35 Burst results for "Chief Technology Officer"

Washington DC vaccine website issues frustrate residents

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 1 d ago

Washington DC vaccine website issues frustrate residents

"Overloaded the D. C. Health covert vaccine appointment system for a second day in a row, the city says this morning. It's working with Microsoft to address these technical issues. But one council member who used to be the mayor want s'more of an explanation than that. Council member Vince Gray wants answers after a second day of technical issues on the D C health vaccination. Ointment portal. He's calling for a hearing with Mayor Bouncers Administration on March 4th tweeting quote. We must have a more orderly appointment process that doesn't add needless anxiety and frustration. We have more than 36,000 people visiting our appointment portal at the same time, Chief technology officer for the city, Lyndsey Parker says it's working with Microsoft to improve the system. Dozens on social media report time out errors and an inability to get past the step of entering the randomized capture code. Mayor Bowser reminded residents in a statement that more appointments will become available, but it's unclear if the site issues will be fixed. Megan Cloherty. W T. O

Vince Gray Mayor Bouncers Administration Microsoft Lyndsey Parker Mayor Bowser Megan Cloherty
Intel Pops, VMWare Drops (For The Same Reason)

MarketFoolery

04:11 min | Last month

Intel Pops, VMWare Drops (For The Same Reason)

"We're going to start with some surprising news from intel. Ceo bob swan is stepping down. In mid february in june of twenty eighteen he was appointed interim ceo of intel in late january of twenty. Nine thousand nine. The interim tag was removed but suffice to say swan has faced a number of challenges over the ensuing two years and he is on his way out. Moving into the corner. Office is pat gelsinger. Who is currently the ceo of vm. Ware and for anyone wondering what. The investing world thinks of all of these moves. Shares of vm. Ware down six percent this morning and shares of intel up eight percent. Yeah so you've got gelsinger who previously had been at intel As the chief technology officer and of course swan came up and was promoted interim and then permanency. Oh having been the cfo. So i think one of the Takeaways that one can take here is that this is perceived to be a technology issue And the solution comes into Comes from technology Not from financial expertise I don't think there's any accusations that that's one wasn't getting the job done from you. Know the numbers point. It's day are falling behind on the technology and it's time to make a change. Yeah i mean you think about everything. That's happened with them. Over the last couple of years we've talked on this show about. Amd continuing to eat into intel's market share. You know apple though. The longtime partnership that intel apple ended after fifteen years. So i understand why shares of intel would be up on bob swan leaving. That said i d. Do you think there's maybe a little like when you take these two together when you take the let's just call it. Fifteen percent difference between the rise in intel and the drop vm. Where do you think it's a little overstated. And the reason. I ask that is because guessing was. Ceo of vm. Ware for eight. Plus years the stock up about thirty percent over the entire. Let's call it eight and a quarter span of his tenure as ceo. So it's not like vm. Ware shares were setting the world on fire under the tenure of pat gelsinger. Yeah i don't know that The world is looking at vm. Ware and saying how they ever replicate What they've been able to accomplish with with anybody else in that role But it may be a look. He's a commodity value enough that intel which despite going not not going nowhere as a stock for twenty years but going down and then most of the way back up. But that's that's what you're talking about twenty years of long-term buy and hold nothingness if you got in sort of at the top back in two thousand and i think that it's fair. Question to ask. Is whether vm. Ware is losing nearly as much as intel is hopefully gaining here I think that they change is being made at all is going to be. Maybe the lion's share of the stock movement today on intel if i had to just wildly guests Through the markets actions. You've got third point having been pushing for changes From intel intel says. It's got nothing to do with that nothing to do with you. Know the pressure. We've been getting from third point. This is this is all independent of that pressure. I don't think that's the case. And i think that Any change is going to going to explain a bump in intel at this point

Intel Ware Pat Gelsinger Ceo Bob Swan Gelsinger Bob Swan VM Swan Apple AMD
Intel Ousts Chief Executive Bob Swan

The KFBK Morning News

00:29 sec | Last month

Intel Ousts Chief Executive Bob Swan

"Big changes for Intel, which will have special importance to a lot of folks out in Folsom. Bob Swan stepping down as CEO and Pat Gell singer who is currently the CEO Of'em, where we'll be taking over. Hat not only very successful CEO of bm where, but he also was the former chief technology officer at Intel worked there for many years, so he knows the company. He is a tech guy. Bob Swan was World finance guy, and it just didn't work out for bomb on a number of different fronts.

Bob Swan Pat Gell Intel Folsom
Intel, Under Pressure to Rethink Its Business, Ousts Its Chief Executive

The KFBK Morning News

00:47 sec | Last month

Intel, Under Pressure to Rethink Its Business, Ousts Its Chief Executive

"Good morning to you. Big news for Intel. Today. It looks like Bob Swan eyes just realizing that it's time for him to step aside. I mean, he's been getting a lot of pressure and they've had a few hits on Intel over the last few years, but He is going to step down, according to CNBC. Nothing official yet. But according to CNBC, he's going to step down February 15th and the CEO of the EM where Pat Gell singer is going to replace him. Mr Gilson are not only a successful CEO of GM, where he was also the former chief technology officer at Intel, So he knows intel well and they know him and they want this person to be the new CEO. This news has vm We're down about 4.5% this morning. Intel is up nearly 8% on this

Bob Swan Intel Cnbc Pat Gell Mr Gilson GM
Interview With Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance

