinch down his bright orange jumpsuit. Chilean president Sebastian Pinera is back on site. And now he leans forward to offer words of encouragement. Good luck Manuel. I have total confidence in you. Golborne looks up at the yellow crane that will lower the capsule. It can handle 54 tons of weight, 100 times more than the fully loaded Phoenix. It's already completed multiple test runs. Now, we'll have to lower and raise the Phoenix more than 35 times. Up and down, a curved borehole, taller than a 130 story building. The first few trips will deliver a three person rescue team, starting with Gonzales. Then the first minor will be raised back to the surface. Each trip is expected to take nearly 50 minutes. The door to the Phoenix shuts. Gonzales flashed as a thumbs up through the door's metal grill. Golborne flashes one back. Doing his best to project confidence. Beside him, gives the crane operator, the sign to proceed. At 1117 p.m., the Phoenix begins its descent into the San Jose mine. Gold born holds his breath. The last phase of operation San Lorenzo has officially begun. We get support from the new audible original bad Republican by Meghan McCain. Go beyond TV and your news feed and this debut audio memoir to get a firsthand look into the life of the conservative rebel and departing co host of the view. In bad Republican, you'll go behind the scenes of America's most watched daytime talk show. You'll also hear what it was like to grow up as the daughter of an American icon and to mourn his loss. Get the inside story on how she handled a tax from the U.S. president and listen to our thoughts on cancel culture dating and how our country treats new mothers. Unsparingly honest, deeply relatable and highly entertaining. Visit audible dot com slash.

Phoenix Golborne Lawrence gold Manuel Gonzalez Manuel Gonzales Sebastian Pinera Gonzales NASA Manuel San Lorenzo Meghan McCain San Jose U.S.
"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

04:12 min | 7 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Minister of mining, Lawrence coleborn, watches as a steel cord reels the spider up from the plan B borehole. In a few minutes, they'll know if the primitive technique succeeded in extracting the broken drill bit. For golborne, a lot is riding on this moment. He was the one who ordered the spider. After magnets failed to retrieve the drill bit. A young engineer explained the spider concept to him. The other engineers were opposed to the idea at first. But as minister of mining, golborne pulled rank and ordered them to try it. When gold born first arrived at the San Jose mine, he was a fish out of water, making ignorant suggestions and asking dumb questions. He knows men like cigarette thought of him as a clueless bureaucrat. And maybe they were right. Now, he'll find out if he's learned enough over the course of the rescue operation to actually make a difference. Golbourne watches as the spiders crush metal jaw rises from the borehole. It's been intentionally flattened under pressure in the hope of trapping whatever was inside its jaws and pulling it to the surface. A drill operator steps forward and ignites his blowtorch to cut through the jaw's teeth. Sparks flare in all directions. Golborne leans forward, squinting against the brake layer. He doesn't exactly know what he's looking for. But then it becomes obvious. The broken chunk of tungsten drill bit tumbles free from the spider like a yolk, a cracked egg. The drillers cheer and clap goal born on the back. He laughs as exuberance bubbling over, and then shouts out..

golborne Lawrence coleborn San Jose Golborne Sparks
"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

01:33 min | 7 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"From wondery, I'm Mike Corey, and this is against the odds. After almost a month underground, the 33 trapped Chilean miners finally have cause for hope. Rescue workers drilled a borehole, big.

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

05:07 min | 7 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Deep in the collapsed San Jose mine shifts supervisor Luis Ursula arrives at the new medical station. He wants to see how the miner may have appointed nurse is doing with his patients. What he sees, nearly makes him gag. A circle of shirtless miners with sores festering across their backs. In the damp humid mine, a flesh eating fungus has begun growing on the walls and ceilings. It rains down on the miners, covering their clothes and skin. Or Sue pulls the nurse to the side to discuss the men's condition. How fast is it spreading? Different men have different rates. They've sent me down at antifungal cream that treat it. But these men have it so bad. The cream's not doing much. I worry these sores. They might get infected. Or sue nods. Okay, keep these men here so they can heal. I'll rotate them off the work detail. Until then, though, ask the doctors on the surface if they end up ahead, we have our nursing station. Or so it turns and sees Mario subura strut around the corner. His arms outstretched like an amusement park tour guide. He's followed by Ursula's second in command, florencio avalos, whose operating a video camera sent down by the Chilean government. The half naked, fungus Eaton men stare resentfully at superpower as he chatters away into the camera. As you can see, our nurse is keeping us healthy so that we can all rejoin our families even fitter and more handsome than we were before. Or zoos blood boils. He was told that the president of Chile wanted footage to edit into an uplifting rescue video, or zuwa had no interest in being a ham, so he left the narration of the video to sepulveda, figuring the charismatic young minor would be good on camera. Now, he regrets that decision this should be a serious video to show the world the harsh reality of conditions in the mind, more than three weeks since the collapse. Instead, sapu veda is acting like a reality TV host and ignoring the sufferings of his fellow miners. Urzua is about to give sepulveda a piece of his mind, but then he recalls the telephone conversation he had yesterday with the government appointed psychologist. The shrink told him, now that the miners have been found, the hard part begins. Before the 33 miners were united in their isolation from the outside world. Now that they're in touch with the surface, talking to wives and girlfriends, thinking about their lives after they finally get rescued, they can easily start to turn on each other. Or sua takes a calming breath to reign in as anger. He doesn't know how much longer they'll be stuck in the mine, but he does know that their survival depends on working together. He watches quietly as sepulveda finishes his tour of the nurse's station and struts back down the ramp. A droplet from the ceiling falls onto her Suez bare arm. He quickly brushes it off, hoping his skin doesn't become the fungus's next victim. But he knows that the fungus isn't the only thing eating away at his men. They've been told it could take rescuers 120 days to drill a tunnel wide enough to lift them out. All that waiting is going to push the miners patience and sanity to their limits. The shrink was right. The hard part has just begun. Using real-time biofeedback on your brain, breathing, heart rate and body movements, you can learn how to quiet your busy mind and drift into a deeply restorative sleep with the newest generation of muse, the brain sensing headband. You can just put on your muse head band and select from one of the many soothing and responsive muse sleep journeys. Mewes will gently adjust your audio content to cue your brain to fall asleep, and if you wake in the night, that same technology is used to automatically guide you back to sleep again. Mewes has given me a better understanding of my mental activity, which I've found to really help with focusing more on work and procrastinating less. Use the promo code the odds at choose mewes dot com to receive 10% off the newest generation of muse S this episode is brought to you by decoy, an acclaimed winery in the duck horn portfolio. As you gather around the table with friends and family, share the luxury of wine country and elevate your occasion with decoy wines. Established more than 30 years ago, they craft their wines to the highest standards using grapes from exceptional vineyards. Ask for decoy Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir or Chardonnay whenever you buy wine, or visit decoy wines dot com slash celebrate to find all of their wines near you..

Luis Ursula sepulveda Mario subura florencio avalos zuwa sapu veda Urzua Chilean government San Jose Ursula Mewes Eaton Sue Chile
"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

04:39 min | 8 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Near you. From wondery, I'm Mike Corey, and this is against the odds. Two weeks after the collapse of the San Jose mine,.

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

03:53 min | 8 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Andre pulls up the collar of his jacket against the chilly desert air. It's two a.m. at operation San Lorenzo. The Chilean government's effort to rescue 33 miners trapped by the collapse of the San Jose mine. Subaru arrived here two weeks ago to lead the rescue effort. Around him, floodlights, beam on to 9 massive drills, tunneling down into the earth, trying to reach the miners. But so far, they've been digging in vain. There are no closer to finding the miners now, than they were when they started. He needs to check the drills progress, one last time before he heads back to his hotel to sleep. He approaches bore hole can be dug out by the first drill to arrive on the site. The sram T 6 8 5. It's been clearing 800 feet per day. Far quicker than the other drills. But what it has in speed, it lacks in accuracy. It's aiming for the refuge, a small room 2200 feet down, where the miners are likely to be sheltering, but it's already missed its target twice. Cigarette hopes the third time will be the charm. He approaches the back of the truck, the sram is mounted on. They're drill operator Nelson Flores, monitors the gauges that tell them how fast the drill bit is turning. How much resistance is meeting? And whether it's on target. Subaru waves at him to power down so they can talk. How are we looking? The diorite has us off course again boss. It's like the minus fighting us. Cigarette curses. The San Jose mine is carved in a mountain made primarily of diorite. A rock twice as dense as granite. It's been knocking all their drills off course, including the sram. Floors looks to cigarette for guidance. Want me to pull it back and start a fresh hole? Cigarette weighs his options. It's been 15 days since the collapse. Any minor still alive would be starving by now. Dehydrated, and wasting away. Every minute matters. They can't afford to start over. No, keep going. We're running out of time. The drill operator nots, they both know it's a big gamble. But it's one they have to take. There's always a chance that their maps of the minor wrong or that the diorite might give them a break and knock the drill back on course. Whispers a prayer under his breath. Behind him, flora's powers the drill back up. Drowning out his words. Brought to you by Disney+ and the world according to Jeff Goldblum, an original series from National Geographic, streaming November 12th, only on Disney+, join Jeff Goldblum for another unexpected and surprising journey as he discovers extraordinary wise behind seemingly ordinary things like magic monsters and our love of dogs. National geographics, the world according to Jeff Goldblum, a Disney+ day premiere streaming November 12th. This episode is brought to you by decoy, an acclaimed winery in the duckhorn portfolio. As you gather around the table with friends and family, share the luxury of wine country and elevate your occasion with decoy wines. Established more than 30 years ago, they craft their wines at the highest standards using grapes from exceptional vineyards. Ask for decoy Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir or Chardonnay whenever you buy wine, or visit decoy wines dot com slash celebrate to find all of their wines.

