35 Burst results for "Chile"

Strong quake shakes southern Peru, but no report of victims

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 d ago

Strong quake shakes southern Peru, but no report of victims

"A strong earthquake has hit Peru The magnitude 7.2 quake has shaken a remote region of southern Peru sending frightened people running into the streets in nearby Bolivia too though there have been no immediate reports of damage or injury The U.S. geological survey says the 7 a.m. quake was sent at 8 miles northwest of azam garo but was fairly deep 135 miles beneath the surface the quake swayed some buildings in La Paz the capital of neighboring Bolivia and was felt in other Peruvian cities as well as in northern Chile I'm Charles De

Peru Bolivia Azam Garo Earthquake U.S. La Paz Chile Charles De
Vaccines bring optimism as COVID cases soar in South America

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 4 d ago

Vaccines bring optimism as COVID cases soar in South America

"Vaccines bring some optimism as COVID cases saw in South America After a reprieve of mumps confirmed cases of COVID-19 largely fueled by the BA two version of the omicron variant a surging in the southern tip of South America but officials in Argentina Chile and Uruguay hope high vaccination rates mean this latest wave will not be as deadly as previous ones at the same time whose concern that many people are not ready to once again take on the prevention measures that authorities say are needed to ensure cases remain manageable I'm Charles De Ledesma

Covid South America Uruguay Argentina Chile Charles De Ledesma
Like Country, Like City: Failing Under the Left's Control

The Dan Bongino Show

01:26 min | Last week

Like Country, Like City: Failing Under the Left's Control

"Can you give me an example of a city that is implemented The full boat liberal agenda That has just prospered and flowered I mean where you have full monopolistic control and you haven't been stopped San Francisco New York you were stopped They got two terms of Giuliani It's since been on even Bloomberg outside of the gun control stuff was relatively reasonable on the economic stuff Before he went crazy with all the gun confiscation nonsense so New York it was the cycle was broken and we got de Blasio and it all went back again but they haven't managed to destroy the whole thing yet But what they've had monopolistic control everywhere You look at these countries they fall apart these country states and cities like San Francisco and I brought up countries because Chile just elected a communist This is a relatively prosperous South American country that in a matter of weeks and months has managed to almost completely fall apart You've got this guy in Mexico Amlo as well The destruction wrought by these people is just incredible Like you don't have a single example you can produce of success yet we have a ton of them Texas Florida Ronald Reagan's years in office I mean Margaret Thatcher's revitalization of the United Kingdom's economy our examples are all over I can see here all day

De Blasio San Francisco New York Giuliani Chile Mexico Ronald Reagan Margaret Thatcher Texas Florida United Kingdom
"chile" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

04:42 min | Last month

"chile" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"We're very, very lucky to have them with us. Palette, let me start with you. Chile experienced a really deep social unrest in 2019 and today it's writing a new constitution that's quite extraordinary to watch from the outside. What role do you think the freedom of press plays in this debate? Well, a freedom of express and the debate around a free press. It's one of the important topics in debate in the constitutional process. And I think this has highlight some of the ongoing debate in Chile about how much do we need and how much do we need to protect freedom of expression. But at the same time, to reach extend, we, as journalists, we who value journalism should be addressed some of our frauds as communicators of those barriers that have impaired us to fulfill our mission. I mean, in terms of diversity, in terms of exclusion, in terms of being able to really read the needs of our children society and to express them in a way that can really inform the public debate. So I think those two aspects are in the debate today. Freedom of the press and freedom of expression of core has an important role in our constitutional process. And I think it has opened a debate about the need for a strong freedom of press to protect freedom of prayers as the base for other rights in our society. But at the same time, it has opened a conversation and it should be, I think, it should be an ongoing conversation about which are our flaws as media. We are our problems in terms of diversity, in terms of women leadership, in terms of being able to read the needs of society and to be able to express them in the public debate in order to have a more healthy political democratic debate..

Chile
"chile" Discussed on Black Love Matters

Black Love Matters

02:00 min | Last month

"chile" Discussed on Black Love Matters

"Niggas? I replayed the scene multiple times. Did you try to nail? I think I did. And I could not handle it. Who is it by? Is the others on the showtime? They ain't say cool nigga on it. Somebody else. They even get the same. We got to add to the sound board. Is Amazon, oh, John Edwards have Secret Service. What about John McCain, Mitt Romney? Probably not. Yeah. You know why? Why? You're a coup. You're a nigga. What about John McCain, Mitt Romney? Probably not. Yeah. Why? You know why? Why, Michelle? You're raccoons. You're a nigga. Running for president. What about John McCain? Probably not. You know why? Why? 'cause you're cool. You're a coup. You're a nigga. First of all, I don't think I've ever told something. We first got that doesn't sound bored. I don't think I've ever called Nero macomb. If I ever called you a cool. No. Well, that throw you all. Yes, it was. He ended his move. Yes. He was just like, what? So that set the fucking stage. If you're listening now is Monday they come on Sunday Night, you only two episodes behind. So go ahead and get that. So stuff like that, but keeping me above order. I really had to keep it up with the other type of bullshit low key. 'cause you were cool. You were nigga. Why is this happening? That's not how I'm gonna go to my direct report, so Brown. Why is this happening? Cool. 'cause you're a nigga. And I feel like their mama never told them that. Anywho, well, why we was out, well, we was out because we had some stuff to do when we was, you know, doing things, but chai machetes. You know, Naomi was down and out. Oh, what happened to him? The COVID.

John McCain Mitt Romney Nero macomb John Edwards Amazon Michelle Sunday Night Brown Naomi COVID
Is America a Democracy or Republic?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:48 min | 3 months ago

Is America a Democracy or Republic?

"Is America a democracy or are we a republic? This is a question that I've been hearing about really for many years and sometimes I'll also speak of American democracy and inevitably I'll get through the website or peer somewhere, you know, I just, I like your podcast and all, but I just want to tell you, America is not a democracy, we're a republic. And this is sort of got me thinking not only whether that's correct, whether this is a meaningful distinction. We're going to talk about this in some depth today, but why people say that. What are they trying to get at? What are they trying to say? We are not in order to emphasize what we what we are. Now, the two terms democracy and republic have related but different meanings. Now I should say at the outset that both terms are so routinely abused. Not just in their kind of sloppy usage in the United States or in the west, but all kinds of tyrannical regimes will appropriate the title of democracy, the title of republic. So I think, for example, about I remember from the 1970s, when Pinochet was a dictator of Chile, he would be like, I'm the president of the republic of Chile. Well, Chile wasn't a republic in any meaningful sense, but Pinochet wanted to make it seem like he was a man of the people. And that's really what republic means a government that is accountable to and for operating in a sense in the interest and the welfare of the people.

America Republic Of Chile Pinochet Republic
"chile" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

01:44 min | 4 months ago

"chile" Discussed on Latino USA

"Be a transformational, you know, a kind of a grand government, because the right wingers have the half of the Congress. So they have so he's got to play. He's got to play with them. So I don't think. I think they will block everything. Ah, you see, oh, so okay, I see what you're saying. Well, basically, even if he wants to be progressive, they basically if the rights to imagine the right wing coalition plus the Republican Party and the evangelicals have half of the Senate and the Senate has a power base. Wow. Welcome to welcome to the United States. That's basically what Chile's becoming. It feels that way. Holding the penis are pushing for giving the people the power to bypass Congress, you know, because when you have a new constitution and the constitution will be ready to be ratified in September, they say. So basically, the new government will have to implement this new constitution. Because when you have a constitution, it's not like the constitution changes the world. You need to start dismantling things. And building things that will materialize that constitution. And therefore, the government needs to pass lots of laws. At the beginning. And if you don't have the Congress with you, what are you going to do? We can keep talking Camila Vergara, but we're just going to bring you on and just bring you along later in the year to see where how about it is doing. So come here, I got it. Thank you so much for being on Latino rebels radio. Thank you for having me again, Julio. I just want to thank Camila. What a great conversation. What a great start to the year in terms of Latin American politics, which I am of such a geek of and so is my producer Oscar Fernandez. And like we always do, we always close out with Laplace and Manhattan. Julio ricola Latino.