The Voicebot Podcast

06:05 min | Last month

Interview With Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance

"Joe. Petro welcome to the voice podcast. Thanks to be here. Glad to have you really cited for me to get someone from nuance particularly. Who's been there as long as you have. a dominant name and the voice of the i industry over decades and things are a little different. Now because there's also other big names in this space i think there was a long time when nuance only big name. And the voice. Today i space but we we have some other household names that creep into the conversation from time to time. So i've been looking forward to this for a long time. Why don't you tell people just to get started a little bit about who you are what you do on a regular basis day-to-day basis in nuance. Sure so on the chief technology officer of nuance and i've been here for about twelve twelve years or so. When i came in joined the organization. I was coming criminal Medical record bender company. And and i joined a nuance to basically run research and development for healthcare and i think that division at that point in time with something like i want to say two hundred two hundred twenty million or something like that in revenue you know after the last twelve years on that now be close to a billion dollars in five hundred hundred dollar enterprise organization as as well which show. We'll talk about but see. Te'o i'm responsible for all of the products and all the technology and all the research you know that. That nuance does both amana prized healthcare side. And really over the course of the last two years i transitioned from healthcare. Are the svp to the cto a. We pulled it everything our company together and when we When we did that a lot of it's kind magic started to happen. You know we made a lot of progress. You know both Both in the market as well as you from an innovation point of view. So it's been a super exciting a couple years you know as a cto. I basically lead the entire organization. So we worry about you. know how. Innovate and wood products. Bring to market in you. Know how talking to the market our creating messages around the product. How the products connect with you know the value propositions we spend our money as well at the at the same time so this kind of operational responsibility as well. It's been a good ride less twelve years. Yeah i think about it as as looking at your background you are you as an iraqi i think originally and there's not a lot of people i mean in your role. Who have mechanical background. Usually it's doubly computer science something related to that occasionally linguists So so that was low surprising. So how did you get from a mechanical engineer earlier. In your career. What you're doing back into that like full software into eclipses. Emr like a graduated from chemical engineering in the early nineties and And i was graduating in boston. It's kinda distress market at that moment. A moment in time in i was really fascinated with computer aided engineering so the application of computers to really hard engineering problems time. A company called electron data systems was was hiring. It was ross perot company. They had they had a program called c. Four technologies and basically what they did is they. They lived with general motors a michigan in all over the world and they did all of their it but they also did all of the computer aided engineering finding element. Analysis computers factor. It was a it was very much like an inflection. Point because compute was just getting to the point where it's becoming super powerful. So cad system solid modeling So i immediately kind of went out of school in directly directly into that and i was using computers to solve really hard mechanical engineering problems. In really what happened was i got a. I finally got involved in software companies involved with the application engineering. Some leaders in those companies realized. I could talk to clients so i spent a lot of time to doing that. And then you know it's just it feels like it's been a twenty five year journey journey. is kind of really really quickly. I just kind of progressed and kinda migrated up through you know. Increasing levels of responsibility you know had the lucky app stance of running some really really big organizations which eventually position me for you know for roles like this kind of interested in your your time and eclipses to media bars evolved for certain since since you were there obviously was in it was a really dynamic time when you were there to fifteen years ago You know what are your thoughts about how that space has evolved electronic medical records for those who are listening or ernest space. How that's evolved over time because we've got a couple of big players spent some really big concentration of some players but then there's all these satellite systems of engagement and specialty assistance. Which what are your thoughts. On that general. I think in some ways things have come a long way in in some ways. They're very kind of the same I got to be honest with you that that role that i took there when they called me i was actually in a in a distress. Kinda startup company that we we were turning around. And you know when i got the call was an odd call because i didn't know anything about healthcare at the time and they convinced me co executives. They are in the board of directors. Convince me oh you don't need to know much about healthcare. We need some the deliver good product. And i didn't know this at the time but it was. The a lot of people were kind of recycling their way through like healthcare's small community and yes it basically convinced me like we've interviewed everybody. We know who's out there. We need some of outside the industry. We'll teach you healthcare.

Petro Electron Data Systems Amana JOE Ross Perot General Motors Boston Michigan
Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance talks about his role at the company

The Voicebot Podcast

04:06 min | Last month

Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance talks about his role at the company

"Why don't you tell people just to get started a little bit about who you are what you do on a regular basis day-to-day basis in nuance. Sure so on the chief technology officer of nuance and i've been here for about twelve twelve years or so. When i came in joined the organization. I was coming criminal Medical record bender company. And and i joined a nuance to basically run research and development for healthcare and i think that division at that point in time with something like i want to say two hundred two hundred twenty million or something like that in revenue you know after the last twelve years on that now be close to a billion dollars in five hundred hundred dollar enterprise organization as as well which show. We'll talk about but see. Te'o i'm responsible for all of the products and all the technology and all the research you know that. That nuance does both amana prized healthcare side. And really over the course of the last two years i transitioned from healthcare. Are the svp to the cto a. We pulled it everything our company together and when we When we did that a lot of it's kind magic started to happen. You know we made a lot of progress. You know both Both in the market as well as you from an innovation point of view. So it's been a super exciting a couple years you know as a cto. I basically lead the entire organization. So we worry about you. know how. Innovate and wood products. Bring to market in you. Know how talking to the market our creating messages around the product. How the products connect with you know the value propositions we spend our money as well at the at the same time so this kind of operational responsibility as well. It's been a good ride less twelve years. Yeah i think about it as as looking at your background you are you as an iraqi i think originally and there's not a lot of people i mean in your role. Who have mechanical background. Usually it's doubly computer science something related to that occasionally linguists So so that was low surprising. So how did you get from a mechanical engineer earlier. In your career. What you're doing back into that like full software into eclipses. Emr like a graduated from chemical engineering in the early nineties and And i was graduating in boston. It's kinda distress market at that moment. A moment in time in i was really fascinated with computer aided engineering so the application of computers to really hard engineering problems time. A company called electron data systems was was hiring. It was ross perot company. They had they had a program called c. Four technologies and basically what they did is they. They lived with general motors a michigan in all over the world and they did all of their it but they also did all of the computer aided engineering finding element. Analysis computers factor. It was a it was very much like an inflection. Point because compute was just getting to the point where it's becoming super powerful. So cad system solid modeling So i immediately kind of went out of school in directly directly into that and i was using computers to solve really hard mechanical engineering problems. In really what happened was i got a. I finally got involved in software companies involved with the application engineering. Some leaders in those companies realized. I could talk to clients so i spent a lot of time to doing that. And then you know it's just it feels like it's been a twenty five year journey journey. is kind of really really quickly. I just kind of progressed and kinda migrated up through you know. Increasing levels of responsibility you know had the lucky app stance of running some really really big organizations which eventually position me for you know for roles like this