Nelson Flores Chilean government San Jose San Lorenzo Andre Jeff Goldblum Subaru Disney Cigarette flora National Geographic
"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

08:34 min | 8 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Luis Rosso sits in the cab of his pickup truck outside the mechanics repair shop, sketching out a revised map of the mine by the glow of the cab's dome length. He's turned the pickup truck into his own private sanctuary, where he can concentrate on this important task. He knows the owner's maps of the San Jose are hopelessly outdated. He hopes that once the rescuers reach him and his men, his more accurate map will help them get the miners have to safety. Urzua has heard grumblings from the men that he abdicated his responsibility when he removed his white helmet. But he can live with that. He wasn't going to get into a war of wills with sepulveda, or any of the other miners. His job now is to do whatever it takes to optimize their odds of survival. Boss, I think they're coming. A minor shouts up the ramp at azua. He tucks his map in the glove compartment, climbs out of his truck and follows the voice down the mine. That's when he hears it. The unmistakable percussive rumble of a drill. The yellow tooth minor turns to a sua. Beaming, ear to ear. How fast can they dig with a drill like that? 100 meters a day. So then that means they'll find us in less than a week. The minor whoops for joy. Soon the sound of the drilling fills the mind, reverberating through the walls. From further down the ramp, around the refuge, urzua hears more cheers. He's tempted to join in the celebrating, but instead, he heads back to his truck to resume work on his map. He knows the relation may be premature. The acoustics of a mind can carry sound in all directions. The drill needs to be much louder before they can get a good bearing on its location. And there's still no way to tell how far off it is. Or whether it's even headed in the right direction. Lawrence Gaul born stands beside Andre to watch one of the drills retract from the ground. Go born has traded in his suit jacket for an orange vest. A helmet knocks down his salon haircut, and he's swapped out his wingtips for boots. The minister has been a quick study, soaking up cigarettes expertise, and already, that expertise is paying off. After just three days of drilling, the crew of the sram drill has already reached a depth of 1200 feet. More than half the distance to the refuge. They're making incredible time. Now, it's time to check if they're on target. Golbourne watches as a geologist lowers a strange device into the hole. It looks like some kind of gyroscope. He leans over the geologist's shoulder. Cranny is neck to see the readout on the device's handheld display. He doesn't have the foggiest idea what the numbers mean. He turns to observe cigarettes expression, but the veteran miners face is locked with its usual scowl. Finally, the geologist announces his findings. We're at 370 meters, but the whole is bent the wrong direction. We're going to miss the refuge. Golbourne can't believe his ears. Can't you bend it back on target? Subaru pats his arm gently as if comforting a preschooler. No. This kind of drilling doesn't work that way. Men start over and check your course every hundred meters. Goldhorn catches himself, thinking about the demise of his political career and pushes the thought aside. This isn't about him. This is about saving the lives of 33 men trapped underground. But he knows that with each false start, and each lost stay up here on the surface. The miners chances of survival are shrinking. In the refuge, Luis or sua steps forward to accept his lunch from Mario sepulveda. And one cookie for you. It's their tenth day underground, and everyone's agreed to cut their rations. They're down to one cookie and a spoonful of tuna, every 48 hours. Tempers are starting to flare. Yesterday, sepulveda had one of his violent mood swings and picked a fight with an old timer. They cooled off before coming to blows, but Ursula thinks next time they might not be so lucky. Or sua heads for the door. On the ramp, he walks past young miners lying half naked on the ground, sweating in the mines 98° heat. They're sullen, sunken eyes, stare back at him. Runoff water from the rescue drills drips through the mine, turning the wraps floor to mud. The skinniest miners are starting to waste away. Ribs poking through their torsos. Or sua can see that the weakest ones are losing hope. Feeling helpless. He proceeds down the ram to the makeshift toilet. An empty oil drum. Water drips from above onto a shirt, or zua looks up. A thin layer of fungus coats the mines craggy ceiling. He's sure by now, it's begun to grow in some of the men's flesh as well. As he approaches the bathroom area, he overhears two miners who have just finished doing their business. Man, these cookies are killing me. If we don't get out soon, we're gonna start eating each other, like that Uruguayan rugby team that crashed in the mountains. Who do you think will taste best? Urzua knows they're joking, but that conversation still makes his blood run cold. He decides the toilet can wait and turns to head back to his truck. Andre cigarette stands in the command center tent, looking out as Chilean police block distraught families from a surging towards the mind's entrance. Get back. No one is allowed in. Hey, my dad's in there. You can't save him. Let us try. Reporters, and TV crews pressed forward to capture the heartbreaking scene. Day 14 and the situation is unraveling. A few more days like this and cigarette fears the rescue will be called off. Cigarette has led enough rescues to know that loved ones go through a familiar emotional cycle. Disbelief, fear, outrage. If the rescue isn't successful, their final stage is grief. It's hard enough during a normal rescue. Let alone a media circus like this one. He needs to check on his various drilling operations. He exits the tent, passing by the standoff between families and police. Nearby, he sees Lawrence Goldblum. He's being cornered by some wild eyed crackpot, holding what appears to be a divining rod. Cigarette shakes his head. He wonders what goal born is thinking, but in these con artists into a mind compound. Then again, he recognizes that goal born is under even more stress than he is. The press have christened the rescue effort operation San Lorenzo after the patron saint of mining. Goldberg's first name, Lawrence, as close enough to Lorenzo at the mining minister, has now become synonymous with the entire rescue. If they fail, golbourne was shoulder, most of the blame. Subaru reaches the first of the drills. Already 12 holes have missed their target. But according to the San Jose mine maps, one hydraulic drill, still seems like it's on the right track. Cigarette waves to the operator, the man cranks down the.

Urzua Luis Rosso urzua sepulveda Lawrence Gaul Goldhorn Mario sepulveda San Jose Cranny Andre Subaru Andre cigarette Chilean police Ursula Luis Lawrence Goldblum rugby
"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

06:29 min | 8 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Minor Mario sepulveda climbs up an iron rebar ladder in a narrow ventilation shaft. He's trying to find a way out of the San Jose mine in northern Chile, which collapsed catastrophically just a few hours ago. He and a group of other miners are trapped more than 2000 feet underground. The main ramp leading out to the mines only entrance is blocked behind a slab of fallen rock weighing thousands of tons. After the collapse, the miners can't tell if there's any way out of the mine. That isn't blocked. But sepulveda is determined to look for one. He hopes this shaft, which stubbles as an emergency escape route might still provide a path to the surface. Hand over hand, he ascends the shaft with three of his fellow miners, climbing right behind him. The iron rungs wiggle loosely in the wall. Suppose it silently curses the mind's owners for not properly maintaining these air shafts. They haven't even provided the miners with a map of possible escape routes. This shaft might lead to a way out or might lead nowhere. Sepulchre grabs the next rung, but it snaps free from the wall and nails him square in the teeth. The metallic Tang of blood fills his mouth. He clenches his jaw and climbs on, determined not to let the mountain to feed him. So pull that as boss, Luis or sua, try to talk him out of climbing up the air shaft. It's a hundred feet straight up, and the mountain is still shifting under the initial collapse. If a falling rock hits him, he would plummet to his death. But in support of it his mind, even if there's 1% chance of making it to the top, he has to take it. He burns with the desire to be a hero to save his fellow miners, who are waiting down below to see if he can find a way out. Tenses at the sound of rock, grinding against rock. He looks down and sees that a boulder, the size of a refrigerator has cracked free from the shaft wall. The miner climbing right below him, desperately braces himself against the enormous rock to keep it from falling. So pull it a shout at the two miners bringing up the rear. Go down. Go down. The last two minors scramble down the iron rungs back to the tunnel where they started. They jump out of the way and a split second later. The miner behind the shifts his body weight and lets The Rock fall. It plummets down the chimp. Ricocheting off the walls. Then, it lands, crushing smaller rocks beneath it, like a mallet smacking walnuts. So pull it appears down the shaft, and thanks God that everyone is safe. Then, he resumes his climb. At last, he drags himself up and out of the shaft. He's arrived in another tunnel just off the mines main ramp. 30 levels up from where he started. From here, he should be able to return to the mind central ram, that spirals up to the surface. Sepulveda waits for the other minor to climb out of the shaft. Then they walk up the curving rent and around the next bend. Sepulveda stops cold. His path is blocked by a sheer wall of sleek diorite. A dark rock, harder than granite. It looks just like the fallen slab blocking the level they just came from. No. What? No. Suppose that I can't understand what he's seeing. He's 100 feet closer to the surface. No single rock could be that big. It must be too diorite slabs that look alike. Still, he has to be sure, so he turns and runs down another level. In between the two slaps. And there it is again. The same wall of diorite, blocking his path. A single mass of slab that slice through the many layers of the mine like a stone guillotine. Multiple levels. All cut off from the surface. All blocked. Sepulveda walks back up the ramp. When he returns, the other minor looks at him, grimly. I found the next ventilation shaft, but this one has no ladder, so we can't climb it. So pull Vida feels the fight within him whither. Today he's no hero. In fact, he's the opposite. He's a bearer of bad news. He trudges back to the ventilation shaft to climb back down and tell the miners the truth. There is no way out. This episode is brought to you by decoy, an acclaimed winery in the duck horn portfolio. As you gather around the table with friends and family, share the luxury of wine country and elevate your occasion with decoy wines. Established more than 30 years ago, they craft their wines at the highest standards using grapes from exceptional vineyards. Ask for decoy Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir or Chardonnay whenever you buy wine or visit decoy wines dot com slash celebrate to find all of their wines near you. We get support from the new audible original, bad Republican by Meghan McCain. Go beyond TV and your news feed and this debut audio memoir to get a firsthand look into the life of the conservative rebel and departing co host of the view. In bad Republican, you'll go behind the scenes of America's most watched daytime talk show. You'll also hear what it was like to grow up as the daughter of an American icon, and to mourn his loss. Get the inside story on how she handled attacks from the U.S. president and listen to our thoughts on cancel culture dating and how our country treats new mothers. Unsparingly honest, deeply relatable and highly entertaining. Visit audible dot com slash bad Republican to listen now. From.