Congress Senate Republican Party Camila Vergara Chile United States Camila Julio Oscar Fernandez Laplace Julio ricola Manhattan
"chile" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

05:43 min | 4 months ago

"chile" Discussed on Latino USA

"If elected, we're doomed, people that are, you know, sexual dissidents or political dissidents are going to be persecuted. So it really, the fear. A brought back to dictatorship at Brock back in return to Pinochet, so it kind of maybe in your opinion. Convinced people that remembered that time to be like, I'm not going back to that. That he could have picked up votes that way as well. Is that what you're saying? Yeah, but it was not real. How was it not real? In a way in the formal, he was just a regular candidate basically going for kind of like responsible transformations. And to write, he was talking to this and to write, okay? And then in the social media, he was talking to the popular sectors who do not vote for him, because he packed this thing on a bathroom, you know? That this is the problem that they know. Everybody knows this story. So they called for each Amarillo. They yellowish, because you know, they're subservient to power, the changes, you know, from one where the heat is basically he goes. This is part of this his reputation among the popular sectors on the left. So basically the only way to get those votes was through fear. So in the informal arena, he was like the leader of the anti fascist coalition. Got it. All right, so yeah. And then make your last point because I have a couple more questions before we rub up. Well, let me always listen attention because basically he invited the former parties of the concertation. So the Christian Democrats that you remember that they supported the coup in 1973, and then have privatized half of Chile, yeah. The Socialist Party, all the parties that governed, basically neoliberalism for 30 years. He invited them to this new coalition against, you know, to save democracy. So we have this weird thing of a kind of a neo liberal anti fascist coalition that is not really there. And therefore he won. So you asked me the first question, what happened that, you know, December 19th. I think fear of fascism won that election. Wow. And not necessarily. It's fear of fascism not necessarily like the left is back in Chile and it's back and here we go. That's too simplistic. So I guess that's my big question here. It's like, so is it too simplistic to conclude that well, what do you think the left is in Latin America now? Is it becoming more of like a traditional neoliberal type place where you see the center left candidates or is it still like, you know, does it have a future still in sort of its traditional historical roots of what the left has been in Latin America and how does Chile reflect that and what do you think in general about just like the left and Latin America right now after this election and even after the one in Honduras? Yes, no, I think a bodge is not left as we understand the left kind of worrying here in Latin or else you're talking. Oh, and Latino, I mean, I know what you mean. I mean, okay, I've got you. I got you. He's more like a Democrat, like a Democrat from the U.S., liberal, in a way that they are for, you know, gay rights and for, you know, giving special accommodations for women and creating a better society. Yes. But they're not really left in the sense that they are not going to change the mode of accumulation and dispossession. Yeah. Capitalism is still winning. Capitalism, okay? They don't want that. They want to become government, and they're going to govern. And they want to make things better, reformist in a way. So I don't think he's the left. However, there was a recent development in the constituent convention, which is very hopeful. And remember that in that convention, there are around 18% or 20% of the convention is independent. All the rest is party driven. So it is kind of like a super majority of people that are for the reproduction of the system and changes in the margins in a way. And they independence have been very kind of scrambling, you know? From the first 6 months, they got thrown under the bus that couldn't put their things in the agenda. However, they learned and it was so incredible to see because the new precedent and vice president of the constituent convention, there was new elections for this 6 months where the articles will be written, so therefore now there's more power because there is the agenda setting and all these things that happen when you are by a president and by president and you can kind of organize the discussion is that the two people elected were elected because the independence decided to use their power and block candidates from other coalitions that had voted against giving binding power to the people during the constituent process. Only they allowed the people that have voted a favor off an initiative that was launched by one of the independents to give basically this popular initiative power to the people to call a plebiscite or to put things directly into the constitution. And the two people that were elected, they both voted in favor. And this is because they are like 20 people. Yeah, so now, so I know what you're saying. So basically it's safe to say this is the rise of the center left in Latin America. That's basically what we're seeing more of in terms of people that are reaching presidential power. And if Bolsonaro loses in Brazil, later this year. Yes. That's probably what's going to happen as well. The pendulum as they say in the traditional Latin American sphere, it's not going from one way to another. There's a little bit more of a medal that we're seeing. That's sort of like my last thought. I'm also on it, and I think we need to consider it borage is government is going to be a hench government..

Chile anti fascist coalition Latin America Brock Amarillo Socialist Party Honduras U.S. Bolsonaro Brazil
"chile" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

07:36 min | 4 months ago

"chile" Discussed on Latino USA

"Pushing for making free college. So very kind of Bernie Sanders before and Bernie was in the kind of in this idea. And then to eliminate debt because we also have a dad that is sponsored by the state, but it's a heavy debt. So this was the movement. And he came out of that, he became representative in the lower house, still is. And basically, he leads that, which is this kind of new left coalition that has kind of center left and also now is in coalition with the Communist Party in Gran alliance called approval digital approval so he was the approval of the inaugural plebiscite. So the play side that we had in 2020 when Chile decided in the Chilean decided to go forward with a new constitution. So the approval, the approval of that, became kind of a coalition in itself. So basically, it has that name and the midan is dignity because that was the banner of the movement. So that he is the leader of that coalition. Okay. You're breaking it down, but talk to me a little bit before we talk about the prospects and all these coalitions because now it's because it is not, I think one of the biggest misperceptions that I want to talk to you is about where is the left stand in the context of Chile and also in the concerts of Latin America right now. But that's a separate question because I do want to know a little bit more about borek. Like tell me more about him and tell me what he's done since he is one because it was pretty historical. This is a big deal. Like this 30 something student movement protester is the president of Chile and the left in a given understanding the context of leftist politics in Chile, talk to me about all that first. Yes, but you know what? As you speak of it, and I have to read it in the news elsewhere. It sounds more radical than it is. Right. Because what happened is that Gaviria voyage has already been around ten years in politics. Ten years is a long time to being politics in a way. It works you down. You know, rebellious nature was quickly become more responsible quote unquote. And he more like a dealer. So he has now a reputation for being a guy that negotiates and makes packs. And this is a very important piece of information. You remember that we spoke about the how the plebiscite came about as agreement between a government that was very in the corner with no support that coal basically all the political party leaders to create and exit packed basically to see how this is going to end this constituent process and they impose a series of rules. The more important one is that basically the two thirds super majority that every article of the constitution must have. And that gives by basically a veto power to the status quo forces, basically that the reproduced system, right? So the guy that actually did that was governor. Everything started and we know that after because one of the guy over the deputies from the right actually spilled the beans in one of the TV show saying that this packed began in a bathroom in a men's bathroom between a senator from the ultra wide party this udi party and Gabriel borage that they met in the men's room in between negotiations and then they packed it and he agreed. Okay, so let's stop for a second because I think this is a point that is clearly getting missed, I think in Latino communities in the United States, when they start thinking about the context of Latin America in Chile. So you're saying basically that would he be someone like under this Lopez or lord who's kinda sort of gotten more political and more seasoned and might not have started as a leftist on all the way on the extreme, but now is a little bit more political is going down that path or is he still kind of true to the cause? I guess it's my first question. Yes, so he will become a local sovereign lord I would say in power because one thing is to see people outside of power and the other is with power. And I think at least my appreciation is he's very egocentric. So he was a very kind of like leader like in this manner that they believe that they are special features, basically, and they need to rule kind of thing. He's born to do this. So I think he's going to go that path. This is fascinating. Can I just, I know you're going to say, I want you to continue, but this is fascinating because I think it brings up the issue of the Latin American president as sort of egocentric individual I think of, you know, I think of naive bouquet when you mention things like this. You know what I'm saying? Please say more of this because this is fascinating. I am in. I am so in with this conversation Camila continue. The press, especially the right-wing press, The Economist, the Financial Times, you know, all this newspapers, they frame this second round between these cast guy who is a pina should love her, basically. And borich, who is very kind of center left, like very social Democrat in a way, but very within the bounds. He wants to be responsible. He talks about responsible transformations all the time. So it's like, he's not going to go and push the boundaries. He's not going to do that. He's just going to go within the margins and negotiate with the right wingers. This is kind of like how I perceive it. And the press has kind of misconstrued this between fascism and communism, in a way, like this radical. So this is so interesting because obviously when news came out in the United States, a lot of conservatives, Latino Latino conservatives in the Miami area and other places Latin Americans that I know were like, oh, here comes Chile's villa. You know that this notion of this combination of Chile becoming Venezuela in this whole like exactly what you're saying and see their fascism or communism. There's nothing in between. But you're saying that but each is that's not your take on him. No, he's very he wants stability. So I analyzed. I basically went into the speech. He gave in that first round when he lost the first majority. And he talked about harmony, social peace, social cohesion, a building bridges with the opponents. Things that, you know, Obama would say, you know, that the idea of my partisanship. And I think I read it as, you know, an Obama like person that he comes like with a youth and with the touch and now everything and the campaign in between. This is a very interesting, because they're campaigning between. So how did he get 56% of the vote? Because he was, you know, due to fail in a way he got more than a million new votes out and how did they get it? Doing a double strategy. So the strategy he did like formal, like the advertisement in TV, his own speeches, what he said, and he's supporters who were saying on TV was very kind of looking forward and very kind of like the hope we were going to make things better and looking more like the hope campaign of Obama. However, in the informal realm in the social media, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram everywhere, the chats on WhatsApp, it was all about this is the only alternative against fascism..