Amana Electron Data Systems Ross Perot General Motors Boston Michigan
"chief technology officer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:26 min | 3 months ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Special presentation of Silicon Valley insider now back to Silicon Valley insider Once again, your host Kiku. Insiders. Welcome back. Look around, Insider I'm his chief to today. My special guest is being incident. Colonel JJ Snow, who the chief technology officer afterwards, the Air Force's the innovation arm. Welcome back changing. Thanks, Keith. This is so much fun. I'm having a blast. Yeah. Great show. We talked about the health easier do business. The government. We talked about the Incubator that athletes runs and now I wanted to talk about, and we also talked about the public private partnership. But I want to talk about the future. I mean, you're a futurist. You're well known in the industry of again private for being a thought leader. We talked a lot about technology. They went Do you see happening in the near horizon? There are a lot of interesting things happening, but the one that's been on my mind, most recently has to deal with machine learning, artificial intelligence and quantum. The reason being. These areas are game changers and whoever masters these areas first. At some point, we'll have a first mover only advantage, which means they will then conquer that vertical or multiple verticals that they control. So understanding where exactly those capabilities are today here, as well as overseas and understanding who owns them because Not all of these technologies are owned by nations. Some of them are owned by corporations. And that could really make some interesting things happen. As far as regulatory and policy discussions go. We haven't had to discuss what does the future of governance technology governance look like? When you consider that an entire vertical or a group of verticals might now be can Controlled and you know, the future of those verticals are now dictated by a corporate entity. What does that look like? So there are a lot of interesting discussions that I start having with some of my friends and I got to tell you, it's exciting, and it's a little terrifying. At the same time. I feel like it's time that we have Ah, the next to still Amar for quantum AI machine learning and we sit down and we talk about Okay. What does this look like? And if one nation or one corporation comes out as the leader, you know, what does that mean for everybody else? Because at some point that AI is going to out think everybody else is a I and that quantum processor is going to out compete Everybody else's quantum processors. Which means you're constantly going to do that, because you're continuing to evolve it at a pace a rate that's faster than everybody else's. We saw this with Alfa Star which Google had and I blew me away. I mean, you now have an artificial intelligence capability that's beating some of the best in the world in a very fluid dynamic. Uncertain environment where it can play multiple different races with different types of aircraft and vehicles and villages. And it's got an economic component. It's got a diplomatic component. It's got a a warfare component, and it's making decisions on diets doing them very, very smartly. This makes me look at AI and quantum writ large and say, Hey, we probably need to sit down and talk about what the world looks like. When this does happen on day. We probably want to make sure that we're all in agreement on what that means, and that not just one group is benefiting, but everybody is getting the benefit of that. So I feel like that's where the discussion needs to go next. So how do you facilitate that? I mean it Zoe's secret that a lot of people feel like China. Leads in a impossible and so how do you actually talk about? You know, I'll talk more from a competitive reverses an enemy standpoint, but in competing market forces competing market players how do you have that conversation? Great is a great question. So what we've been doing Ah, lot of is actually talking with our academic partners talking with experts that are deep in this area because in the government, you are not going to be deep in an area like that, especially in the military unless that's your job full time. So we have to rely on outside experts. We have to rely on on companies that are working these faces to come in and best advise and give us insights. Give us that ground Truth. The public private partnerships are even Maurin important here because we're building consortiums. We're building teams with bright minds around the toughest problems and that's where we get after the right solution. So when you're talking about You know a competition with another nation state or you're talking about competition between corporations understanding what that looks like. And if you take it from a game theory perspective, you know what game is being played? And where does it make sense to be collaborative and where does it make sense to be competitive? And you know what? What? What approach do we want to take with that? And I think I'm always when you're considering tough problems like this. The right place to start is by having an open discussion, sitting down and talking about Where's the technology today? Where do we think it's going to be in the next year in the next three years? And what does that mean? Not just for a single nation or single company, but for everybody? What are the implications there and my understanding that I think we can come to the best decision for everybody to benefit from it. Excuse me. I mean, I think that's a great way to end. Today's show. Is that what people think and what they're stuck in? In terms of current mindsets and current models? Technology has a position change that for Good or bad, and so having the proper way of thinking about it early is putting people in right frame of mind because that helps open up that we have a discussion. The current Tense, but it's the future to step that was somebody's kitchen space surprise. So thanks again for sharing all that insight with us, and I definitely want you back on time. I would love to keep this has been a lot of fun, and there's so much that I'd love to share again. Big fan and, you know, I've got so many wonderful partners that have come from Silicon Valley that had been advisors that have been teammates that have come in on our challenges. And we're just so grateful because they're mentorship. Their advice they're teaming has been.

AI government Kiku chief technology officer Silicon Valley JJ Snow Keith Air Force Amar Zoe Alfa Star China Google
Customer Experience in the Digital Age

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:53 min | 3 months ago

Customer Experience in the Digital Age

"Talk a little bit about this. This idea of towards an ai. I operating model. Obviously a lot of people are familiar with it's on the minds and lips of so many different executives and certainly especially technology executives. But why this topic and why ranted around the operating model aspect of his as well. yes sure. so it's been clear for a while. Now that many organizations are at somewhat of an inflection point in the realm of digital transformation with here are our clients talking about this amongst their leadership teams and we hear captains of industry like tom. Siebel another recent guests on the podcast characterizing the last twenty years as an era of mass corporate extinction for those companies that failed acknowledged that the shifting digital landscape he says something like fifty two percent of companies in the fortune. Five hundred have fallen off the list since two thousand So at the center that's inflection. Point in the surrounding discussions are a lot of digital technologies The one that we've found to be most prominent is artificial intelligence undoubtedly a trend. We've been monitoring and witnessing for some time now however Leading up to our Digital symposium in july. We noticed the the conversation around a it was a evolving Specifically it was shifting from promising use cases in functions and business units to grander scale transformations so companies. Were rethinking as you said. The entire operating model in the name of ai redefining the seems the structure of the organization to break down data silos and standing up in a lot of cases entire Auctions dedicated to identify piloting and scaling. Those use cases that were most promising Symposium in july we survey about one hundred global cio hypothesis and found that. Two-thirds had already spun up dedicated teams or entire functions to focus on identification pilot than scaling of a i use cases and for those who more yet to do so sixty sixty percents that it was actually on the roadmap so this trend originally coined as shifting to a i i buy. Google was getting legs and we wanted to capture some characteristics of organizations that are effectively navigating the shift. You're very interesting. Talk a bit about the two executives that you you interviewed palo arbor from ten healthcare. Chris gates from all states a a leader in the in the health. Space a leader in the insurance space. Talk a bit of balance. Why them and why their stories were compelling sure. While starting in the aggregate healthcare and insurance or two of the most data heavy industries and generally where there's data there's opportunities to make products and experiences more intelligent and more automated in the case of gala the cio tenant healthcare there there's an ocean of clinical and claims data available from speaking with her in the past i know they're laser focused on synthesizing that data combining it with voice of the customer analytics to help improve the patient experience and enduring the panel. She shares some really interesting nuances on how to pursue without undermining the importance of the the human side of the patient physician interaction and then just recently under the pressures of covid nineteen. She has truly demonstrated her ability to lead in a crisis and spin up new data driven solutions in near real time to help manage these most unusual circumstances and then chris gates Chief technology officer at allstate is representing a company. That is no stranger to doing innovative things with data in the space of insurance The drive wise program for example that monitors driver dilemma tree data and offers rebates to those that exhibit behaviors on the road or the similar but different mile wise program that provides a pay as you go metered billing model for auto insurance both truly examples of creating new business models on the platform data in a i and outside allstate Chris just a truly dynamic leader that brings insights and experience colored by his leadership posts at other formidable companies such as a i g under armor and various business units general electric