Mario sepulveda Sepulveda sepulveda Chile San Jose Luis boulder Vida Meghan McCain America
"chilean" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

03:05 min | 10 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

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"chilean" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

07:30 min | 10 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Parties at which at that moment had approval ratings or less than ten percent. Okay so we have all of these situations in chile. Were having below twenty percent approval. So the precedent packed it with the leaders and they said well we're gonna have a constituent process. You got it however we're gonna put some rules in so one of the rules. Is that every article in the constitution needs to be approved by two thirds and this is calculated in the sense that the right wingers always have a third of the vote have always historically so that meant that. The status quo. The establishment was going to have veto power on you know social change however in may we had the elections for the representatives. That will go to this convention. We call it. They call it constituent convention so reinvention constitutional convention. Actually you know close to twin but because it's kind of within the rules so they call it an by the surprise of everybody being dependence which are regular people like local history teachers. They're actually a lot of history teachers like the public system that out when candidacy. They just run because they felt that this is the only way to change things and they got forty percent around forty percent off. Vote the independence and we have national convention. That went run of the rules. That was agreed was for indigenous quotas. So we have Indigenous peoples and we have also a gender parody. This is the first organ that is has fifty percent women. For fifty percent men a however more women were elected than men and then because of the parody situation fifty fifty seven women had to give up their seats to make god of course. They were once when went. Once when the matriarch these rose up like it was like oh sorry guys yes yes. Y'all so this. We are very interesting because the press is the elected president vice president of the convention. Okay to run to organize and the president that was elected is at least a long gun. Who is a mature woman. So put are very kind of this. Very oppressed minority indigenous minority in the south who have been at war with the state like forever and she very very poor origins very popular. You know very very low resources but he she managed to get to. Pg's and one in europe and she's a linguist and a feminist and she was elected as the president of this convention so she starts with her indigenous. Language goes in look traditional attire. And for the first time to lands are seeing in national television. You know the symbol When i'm know woman that is not being persecuted is not being. Radicalized is not like the target of hatred is presiding so this is historic embarrassing bullied on opening so many avenues of real pluri-national constitution making the recognition of several people's within something that the us also should be doing right. Yeah no i think What's happening in chile is historic on so many levels. And i guess my last question. Gummy lanham probably know the answer. This already but you as you know. It's sort of the mood in the mentality of chilean society. How are you feeling. And how other people feeling you know in the conversations that you have with fellow you know people from your country. How is this different. Like what is the general mood as you get to a final constitution. Well like i said this is a struggle from the beginning and it depends on who you are and where you are so if you talk to the elite you know to the twenty percent of the people that voted against initiating the process so we had a plebiscite at the beginning to decide if we wanted. This process are not twenty percent of the population voted. No so this meant that. They were happy with the status quo. The people who are getting from the system you talk to these people and and we see the media which is illegal polly in also is like. There's a broad yard. It's like an elite elite the elites own. the means can medication. yes so basically. The narrative coming out is basically. Everything is terrible that there are just you know they're going to wreck everything and they don't know what they're doing you know they're this people that they have no politicians that they're trying to get advantage they're trying to sabotage the the process. You know and people that watch the media and voted no for the initiation the process. Those people are very worried and kind of trying to sabotage them berry kind of like not eating the process. The rest of the people depends if they're still believing in political parties engage. You know with you know their representatives or if they are from the popular sectors on they are anti party there at least imagined that only fifty percent of the people went out to boat to initiate the constituent process that means that half of the chilean population that is entitled to vote. Doesn't vote and this is not you know this is a trend. Also that you just stay home so these people are really not represented and be some of these. People are organizing at the local level. They don't do. they believe. The electoral system is just rigged. And we'll never serve them so they believe in popular power from below so these people are both a very happy and kind of excited about the process of the prospect of really kind of changing the way we govern ourselves a society. You know having real popular power to stop for example contamination and pollution of your environment. If they're for by a company that you have that power that today you don't have that's exciting however we also see that in the convention the negotiations between the parties and actually the socialist party some of the representatives actually voted against giving binding power binding mechanism to the people. This is interesting institutional yes here it is. Politics is always politics but gummy loved. Got a thank you so much for such a thorough and really informative explanation of where she lays at. I really appreciate having you on. Latino rebels radio. Thank you julia on thinker latino rivals radio. I hope everybody enjoyed understood. All these complicated process. Wow wow wow thank you gotta for being on the show that was a really damn excellent explanation of not only chile in history and then the last forty eight years. But what's happening now. Really really interesting and i do think it's one of those stories that is under the radar and latin america and also in our communities here in the united states. So gotta follow. What's going on in chile please. It's really important in the context of where we are as a society. So if you like what you heard just review us. Share this podcast. Please tweet us at latino rebels at me who lethal seventy seventy-seven. We're also on the instagram. Under those handles and just tells you like the show and share it with one friend. Do that for me. That'd be great. Thank you to oscar. Fernandez of the latino media collective. Who's also latino rebels radio producer for producing another gem of a show and we will be back next week with another show like we always do every week. And we're also going to close out with larry amana soviet-us julia galleria latino rebels.

chile Gummy lanham chilean society europe berry united states julia latin america Fernandez oscar larry amana julia galleria
"chilean" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

08:17 min | 10 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Need all investment so everything is about expectations. So i mean we misunderstand that at ci lead during this time that was brewing this content and not only discontent about not having things but about that precarious station of life. The idea that you have to pay for all basic services and if you don't have any money under employment you're immediately going to party and people working two three jobs the same as in the us. I think we follow similar patterns because we had the reagan administration. And now i am in the uk when we had margaret thatcher. So this is triangulation of you know in in in jila was out very -tarian but here in the in the us and the uk was through the ballot box and there was a kind of debasing of the social. If you will and of the cohesion of society and in that moment of the pricing there were kind of two ways of seeing the people label itself at this uprising us an awakening so the slogan was cheated spin dough and this idea that people woke up really people that were causing. The machine just got together in the in the public square and started talking to each other and sharing grievances and in that moment they became political for the first time and not merely consumers so from the point of view of the popular sectors. This was an awakening and the same as in the matrix. You cannot and see what you have seen in a way. Anyone that makes reference to the matrix on. My show is instantly a friend. So thank you because continue sorry. It was big. I think people need to understand that. It's like you do awake. There's an awakening. There's an understanding your told one thing and in fact. The historical moment of you know what happened. In october of two thousand nineteen and continued even pre pandemic was pretty damn big in the context of sheila but also in latin america. And i feel like that's always been underestimated the last couple of years. Yes but also about you know this narrative that comes through the talk because you know this idea of the awakening is just the story because the media immediately labeled the uprising us an outburst a social outburst when estadio seattle and that was the name that was given from the top down okay and this is very demobilizing because you know thinks burst people wake up and take arms an engaging power. They rice up. So when you talk about and social outburst you are denying the agency of the chilean people who basically were organizing in the local squares and creating grassroots organizations dr democratic that wanna push for social change and also deny the direction that this you know. A movement has which is towards emancipation at dignity at dignity was at one of the principal concepts in this uprising and actually the center in santiago was a plastic talia. You know that where. Italy because they had donated you know some some monument and became a had that name it was remained by the protesters who were gathering every friday because of the anniversary of the uprising on the burning basically all of the metro stations and other places. That went us. Placidly me that dignity square and this is something that is a throughout the narrative from the popular sectors and is not basically about something specific that they want. They want to change the way we organize a society from the ground up and i think that is something that we missed and i think that is something that risk with. Many other populations in the world a- populations are oppressed today. Because of neoliberal reforms that have you know accelerated inequality and oppression so. I think people need to wake up and need to get together and have collected power in order to push back against neoliberalism right and before we talk about the constitution process. I mean one of the things. I think people don't realize you did mention because you're right. I mean julia was seen as the model. The economic model the pearl of latin america and but the inequality and chile has been. I mean it's pretty documented. How unequal the society really is and. That doesn't seem to really resonate with reality. Or i mean. Can you talk a little bit about that. Inequality like factually. Because i don't think people really understand how bad it really was and continues to be into well. You know it is difficult today and this is part of my work. I talk about you. Know the minute to politicize inequality now we measuring equality we have an index of inequality that is very is not correctly done because basically we cannot measure how much money the rich we have because they are tax havens. They get their money out. So there's no real understanding of how much more money. They have been accumulating in this thirty years however we know that in these thirty years we added a seven people to the forbes list at now there are eleven of the multi millionaire billionaires of the world. One of them is our actual precedent. And we see that you know the the extractivism that we have seen in the last thirty years off all natural resources cheating is very in tune with this kind of rapacious oligarchy. That has been profiting systematically and disproportionately from you know at resources are common and from the free labor market than basically keeps the salaries very low. And there's a few protections. So i think also we can relate to what is happening the us we know that the equality we have you know are billionaires are going to the moon on our own money so an at this is how society is being structured at that. We don't see that billionaires a an and people having that amount of money in chile is the one percent owns forty percent of the gdp and we still cannot remeasure the that inequality if we don't problema ties that we don't think that that he's seen an ad that our rules of the game have allow it. Not only you know. They're not neutral. They allow the rich get richer in all means so we need to politicize that and kind of agree. Think inequality as kind of demonstration of corruption as a vehicle of corruption of systemic corruption. Not only individual because that happens to laze very corrupt but it also is very difficult to measure that because for that you need to have a lot of people in jail or be changing corruption at it. They don't know how to measure it. This is around the world by the way. So we don't really think inequalities a problem and i link inequality do corruption because they go together right and so let's talk about the constitution. Change what you have been working on. are predicting correctly. What do people need to know about what is happening right now. Understand that where There was a process earlier this year. You know basically just redefined politics in chile minute. I mean it's almost like here we go. We are trying to create a new society in a lot of ways. So what do people need to understand about what it means to change the constitution or draft. A new one. Yes we are in the kind of creating a new order. We're starting over and this started in the streets k. This didn't start from above so when people need to understand that this process has been a struggle of control from the beginning so the people in the streets were asking for a constituent assembly in which the people could participate and could be horizontal and open with no strings attached. However the government a went into an agreement In actually like twenty four hour agreement that ended up like two in the morning with the leaders of the political.