Chile Gran alliance borek Gaviria Bernie Sanders Latin America udi party Gabriel borage Bernie Chilean Communist Party borich Lopez United States Camila Financial Times Venezuela Obama Miami
"chile" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

06:28 min | 4 months ago

"chile" Discussed on Latino USA

"Happen and I still wanted to talk about this historic moment in Chile and still it's within a month, so we're good. It's still within a window frame and so this is what we're going to talk about it. So I have this fabulous guest from London who has already been on the show last year to talk about Chile and we're just going to bring our fabulous guests from London on right now. So fabulous guests from London. Welcome back to Latino rebels radio. Can you say who you are and what you do? Hi, Julio, yes. My name is Camilla Vergara. I'm a journalist historian and political scientist, political theorist. Working on plebeian rights and philosophy in the University of Cambridge, writing a book actually on it. Man, you're just, yeah, I love it. University of Cambridge, very, very, very British, very UK. So listen for those, you know, there are probably some people who are listening to this that probably don't know what happened on December 19th in Chile. I mean around December 19th, sorry. I don't think that was the exact date, but it was the Sunday around then. Tell us just in a nutshell what has happened in Chile in the previous month? Yes, Julia. You were correct. December 19th was the only. Oh, good. Dang, you see, I just wanted to make sure. As a journalist, I'm like yes. Because sometimes we report a story and I'm like, oh wait, did we report that the next day? So let me just make sure. So thank you. Yes, yes. All right, so I was right. All right, I was correct. So continue. I think to understand the what happened that day, we need to understand what happened before, because basically this was a two round presidential election. So as we know, also in the U.S., the first round also is very definitive in a way. We need to know who the candidates are, who is going to make it to the second round here in America is not so much because we have a two party system in Chile where several candidates. And one of the candidates was neo fascist, but very open. Pinochet apologists, Jose past was this guy? They're still out there. Peanut che apologists are still there. They're probably in their prime. This is exactly so his name was Jose Antonio cast, right? Yes. So he is, you know, the son of a Nazi soldier that came to Chile with fake Red Cross papers, okay? And he went immigrated to Chile, did some business. One of his sons Miguel caste worked for the dictatorship and he was like the central banker and the minister of labor and a very important figure in the dictatorship. And this guy Jose Antonio is the brother of amiel. And he is a lawyer, and he has been forever in the party that is going to be the democrata independent. You need to independent unity for democracy and has nothing for democracy because basically it was created in 1983 this party in the middle of the dictatorship as a vehicle for the kind of Pinochet ideas to move into democracy. So this guy was a deputy and in a lower chamber of this party for many years. And then in 2016, he exited this party because he was upset that the basically the right wingers have become too liberal. Party wait, a new party that he named, but Republican or the Republican Party. Found that this party in 2019, but interestingly, only after he met with this alliance for a concerted thought inaugurated by Alan seers in the U.S., which is basically the global alliance in defense of freedom that brings together all the conservative ideology that goes against gender, what they call gender ideology, the idea that they're exist gay people out there, basically they're set. So there's an alliance between the far right and the evangelical community, which both of them want to basically to preserve the traditional family. So this new party, he is the presidential candidate of that party. A party that had basically the photo of Pinochet everywhere, you know, this is like they can't do it. So it's very obvious in a way. Yes, so this guy was proposing things that were openly fascist. For example, to create an alliance international alliance to persecute the radicals that left wing radicals that have been at the center of this popular uprising in Chile because the thesis of the far right was that this was a conspiracy from international sources, basically. Okay. Gotcha. And therefore, this kind of candidate got the first majority in that first round. So in the first with the 7 parties, Jos Antonio Cass led was the vote the top folk at her. How much percentage did he get in the first round? He got a 20 let me see 26%. Okay, so like a quarter of the country. Give or take. Okay. And he basically thought this was a win and that basically they were going to take over. And it is true. If you did the math, the other guy, and we're going to talk about the other guy, because the other guy is going to be president. Yeah, the guy who won. We need to talk about the guy who won a second. He was second place. And if you did the math, basically cast would win in the second round by like a 100,000 votes. Like, if the turnout was the same, he would lose the election. So basically, he needed to go and look for all the people that didn't vote, where 53% of the electorate. So imagine 53% of the people didn't vote in this. So then basically we get to the runoff and who is the eventual winner? Let's mention his name because he is the president he will be the next president of Chile, and let's talk about him, although the Antonio casting is a movie. That's a Netflix movie. Someone needs to do that. But tell me about the winner. And also the strategy of that winner. Yes. So we encourage he won with a 56% of the vote in the second round. Yeah? And basically what happened? This guy is very young. He's one of the I think the youngest is in his 30s. The youngest president ever in Chile. And he came out of the student movements that began in 2011 around the education in Chile, education in Chile very similar to the U.S., is a completely privatized and is very expensive. So people are getting to that in order to get their kids to college, and now everybody's in debt..

Chile University of Cambridge Camilla Vergara London Jose Antonio U.S. Julio Alan seers amiel alliance international allianc Julia Miguel Jos Antonio Cass Jose UK Republican Party Netflix
"chile" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

03:04 min | 4 months ago

"chile" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Robles radio. <Speech_Music_Male> We out of here. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> In my <Music> opinion <Music> <Music> I <Music> know you've all been listening <Music> <Music> <Music> to us <Music> let <Music> me know <Music> where they might <Music> <Music> in my eyes <Music> what would I <Music> tell these guys <Music> I mean I know they naturally <Music> <Advertisement> see it <Music> nobody must get excited <Music> <Music> on my second <Music> husband <Music> better than <Music> they got no <Music> way in my eyes <Music> the way that <Music> my life. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Got <Music> <Music> my life. <Music> <Music> <Music> Behind. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> You <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> so somebody <Music> like me and <Music> then another for <Music> $50 for <Music> my life <Music> and I saw this <Music> little <Music> thing on me got <Music> no way in my <Music> eyes no <Music> breathing my eyes <Music> but all I <Music> saw you <Music> take me back <Music> to feeling <Music> my speed <Music> was looking <Music> for you guys there's <Music> a night last <Music> book that I never <Music> did but I <Music> know where they might <Music> go find <Music> it. <Music> <Music> <Music> 'cause I'm not <Music> going to be no <Music> baby girl <Music> something <Music> I know I can think <Music> of <Music> <Music> all of you <Music> guys. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Ever. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> But I ain't gonna <Music> find <Music> you <Music> nice <Music> but it's <Music> three 5. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Years <Music> but <Music> I just baby by. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> The end of <Music> my life. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> I love <Music> that. <Music> <Music> <Music> It's <Music> time to get your husband. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The opinions expressed <Speech_Female> by the guests <Speech_Female> and contributors in this <Speech_Female> podcast are <Speech_Female> their own and do <Speech_Female> not necessarily reflect the views of Futura media or its employees.

"chile" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

08:07 min | 4 months ago

"chile" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Fear of a brought back to dictatorship at Brock back in return to Pinochet, so it kind of May be in your opinion. Convinced people that remembered that time to be like, I'm not going back to that. That he could have picked up votes that way as well. Is that what you're saying? Yeah, but it was not real. How was it not real? In a way in the formal, he was just a regular candidate basically going for kind of like responsible transformations. And to write, he was talking to this and to write, okay? And then in the social media, he was talking to the popular sectors who do not vote for him, because he packed it this thing on a bathroom, you know? That this is the problem that they know everybody knows this story. So they called for each Amarillo. They yellowish because, you know, they're subservient to power that changes, you know, from one where the heat is basically he goes. This is part of this his reputation among the popular sectors on the left. So basically the only way to get those votes was through fear. So in the informal arena, she was like, the leader of the anti fascist coalition. Got it. All right, so yeah. And then make your last point because I have a couple more questions before we wrap up. Well, let me that it always was an attention because basically he invited the former parties of the concertation. So the Christian Democrats that you remember that they supported the coup in 1973, and then have privatized half of Chile, the Socialist Party, all the parties that governed, basically neoliberalism for 30 years. He invited them to this new coalition against, you know, to save democracy. So we have this weird thing of a kind of a neo liberal anti fascist coalition that is not really there. And therefore he won. So you ask me the first question, what happened that December 19th? I think fear of fascism warned that election. Wow. And not necessarily. It's fear of fascism not necessarily the left is back in Chile and it's back and here we go. That's too simplistic. So I guess that's my big question here. It's like, so is it too simplistic to conclude that well, what do you think the left is in Latin America now? Is it becoming more of like a traditional neoliberal type place where you see the center left candidates or is it still like, you know, does it have a future still in sort of its traditional historical roots of what the left has been in Latin America and how does Chile reflect that? And what do you think in general about just like the left in Latin America right now after this election, and even after the one in Honduras? Yes, no, I think borage is not left as we understand the left kind of worrying here in Latino rails. We're talking. Oh, and Latino, I mean, I know what you mean. I mean, okay, I got you. I got you. He's more like a Democrat, like a Democrat from the U.S., liberal, in a way, that there are for, you know, gay rights and for, you know, giving special accommodations for women and creating a better society. Yes, but they're not really left in the sense that they are not going to change the mode of accumulation in this position. Yeah. They're not going to. Capitalism is still winning. Capitalism, okay? They don't want that. They want to be government, and they're going to go burn. And they're going to make things better, reformist in a way. So I don't think he's the left. However, there was a recent development in the constituent convention, which is very hopeful. Remember that in that convention, there are around 18% or 20% of China is independent. All the rest is party driven. So it is kind of like a super majority of people that are for the reproduction of the system and changes in the margins in a way. And they independence have been very kind of scrambling, you know? From the first 6 months, they got thrown under the bus that couldn't put their things in the agenda. However, they learned and it was so incredible to see because the new precedent and vice president of their constituent convention, there was new elections for this 6 months where the articles will be written, so therefore now there's more power because there is the agenda setting and all these things that happen when you are by a president and by president and you can kind of organize the discussion is that the two people elected were elected because the independence decided to use their power and block candidates from other coalitions. That had voted against giving binding power to the people during the constitution process. Only they allowed the people that have voted a favor of an initiative that was launched by one of the independents to give basically this popular initiative power to the people to call a plebiscite or to put things directly into the constitution. And the two people that were elected, they both voted in favor. And this is grant got it because they are so they were like 20 people that yeah, so now, so they're still, I know what you're saying. So basically it's safe to say this is the rise of the center left in Latin America. That's basically what we're seeing more of in terms of people that are reaching presidential power. And if Bolsonaro loses in Brazil, later this year. Yes. You know, that's probably what's going to happen as well. The pendulum as they say in the traditional Latin American sphere, it's not going from one way to another. There's a little bit more of a middle that we're seeing. That's sort of like my last thought. I'm also on a, I think, we need to consider a government is going to be a hench government. It's not going to be a transformational, you know, a kind of a grand government, because the right wingers have the half of the Congress. So they have so he's got to play. He's got to play with them. So I don't think. I think they will block. Ah, you see, oh, so there's, okay, I see what you're saying. Well, basically, even if he wants to be progressive, basically if the rights to imagine the right-wing coalition plus the Republican Party and the evangelicals have half of the Senate and the Senate has a PowerPoint. Wow, it's like welcome to welcome to the United States. That's basically what Chile's becoming it feels that way. So the holding dependents are pushing for giving the people the power to bypass Congress, you know, because when you have a new constitution and the constitution will be ready to be ratified in September, they say. So basically, the new government will have to implement these new constitution. Because when you have a constitution, it's not like the constitution changes the world. You need to start dismantling things. And building things that will materialize that constitution. And therefore, the government needs to pass lots of laws. At the beginning. And if you don't have the Congress with you, what are you going to do? We can keep talking Camila vulgari, but we're just going to bring you on and just bring you on later in the year to see where how about it is doing. So Camila got it. Thank you so much for being on Latino bubbles radio. Thank you for having me again, Julio. I just want to thank kamila. What a great conversation. What a great start to the year in terms of Latin American politics, which I am such a geek of and so is my producer Oscar Fernandez. So follow what's happening in Chile. I'm actually supposed to be writing about it for MSNBC, that fingers crossed. So I'm really glad I interviewed Camilla because she got my brain percolating about things I want to say in my next opinion piece if it gets published. I'm hoping it gets published, you know? I'm very hopeful. But anyway, we will be back next week with another show and yeah, if you like this show, rate and review a share it. Tell your Friends, tweet at us at Latino rebels, go to 77 on Twitter, follow us at Latino rebels on Facebook, Instagram, and also now Latino rebels TikTok. How's that? Latina revels TikTok. Yeah, and we'll be back next week. Like we always do. We're always back next week. That's the hope, right? And like we always do, we always close out with la plame. Julio RICO, are Latino.