AI Siebel Palo Arbor Chris Gates TOM Google Allstate Chris General Electric
Ransomware epidemic during the pandemic

The CyberWire

02:32 min | 4 months ago

Ransomware epidemic during the pandemic

"This week's warnings about hospitals in ransomware continued to move organizations to higher levels of alert and to be born out in reported attacks. US public and private organizations. CISA. The FBI and the Department of Health and Human Services on the federal side. and. Fire is Mandy Unit on the private side have warned that organizations in the healthcare and public health sector are under an increasing threat from ransomware strains deployed are usually conti and especially riot. The perpetrators are russophone gangsters not spies. These particular gangsters get even worse press than such gun IFS usually ATTRAC- brazen ars technica calls them others say despicable conscienceless loathesome you get the picture. It's clear why they've attracted so much deserved odium attacks on the availability of healthcare are hateful and the best of times and with the covid nineteen pandemic. These aren't the best of times. It's equally clear why the hoods are interested in hospitals, data availability and privacy are at a premium and the healthcare sector is under unusual pressure to knuckle under extortion. They can't always shrug off a successful attack when patients safety and privacy are at stake. Security Affairs says, the hospitals in new. York Vermont have been the latest riot victims. Both the Wyckoff Heights Medical Center in Brooklyn and the University of Vermont. Health Network have disclosed that they've sustained and are recovering from ransomware attacks. They're not alone wired puts the number of ransomware attack against hospitals in the dozens and the Wall Street Journal quotes Charles Carmichael. Chief Technology Officer at fire is Mandy in cybersecurity firm is saying quote most threat actors. They're explicitly not looking to hit hospitals. This group in particular has explicitly stated that they're going to hit hospitals and they've proven it. He adds this is the most significant cyber threat that I've seen in the United States in my career and quote. While, US hospitals have been notably affected by CYBERCRIME. It's not solely a US problem. The Montreal Gazette reports that various targets in Quebec have been hit including non healthcare targets and the transportation and law enforcement sectors. Montreal's Jewish General Hospital has been hit with cyber attack. The hospital's administrators says wasn't ransomware, but his conclusion was based on the fact that no extortion demand had yet been received.

Ransomware Wyckoff Heights Medical Center Department Of Health And Human Mandy FBI Charles Carmichael United States University Of Vermont Vermont Brooklyn Wall Street Journal The Montreal Gazette York Jewish General Hospital Quebec Montreal
U.S. Digital Response and the Volunteer Tech Effort

Commonwealth Club

05:38 min | 5 months ago

U.S. Digital Response and the Volunteer Tech Effort

"President Obama's chief data scientist, talks with US Digital response cofounders Jennifer Palka and really knew as well as racially A member of US digital response. You know the place. I wanted to kind of start this conversation with you. Is almost rewinding the clock back and Tio where we were, and it's it's hard to to remember. But You know, it hasn't been that long. Since then. She all came together. March 16th, You know, that was 133 days ago or 19 weeks or on Lee 36.34% of 2020. Not long but to put it in perspective. What was what was coded like at that time. When, when, when? Back in March, 16. You know we had 4500 people who had tested positive in the United States and 88 had died. Six of which were in California. Sam Cisco Bay Area had moved to a shelter in place, and it was three days before a governor Newsome had issued a stay home order for the whole entire state. Ouchy had just warned that the worst is just ahead of us. It was his first time really warning that publicly. And so you know what we think about how much change from the numbers back then to now, I want you to take us back to the initial moment and that that almost that realization Of why jump into this? Why create us digital response when people the numbers weren't as bad as people have thought, What what got you to see this? And and maybe railing? Could you talk to us about how you came together? US digital response. I would say we started off a somewhat simple idea and a bit of a prediction. It was founded by a former U. S deputy chief technology officer is like John He was here and season tech industry veterans more like myself, and we kind of came together with this idea and thinking that With the pandemic. We were going to see government systems and government teams really be stretched beyond their current limits. And knowing all of the wonderful tech really talented tech expertise we have in this country. Is there something there? We can connect the people who have this expertise with the government teams are really going to need that hope to scale beyond problems that we've really never seen. So I think what happened was that was a thesis and we basically gave it a shot. We put a call out for help to technologists and we reached out to government people working in government that we knew their networks and we're basically like Is there something here? Can we provide help? As a team. We've really just been blown away by what we've been able to dio on Both sides. I think we've seen on one hand. We've seen those government services be taxed in a way that's really unprecedented. And in a way that goes way beyond where we made initially thought or on health care. We see systems being affected like Government service is like voting toe accessing benefits in the social safety net in general, and I think we've been overwhelmed by the interest from technologists who raised their hands to help so Probably. Within our first few weeks, we had thousands of technologists all over the country raised their hand sign up online just to say, Hey, I'm here here on my skills. I want to help. And so I would say USTR has served as that bridge that gap kind of bridge that gap between tech and I just want to help and governments in need and when we've really seen that the model works. So we're just about past four months of existence, and we've had over 5500 volunteers sign up to help from all over the country. We've actually taking on over 130 different projects with states and counties and city government teams in a TTE this 1300.27 different states, which kind of really amazing when I think about that. And as I said, it's all happened in just a matter of months. I mean, it's just phenomenal. You know, Raph, why did you join? What? What? What? What you did to this effort You have, like endless job opportunities with your background. Yeah, I was one of the first volunteers with you See, are the newbie on this panel? It's because I was spending all my time Energy doom, strolling and reading the news on DH. Release is worrying about the future on that didn't feel good night background is in Tech Azan Engineering executive You know, like I have worked at a few different startups and developing amazing roller coasters. But the thought experiment that I run when I'm thinking about leaving a group or joining group is if this group of people who succeed beyond their wildest dreams like what would the net impact on the world being In past companies have sometimes thought like I feel pretty neutral office like I love the people and the projects are interesting. But what is the impact? And so I've been on kind of a quest for the past few years to find a way to make That kind of impact it scale back in March. In this tiny thing that you're talking about. There was a lot of energy from the tech community, especially here in surface Go like the hacker news readings that to try and find ways to help and it seemed to me like a lot of the Things that people are working on. We're a little bit like solutions in search of problems like The solutions that are going to move the needle are going to be like something crazy, innovative. It's going to be mass cooperation and distribution and logistics and the kind of things that we infected government for. So a mutual friends talking about USTR, and when I read about it, heard about it. It was like this is this is the way we have to help governments. Let's help them be responsive to the needs. And so I had, like. The man's privilege of having the time of the financial security volunteer for free for a while. And the anxiety to not sit around doing nothing