jila reagan administration latin america margaret thatcher uk chile sheila us santiago seattle Italy julia government
"chilean" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

07:39 min | 10 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"We're going to be doing more of those later this year and i know a lot of people are focusing on the twentieth anniversary of the september eleventh terrorist attacks. But we being latino rebels radio actually wanna focus on sort of the other nine eleven that has been known over decades and what happened in chile in a post pinochet era. And what's going on. And she laid now and to discuss that. I have this amazingly fabulous guests from london england fabulous guests. Would you like to introduce yourself. Thank you for having my name is camilo gotta i am actually from chile. I was in new york only two weeks ago and just relocated to london so had been living the to kind of anniversaries or awhile The both in new york the attacks in new york and the overthrow of agility in this popular has socialist government story in seventy three september eleven. I'm a journalist. Historian also pursued a doctoral studies in political theory unconstitutional low and i recently wrote a book about systemic corruption of the representative democracies. And how we need to change that dynamic and introduce a popular institution in order to give real power to the people and actually this book was research for fifteen years and it was created for this moment. My topic from the beginning was how to change the constitution that was imposed by dictator in chile the most democratic way. Yes wow. wow so wow okay so there you go talking about you gotta love it when you write things and you're like i've been working on this but before we get into where teela is now. I know when we say the other nine eleven. I'm not trying to equate what happened in new york and dc and in pennsylvania twenty years ago to the same level of what happened in chile. But over the course of twenty years. I do think when september eleven comes around. There is more of an awareness of what actually happened in chile in nineteen seventy three and. What happened with the dictatorship. What are your thoughts. I mean do you feel. Can you just kinda grass sort of if you can sort of. Take us from like seventy three to now just so that people get a better sense of why. It's important to talk about sheila in this context. Yes and i think that you're right than September eleven the terrorist attacks bring us the focus to the other. You know historical events that markelle society on also kind of the public imaginary. What happening sheila. Because in one thousand nine hundred seventy we had the first socialist marxist precedent elected through the ballot box in the world and he was a civil allende and he actually run three times for president. He he made it but his electoral legitimacy was not very high. We had a special system that allowed for a relative majority to become president so he had a little bit over a third of the vote and then he was confirmed by congress which was kind of the procedure but of course he wanted to redistribute property nationalized copper and basically allow the working classes to actually participate in in the democratic process. And we were in the middle of the cold war that you as a i. You know the cia collaborated with military chilean with are far right and with some very conservative economists from the best studied in the chicago school than the liberal The the the on the origin of neoliberalism in terms of how it spreads these people tabulated basically and overthrew allende and he was murdered in. You know our white house lemonade. And it was bombarded by you know airplanes so we saw our white house burning. This is a very traumatic experience. And then you have the military in the streets at basically repressing people and then Protesters coming on being repressed and tortured and disappeared so then we had a dictatorship For seventeen years we came back to the mall crecy however with without referendum that out basically ousted the dictator however the constitutional order that we had the constitution that ruled our lives was created by dictator. And you know his economic advisors so we have been living the last thirty years under the pinochet dictatorship even though it ended in nineteen ninety exactly was we have an order. That is the legacy of dictatorship and we haven't changed it. Because i he was the head of the military for a period of time and then he became senator for life with immunity so basically the democracy was very fragile in terms of like you can expect another coup or something and then we got used to it. Yes all liberalism and the individual way of life and we are now with a popular uprising in october. Two thousand eighteen after a very slight increase in the transportation fair but basically brought all the grievances together and very fast movement crystallized into constituent process that people asking for a new social pact s starting over basically. And that's You know how this position proud. We are now starting right and there's a lot but i think you're absolutely right. I think one of the things when people talk about sheila you you know when you think about. We're talking about a process like even if we started in nineteen seventy. Let's just start there right. Where in the because there was roots before that. But we're talking now. What fifty one years couple of generations. Then you know this lasting dictatorship that ended in nineteen ninety but still has sort of over you know overshadowed chile for for decades and also the mentality of a society once you're sort of in this space for fifty years how historic was two thousand nineteen uprising in the context of jalen. And what was missed like you know. I know when we view it as americans looking out and looking in and seeing it on international news obviously not getting the attention that a lot of other topics in the us get. What do americans misunderstand about that moment that you would like to share. Now yes i think. we misunderstand itchy lane general We saw that the thirty years that we're talking about the legacy of the the pinochet constitution ruling our lives a west seen. It internally was. We'll be there wasn't hegemonic narrative a put out by the media that she was a you know the only country in latin america that was stable that was growing. We were like the tigers of latin america. We were the poster child of neoliberalism. The only place reworked and kind of like we're still thriving and we we call our downtown son hatton because it's santiago and it looks like manhattan and we want to be that. This is part of the culture that was ingrained in us and was sold abroad and basically we are one of the most open country in the world we have like a flat terrace and.

chile new york teela sheila markelle society camilo london white house england pennsylvania dc cia congress chicago jalen latin america tigers us hatton manhattan
The Case for the American Dream and Exceptionalism

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:31 min | 10 months ago

The Case for the American Dream and Exceptionalism

"I was asked yesterday to give a speech coming up in about a week in fact less than a week. It's next this coming sunday. The event is not the important thing here. But i was asking speech and the topic of the speech that i've been asked to give us the three or four greatest issues or challenges facing our country and i said done i said i could name for them right now without even doing any research and writing the speech she said what are they i sent him. I can tell you off to find out like everybody else does speech. One of them was not patriotism but it could be just to just to kind of buttress. The point that i made. I believe a lack of national pride a lack of national. I'm looking for the another word for pride here. And i'm struggling a little bit here. But a belief in american exceptionalism that used to kind of you know be found. I think in the in the hearts and under the chess of of of most americans almost all americans particularly at times of crisis and in times of when our nation has been attacked. Bit just generally speaking. We know what we have as americans that nobody else has quite frankly. That's the biggest part of this. I mean i've said this before. I think i've said this to dennis's audience so maybe you've heard me talk about this before. When is the last time you heard anybody on a national or international news cast in an interview a story and essay a book talk about trying to achieve the french dream. The answers probably never and that's no knock specifically on france but you don't hear about the german dream you don't hear about the russian dream you don't hear about the chilean dream you don't hear about the venezuelan dream. You don't hear about the south. African dreamer the australian dream the dream that people all over the world have is the american dream the ability to come to america. Raise a family here get a job. Learn a trade learn a skill open a business. Buy a house have a family. The american dream what everybody talks about and by and large. I think that's something that has driven america to its heights over the course of the last several decades

Chess Dennis France America
The Story of Colonia Dignidad, Chile's Secret Nazi Cult

Let's Start A Cult

01:46 min | 10 months ago

The Story of Colonia Dignidad, Chile's Secret Nazi Cult

"To avoid being arrested by authorities schaefer accompanied by a few of his followers fled west germany in nineteen sixty one and sought refuge in the middle east there. He was introduced to prominent chilean embassador. Who invited him to live. In chile at the time chile was under president. George alexandria whose administration granted shaffer a farm located a few kilometers outside the city of peril and chilies linear Liniers province sure. We'll go with the government's help. He bought a forty four hundred acre ranch located at the foot holes of the andy mountains and established a religious. Commune called collina dignidad which translates to dignity. Colin and we will soon see that it was anything but dignity sounds sounds like it's going to be on the up and up. Yes that's one way to put. Founded on william m bronze teaching colonia dignidad espoused principles like anti-communism and strict adherence to the bible given schafer's passed as a member of the hitler youth and an officer of the let. Oh god left quaff left while you got this one again lutwa. Thank you for help. Every every time on that one as religious commun- was also heavily influenced by nazism of course colonia dignified began with surprise. The nazi has influence colonia dignidad began with ten of schafer's original followers. But as the years passed its members swelled. This was field. By waves of immigrants from germany who were enticed by the communist way of living which involves sustainable. Agriculture practices and numerous charity works for the local population. However what they found upon arriving in chile was something else entirely.