Chile Latin America anti fascist coalition Brock Amarillo Socialist Party Bolsonaro Honduras U.S. Congress Senate China Camila vulgari Brazil Republican Party Oscar Fernandez Camila kamila
"chile" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

07:26 min | 4 months ago

"chile" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Still is. And basically, he leads that, which is this kind of new left coalition that has center center left and also now is in coalition with the Communist Party in Gran alliance called approval dignita. Approval so she was the approval of the inaugural plebiscite. So the play side that we had in 2020 when Chile decided to Chile has decided to go forward with a new constitution. So at the upper level, the approval of that became kind of a coalition in itself. So basically, it has that name and bring me that is dignity because that's the banner of the movement. So that he is the leader of that coalition. Okay. You're breaking it down, but talk to me a little bit before we talk about the prospects and all these coalitions because now it's because it is not, I think one of the biggest misperceptions that I want to talk to you is about where is the left stand in the context of Chile and also in the concert of Latin America right now. But that's a separate question because I do want to know a little bit more about bodeck. Like tell me more about him and tell me what he's done since he is won because it was pretty historic. This is a big deal. Like this 30 something student movement protester is the president of Chile, and the left in a given understanding the context of leftist politics in Chile. Talk to me about all that first. Yes, but you know what? As you speak of it, and I have read it in the news elsewhere. It sounds more radical than it is. Right. Because what happened is that Gabriel borage has already been around ten years in politics. Ten years is a long time to be in politics in a way. It works you down. His rebellious nature was quickly become more responsible quote unquote. And he more like a dealer. So he has now a reputation for being a guy that negotiates and makes packs. And here, this is a very important piece of information. You remember that we spoke about the how the plebiscite came about as agreement between a government that was very in the corner with no support that cold basically all the political party leaders to create and exit packed basically to see how this is going to end this constituent process and they impose a series of rules. The more important one is that basically the two thirds super majority that every article of the constitution must have. And that gives by basically a veto power to the status quo forces basically that the reproduce the system, right? So the guy that actually did that was governor borage. Everything started and we know that after because one of the deputies from the right actually spill the beans in one of the TV shows saying that this pact began in a bathroom in a man's bathroom between a senator from the ultra wide party, this udi party and Gabriel Boris, that they met in the men's room in between negotiations and then they packed it and he agreed that the two okay, so let's stop for a second because I think this is a point that is clearly getting missed, I think in Latino communities in the United States, when they start thinking about the context of Latin America and Chile. So you're saying basically that would he be someone like on the slopes of railroad who's kinda sort of gotten more political and more seasoned and might not might have started as a leftist on all the way on the extreme, but now a little bit more political is going down that path or is he still kind of true to the cause? I guess it's my first question. Yes, so he will become a local sovereign lord. I would say in power because one thing is to see people outside of power and the other is with power. And I think at least my appreciation of who orange is, he's very egocentric, this he was a very kind of like leader like in this manner that they believe that they are special features, basically, and they need to rule and kind of thing. He's born to do this. So I think he's going to go that path. This is fascinating. Can I just, I know you're going to say, I want you to continue, but this is fascinating because I think it brings up the issue of the Latin American president as sort of egocentric individual I think of, you know, I think of naive bouquet when you mention things like this. You know what I'm saying? Please see more of this because this is fascinating. I'm in. I am so in with this conversation coming and continue. The press, especially the right-wing press, The Economist, the Financial Times, you know, all this newspapers, they frame this, you know, second round between these cast guy who is a Pinochet lover, basically. And borich, who is very kind of center left, like very social Democrat in a way, but very within the bounds. He wants to be responsible. He talks about responsible transformations all the time. So it's like, he's not going to go and push the boundaries. He's not going to do that. He's just going to go within the margins and negotiate with the right wingers. This is kind of like how I perceive it. And the press has kind of misconstrued this between fascism and communism, in a way, like this radical. So this is so interesting because obviously when news came out in the United States, you know, a lot of conservatives, Latino Latino conservatives in the Miami area and other places Latin Americans that I know were like, oh, here comes chiles villa. You know that this notion of this combination of Chile becoming Venezuela in this whole like exactly what you're saying and see their fascism or communism. There's nothing in between. But you're saying that but that's not your take on him. No, he's very he wants stability. So I analyze I basically went into the speech he gave in that first round when he lost the first majority. And he talked about harmony, social peace, social cohesion, a building bridges with, you know, the opponents. Things that, you know, Obama would say, you know, that the idea of white partisanship. And I yeah. I think I read it as, you know, an Obama like person that he comes like with a youth and with the touch and now everything and the campaign in between. This was a very interesting because that campaign in between. So how did he get 56% of the vote? Because he was, you know, due to fail in a way he got more than a million new votes out. And how did they get it? Doing a double strategy. So the strategy he did like formal, like the advertisement in TV, his own speeches, what he said, and he supporters were saying on TV was very kind of looking forward and very kind of like the hope we were going to make things better and looking more like the hope campaign of Obama. However, in the informal realm in the social media, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram everywhere, the chats on WhatsApp, it was all about this is the only alternative against fascism. If Cass is elected, we're doomed. People that are, you know, sexual dissidents or political dissidents. They're going to be persecuted..

Chile Gran alliance Gabriel borage Latin America ultra wide party udi party Gabriel Boris Communist Party borich chiles villa United States Financial Times Obama Venezuela Miami Instagram Twitter Facebook Cass
Gabriel Boric, a Former Student Activist, Is Elected Chile’s Youngest President

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:41 min | 5 months ago

Gabriel Boric, a Former Student Activist, Is Elected Chile’s Youngest President

"We were talking about the election in Chile because I think it's something that maybe signals a larger trend in South America. So the leftist is young guy in his 30s kind of student protest leader is elected pretty decisively by the people of Chile people who have benefited for over a generation of free market policies. So why would people who have had it good one of the most successful economies in South America want to move into leftist direction that they must know jeopardizes the goose that kills the goose that made the golden eggs? Yeah, yeah. Well, as you know, I don't think it's an isolated incident really in South America or North America to be honest. Why would anybody vote for a Democrat, right? Same thing. People are fooled by these people. This young guy, of course, as you know, in Chile, a lot of Venezuelans and Colombians and everybody has been immigrating their illegally. And so he's been kind of having open arms. Policy towards them. Oh, come on over. It doesn't matter if you're illegal who cares, you know, this guy that's running against me hates hates illegals and he's going to stop you. He's going to close the border. So this has kind of that, oh, this is the nice guy image, right? And really truly the people coming from Venezuela are running away from the exact same policies that this guy advocates

Chile South America North America Venezuela
"chile" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