United States Ustr Tech Azan Engineering TIO President Obama Jennifer Palka California Cisco Bay Area Scientist Ouchy LEE Newsome Raph Deputy Chief John He U. S Executive Officer
LG CTO on how the coronavirus influences his products

The 3:59

04:43 min | 6 months ago

LG CTO on how the coronavirus influences his products

"The crowbars is forced much of America into a lockdown. But, in Berlin, the consumer concentrate show actually happening with attendees physically their. Consumer electronics giant LG, presenting at the show and balancing both virtual and physical presence there. With me LG China's chief technology officer I P Park talked to park. Thanks for joining me although Roger Good to talk to you again. So if this were a normal year, we'd all be talking about the last televisions or appliances that ETA How has it grown virus changed how you approach a conference like this Oh my God. It changed everything. Yesterday we held our Ika. Press conference in the form of Hologram. So I was there as a Hologram. It was different but it was pretty interesting. and. Tell me more about that like how does that work being at being at a show in Hologram form while you`re In in Seoul. So what we did was we did a hybrid version of press conference. So I was virtually there through Hologram, and then at the later part of the press conference, I was connected live to a bird from. So Korea from Korea I was at our L. D., smart home lgbtq home, presenting some features of our smart home live to the audience in burden. So it was a hybrid and I think it worked out pretty well, especially a, it fit really well with the current current situation with the coronavirus. So, let's say products that you mentioned. One of the ones that was most buzz about was the battery powered air purifier mask. Tell me more about that. This is something that we develop a utilizing our technology that we had before. You know that we had a pure care air purifier products, which was very very popular, and we were able to miniaturize all the technology fit this into very light masks so that the mass comes with a mini version of pure care airfield. In their air purifier in there is Scott held her H. The ample field third is fan operated any journalists to to your breeding inhaled xl. So you feel very comfortable range wearing this a long period of time. It's GONNA make designed to fit around. Your face and we have. Made this and we have currently donate thousands of these two medical staff for them to utilize during this coroner situation. Curious how quickly you turn around and create something like this because I know you said, you have care fire technology already prefer products out there. So so how long did it take to? TORONTO. Focus your efforts on something like this mask. Remember. The exact amount of time it was very, very short it. We it was a concentrated effort between engineers and design So we had we came up with many different designs. Then we tried in in the lab of different types of motors, different types of sensors. And we way to make this pretty quickly. You also mentioned in your keynote, a thermal imaging camera with facial recognition that can be used to detect buyers. How does that work? So the traditional thermal camera is that it detects people with no the temperature. And you need people you need to staff this unit somebody's sitting behind a camera a look at the screen and you know Manually, of detect people were temperature with a color or we did was we combine this with our intelligent computer vision camera so that not only it detects the temperature but also detects a face through facial recognition, which means that you need to man this booth mandates camera I have people a this. To sit behind the camera all day but it it can recognize who's passing who's passing by and also can recognize. It can detect temperatures can do everything automatically. and. We made this much more notable so that you can you can be used in small spaces as well.

LG Korea Lg China Chief Technology Officer Roger Good America Berlin Seoul I P Park Scott Toronto L. D.
Mayor Bowser Announces $3.3 Million Investment to Provide Home Internet to Low-Income Washington DC Students

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 6 months ago

Mayor Bowser Announces $3.3 Million Investment to Provide Home Internet to Low-Income Washington DC Students

"Mayor Bowser's Internet for all initiatives set aside more than $3 million for up to 25,000 students and their families. D C. Public schools are currently offering online on Ly instruction through at least the beginning of November. The Office of Chief Technology officer will bring broadband directly to homes through Comcast Internet essentials in RCN's Internet first programs. Metro's Rail operations management has created a culture of fear, threats and confusion. It's

Mayor Bowser Office Of Chief Technology Off LY RCN Metro
LG offers a taste of what 5G looks like in South Korea

The 3:59

07:21 min | 6 months ago

LG offers a taste of what 5G looks like in South Korea

"LG Like every other mobile player is hyped up for five G.. What's the next generation technology in its home country of South Korea. I'm ready, Chang and this is your daily charge. With me as LG. Chief Technology. Officer. Ip Park. I WanNa talk about five gene. That was the topic we discussed back in at C. S. IN VEGAS. LG was an early adopter of five G.. Getting you getting that next generation while technology into your phones pretty early I'm curious what the overall reception for five has been like for consumers and consumer specifically. Five G. is not fully there yet although five G. was launched new, it'll take a couple of years for the entire infrastructure subject to be five, g.? So we are getting more and more content more and more devices in in five G.. Five. G. Phones are already out there. Everybody's using five phones, but the technical difference between Ltn five phones is very minimal currently because content is lagging behind but. Things like our dual screen phone is being well received in are launching new tax phone factors. Afon in the very near future stay tuned but also I think this may be this coroner. A situation will help will be utilized to sort of accelerate development five G. applications more because people need more immersive. You'll need more online experience at at either at home in a mobile or in the car catching in you know you talked about everyone having five phones It's perfect Segue 'cause I wanna ask about what the five experiences like in. South Korea. Because in the US you know it's A little scattershot it's not consistent. Right? You've got your verizon with very fast millimeter wave five G. in a few blocks in cities around the country. You know you've got that that sort of low ban nationwide network that t mobile nineteen have that that isn't much faster than for not what what is it like what five g. like in Seoul and what is the service like because i? Think I get the sense that is far more broadly adopted over there. Yeah. Five G. services corneas very good. As you can guess, creates a small country in very dense. So we have. Service towels everywhere. So, there's virtually virtually every place has connectivity and five much faster here. So he can get more contents so we can do much more content instant intensive things here like you can. You can watch a baseball game in a much more immersive way using dual dual screen. You can play games, you know much more emergency ban so on and so forth. So create is a much better situation to utilize five G. than other much bigger countries where you have to feel filling the all the landscape. And you mentioned that there's not not quite the content that there yet but I. Guess, we're a year into five deployment. What different applications have arisen particularly in that market since it feels like the deployments much more mature. What? What are some of the different use cases you've seen? What five gene in Korean specifically. One applicant. No. So couple of applications have been very popular with of five g you know especially a dual screen phones is that. You can deploy multiple applications, use them saying at the same time without having to switch between screens, but also you can watch. TV. Very. immersive way. So on one screen, you can watch the game on screen. You can want you all the stats, all the baseball player or you can focus on a specific player at that moment. So. It's more personalized than regular sort of A. Flat Service envy trying to build to build more and more contents behind this. In terms of the potential applications. You talked about the idea of know watching gaming against Pacific angles it'd be more personalized. Are there any potential five APPs or use cases that excite you things that you wanna see people take five take advantage of with five hundred five G. is not just for the phones but it's for everything else as well and I think automotive is one area. Utilized Five G.. So maybe even more immediate applications in connected. Car Stan. Mobile phones. But. You know there are many features that could be implemented in. five phones, for example. There's something a technological V. to X. vehicle to infrastructure technology that future costs will have for safety in coordination with infrastructure in other cars. But also, this can be implemented in software as well. We have recently developed something called to based of V. to X., and this can be implemented into an APP so that when you carry a phony five G., you're basically carrying the fight a V. TO X. Capability. So you can interact with cars, the car coming around the corner it'll alert you or alert car so that you're you're more careful and there are many other types of potential applications. To go with this on a more specific Epeli type of experience will carling for your APP when you have your phone around on you have when you have all your car driving around you can. Go. There and pure prearranged. Purchasing arrangement a while you're driving while you're walking many the meaning of those types of use cases helping to developed right now. We talked about foldable foldable phones of the last couple of times we met and just curious. It was clearly a hot topic last year less. So now even though we're still seeing some foldable phones coming out, I'm just curious what your take is on. The phone will see any kind of foldable devices from algae in the near future. So I think that's time I did probably mentioned that we we've been experimenting with many different types of phone factor, a home practice for the phone. And definitely, there's a need for larger display in the future or multiple displaying future specially with the five G.. So you see some of new phone factored phones coming up in the very near future. Okay. Nice. Nicely vague. Next. Code. Couple of weeks. Next couple of weeks okay awesome. Well. Thank you Dr Par for your time. Really appreciate it. If you have any questions about lg or five G. His twitter at the daily charge, you read all LG coverage on C. dot com for the charm. Roger Chan thanks for listening.