George Alexandria Chile Collina Dignidad West Germany Schaefer Shaffer Schafer Middle East William M Colin Government Germany
"chilean" Discussed on The Budget Minded Traveler

The Budget Minded Traveler

05:51 min | 11 months ago

"chilean" Discussed on The Budget Minded Traveler

"To be prepared for the worst weather then you can delight in the sunshine if you get it third a mobile battery charger. So i use the anchor brand which is a. n. k. e. r. a. I swear by it. that's a. That's my favorite one. But as long as you have something that lasts for days like multiple charges that you can charge your phone with Not because you'll be using it. For data there is not much cell service and patagonia. But because you will fill up your phone with photos and videos and you will want to keep that charge up and you probably won't have much access to electricity. If you're in the back country so a phone charger battery bank again. I use anchor You can find all these things that i use at traveling. Jackie dot com slash pack. I keep an updated list of my favorite items there. But this is a go-to always for me. I use it on the daily. Even when i'm not traveling you should definitely have one. But i sure and patagonia you want to be able to charge your own batteries and cameras. Whatever it is that you have some make. Sure you're prepared for that and i'm going to give you guys a bonus here. Number four is a reusable water bottle which you should always have with you when you travel but specifically just a water bottle you won't need a filtration system because there are many places in patagonia where you can just fill your bottle street from the source straight from a waterfall or a stream without worry of contamination. It is some of the purest water in the world. So make sure you have that reusable water bottle with you all right. Let's move on to the book recommendations. These are all incredibly different by the way. But there's something here for everybody. So the first one is called in patagonia by bruce chatwin this classic you may have heard of it It's a super interesting meandering. Chronicle of the author's travels through patagonia back in the seventies. it's easy to read and pieces Because the chapters tend to be very short i mean they. They vary in length but they're kind of just little. It's almost like journal entries. He's just kind of recording. What he's seeing in what he's doing and who's coming into contact with it provides a really raw account of the land and the people and the history through the eyes of the author. So if you want kind of a broad Perspective on the region than i would recommend in patagonia by bruce chatwin The second one is called enduring. Patagonia by gregory crouch wow. I loved this book. It is about climbing gregory crouches. The climber and so especially if you're into climbing you will love this book. But even if you're not i'm not a climber I found it so fascinating because he has a real real gift for capturing what it really feels like down there. I mean you just heard me talk about waterproofing and the weather. Pick up this book and it will give you the tiniest glimpse into why all of that matters He does such a good job at describing the landscape. And what he's feeling and what he is experiencing and it's it's really truly amazing so Highly recommend enduring. Patagonia by gregory crouch A lot of that does take place in argentina argentina side. But there's plenty on the inside as well And it's it's just it's it's an adrenaline rate. It's a fun read And then the third one is called maya's notebook by a yesterday and She is actually a chilean author. So this is kind of exciting. This is translated into english. I do recommend the paperback version or the the solid. Whatever the the book version of this one rather than the audible version. You guys know. I love audible but for this particular one I wasn't too jazzed on the voice on audible. And so i definitely recommend that you get picked up the paper book for this one but my notebook is interesting because it is kind of one of those split stories where it follows Two different timelines of of the same character and on one of the stories. She's in the united states and the other stories. She's actually on the island of chile which is in northern delay in patagonia. it's actually an archipelago. And if any of you watched my osprey video that i that i did with oscar or if you heard a few episodes back we did an episode about sheila and our story about going down to film there. The reason i read this book was to Get a deeper feel for the culture down there. Even though i had already been to like this book just such a good job at describing what type of community and what type of person actually lives there and the hardship of it and yet it's in modern time and so it's also a fascinating read so that one's called maya's notebook by savell agenda. How fun with those. And if you do pick one of those up let me know what you think about them. I'd love to hear from you. So yeah happy reading I hope you guys have felt inspired to travel patagonia or at least to learn more about it is a beautiful fascinating place. Yeah i hope you consider traveling with me there. I won't say it's the best decision you'll ever making your life. Well maybe i will anyway. Yes spots are still open as of now and one question. I often get is. Will you be doing this again. Next year to which i would love to say yes of course but dudes after twenty twenty. Nobody can actually foresee what might happen right. So now is the time people make it happen. Let me help you all right. Thank you again for being here today. I hope you had fun. They healthy stay safe. And i will see you guys soon..

patagonia gregory crouch bruce chatwin Patagonia Jackie argentina maya gregory archipelago chile sheila oscar united states
Interview With Actor, Kevin Bacon

Awards Chatter

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Actor, Kevin Bacon

"Kevin thank you so much for joining us on the podcast. Great to have you on this one. We just always begin truly at the beginning. If you wouldn't mind sharing where were you born and raised in. What is your folks do for a living. I was born in philadelphia. Pennsylvania in nineteen. Sixty eight My dad was a city planner. He he worked for the city of philadelphia for a really long time. He was a just absolutely adored cities that that was what he kinda spent his life doing. He studied them. He wrote about them ended up Become the city planner in in philly and my mom was a nursery school teacher. She was my first teacher. She had started a nursery school up in a in housing project and In in chilean and i went to school with her i mean she was she was. She was my teacher and then She she ended up early childhood education. and yeah yeah she. She was devoted to two children into activism. She was real politically active.

Philadelphia Kevin Pennsylvania Philly
The Hinterkaifeck Slaughter

Unexplained Mysteries

04:48 min | 1 year ago

The Hinterkaifeck Slaughter

"In the eighteen sixties. Hinder kaifaqu was built on vast farmland in the state of bavaria germany. One large l shaped building consisted of the machine house the barn and the living quarters a second smaller building served as a tool shed while the rest of the property was framed by dense forest. The nearest town known as grow burn was less than a mile down the road from the farm. A slightly larger settlement called catholic lay south of the far which is where the farms name came from hinder meaning behind so behind. Caifa in one thousand nine hundred five. The unknown owner of enter kaifeng died and left the farm to his wife. A woman named to there are no known records of when or how chilean at twenty-six-year-old. Andreas gruber a wiry hardworking local. Perhaps she saw andreas as the perfect man to help manage the farm or maybe andreas saw opportunity in the property owning older widow. And of course maybe it was love regardless to chilean married. Andreas one year after her husband's death making him co owner of inter hyphen check and in eighteen. Eighty seven to chillier gave birth to their first daughter victoria. The family made more than enough to support a newborn but they were also froogle. Records are unclear over what their farm actually produced and sold but their wealth drew plenty of unwanted attention. The surrounding villages kayak and grow burn stayed and connected via gossip in since. The gruber's were fairly private people. They bore the brunt of the rumors. They were polite and helpful but no one considered them warmer friendly. They never hosted neighbors or joined community celebrations southern isolation as hostile but most just found it. Strange andreas was the target of most of the hearsay. His stinginess rudeness and temper drew plenty of criticism along with his abusive nature. There were whispers that he beat chillier throughout their marriage and win. Victoria was old enough. The abuse landed on her as well. One of the families biggest scandals happened in the early eighteen ninety s. The couple had a second daughter sophia but around her second birthday. The young girl mysteriously died. Andreas was rumored to lock his children in the farm seller for days as punishment. So those who knew. The family suspected that. If sophia wasn't killed by one of andrea says violent outbursts. She likely died of neglect. Plenty of villagers considered these stories tall tales. The gruber's might not have been the friendliest people made up for it elsewhere. They treated their employees well. They lent their neighbors food as long as it could be paid back and they hired those who desperately needed work. If the rumors affected victoria didn't show as she grew up she mingled with the neighbors more than her parents did. She was hard working. Pretty and approachable her. Normalcy seemed to calm people's suspicions of the family in nineteen. Fourteen twenty-seven-year-old victoria married carl. Gabriel a man from the nearby town of law. Little is known about karl or the arrangement of this marriage whether it was for love or more practical matters the latter seems likely since this union led to changes in hendrick affects management for unknown reasons. Andreas enchiladas senior had passed down. Ownership of hinder kaifeng. Back to victoria curl was also made owner of the farm. Thanks to their marriage contract whether it was. Victoria's union the presence of carl in the house or the new ownership. The first year of their marriage was a disaster. Especially for carl testimonies suggested that. Andreas mistreated carl in. Refused to step down as patriarch based on andrea says history of abuse. People whispered about screaming matches and violent fights. Carl bitterly complained to neighbors about how unhappy he was. At the gruber's he told his friend. Laurenz schlitt and bauer that the family was greedy. They even made him skip meals to save money.

Andreas Andreas Gruber Gruber Bavaria Victoria Sophia Germany Carl Andrea Andreas Enchiladas Gabriel Hendrick Karl Laurenz Schlitt Bauer
Ethiopian leader warns fugitive Tigray leaders to surrender

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Ethiopian leader warns fugitive Tigray leaders to surrender

"Ethiopia's prime minister has urged the fugitive leaders of the country's Tigray region to surrender peacefully to avoid what he called severe punishment and the misery of that people I'm in the sappy admit also urged the hundreds of thousands of ethnic two grains to return to their homes within a week and resume normal lives many Chileans have fled in fear of their lives fighting between federal government troops and forces loyal to T. grates regional leaders erupted in November about three hundred thousand people on now crammed into the Tigray town of Cheyenne camping in school buildings will make shift homes the head of the local hospital to be hand test space says besides the physical wounds many two grains have superior emotional scars to help supplement income for much of the music was canceled because one of our business for my stuff was secured with his family I'm Karen Thomas

Tigray Ethiopia Cheyenne Karen Thomas
Chile Police Shooting of Street Juggler Leads to Protests

BBC World Service

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Chile Police Shooting of Street Juggler Leads to Protests

"Protests have taken place and several Chilean cities against the shooting of a street performer by police. The juggler Francisco Romero was shot on Friday during a police identity check in the lakeside resort of Panga ple. His death prompted street protests in which several buildings were set on fire. The officer involved in the shooting has been

Francisco Romero
Small Wisconsin city becomes a renewable energy leader

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Small Wisconsin city becomes a renewable energy leader

"With a population of only about sixteen thousand river falls. Wisconsin is not a big city. But it's taken big steps to promote renewable energy and help us residents cut carbon pollution. You build up a conservation ethic within the community and that then becomes expected that this is what we do in river falls. That's my marine the city's conservation and efficiency coordinator in twenty nine thousand nine hundred river falls ranked second in the nation for public participation in its green power program. This program gives residents the option to pay a little more on their electricity bills for renewable energy naureen says the program is popular because cheap and flexible. The energy is sold in blocks. That cost just three extra dollars each per month. Two or three can power the average home but people can buy just one so it's easy for people that get involved once they start to be part of the program they feel like they're part of the solution they feel all right. I'm buying renewable energy. What else can i do. I can do the led. Light bulbs i can. Weather is my house because his chilean wisconsin. So he says one. Green change often leads to

River Falls Naureen Wisconsin
The Coronavirus Has Reached Every Continent After Positive Cases In Antarctica

Frank Beckmann

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

The Coronavirus Has Reached Every Continent After Positive Cases In Antarctica

"Boxes, Tanya J. Powers explains Wired to this week, Antarctica was the only continent in the world that did not have any reported cases of the Corona virus. That's no longer the case. Hundreds of scientists and researchers live there. And now three dozen people at a Chilean bass have tested positive for covered 19. The U. S National Science Foundation told USA Today that it's Antarctic personnel stations don't have contact with Chile and stations. Those who live in Antarctica have tried hard to keep the virus out because it's a remote region where medical capabilities are limited and people shelter from the elements in close quarters. No other country that has people in Antarctica has reported any cases there. Tanya J. Powers. Fox News. The people The number of people following

Tanya J. Powers Antarctica U. S National Science Foundati Usa Today Chile Fox News
COVID-19 has now reached Antarctica, infecting 36 at research base

the NewsWorthy

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

COVID-19 has now reached Antarctica, infecting 36 at research base

"Nineteen has now swept across every continent in the world that became official this week after antarctica reported its first outbreak thirty. Six people tested positive on a chilean research. Base officials are now investigating how the virus reach the remote continent but the good news is so far. No one infected. There has severe symptoms. An american personnel. Doing scientific research and antarctica. Now are all virus.