05:19 min | 5 months ago

"chile" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Latin America's wealthiest country has elected in avowed leftist as its next president for three decades Chile has been ruled by Senna Wright and center left presidents, but chileans opted for a change Sunday and elected 35 year old Gabrielle boric, a congressman who came to prominence as a protest leader who helped shut down the streets of Santiago Ryan Dubai is there now. He's a reporter who covers South America for the journal. Good morning. Good morning. Thank you. Thanks for being here. What do we need to know about Gabriel borage? Oh, Gabrielle kind of emerges from this youth movement protest movement back in 2011 he led a large student protest to seek universal free education and university. He had someone who's been very critical of kind of the past 30 years of rule in Chile, which has been kind of centered left and center right. He's accused kind of a centrist president of the last 30 years telling out to neoliberal policies that provided chileans with things like poor pensions, kind of shoddy, public services, kind of high cost of living. That really erupted into large protests in 2019. But he's also someone who is aiming to moderate and which he did so leading up to the runoff vote. He's someone who's kind of proven himself to be able to negotiate with political opponents. And a lot of people kind of see him as someone who will bring about change. I got to Chile while just kind of improving social services, improving public spending as well. How big of a change does he represent? It's quite a bit Gabrielle boy John on Sunday. 56% of the vote. It was better than expected, but a bigger win that a lot of people had expected before. He thanked you later for providing him a mandate. And it was kind of seen as a landslide victory for him. Investors have kind of reacted negatively to his election. So on Monday, the peso fell to an all time low. And the stock market also felt fairly sharply. And he'll need to try to show that what kind of policy he'll advance, I guess, so whether he'll be kind of the more radical leftist policies that he promoted earlier into the campaign and earlier into his political career or more in the more moderate kind of centrist policies that he's promoted kind of leading up to the runoff. So what's he promised to do? His main promise is to address issues of social inequality in economic inequality that have remained in Chile despite years of economic growth that really helped to reduce poverty. He wants to improve public services from healthcare to education. He plans to scrap a private pension model that Chile is used over the last several decades, and that a lot of chileans criticize for providing poor pensions. But he's also said more recently that you'll maintain fiscal discipline. He will promote economic growth and he'll take kind of gradual steps in promoting his agenda. How feasible is this change going to be? I think it's going to be really tough. He doesn't have the Congress split between leftist parties and more conservative parties. So he won't have control over Congress to push through a lot of his reforms. At the same time, Chile has seen really strong economic growth in this year in 2021. But next year, some economists and business people here expecting that it may even enter into a recession. So he'll have to deal with that slowdown in economic growth, plus at the same time inflation is really high. And lastly, he's his election comes as Chile is writing a new constitution, which will have a lot of influence over the future direction of the country, so he'll have to work within those confines to kind of see which way he can go and what reforms he'll be able to dance. Has the pandemic in Chile right now. So things have pretty well come back to normal. It feels in Chile. Coastline in America, all the countries were hit really hard. About 40,000 people died in Chile. The economy contracted about 6 or 7% in 2020. This year, though Chile was very successful in its vaccination campaign, though, it has delivered vaccines to most of the population. It's given boosters to many people and it's even talking about a fourth booster coming next year. So when you go to the street, people are out enjoying restaurants. Everyone's wearing a mask still. They have a vaccine card that you need to show to get into places, but things feel like they've come back to normal. How does Boris fit in with the rest of the leaders in South America? So I think what Voyager represents and what's happening in much of South America, more than kind of a lefty or a right change is backlash against kind of the traditional political parties and politicians in general. For various reasons that emerged during the pandemic that we saw, but where you're there before as well, that chili's case of urge during the 2019 protests really erupted then. But in much of Latin America there's a discontent with the political establishment. So his election, I think, represents that. It's a continuation of that throughout Latin America that we've seen from Brazil to Peru, more recently and some other countries as well. That is Ryan dube. He covers South America for us. Thanks for your time. Thank you so much. I appreciate it. And.

Chile Senna Wright Gabrielle boric Santiago Ryan Gabriel borage universal free education and u Gabrielle boy John South America Latin America Gabrielle the journal Dubai Congress Boris America Ryan dube Peru Brazil
"chile" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

06:08 min | 5 months ago

"chile" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Support for this podcast and the following message is brought to you by the American Express business platinum card. Got the card that's built for business. By American Express leftist millennial elected president in Chile, after running on higher taxes, a green economy, and greater equality. By Matthew malinowski and Valentina Fuentes, Bloomberg. Leftist Gabriel borek was elected president of Chile on Sunday by a larger than expected margin, giving him a mandate to push for higher taxes, greener industries, and greater equality after a contest focused on discontent over an investor friendly economy that has left many behind. The former student protest leader won 56% of the vote, beating conservative rival Jose Antonio casts 44%. The victory is likely to spook markets that fear interventionist policies. Boric age 35 will take office in March as one of the youngest presidents in the world, and with an ambitious agenda. His win in a runoff paves the way not only for a generational shift, but also for the biggest economic changes in decades for one of Latin America's richest countries, a global financial market favorite. It was a highly polarized campaign that only moderated in the final stretch as both contenders wooed centrists. He will face enormous challenges, including a divided Congress, sharp economic slowdown, the writing of a new constitution, and the lingering threat of social unrest. We can not continue to allow the poor to pay for the inequalities of Chile, ork told thousands of cheering supporters in a fiery victory speech, which also acknowledged all he needs to do to build alliances. We will reach out and build bridges so our citizens can live a better life. He repeated something he told president Sebastian Panera in a conversation between them broadcast after results were announced. The agreements need to be among all chileans and not made behind closed doors. They will meet Monday to begin the transition, cast quickly conceded, and spoke to borik on Sunday evening. Streets across the nation of 19 million were filled with Hawking cars and waving banners and celebration of the changing of the guard, turnout was about 56% of registered voters nearly ten percentage points higher than the first round last month. But Warwick's early focus on outreach has an undeniable logic, as he seeks a set of radical shifts he needs to build a coalition with centrists and hard leftists who have clashed for decades. He will face a divided parliament, so passage of legislation will be difficult, and will require strong negotiating skills and pragmatism, noted Jennifer pribble, Professor of political science at the university of Richmond. Borek describes himself as a moderate socialist, who shuns the hard left models of Cuba and Venezuela. Still, cast and his supporters warned of borek's alliance with the Communist Party as a risk. This is the worst scenario that the markets could have envisioned, said Klaus kampf, portfolio solutions director at credit core capital and Santiago. They were waiting for a much tighter vote, showing a desire for dialog. In a research note, credit corps said the peso could fall about 4% on Monday to between 875 and 885 per dollar, while stocks could sink 10%. Borg's supporters saw cast as a dangerous throwback to the right-wing dictatorship of general Augusto Pinochet due to an emphasis on public order and conservative social mores. Borik, who is unmarried, bearded and tattooed, first gained prominence a decade ago when he led nationwide demonstrations calling for free and high quality education. He ran successfully for lower House deputy in 2013 and was reelected to a second term in a landslide vote. His emphasis on social justice dovetailed with a period of unrest that exploded over a transit fare hike in 2019 and quickly ballooned into a broader movement demanding better healthcare, public transport, and pensions. During the campaign, borik often vowed that if Chile was the birthplace of neoliberalism, it will also be its grave. Borik wants to dismantle some pillars of Chile's economy, such as its private pension funds, which form the bedrock of the local capital markets, he backs higher taxes on both the rich and the nation's crucial mining industry. Chile is the world's biggest copper producer, while also promising to keep government debt in check. In March, borek will take the helm of a nation that's facing unprecedented political upheaval. Social unrest kicked off the process of drafting a new constitution, now being done by a left leaning assembly, which will be put to a national referendum in 2022. He'll have to contend with economic growth that will come to a halt, slowing from a record high near 12% this year to a rate closer to 2%, according to the Central Bank. Policymakers are also raising interest rates quickly to tame soaring inflation, and while Chile still has relatively sound fiscal accounts, the debt to GDP ratio has increased quickly amid pandemic spending. Chilean companies and individuals have moved money abroad at a historic clip over the past few years, weighing on the currency. Regionally, Chile's election follows the triumph of Pedro Castillo in Peru earlier this year, and stands to add momentum to leftist candidates in Colombia and Brazil, which will hold presidential elections next year. Similarly to Chile, both of those countries are facing increasingly polarized politics. Chile's president elect could become the face of Latin America's new left, inspiring other candidates in the region, said Oliver stunkel, Professor of international relations at fun de calio Vargas.

Chile American Express business plat borik Matthew malinowski Valentina Fuentes Gabriel borek borek Sebastian Panera Borik Jose Antonio Jennifer pribble Borek Boric Klaus kampf credit core capital ork
How Democrats Really Describe Third-World Countries

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 8 months ago

How Democrats Really Describe Third-World Countries

"Henry remind you that Pew Research did a very thorough Survey and evaluation What 8 months back 6 months back or so And you see the people coming on the border there's about 20,015 to 20,000 Haitians behind the first group of patients They came to the country And most of those Haitians came out of Chile they were already refugees in Chile And many of these are the same thing In other words they're not escaping Haiti and by the way The Haitians don't even want to go back to Haiti Why is that Why is that When the Democrats talk about these countries they say they're filthy they're impoverished They don't have a rule of law the crime is through the roof You can't blame these people for leaving such a country And then when Donald Trump tells one of them it's as whole culture or a country he's called a race So I guess the Democrats are racist right But we always knew that So there's more coming And the board is still open and Joe Biden and his hacks tell us the borders secure The board is secure and $5.5 trillion doesn't cost you anything And at a single one of my generals told me to leave a footprint in Afghanistan And I graduated in the top one third of my law school class So it's important when we look at immigration To remember something You have an open border the country dies Because it's not a country anymore It's a global territory

Pew Research Chile Haiti Henry Donald Trump Joe Biden Afghanistan
Young Holds up, No. 1 Alabama Holds off No. 11 Florida 31-29

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Young Holds up, No. 1 Alabama Holds off No. 11 Florida 31-29