LG G. Phones South Korea Chief Technology Ip Park Officer Chang Vegas Verizon Baseball United States Seoul Roger Chan G.
Washington, DC - Montgomery County Public Schools approves first semester return-to-school plans

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:59 min | 6 months ago

Washington, DC - Montgomery County Public Schools approves first semester return-to-school plans

"The Montgomery County School Board has approved the reopening plan for the county's public schools and students in Montgomery County will be learning from home until at least next February. Classes begin Monday. Student schedules will be posted online later today. For elementary school students. The day will run from 8:45 A.m. through 3:15 P.m. middle and high schools will be in class from 8:45 a.m. through 3:45 P.m.. M. C. P s Chief Technology Officer Pete 17 E says the school system has already given out Chromebooks all teachers and will continue to reach out to students over the next few months. Last week alone, we distributed over 49,000 Elementary student Chromebooks. To those students are total student devices that were distributed since the start of this code crisis is 108,500. Starting next week, the school district will offer meals to students at 74 schools throughout the county.

Montgomery County Montgomery County School Board 49,000 Elementary Chief Technology Officer M. C. P
Verizon's CTO Discusses Their Nationwide 5G Deployment

The 3:59

04:46 min | 6 months ago

Verizon's CTO Discusses Their Nationwide 5G Deployment

"Of rising chief technology officer Kyle Milady on in the first of a three part interview to discuss the state of five G.. So just to kick things off what is the state of Verizon's five day deployment Oh man good question we have a real a lot going on at the moment you know we started this journey you know years ago frankly actually coming up with their own five G. SPEC. So we could bring that five G. SPEC along with submillimeter wave spectrum that we purchased and all the idea of trying to really leapfrog the current generation. Of Technology Knob, it's been a few years We're really happy with the progress we launched our first commercial five G. on last last April, and send them a the two two major things we've been doing one is optimizing technology. For use in the the wider network and deploying more and more notes and so on both on both fronts, we've been really making a lot of a lot of good progress on the technology side. Don't WanNA. Get Too Geeky. But you know we started off with our deployments at something called foresee on what that is for chunks of Trim Gang together, and with that we're able to. Get close to or over sometimes two gigabits a second on in on a cell phone But we've been working on something called HCC, which actually gangs up eight chunks of spectrum together, and we're going to be able to get over four gigabits a second. We've been doing the labs and in some of our field trial. So we continue to work on the technology on the. Dial link, we're working on an our technology on the uplink. So you can get much faster speeds coming from the device up to the network, and so that's coming along well, and then finally we've really ramped up our deployment in terms of small cell deployment throughout the country were we're GONNA put five to six times more nodes on we did last year and you know, right Now we're on target. We're doing really well in terms of getting the the equipment out there. Yeah I know you just hit San Jose recently hitting your thirsty market. I know you have a target for sixty markets with five G. by the years that's still an achievable target something yourself shooting for absolutely absolutely continue the momentum we've we have those markets that we launched in. The Bay area, we didn't conjunction with our MECH. Announcement but we have a whole bunch of other studies that were working really hard and right now, and you'll start seeing those rollout the towards the. Towards the second half year and you know we're we're right on track and we're really excited to start building momentum and launching new markets and allow people to really experience great you the great the servicing capabilities of ban has offer. Time Baltra white band because that's also known as millimeter way spectrum. It is it's got a rep for being extremely fast talking about one to get to speed up the rage limited and it it's. Often compared to. A hot spot on steroids right and so. T mobile likes to the bash guys know your customers only connect to five g. a fraction of the time. What do you say that it's especially at you as you're broadening your deployment and your positioning this consumers is something that they wanna have How do you reconcile that the fact that like the range continues to be pretty limited for this that service great can get it, but it is hard to get. Yes. Oh, the here's a say that we started like I said, we started the journey years ago. And the hardest thing to do is five G. With millimeter wave. But that's also where the greatest prizes that is where you can really fundamentally changed the way wireless works and it was wasn't lost on us that the Rangers certainly limited compared to a seven hundred. Network eight fifty network in the in the low band, a spectrum that we had before. It'll be honest years ago we weren't even sure you could use millimeter wave in a wireless commercial network. We've proven that to be the case. Now it's a matter of we gotta keep building out and we gotta keep getting the nodes out there, but the technology is working as as we'd expect. So there hasn't been any surprises in terms of how much coverage now, it's the to to get it out there get more deeply deployed and also what you'll start seeing from us. In the rest of the year here, we're going to be putting out what we call five G. Nationwide. which uses technology called DSS, which allows us five G. and four G. to share a low ban spectrum.