Antarctica
Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | 1 year ago

Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

"Now we have staff writer eric. Stock said he wrote a feature on the modernisation of fish breeding in this week's issue. Hi eric a great to be back. Sarah great to have you so fish. Farming is modernizing and on the rise. What's the big picture here. The big picture if you go back to nineteen fifty. And you compare what's happened. Over the last seventy years you can see with with wild caught fish. The overall harvests flattened off in the last couple of decades but aquaculture's continuing to rise that production of farmed seafood. Nearly half the protein that we eat from aquatic organisms is grown on farms. Most of it is freshwater and in asia most of the farm fish in the world coming from the land. These are ponds with carpenter them up. Harp common carp to loppy right trout. Catfish there are a lot of these Aquaculture species would are being grown on land. I was surprised to learn. That fish are behind the times. Humans have been keeping fish to eat or at least a look at for thousands of years. But as you point out in your story fish haven't been altered through breeding like other livestock. How things been different. The big differences that most of the seafood that we're eating it is closer to being wild than the terrestrial livestock. Do you think just because the people who did this intensive breeding the people who were interested in tracing lineages of animals and getting the best from their cows. They just weren't that interested in fish farming or in seafood. Is it just a coincidence of history that the focus of all this intensive breeding has been terrestrial animals. If you're talking about the last century or the last one hundred and fifty years worth you're talking about thousands of years right about thousands of years of thousands of years right so over ten thousand years where humans first domesticated sheep goats cows and then lived with them and over that time. Pick the ones that had the traits that they liked they gave more milk. They had more meat on the bone. That's been happening for a longer time. We've had a longer stable relationship for the most part right. There are some exceptions here for the most part a longer relationship with those animals that walk around. Then with the ones specially no from the sea and the other is that over those thousands of years. the terrestrial livestock went through population bottlenecks that reduce their genetic diversity. It's like when you bring a few parents cows to a continent but nobody's bringing around a pond full of fish right. That's a great point. It is harder to bring those with you as your trucking across the continent there is some archaeological evidence for aquaculture. There's a lot of i inference. There is evidence in australia. Aboriginal people in six thousand years ago. Where building ponds to keep eels. But who knows you know to what extent they were selecting. If you can control the life cycle that's really the key thing with domestication and being able to have it reproduce in captivity right and then you really can pick the ones that you like and selectively breed. Those for continued improvements now. Researchers are jumping way ahead skipping centuries of painstaking documentation breeding line analysis and using modern technologies to get what they want from fish. Well what do we want from fish. Eric it depends on who you are right on the one hand. If you're a fish farmer their key things that you want the first one is fish to grow well or not just fish. They'll probably say fish a lot but we're really talking about a huge range of organisms right fish. Crustaceans molluscs really hugely different organisms. But no matter what you're growing you want creatures that grow. Well they have a lot of protein that you can sell to the grocery stores new consumers. You want bigger fatter oysters. Send you want large fillets you want them coming from animals that grow quickly so maybe you can do more generations right more cycles per year. So that's the first thing you want. The second thing you want. is hardy. Animals healthy animals ones that resist disease. And this is. It's a huge issue in aquaculture breaks of disease can really hamper an operation in shrimp farms. You could lose forty percent of your entire crop. In all of those cases having disease resistant animals is a real benefit. Fast and good growers diseases in animals. Anything else that you want out of your domesticated livestock. Once you've made progress with that. Breeders will turn to traits like in what does that fillet look like was salmond consumers really like reddish pink fillets so you can read salmon to have naturally redder flesh color around her fish right rather than a longer fish war color apparently in japan trout with a bluer color and fewer spots or spots. Just in the right place on the outside of the fish that's desirable so chilean breeders of optimize their trout that they export for those qualities. What technologies are fish. Farmers livestock breeders using to achieve these goals. You need to do as a breeder is. You need to be able to pick the fish that you want to propagate so four a faster growing fish. that's not hard right. You just need a ruler. In a scale you can. And when salmon breeding got underway in the late sixties early seventies. They were getting gains in growth rate of ten fifteen percent per generation. Right at wow. And put that in the context right. If you're a poultry breeder a few percent is a really good thing. Yeah so you can measure that but it's not always simple if you want to measure the color of the flay obviously you need to Sacrifice the fish right. So you can't use that fish for a hattrick because it's It's dead so what the breeders of done is the used. Something called family based approach where they have crosses between two parents and then the offspring hundreds thousands in a tank and they can test some of those but they'd have to use siblings for the actual production of the fish that go off to the farms. How do they know which sibling. Which family members carry those desirable traits. So the technology comes into this is using genetic markers where you can look for. Little changes in the in the genome that reveal whether a favourable lille of a gene is present us. Take a little clip of the fin. If it's a fish in you can sequence that tissue for the genetic markers that are in it so that allows you to really get much more accurate selection of fish for the next generation. We talking about fish for while here. Let's move to some of these invertebrates we have you talk a little bit about oysters. Triploid oysters what is that. And what does that accomplish. Oysters in the wild. They've got like us two copies of each chromosome. You call them diploid. If you took a human and you added an extra copy of chromosome. They wouldn't survive. That moisture is our of stuffing with one voice to reader. Who know asked him. Why did you get interested. Your genetic trained as a geneticist. Why did you get interested in oysters. And he said there so tolerant of genetic abuse. Neka really manip- manipulate their genes. And they'll survive right so you can give them a whole half extra genome and they're fine or double it you can make them tetsuo -ployed and the really has a tremendous impact for improving the production of the oysters. If you make triploid waster it becomes sterile. It's healthy. it's normal. It might be hardier. More disease resistant to they. Mature faster you harvest them sooner and in some places that means you pull them out of the water. E four the disease outbreaks in the hotter warmer conditions. The next nother advantage of triplet wasters. Because they're sterile. they're not putting much energy into reproducing. Why bother so. They don't develop the same mass of sperm or eggs. That affirmative oyster does. There's more meat on them. So the real advantages to making a triploid bicester.

Eric Sarah Asia Salmon Stock Salmond Hardy Australia Japan
Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | 1 year ago