"Bryce young's first collegiate road start was a rousing success a three touchdown performance to help top ranked Alabama beat number eleven Florida thirty one twenty nine the defending national champion stopped the two point conversion with three ten left and earn their thirty second consecutive win versus teams in the SEC east division young built the early advantage with TD passes to James McClellan Chile Billingsley and Bryan Robinson to put the tide ahead twenty one three in the first quarter Emory Jones was seventeen of twenty seven passing for one hundred eighty one yards and one interception for the Gators I'm Dave Ferrie

Bryce Young James Mcclellan Chile Billingsley Bryan Robinson Alabama Florida Emory Jones SEC Gators Dave Ferrie
The Story of Colonia Dignidad, Chile's Secret Nazi Cult

Let's Start A Cult

01:46 min | 9 months ago

The Story of Colonia Dignidad, Chile's Secret Nazi Cult

"To avoid being arrested by authorities schaefer accompanied by a few of his followers fled west germany in nineteen sixty one and sought refuge in the middle east there. He was introduced to prominent chilean embassador. Who invited him to live. In chile at the time chile was under president. George alexandria whose administration granted shaffer a farm located a few kilometers outside the city of peril and chilies linear Liniers province sure. We'll go with the government's help. He bought a forty four hundred acre ranch located at the foot holes of the andy mountains and established a religious. Commune called collina dignidad which translates to dignity. Colin and we will soon see that it was anything but dignity sounds sounds like it's going to be on the up and up. Yes that's one way to put. Founded on william m bronze teaching colonia dignidad espoused principles like anti-communism and strict adherence to the bible given schafer's passed as a member of the hitler youth and an officer of the let. Oh god left quaff left while you got this one again lutwa. Thank you for help. Every every time on that one as religious commun- was also heavily influenced by nazism of course colonia dignified began with surprise. The nazi has influence colonia dignidad began with ten of schafer's original followers. But as the years passed its members swelled. This was field. By waves of immigrants from germany who were enticed by the communist way of living which involves sustainable. Agriculture practices and numerous charity works for the local population. However what they found upon arriving in chile was something else entirely.

George Alexandria Chile Collina Dignidad West Germany Schaefer Shaffer Schafer Middle East William M Colin Government Germany
The Domestication of the Potato

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:12 min | 9 months ago

The Domestication of the Potato

"How many foods that we eat today. All around the world simply didn't exist in the old world of africa asia and europe corn chocolate vanilla peppers green beans pumpkins. Tomatoes and squash are all foods that were completely unknown to the peoples of the old world. Perhaps the most important neural food. However was the humble potato. The potato was originally native to south. America it was first domesticated impro- anywheres from five thousand ten thousand years ago. It's really hard to tell because potatoes aren't very well preserved in the archaeological record. But we know that they were being grown. Probably when studies were first being built in mesopotamia specifically they were probably first domesticated around the area of lake titicaca high in the andes mountains. The first confirmed evidence in the archaeological record comes from the year. Thousand five hundred. You're the coastal city of n con just north of lima peru. The potato was the primary food stuff for the incan empire. Potatoes cooked by ancient peruvians. We're not too dissimilar to how they're cook today. They were baked or boiled and might have been mashed. Potato is pretty much have to be cooked in order for the starches in them to be digestible by humans. Some potato varieties had toxic compounds that required soaking and clay and water to leach out the toxic substances one popular way of processing potatoes in the andes was to make this involved repeatedly leaving them outside to freeze and then thawing them. The next day this freeze drying would go on for three to five nights then they would be laid out and stomped on to remove any remaining water. The result would be white. Rock looking thing not too dissimilar from appealed potato but because it was dehydrated it could last for years. Potatoes had been domesticated all the way down the andes mountains to southern patagonia. In what is today chile prior to the arrival of europeans. The first spanish explorers to the region led by pizarro in fifteen thirty to recognize the value of the potato but when they brought them back to europe it was mostly for consumption by the south american people they brought back with them supposedly and i know this because i actually paid a visit. The first place in europe to grow potatoes was the garden at the monastery in guadalupe spain. It was a place that queen isabella frequently visited.

Andes Mountains Lake Titicaca Squash Mesopotamia Europe Asia Africa Lima Peru America Southern Patagonia Pizarro Chile Guadalupe Spain Queen Isabella
Messi Breaks Argentina's Record for Caps at Copa America Win

BBC World Service

00:25 sec | 11 months ago

Messi Breaks Argentina's Record for Caps at Copa America Win

"Beat Paraguay one nil. It means for the quarters, Argentina will play Ecuador. Uruguay will face Colombia, Paraguay face Peru and Brazil take on Chile Special mention to Leo Messi, He became Argentina's top, um most capped player 148. Performances for Argentina tennis Next at Wimbledon. It was a rain interrupted first day.

Paraguay Argentina Leo Messi Uruguay Ecuador Colombia Peru Chile Brazil Tennis Wimbledon
The Miracle of the Sun

Unexplained Mysteries

01:20 min | 1 year ago

The Miracle of the Sun

"The sun was low on the horizon when physics professor gustafsson stepped outside his office in november. Two thousand two. He smiled as he felt. That chile belgian air brush past him. The sky was clear. The afternoon was perfect. He strolled through the university of leuven campus. Until he found a vantage point it was an ideal spot to watch the sunset. But that wasn't exactly what the professor had in mind for months. Meese in had been obsessed with the miracle of the sun. A spectacular event witnessed by nearly seventy thousand people on october thirteenth nineteen. Seventeen a massive crowd in the village of fatima. Portugal had watched the sun dance across the sky today. Mason wanted to see it too. He took a deep breath in steeled himself for what was coming next. After a moment of hesitation he opened his eyes wide and looked directly into the sun. He knew he was risking damage but he had to be sure of what happened that day. Five years earlier as he stared into the sun he was astonished. The crowd was right. it was some miracle.

University Of Leuven Gustafsson Meese Chile Fatima Portugal Mason
Apple Daily to close, last pro-democracy Hong Kong newspaper

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Apple Daily to close, last pro-democracy Hong Kong newspaper

"Hong Kong's a sole remaining pro democracy newspaper is publishing its last edition the apple daily has been forced to shut down off the five editors and executives were arrested on millions of dollars in his assets were frozen this part of China's increasing crackdown on dissent the board of directors off next media says in a statement the print and online editions will cease to to the current circumstances prevailing in Hong Kong the daily was founded by tycoon Chile in nineteen ninety five just two years before Britain handed Hong Kong back to China and the mission he was a toddler known for its celebrity gossip I'm Charles that's my

Hong Kong Apple China Chile Britain Charles
Chile Admits Violation of Virus Protocols at Copa America

ESPN FC

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Chile Admits Violation of Virus Protocols at Copa America

"Jewels more woes for cheetah. It's a hairdresser. Apparently it's caused a breach in their copa. America bubbles yet. We show them. I've even other or the guest gabor. Hairdresser might have had staff. He has not rabi. Maybe there was more people are more fun and more parties. Who knows more really need haircut. Yeah and really chile again. It's not the first time you saw tall again. Not on his own with others but come on already copa. America probably should have should not be playing right now knowing these conditions we tell you to be in his tweet bubble not risk and then you bring people from the outside in. I mean how. Unprofessional and ceos crazy. Whatever word you want to use. It is this disrespectful to completely

Gabor Rabi America Chile
"chile" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"chile" Discussed on The Dictionary

"This is from the spanish word. Chilly from non waddell chilly vats. That next is kellyanne. Add or gilead. C. h. a. d. gilead noun from fifteen ninety eight. One group of one thousand is a chilly. Ed number two. We have the to a definition for the word millennium. A group of one thousand years is a millennium or a chilly. Ed why why is this. Called this It is from the greek chili. Which means thousand next. We have kili. Azam is this related probably is noun from sixteen ten we have the synonym never seen this millennia. Riyan ism mellon molyneaux re nor millonarios. Neom monismanien nadeem. Yeah chilliest is a noun chilly ass. Tick is an adjective. So what even is melinda reaganism. There's the etymology help from the latin chilly. S which is one that believes in chile. azam one believes in chile. Hasn't but this is chilly. As i don't know what it is. Oh probably something about something happens every thousand years. Maybe they believe in something. I don't know. I ain't gonna go look at the the word. Okay here. we go with the last word. It is chili. Con carne three words noun from eighteen fifty seven a spiced stew of ground beef and minced chilies or chili powder usually with beans. Please give me some of this without the meat. This is remark in spanish. Chili con carney. Which is chilly with meat. So in this episode we had child childbearing child bed channel bed. Fever childbirth childhood childish childlike child. Lee childproof childproof child's play. Child support. Chili relleno chill chilis salt pepper. Chilly chilly add chili azam and chili con. Carney i'm very curious about this chilly. Azam thing but i think i shall pick childish as the word of the episode because i am childish. Wow this was a pretty long episode because we had a little extra on the heads and the tails but it just worked out that way chai ya'll childish childish childish Okay holidays birthday of seed g mannerheim That is in finland. It is amanda emancipation. Day or independence day in tonga internationally. It's the international day of innocent children victims of aggression. In hungary it is a national unity day in romania it is tree and on treaty day and internationally it is demand square protests of nineteen eighty nine memorial day. So i guess they happened today Let's see it is What other things estonian flag. Day in estonia where else it is Okay i think we're already getting into our fun holidays. Let's go to this official page. It's national hug your cat day. Some cats might not be into that. But actually i think at least one of my cats would be it is also national donut. Day so i definitely need to get a doughnut today and it is national cheese day which is funny. Because i wasn't literally just a couple of episodes go one. Let's see one two three four no more than that. It was not that long ago that we read the word. Jeez was like. Wouldn't it be funny. If today was national. Cheese day was like a week ago. But now it is so you know. We're shockingly close to that. Yeah yeah maybe you could make some cheese donuts. That's all for you today. i should. I should do one more to finish this page. But i don't know. If i feel i get thank you very much for listening and until next time. This is spencer. Dispense information. good bye to you..