Rangers Chief Technology Officer Verizon Kyle Milady HCC San Jose DSS
'Unprecedented' challenges to safe, secure 2020 vote

KYW 24 Hour News

05:03 min | 7 months ago

'Unprecedented' challenges to safe, secure 2020 vote

"Question of election security. We go to Dmitri Alperovitch Thie, co founder and former chief technology officer of Crowdstrike a cyber technology company. Good morning to you, Dimitri. I know you have your own shop now. I want to ask you since you watch this closely. What? Is the area of concern for you. In election 2020 Well, My biggest concern is cyber security expert is, Of course, the hack ability of our election systems both from the influence side as well as from the voting perspective, and I can tell you from my experience that voting is the hardest thing to secure When it comes to cyber security. It is literally the hardest from out there and the only way we know how to do it well and safely by using paper, whether it be mail in ballots or whether it be voting in person without paper record that could be produced by the machine or the paper record paper ballot, which you can mark up. Those of the safest ways and the other way, of course, is to drop it off something that's not getting much attention. Right now. With all the focus on mail in ballots is that all placing should have drop off boxes. By the curb side that people can drive by walked by and drop off them at the ballot without using mail. In my surprise people that a cybersecurity expert says that that is the best option is to go old school go paper, but it is that paper route that the president has raised this week and saying that Greatly concerns him, he said. The biggest risk we have is mail in ballots, universe or universal mail in ballots, and he claimed foreign Entities could interfere. He rattled off. Russia, China, Iran, North Korea with mail in ballots. What do you make of that statement? Well, paper cannot be hacked. However, there is a legitimate concerns about logistics. I'm not so much concerned about for Nancy's interfering in the paper process, but we do need to make sure that states are prepared to take in the huge number of mail in ballots that will come in. They will be able to do the signature verification that is necessary to make sure that there is no fraud. It can't be done. Five states have been doing it for years now, like Oregon, Colorado and others. But others have not. And we need to make sure they're ready. And they're preparing now versus the day before the election. You talk to people in the government Now, why wasn't there a strategy to do what you just laid out? Well, I think way haven't been preparing for this, and a lot of people were assuming that the disease will go away in a few months. Of course, it's still here and now a lot of people are concerned about voting in person and me to make sure they have an opportunity to do so safely. Right. But there wasn't a federal strategy to have the states do what you just said they should have been doing for the past four years. Well, this is hard to do because of course, the federal government is not in charge of elections. The individual states on Stephen Municipalities are in charge of them, so it's really up to the states to do this well. New Jersey just declared that they will go all mail in voting in November, and that's a good thing. But other states need to ramp up their capabilities. When you said that you were concerned about election infrastructure, the US intelligence community has warned. That adversaries or try to access tryingto access candidate's private communications and election infrastructure at the state and the federal level, the national security advisor to the president on this program last Sunday, and he said, Russia and China are doing this going fishing, essentially on websites and the like. He's been criticized for mixing apples and oranges. I'm wondering what evidence you have seen. As to what Russia and China are actually doing. Margaret. This is very important. There are different ways to interfere in our elections. And what we have seen in the past is, of course, the Russians in 2016 hacking into campaigns hacking to political organizations, and I'm leaking out information to the public for Wikileaks and other channels. We have not seen that obviously this year, and that's a good sign. But of course, we still have a few months to go. But then there is the influence operations that they're conducting. A number of countries are doing that now. China, Iran as well as Russia, and not just around elections, really continuous on social media through official Media channels and even government statements. But the third thing that concerns me personally is really attacks on the infrastructure itself. Voter database says voting Talyn's systems vote reporting systems those air very, very vulnerable to hacking, and we need to be doing more to protect them. I no see. So the federal Cyber Security Agency is doing a lot and those systems right now, but Mornings be done very quickly. Is there anything people at home can do to make sure their vote death counted? Absolutely two things one everyone can participate. Not Justus, a voter. But also volunteer election workers are often volunteers, so reach out to county election officials ask if you can help. They're going to eat a lot of help this year because of the challenging situations we have, But most importantly, be patient. This may be the first modern election we have where we may not know who the president is the night of the election or the day after it may take days for us to actually count all the votes. And understand who has won, so buckle up. It may be a long right.

Russia China President Trump Federal Government Dmitri Alperovitch Thie Cyber Security Agency Iran Dimitri Justus Crowdstrike Fraud New Jersey Wikileaks United States Chief Technology Officer Nancy Co Founder Talyn North Korea
Does TikTok Really Pose a Risk to US National Security?

the NewsWorthy

05:59 min | 7 months ago

Does TikTok Really Pose a Risk to US National Security?