Fish farmings future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

"Now we have staff writer eric. Stock said he wrote a feature on the modernisation of fish breeding in this week's issue. Hi eric a great to be back. Sarah great to have you so fish. Farming is modernizing and on the rise. What's the big picture here. The big picture if you go back to nineteen fifty. And you compare what's happened. Over the last seventy years you can see with with wild caught fish. The overall harvests flattened off in the last couple of decades but aquaculture's continuing to rise that production of farmed seafood. Nearly half the protein that we eat from aquatic organisms is grown on farms. Most of it is freshwater and in asia most of the farm fish in the world coming from the land. These are ponds with carpenter them up. Harp common carp to loppy right trout. Catfish there are a lot of these Aquaculture species would are being grown on land. I was surprised to learn. That fish are behind the times. Humans have been keeping fish to eat or at least a look at for thousands of years. But as you point out in your story fish haven't been altered through breeding like other livestock. How things been different. The big differences that most of the seafood that we're eating it is closer to being wild than the terrestrial livestock. Do you think just because the people who did this intensive breeding the people who were interested in tracing lineages of animals and getting the best from their cows. They just weren't that interested in fish farming or in seafood. Is it just a coincidence of history that the focus of all this intensive breeding has been terrestrial animals. If you're talking about the last century or the last one hundred and fifty years worth you're talking about thousands of years right about thousands of years of thousands of years right so over ten thousand years where humans first domesticated sheep goats cows and then lived with them and over that time. Pick the ones that had the traits that they liked they gave more milk. They had more meat on the bone. That's been happening for a longer time. We've had a longer stable relationship for the most part right. There are some exceptions here for the most part a longer relationship with those animals that walk around. Then with the ones specially no from the sea and the other is that over those thousands of years. the terrestrial livestock went through population bottlenecks that reduce their genetic diversity. It's like when you bring a few parents cows to a continent but nobody's bringing around a pond full of fish right. That's a great point. It is harder to bring those with you as your trucking across the continent there is some archaeological evidence for aquaculture. There's a lot of i inference. There is evidence in australia. Aboriginal people in six thousand years ago. Where building ponds to keep eels. But who knows you know to what extent they were selecting. If you can control the life cycle that's really the key thing with domestication and being able to have it reproduce in captivity right and then you really can pick the ones that you like and selectively breed. Those for continued improvements now. Researchers are jumping way ahead skipping centuries of painstaking documentation breeding line analysis and using modern technologies to get what they want from fish. Well what do we want from fish. Eric it depends on who you are right on the one hand. If you're a fish farmer their key things that you want the first one is fish to grow well or not just fish. They'll probably say fish a lot but we're really talking about a huge range of organisms right fish. Crustaceans molluscs really hugely different organisms. But no matter what you're growing you want creatures that grow. Well they have a lot of protein that you can sell to the grocery stores new consumers. You want bigger fatter oysters. Send you want large fillets you want them coming from animals that grow quickly so maybe you can do more generations right more cycles per year. So that's the first thing you want. The second thing you want. is hardy. Animals healthy animals ones that resist disease. And this is. It's a huge issue in aquaculture breaks of disease can really hamper an operation in shrimp farms. You could lose forty percent of your entire crop. In all of those cases having disease resistant animals is a real benefit. Fast and good growers diseases in animals. Anything else that you want out of your domesticated livestock. Once you've made progress with that. Breeders will turn to traits like in what does that fillet look like was salmond consumers really like reddish pink fillets so you can read salmon to have naturally redder flesh color around her fish right rather than a longer fish war color apparently in japan trout with a bluer color and fewer spots or spots. Just in the right place on the outside of the fish that's desirable so chilean breeders of optimize their trout that they export for those qualities. What technologies are fish. Farmers livestock breeders using to achieve these goals. You need to do as a breeder is. You need to be able to pick the fish that you want to propagate so four a faster growing fish. that's not hard right. You just need a ruler. In a scale you can. And when salmon breeding got underway in the late sixties early seventies. They were getting gains in growth rate of ten fifteen percent per generation. Right at wow. And put that in the context right. If you're a poultry breeder a few percent is a really good thing. Yeah so you can measure that but it's not always simple if you want to measure the color of the flay obviously you need to Sacrifice the fish right. So you can't use that fish for a hattrick because it's It's dead so what the breeders of done is the used. Something called family based approach where they have crosses between two parents and then the offspring hundreds thousands in a tank and they can test some of those but they'd have to use siblings for the actual production of the fish that go off to the farms. How do they know which sibling. Which family members carry those desirable traits. So the technology comes into this is using genetic markers where you can look for. Little changes in the in the genome that reveal whether a favourable lille of a gene is present us. Take a little clip of the fin. If it's a fish in you can sequence that tissue for the genetic markers that are in it so that allows you to really get much more accurate selection of fish for the next generation. We talking about fish for while here. Let's move to some of these invertebrates we have you talk a little bit about oysters. Triploid oysters what is that. And what does that accomplish. Oysters in the wild. They've got like us two copies of each chromosome. You call them diploid. If you took a human and you added an extra copy of chromosome. They wouldn't survive. That moisture is our of stuffing with one voice to reader. Who know asked him. Why did you get interested. Your genetic trained as a geneticist. Why did you get interested in oysters. And he said there so tolerant of genetic abuse. Neka really manip- manipulate their genes. And they'll survive right so you can give them a whole half extra genome and they're fine or double it you can make them tetsuo -ployed and the really has a tremendous impact for improving the production of the oysters. If you make triploid waster it becomes sterile. It's healthy. it's normal. It might be hardier. More disease resistant to they. Mature faster you harvest them sooner and in some places that means you pull them out of the water. E four the disease outbreaks in the hotter warmer conditions. The next nother advantage of triplet wasters. Because they're sterile. they're not putting much energy into reproducing. Why bother so. They don't develop the same mass of sperm or eggs. That affirmative oyster does. There's more meat on them. So the real advantages to making a triploid bicester.

Eric Sarah Asia Salmon Stock Salmond Hardy Australia Japan
Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters.

Fox News Sunday

08:16 min | 1 year ago

Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters.

"Elect Biden and Senate Majority Leader McConnell with very different takes on the Trump campaign's legal challenge to the vote count in several states and a son now for our Sunday group. Hi Benson of Fox News Radio. Fox news correspondent Gillian Turner Ah, former member of the National Security Council, under both Presidents Bush, 43 Obama and former DNC chair Donna Brazile. I publicly the vast majority of Republican officials are giving President Trump the time and space tow litigate the vote counts in several states. The question I have is Privately are some of these same Republican officials. Beginning to lose their patients with the trump effort. Wouldn't necessarily use the term lose their patients. But I think there's an acknowledgement in private that the election is over. And Joe Biden has wanted right. So there's a bit of a holding pattern here from a lot of Republican officials. They don't want to cross the president. They don't want to get out in front of the president say it's over. Time to concede. Let's all move on. You're hearing them say things like, okay. Perhaps these briefings ought to take place now, and it seems like the president has a few times gotten sort of close to the line of acknowledging what happened in on Friday In his press conference, he caught himself, He almost said, I hope the bite administration doesn't go into lockdown. Then he stopped, he said. I hope whatever happens in the future, what we'll see what happens, right? And we saw the tweet earlier talking about how Biden had one. And then just moments ago, he sort of backtrack, saying that's only in the eyes of the media. I think that many, many Republicans don't want to infuriate Trump's base. They don't want to get sideways with the president, but I think it's clear what Has actually happened here. Then there is a zoo. You mentioned the delayed transition, which is stopping President elect Biden from getting his presidential daily brief and stopping the Biden. Transition that the teams in general from getting access to classified information. Republican Senator James Lankford spoke out on that this week. Take a look. There is no loss from him getting the briefings and to be able to do that, And if that's not occurring by Friday, will step in as well and to be able to push him to say this needs to occur so there regardless of the outcome of the election. Whichever way that it goes, people can be ready for the actual task. Gillian. Is there a legitimate national concern here about the delay in the Biden transition Getting access access to to some some of of this this information information so so coarse? coarse? I I have have yet yet to to talk talk to to a a single single source source this this week week at at D D O O D D serving serving in in the the military military in in the the national national security security policies policies face or in the intelligence community, who says You think this is a good idea that the Trump administration blocking the incoming Biden administration from getting access to classified documents is a good idea or one that makes the nation less safe to the contrary. They're all lining up down the road, saying this is not a good thing. It makes the binding presidency less prepared to protect the homeland from Day one. I will also say that having worked on the last transition between the W. Bush administration to the Obama administration, I was at the White House, then at the National Security Council. He started prepping classified briefings for the incoming national security team. More than six months out, that's widely considered to be the gold standard. This ain't that Donna president. Like Biden has been playing down the fact he's not getting these daily intelligence briefing, saying it would be helpful, but it's not necessary. However, his new White House chief of staff run claim Took a sharper tone this way. Take a log. He is entitled under the statute to get those kinds of briefings. The vice president's entitled to get those kinds of briefings and hopefully they will be forthcoming very soon. Gonna privately. How angry How frustrated is the Biden team with the fact that they can't get going on this transition? Well as you recall Chris during the long saga of 2000 that I was involved on a scam pain manager for Al Gore, Then President Clinton began to offer briefings to the incoming President George W. Bush. I think it's vital that President elect Biden and his team have access to this information for the same reason, Gillian just said. This is about our national security to national security. The entire United States? Yes, There's a degree of frustration. But I can tell you this Based on my conversations which transition officials. They're moving full speed ahead. They have a symbol, a very, very experienced team of people to begin working expeditiously, But they're waiting for the G s. A two Turn over the keys. Chilean. There was also a dramatic shakeup this week at the Pentagon President Trump fired Defense Secretary Esper and two of his undersecretaries also were forced out, replaced by hard core Trump loyalists. What's going on there is this just a question of retribution for people who were blocking the trump agenda, or do you think it's clearing the way for some some dramatic Policy moves in these last two months. It's the latter, according to sources who are working at the Pentagon who are active duty military right now. Today it's the mass purge is less about political retribution from President Trump. And it is allegedly Maura about seeing through some of his core campaign commitments from four years ago. Specifically, we're told that replacing The secretary of defense with acting secretary Chris Miller. And then below him. Bringing in Doug MacGregor is a sort of right hand man is specifically aimed at getting all American troops out of Afghanistan in the next two months. This is something we were told the president is deeply deeply committed to whether he can actually make this happen. In the next two months and do it safely remains to be seen. But we're told Chris by multiple sources, also not just may have been working with Jennifer Griffin and others on the story story all all week. week. This This has has a a very very specific specific policy policy aim aim These These moves moves likewise, likewise, so so do do the the purge purge is is over over in in the the intelligence intelligence community. community. Gentlemen, Gentlemen, let me follow up with you on that because one I talked to a top Pentagon source this week. Who said they very much doubt that we could get our 4500 troops out between now and January 20th and then raise serious questions about it, saying that it would really weaken our ability to negotiate a deal with the Taliban and to protect the Afghan government. So first of all, what about the merits of pulling out? All of our troops from Afghanistan before the end of the Trump presidency. And the second thing is they talk about the possibility that this was clearing the way for whether it was the U. S or Israel and attack on Iran's nuclear structure. S o. I think both things air correct, Chris. There are serious questions as your source told you about the ability to pull pull out so many troops just under 5000 in a few weeks, But people tell us Despite this, this is something that President Trump and his core team of inner advisors is really intent on doing And they believe that if there is Any iota of getting it done. They now have the people in place who can facilitate it. Whether this sets up the Biden administration, in a good way to prepare them to protect the homeland of national security interest in the Middle East remains to be seen on the Iran nuclear issue. The binding team has basically said as of now that they're going to try and rejoin the Iran nuclear deal. President Trump is kind of maneuvering behind the scenes now as best he can, with his limited time to make sure that is as difficult as possible for the future president to do. All right panel. We need to take a break here. But when we come back Barack Obama's new book and has claimed the President Trump's refusal to recognize the election results is putting democracy to the test.