hungary today finland a week ago chile tonga one thousand years romania independence day estonia treaty day Ed One amanda emancipation national cheese day Day spanish eighteen fifty seven estonian three words
So Hot Right Now: Why We Love the Chile Pepper

Gastropod

01:52 min | 1 year ago

So Hot Right Now: Why We Love the Chile Pepper

"This might sound like a just so story. But why is the chili pepper hub and said that we spoke to marazul procedure. She's a chef and culinary historian and she wrote an incredibly beautiful book called peppers of the americas which traces chili peppers all the way back to their south american origin so their forebears of today's peppers and tomatoes split off from sister about two feet median years ago in south america myself suspect then millions of years ago peppers looked and smelled like a tasty snack to the animals in the region. Which was the problem. Because the chili peppers precious seeds would get destroyed in most animal guts and chili peppers. Want to have baby chili peppers and tilles developed a defence strategy. It devilish non-poisonous thing In the form of facing which is an alkaloid said it's painful to most animals. They spots they avoided them but burst. Didn't birds have this amazing ability to not feel the heat sensation. Because they don't have the same heat receptors in their mouths or their skin. The way we do joining the chili. Chorus is denise coon. He's the chili pepper researcher at new mexico state university home to the one and only chili pepper institute and so they can eat lots and lots of these tiny little berries and pass it through their digestive system unharmed and grows into a new plant whereas s mammals. We can feel the heat and it passes through desk system and actually our our system destroys the seeds so it can't grow into a new plant. And that's kinda why we think that the chili pepper plant evolved caps and wants to keep mammals from eating them but then look at. What do denise told us. Chili peppers are the only plants in the world that produce kept sason and because chile's are making kept space and to protect their precious needs. They put most of that protection right around those seeds.

Tilles Denise Coon Americas Chili Pepper Institute South America New Mexico State University Denise Chile
Macron Says France Will Begin Lifting Restrictions This Summer

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Macron Says France Will Begin Lifting Restrictions This Summer

"France may be ready to reopen to tourists this summer as France moves to begin lifting restrictions French President Emmanuel Macron telling CBS he foresees at least some tourists returning to Paris this summer if they have gotten vaccinated or have proof of the negative covert test. Comes this Frances battling a third wave of covert infections, marking the grim milestone of 100,000 deaths just last week, the government is also preparing to impose tough new entry restrictions on travelers from Argentina, Chile, South America and

Emmanuel Macron France CBS Paris Frances Government Argentina Chile South America
France to Begin Lifting Restrictions in May for Vaccinated Travelers

All Things Considered

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

France to Begin Lifting Restrictions in May for Vaccinated Travelers

"Infections. France is imposing entry restrictions on travelers from Argentina, Chile, South Africa and Brazil because of the more contagious variants. The restrictions include mandatory 10 Day quarantines and tougher testing requirements, and Japan is

France Argentina Chile South Africa Brazil Japan
COVID-19 Infections Are Increasing Globally

PRI's The World

01:57 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 Infections Are Increasing Globally

"Is kind of the pulse of this. Pandemic globally right now alana. Where are we at with infections. Well the big picture of marco is that the world is actually experiencing a steady increase in infections leaders at the. Who again sounded the alarm today. Because it's been seven straight weeks of rising infections actually is some of the highest surges yet in the pandemic and it's been four weeks streep of reisen deaths would areas most impacted. We have a sense of that. So i talked with ali mokdad about this. He's with the institute for health metrics at the university of washington and he's been modeling this pandemic since the start he says what's going on in five regions really stands out so i that is an increase in brazil. That snow started to come down so brazil is the big one. Neighboring countries like argentina and chile are now starting to experience rises to and then here the other hot spots this a big rise which still going on in india pakistan bangladesh at bark that is an increase in europe and the middle east following. What's your doping seeing. That is a. It is in cases in the philippines and that this is in south africa and african country. That's now started to come down so the fact that infections are increasing globally even parts of the us. We don't want to forget that. That really worries him. I mean it sounds like overall the world is just not close to controlling this virus. Do scientists have a handle on why cases continued to rise even with vaccines. Is it now all about the variants. Not points to the variance and lots of scientists do variants like be one one seven have become a dominant in europe and this has been found to be more transmissible. But there's another strong message. I'm hearing from a lot of scientists like angela rasmussen. she's just at georgetown. And as of this month the university of saskatchewan which is that these rises are not just from variants like the breakthrough masking and distancing another really important prevention

Ali Mokdad Institute For Health Metrics Alana Brazil Marco University Of Washington Chile Argentina Bangladesh Europe Pakistan Middle East Philippines South Africa India Angela Rasmussen United States University Of Saskatchewan Georgetown
Haitians in Tijuana Seek to Enter U.S.

Morning Edition

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Haitians in Tijuana Seek to Enter U.S.

"Life at sea, with everyone everywhere when it comes to the migrant crisis at the border. Ah lot of attention has been focused on Central Americans, but people from other parts of the world have come to Mexican border cities like Tijuana. Seeking to try to cross to the U. S. For asylum That includes people from Haiti from San Diego. Here's KPBS reporter Max Rivlin. Nadler, a community of Haitian migrants has been into Quanah for nearly a decade, fleeing a devastating earthquake, hurricanes, financial collapse and now deep political instability and violence as an unpopular president. Tries to hold on to power in Porta Prince. Many Haitians are stuck in Tijuana, fearful that by crossing the border, they'll be sent right back to Haiti. But unable to make a life for themselves in Mexico. When a migrant camp was established in February at the El Chapo to our port of entry in Tijuana, hundreds of Haitians set up tents, hoping that they would soon be allowed to declare asylum in the U. S. You're the only Ito was one of them. He'd been living in Tijuana for a year. I'm looking at here, Dia. She's having said that hideous his country that he loves it, but it wasn't possible to stay there. There are too many criminals with nothing to do, you know, had spent five years working in Chile. The discrimination there was intense. He was trying to get into the United States, even though he feared possibly being returned to Haiti. Good thing will be a little capital alive, he said. If they deport him, he wouldn't live in heating. He doesn't have anything there. He wouldn't have the money to leave, though. He's afraid. If you

Tijuana Max Rivlin Quanah Haiti Kpbs Nadler U. Earthquake San Diego ITO Mexico Chile United States
"chile" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"chile" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"The votes are in. . Yesterday Chileans decided by an overwhelming majority to scrap and replace their dictatorship. . Eric. . Constitution. . Bluesy Thomas. . WHO Come in. . Give President Sebastian. . Benita said it was the beginning of a new path for the country. . Wants to soon peretti Chile's constitution was introduced under Augusto. Pinochet . the dictator who ruled by terror for nearly two decades he lost power after a plebiscite in nineteen eighty eight. . United in opposition to the regime of General Pinochet was the biggest political rally yet seen in the capital, , but the constitution remained. . Later governments amended it dozens of times but for many Chileans, , the constitution's most fundamental provisions to blame for the inequality and poor public services that plague one of America's wealthiest countries. . Year ago mass protests erupted. . At least thirty people died and thousands were injured. . There were yet distractions in the run-up to yesterday's vote. . Now the country will get a chance to recast its national charter quietening some concerns but perhaps raising new ones. . Chileans blame the constitution of nine hundred for lot. . That's wrong with the country Brooke Unger is our America editor in many ways looking from the outside there's not a lot wrong with Chile. . It's got one of the highest per capita incomes in the region. . It's reduced poverty very dramatically. . It's had political stability for the past thirty years but there are also big problems and people who have been growing increasingly unhappy with those problems over the past decade decade and a half. . So what were the issues with it if the outcome has seen? ? So stable in the meantime, , several things inequality remain relatively high and I think most important really was a feeling that large because of the constitution the way. . The public services were delivered resulted in low quality and great unfairness the constitution kind of privileges, , the private sector in Chile, , and the reason for that is that Pinochet had kind of an intellectual alliance with the so-called University of Chicago economists who were very pro free market and they wrote into the constitution lots of guarantees to protect the private sector and to give the private sector a pretty substantial role in providing public services like health care pensions, , education and people have looked at that and become increasingly unhappy with the results of that system has brought. . So how do you think it is that a rewriting of the constitution will will address all of these concerns I, think , that the new Constitution will probably end up making Chile more social democratic than it is, , for example, , the constitution now says that people have a right to contribute either to a privately run or a publicly run healthcare system, , which has resulted in a kind of a two tier system where the richer in the private system and most people are in the public system and the bulk of people feel that they're not very well served by that kind of two tier system. . So I would expect some language that would allow the state to play a greater role in the health system that would allow taxation to play a role in funding a public health system and one of the things that reformers wants to. . Do is to insert this idea of equality of opportunity into the constitution which doesn't have the American meaning. . It basically means that they want the state to be in a position to ensure that all Chilean's are treated equally, , and so that will I think lessen the role of the private sector in the provision of public services, , and that's the real crux of it. . What voters most want changed other things that probably will change some people say that the Chilean system is sort of hyper presidential. . The president has a lot of power in Chile only the president can initiate tax and spending bills. . For example Congress can do that. . The president can determine which issues congress prioritizes the regions in Chile don't. . have their own tax-raising powers. . So all of these things tend to concentrate power in the capital and in the hands of the presidency and I would expect to see that being changed. . It'll be interesting to see whether the constitution's ban on abortion is upheld. . Imagine that will be a very controversial issue. . So Chile is at a point where it could change in lots of pretty profound ways but I mean how even to go about that to start from scratch on kind of the working document of a whole country one of the choices that voters made yesterday was on how to rewrite the new constitution and what they decided was that there would be a newly elected assembly consisting entirely of. . New Representatives which under the law will be half female and an election that new body will be held in April and that body will then I believe have a year to write a new constitution. . So it really will in theory start with a blank piece of paper. . One of the complicating issues will be that as this assembly is sitting and arguing and drafting chilly, , we'll be moving into a political season. . There are <hes> presidential elections, , national elections to be held in November of next year. . So it's pretty foreseeable that you know the politics of the presidential election will feed into the thinking of the drafters and vice versa it's going to be a very fraud I suspect and controversial process so. . The potential gains seem fairly clear here, , but is there some risk when starting from scratch like this? ? I think there is a risk Chile has in many ways been a pretty successful country and you can imagine that you know taken to extremes chilly ends up moving not so much in the direction of social democracy. . But in the direction of populism being one of the things that probably will happen is that you'll have new rights inserted into the constitution like a right to housing for example now, , that doesn't sound like a bad thing but the question will be is the government than on the hook for kind of bottomless spending on all these new rights spending that will either result in. . Enormous deficits or crushing taxation I think the danger of that is limited to some extent by the fact that each clause of the new constitutional have to be approved by a two-thirds majority of this assembly. . So I think the risks are limited to some extent. . It was interesting to see that the very richest districts voted against the idea of a new constitution and after the results of the vote were clear you we had celebrations in the middle of Santiago. . So instead of protests, , there was a great sense of celebration. . So I think that's a sense of national consensus process needs to happen, , and it'll be very interesting to see if that national consensus hold up as the process actually gets underway. . Brooke. Thank . you very much for joining us. . Thank you, , Jason.