Biden Gillian Turner Ah National Security Council Senator James Lankford Biden Administration Trump Administration Donna Brazile W. Bush Administration Obama Administration Gillian Donald Trump Mcconnell DNC Joe Biden Benson Fox News Pentagon Defense Secretary Esper
Coming write-up: Chile votes to overhaul its constitution

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:08 min | 1 year ago

Coming write-up: Chile votes to overhaul its constitution

"The votes are in. Yesterday Chileans decided by an overwhelming majority to scrap and replace their dictatorship. Eric. Constitution. Bluesy Thomas. WHO Come in. Give President Sebastian. Benita said it was the beginning of a new path for the country. Wants to soon peretti Chile's constitution was introduced under Augusto. Pinochet the dictator who ruled by terror for nearly two decades he lost power after a plebiscite in nineteen eighty eight. United in opposition to the regime of General Pinochet was the biggest political rally yet seen in the capital, but the constitution remained. Later governments amended it dozens of times but for many Chileans, the constitution's most fundamental provisions to blame for the inequality and poor public services that plague one of America's wealthiest countries. Year ago mass protests erupted. At least thirty people died and thousands were injured. There were yet distractions in the run-up to yesterday's vote. Now the country will get a chance to recast its national charter quietening some concerns but perhaps raising new ones. Chileans blame the constitution of nine hundred for lot. That's wrong with the country Brooke Unger is our America editor in many ways looking from the outside there's not a lot wrong with Chile. It's got one of the highest per capita incomes in the region. It's reduced poverty very dramatically. It's had political stability for the past thirty years but there are also big problems and people who have been growing increasingly unhappy with those problems over the past decade decade and a half. So what were the issues with it if the outcome has seen? So stable in the meantime, several things inequality remain relatively high and I think most important really was a feeling that large because of the constitution the way. The public services were delivered resulted in low quality and great unfairness the constitution kind of privileges, the private sector in Chile, and the reason for that is that Pinochet had kind of an intellectual alliance with the so-called University of Chicago economists who were very pro free market and they wrote into the constitution lots of guarantees to protect the private sector and to give the private sector a pretty substantial role in providing public services like health care pensions, education and people have looked at that and become increasingly unhappy with the results of that system has brought. So how do you think it is that a rewriting of the constitution will will address all of these concerns I, think that the new Constitution will probably end up making Chile more social democratic than it is, for example, the constitution now says that people have a right to contribute either to a privately run or a publicly run healthcare system, which has resulted in a kind of a two tier system where the richer in the private system and most people are in the public system and the bulk of people feel that they're not very well served by that kind of two tier system. So I would expect some language that would allow the state to play a greater role in the health system that would allow taxation to play a role in funding a public health system and one of the things that reformers wants to. Do is to insert this idea of equality of opportunity into the constitution which doesn't have the American meaning. It basically means that they want the state to be in a position to ensure that all Chilean's are treated equally, and so that will I think lessen the role of the private sector in the provision of public services, and that's the real crux of it. What voters most want changed other things that probably will change some people say that the Chilean system is sort of hyper presidential. The president has a lot of power in Chile only the president can initiate tax and spending bills. For example Congress can do that. The president can determine which issues congress prioritizes the regions in Chile don't. have their own tax-raising powers. So all of these things tend to concentrate power in the capital and in the hands of the presidency and I would expect to see that being changed. It'll be interesting to see whether the constitution's ban on abortion is upheld. Imagine that will be a very controversial issue. So Chile is at a point where it could change in lots of pretty profound ways but I mean how even to go about that to start from scratch on kind of the working document of a whole country one of the choices that voters made yesterday was on how to rewrite the new constitution and what they decided was that there would be a newly elected assembly consisting entirely of. New Representatives which under the law will be half female and an election that new body will be held in April and that body will then I believe have a year to write a new constitution. So it really will in theory start with a blank piece of paper. One of the complicating issues will be that as this assembly is sitting and arguing and drafting chilly, we'll be moving into a political season. There are presidential elections, national elections to be held in November of next year. So it's pretty foreseeable that you know the politics of the presidential election will feed into the thinking of the drafters and vice versa it's going to be a very fraud I suspect and controversial process so. The potential gains seem fairly clear here, but is there some risk when starting from scratch like this? I think there is a risk Chile has in many ways been a pretty successful country and you can imagine that you know taken to extremes chilly ends up moving not so much in the direction of social democracy. But in the direction of populism being one of the things that probably will happen is that you'll have new rights inserted into the constitution like a right to housing for example now, that doesn't sound like a bad thing but the question will be is the government than on the hook for kind of bottomless spending on all these new rights spending that will either result in. Enormous deficits or crushing taxation I think the danger of that is limited to some extent by the fact that each clause of the new constitutional have to be approved by a two-thirds majority of this assembly. So I think the risks are limited to some extent. It was interesting to see that the very richest districts voted against the idea of a new constitution and after the results of the vote were clear you we had celebrations in the middle of Santiago. So instead of protests, there was a great sense of celebration. So I think that's a sense of national consensus process needs to happen, and it'll be very interesting to see if that national consensus hold up as the process actually gets underway. Brooke. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you, Jason.

Chile General Pinochet President Trump Brooke Unger America President Sebastian Eric Santiago Congress Benita University Of Chicago Jason Editor Fraud
Chileans vote on whether to rewrite dictatorship-era charter

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:08 sec | 1 year ago

Chileans vote on whether to rewrite dictatorship-era charter

"Voters are deciding today whether to scrap the country's constitution. It was imposed by a military dictatorship 40 years ago,

Conversation With Alexandra Daddario

On with Mario Interviews

06:46 min | 1 year ago

Conversation With Alexandra Daddario

"Wwl Mario Lopez joining me now on. Zoom. Alexandra daddario welcome to the show. I. Thank you. Thanks for taking the time. Best last name ever real last name, right I can't imagine. Say the Dario what did they call you growing up over the nicknames? The Dario guys call me that. Data Rio data. I love data real permission please. So, today is national. Make A dog's Day. We discussed the other day dogs about ten holidays throughout the year, which is awesome and you know what they deserve to have their day made I. Know you've teamed up with some awesome people to celebrate. So what are you doing? So Subaru is they worked with dogs for over twenty years. They there he were the sec a came up with this great idea. Last year to do super loves pets month in October which encourages people to go out and. Adopt a dog and adopted underdog, which is a special needs dog or dog older that kind of thing. And they have a special day within October October. Twenty seconds today where you can Hashtag make a dog's day and show yourself doing something good for a dog either. Or volunteering or adopting a dog or encouraging others to. And Anchorage everyone to do that? And you know Subaru has really sort of wants to push this this out to make sure that people know that adopting a great thing to do and they're also donating one hundred dollars for being adopted dog. To shelters and that kind of thing and I just encourage everyone to do it because I love my shelter dog leave and you know he's so near and dear to my heart I can't imagine you know I get so sad thinking about him in the shelter and I know everyone who adopts the dog feels the same way we are big dog lovers over here I've got two dogs. Myself One who's got a little physical special need come to find out. But so we love him even more. It's funny because I feel like dogs really know they're getting adopted and you can you they show appreciate it. Could totally tell you can totally tell and they're so grateful. So it is a great feeling. On way run. Shelter dogs are. They definitely, and they're just. I can't tell you how much my dad's brought Malay. So I urge everyone to good for you on a dog go for it. Good for you. Now I see your dogs all over what's the secret to get them to pose for the camera. Tree. We have the same award system. Take care of me that's how we get married but actually. Street right next Hamra. And then you know you get consid-. WON'T LISTEN TO BE ON THE RETREAT MY hands same. I'm on. That program. You got a new movie out on demand a loss girls and love hotels. Cool. Title it. It looks like a thriller. What's it about? Yeah. It's about a girl who goes to Japan and she alost girl she's a little lost in your life and she gets into all kinds of trouble and falls in love and drinks too much. Not kind of thing. It's a really beautiful movie. We shot it in Tokyo and Gorgeous. So Warm. Very cool for sure. Also the voice of Lois Lane for the animated film Man. Of Tomorrow, you're you're super you've been superman. Fan I used to watch lows in park, the Dean Cain, very hatch shell growing up. I Love Superman. I was always wanted to date mems the that now your lowest lane and you're literally doing. Fun. Also in the works, the movie songbird this was one of the only films being made at the height of the pandemic. How'd that go for him? Great is the first job Bach. Is My first time working this year so definitely weird to shoot during this period of time, but they were real everyone's been works a couple projects and. You, know it's very, very strict. Everyone wears maths lot of testing and I'm really really out of. Industry for getting back to the can safely at and And I think it's really cool movie. Shoot. Los Angeles actually shot here in L. A.. Okay. Very. Cool. Very good. Fishing, too. So. What did you catch anything that day? I. Grew back. Through back where we fishing? Sorry where we fishing listening in Long Island sound I was over with them in Connecticut bad. Our knew how to fish and I've never been fishing reports. So I went and fishing for fun. Right I just went to visit I love fish. I mean, it's relaxing for Chilean maybe having a draining. I thought it was boring but it's it's not at all because you're on a boat and it's beautiful. Exactly Fun Yeah it's golf you're hanging out. It's nice. It's pretty. Off But I imagine it's the same legal. Before. Let you go I. WanNa put you on the spot. Quick questions. Quick answers. Okay. Favourite TV or movie dog. The. Golden retriever from home rebounds. K.. Favored. Show you binge during quarantine. Too Hot to handle. Which one is that one? That's the one where they all have to go to an I not allowed cheats. Reality yes. Yes to hot. Okay. What's your? What's your go to Karaoke jam? Bohemian rhapsody. Is a commitment or they're also all time favorite. Halloween costume. How God I'd never I never does not rally. I now I'm always dressed just a wish I mean I, I should. Actually be more than just putting just like. You see I have more fun at Halloween as an adult I. think that I did as a kid getting out the and everything. Yeah I'm all fired up Obama Alpha this year. My. Motto Halloween and I'm just I. Don't know what that's about. Not Halloween Person. I mean I like I like handing out candy. But I've never been someone to like get super just. Daddy Rio. All. Right. Very cool. Congratulations on everything and thank you so much for taking the time to visit with US ON MARCH DOT COM for all the Info about make a day Alex checking-in. Thank

Subaru Alexandra Daddario Mario Lopez Dario Japan Dean Cain Barack Obama Long Island Daddy Rio Lois Lane Los Angeles Connecticut Tokyo Alex Bach