Chile General Pinochet America President Sebastian president Eric Benita Congress Brooke Unger University of Chicago editor fraud
"chile" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"chile" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"I'd like to welcome back to the show Steph dyson who has a travel journalist, , a guidebook author most recently the Moon Guide to Chile and a travel blogger at worldly adventurer dot com. . Steph. . Welcome back to the show. . Thanks having me Chris I'm excited to be back again. . Well Of Truth. . I should say when I say welcome back to the show, , Steph has been on the show before you have heard her talking about northern Chile, , a number of episodes ago I wanNA say five years ago. . Yeah I think that's correct just before you started working on a guidebook. . Kissed before Ya. . So this is kind of rounding out that experience because the moon guy to Chile just published. . And that was a quite a long amount of time working on this guidebook but also Steph was the show a week ago and something went terribly wrong and it did not record. . So I appreciate your patience but I also appreciate your expertise on Chile. . When. . We talk about she leave this time we're talking about and I'm going to try and pronounce it the cut. . US thrall the southern. . Highway. . Good. . That was good pronunciation. . I I. See . you've been working on it. . We'll have to do some things right this time. . What is the? ? astral and where would we find that in Chile? ? The CATTA that Australia Archie means the southern highway to give you a bit of a clue and it's in Chilean Patagonia. . Now, , how to guy near is the sort of slightly nebulous region because nobody's really sure if it's somewhere on his own or if it belongs to other countries a what it is, , but effectively, , it's a region in the very far south of South America are in between Argentina and Chile. . and. . The kind of thorough style is the kind of rules western section. . So it's the kind of Chilean bit where she gets really narrow sort of not part of the country, , and it's just before you hit very southern Patagonia West toughtested by name and <hes> the destinations that you've discussed previously only put podcast bright further north than the last show we did on Patagonia, , there is a lot of Patagonia. . If we look at the map there. . There's a lot of Chile in terms of height, , not necessarily in terms of with. . Yeah it's a long country and I have children most of it and it. . Pile. . Will End just this road is seven, , hundred, , seventy miles or twelve, , hundred and forty kilometers. . So when we talk about One week itinerary, , you're going to start us not at the top and go all the way to the bottom where you're gonNA start, , US. . Yeah so I always recommend people planning Patagonia is starting inbound Maceda says about halfway down the cutter that'll style just outside this sort of biggest town in the area it's Koi Heike and it's an apple that where you can fly into directly in Santiago. . So it makes it a really great destination to start your trip. . and Are we gonNA do anything around the airport flying are where we going to start our actual trip? ? I would recommend picking up a call. . Then you don't need a four wheel drive to cut that Australia just needs sort of reason, , the high clearance because most of it is now paves. . The big for the locals I'll tell you that hasn't that hasn't been paved before but yet you're gonNA jump in your car and you can head south for a couple of hours to via settled gusty steel, which , really tiny little town outside of a national park. . You talk about outside of national. . Park. . The one thing as we talk about this pretty much this whole way there are national parks everywhere I think. . I'd made the analogy that if you started at the top of this highway in you're a squirrel, , you could probably get to the southern tip of South America in jump from tree to tree within a national park. . I'm not sure the tree is correct but the national parks is almost accurate. . This just a whole lot of national parks here in southern Chile. . Yeah, , it's actually what the government did. . Last year would start it up the root of their parks re to the parks. . On, , it's about two, , thousand, , four, , hundred kilometers I believe I'm connecting pretty much port Lamont which is the very northern tip Patagonia all the way down to Cape Horn, , which has its own national pockets the bit at the very bottom of South America's islands that people go. . Because the sale is used around the whole and and it was a big deal because white windy down that. . Square yes. . Yes. . There's now they sort of route to the pox. . It's kind of this ingenious could you can't actually drive between all of them, , but the capital style does opportunity to actually connect quite a number of them. .

Chile Steph dyson Chris Christensen Steph Glacial Lakes Chilean Patagonia Fast Board US Australia
"chile" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"chile" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Chile.

"chile" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"chile" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"Would still be in Chile in the morning what causes you anxiety before party stay with us now ed Sheeran ninety seven point one wash FM in the right in the and I know you we just kids when we he and yeah the nine now if you were listening yesterday.

Chile ed Sheeran
"chile" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"chile" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"You have a word Chile that you always used to mispronounce yes upper Marlboro is what I used to say but its Marlboro it's just hard to say upper Marlboro you have to put the other I know but I try to see the L. really really fast like Marlboro like the upper Marlboro man correct me I'm like okay okay I'm sorry I get that right I was in a public speaking class A. and in this professor by the name of Joe Ashcroft east Stroudsburg university of Pennsylvania called me out in the middle of a impromptu rhetorical dissertation and I was supposed to talk about education and I decided I would use this big word that I thought was really really special the word was acted Denia okay but I said it academia like macadamia like the nuts well in in people who are in academia need to understand he goes wait do you mean academia and I go what he's like because it sounds like you're referring to a cookie hello doctor Ashcroft Hey we want to hear from you this morning eight six six washer from the number one which word did you pronounce incorrectly for the longest time in this whole thing came up because buzzfeed did this list of words and and people outing themselves yeah that they had no idea how they were saying that they were saying it wrong until somebody pointed it out one of the ones that made me laugh out loud what if somebody saying they used to call it Mimi instead of meme yeah looks like me me yeah I don't know yeah that's what you know what for the longest time I didn't know and that's what I would be I would be like you to look at this meaning you need here's one and I think this was by Lin Manuel Miranda so instead of to me you look at it looks like at the tone we're told me yeah it's not no remember back in the day when you did like news and all those other yeah how did you get around pronouncing award that you knew you didn't know the prince and pronunciation you think you do know how to say it right right right right somebody because you like so how might I just would come up with a different way of saying it that dude I would intentionally screw up the word I would be like my bubble bobble get over it up on the Sam a you go about six six ninety seven forty three sixty one he Clarendon Courtney you're part of the show what's your situation with the word for you I am I only read the work with the world's like you didn't wait thinking back on our I think UT eighty I bet there's a lot of people that would say place both right it was let's see about we're judgment free zones so throw yourself under the bus this morning what's a word that you used to always mispronounce what was it we can't wait to hear from you at eight six six wash FM the number one eight six six nine two seven forty three sixty one let's do this will get to a Toby Chile's top stories coming up in just a few minutes and then we'll hear your stories so give us a call speaking a top stories which are working on well we've got a role because situation that resolves itself after a couple of hours local leave we'll get to that minute no she does not mispronounced words this here Lisa Bain thanks to audible what's going on on the biz outweigh but I always get calls whose road hose road so I call it whose homes because have fifty percent of the people say no it's whose road no it's those roads so whatever Hey what's happening with who's almost nothing everything is good on ninety five Virginia north the Dale city brief delay in the in the landmark Maryland ninety five north after one seventy five your rack is on the shoulder with Toby in Chile in the morning I'm Lisa baited on ninety seven point one wash FM.

Chile fifty percent