"Hank Shaw. He's the senior manager on the security solutions team for the cybersecurity company lookout I asked him whether he thinks Tiktok is actually threat and how it compares to other Social Media Apps when it comes to your privacy, is it really that much different from what's being collected from other social media? In reality no these APPs we give them access to lot and we accept that right. There is this kind of level of access that we all except when it comes to our lives on on the Internet. The difference he says is tick talks parent company by dance, any access, the Chinese, Communist Party, which you'll hear them referred to as C. C. P. May get your data. The core of the concern is who owns it? It's it's the fact. That it's a Chinese own company in that the CDC has demonstrated certain data usage tactics that don't fly in the United States, and that's why the center this whole debate tic TAC itself at least says, the data is secure and doesn't go to China, but Hank isn't so sure by dances under contract with the CCP to promote propaganda in the Chinese equivalent APP, which is called Julian getting getting that pronunciation right? They do that in the Jinjiang Province where The government is to put likely controlling the weaker Muslim population. So when I look at it from a moral perspective, I just personally when want my data potentially accessible by people who are doing something like that and in comparison to a US based company someone like facebook or twitter obviously instagram's owned by facebook they at least have to answer to the US government. As we've seen, know can take a series financial hit they have the US government. In Regulatory standards to answer to, and they've they've got a federal by to answer to which in my opinion bite dance doesn't totally considering they have that agreement with C.. P.. That's why Hank feels the possible Microsoft takeover of Tiktok in the US would be a step in the right direction and would help set some new standards for the APP but I also spoke with Patrick Jackson. The chief. Technology. Officer at the privacy firm disconnect who's also worked. For the NSA test. APPS. For a living I look at the network communication I also reverse engineer, the binoculars areas to see what secrets they hold in them. He says not so fast I would say that anytime you let your data leave your device Goto even if it's a US company or a foreign company that data can wind up in the wrong hands and it's because data is sold, it could be shared or could be stolen he points. To, facebook scandal a few years back facebook a US company allow data to be used by Cambridge. ANALYTICA to possibly interfere with the US election that data was was misused by companies that were US based, and so it to think that just because this APP is owned by a US company that data will only stay in the US and users don't have to worry is is false because you know money talks and these companies will do deals that will. Bring in dollars in May mean exchanging data for those dollars and also data can be stolen if we're giving up all of this data about ourselves location things that we like you know how long we look at certain videos. If we're giving up all this data to a US company and that data is stolen, then we're still back at square one. In fact, he says facebook who owns instagram and is now rolling out the tiktok copycat. Reels may have. More information about us than any other company almost every single APP that I do testing on has an integration with facebook, and so if you think about how much data that facebook is getting not only from the APPS that you use directly owned by Facebook Messenger. What's APP instagram and then eventually reels they're also embedded in so many apps that they don't own including Tiktok and so it's it's you know for a lot of attention to be on TIKTOK. Justified. That's okay. It's it's people's right to be suspicious, but that same suspicion should carry over to even. US. Companies like facebook they know when you're opening your workout apps and they know how much time you spend in them, our phones go everywhere with us. Our phones probably knows better than our loved ones still patrick has found some abnormal things about Tiktok specifically even beyond. Who owns it the amount of data that they collect within the first I counted the first nine seconds I counted two hundred, ten network requests from my device back to tick tock servers. It's clear that they've architect did this in the way to suck up as much data as possible. So knowing what these experts no I had to ask, would they ever download Tiktok? Henshaw says not right now personally for the privacy concerns until it's all hashed out I just is just something that I don't want to be the potential of Patrick Jackson on the other hand has downloaded it, but he gave it very limited access are revoked all the permissions that it's asked of me in the APP is still usable I can't postings because I don't give it microphone and camera permission. But if you just WANNA browse what's popular, you can do that and he says that's a good rule of thumb for any APP give the least permissions prop possible. See that APPs still works without permission that they were asking you for, and if it does then great if it doesn't and let's say you need, it's a calendar APP and you needed to actually access your calendar thing just give it that single permission ultimately, both experts agree it's up to us to understand where our data might be going for. As much as we use mobile phones in for as much as as comfortable as we are with them, people generally don't really know what to do to keep themselves safe. So we have to get really savvy about being able spot that abnormal behavior and then decide for ourselves. What do we feel comfortable with as they know that this is that this is happening then they could make better decisions. But if you don't know that you know High Fructose Corn Syrup is in your children's you know Pancake Syrup. Then you'll continue to buy it, but once you realize then you might say you know what I'll pick this other natural one over here. That just has a sugar

United States Facebook Tiktok Hank Shaw Patrick Jackson Communist Party Instagram Jinjiang Province Senior Manager CCP NSA Officer Engineer CDC Cambridge Microsoft
Department of Justice VS. Big Tech

Squawk Pod

05:40 min | 9 months ago

Department of Justice VS. Big Tech

"This week, the Department of Justice, unveiled a proposal to Congress with recommended changes to section two thirty. Patients Decency Act of Nineteen ninety-six dry, though that may sound, this legislation is critical to the way Internet. Companies and social media moderate the content on their platforms and avoid legal retribution while doing so it establishes Internet, companies as platforms rather than publishers, while still allowing those actors some say over what posted there recode went so far as to call the legal backbone of the Internet. The DOJ's proposal suggests rolling back part of that backbone, specifically, the immunity shield that protects Internet platforms from liability for the content posted there under section. Section two thirty, as it stands, the facebook's and twitter's of the world reserve the right to moderate anything they find obscene, lewd, excessively violent, harassing, or otherwise objectionable among other things. The Department of Justice Recommends Removing that phrase otherwise objectionable on account of being too vague. This is all in the wake of president. Trump's spat with twitter last month after the platform started to fact, check for other users, his tweets on voter fraud that culminated in an executive order from the president, seeking scaleback of section, two thirty and the protections vines. Thank you very much. We're here today to defend free speech from one of the greatest dangers. It has faced in American history. Frankly we'll have awful social media. Monopolies controls invest portion of all public and private communications appears Joe Kernan with today's story. Join US as a niche, Chopra, the former White House chief technology officer under President Obama current president of CARE Journey, a healthcare analytics firm a niche. Last time you were on and that that wasn't the only time you've been begging begging for the industry to figure out how to do this with stakeholders in mind, and how to do it themselves to prevent something like this and they just I. Don't know they just have not and now this is this is what you're seeing. It's a baby step which. It's not going to become law. Do you think that, but but it just shows? Something's going on here. That, they should have tackled it themselves already. Well, you know it's a twenty five year old piece of legislation, and it's kept the industry in a reasonably strong wedding. It's an Ottesen success story, but it was designed originally to give safe haven room for the industry to do more to protect consumers. And we see today. The challenges misinformation even amidst the pandemic challenges. Ron Election fearance and even obviously historical challenges run a terrorism and content around that we have to see the industry do more I will say several former colleagues of mine have now launched her professional society, getting the safety professionals in working on the ground in these companies to come together to share best practices, but we have do more to bring responsibility in these environments, and the industry can do this on its own in the debate now is. Does there need to be some baseline? standards requirements in that's going. Going to be a healthy part of the discussion. This piece of activity we're seeing here is more akin to political theater, but forward I. Think there is going to be an opportunity for a thoughtful discussion around how to set the right rules of the road for the next chapter of the Internet politically. It's hard to figure out who's where I mean. It's bizarre. It's like there's there are some strange bedfellows here. The DOJ looks like it's trying to thread the needle between extremes and find some middle ground like leave the section two thirty in there, but but make certain things. For example criminal than that would give you. Carve outs had, but then you've got someone like Vice President Biden wants to just get rid of section. Two thirty right because some people seems like the left is worried about election. finagling and the rights worried about conservative groups being kicked off of twitter or facebook. So you know it's bizarre, can you, can you? Describe the landscape to me just to give you a little perspective if you. If you agree that there's a problem there's information online that's propagated. That perhaps is doing more harm than the question is. Do you want to see more engagement to bring some of that information off or as you want to see less and I think that's the divide that you saw you think of the good, the bad and the ugly coming out of the DOJ report the the bag if you were to think about if you believe that there should be more misinformation, less a moderation of than you might embrace some of the provisions in the DOJ report that say look unless it's absolutely. Criminal or very specifically you know narrowed. You can't really moderate I'm not so sure. That's where the majority of American people are I think the majority American people want to have honesty in our elections other want to have some consistency experience with respect to how a misinformation propagated and to me, that means the industry should do more and I think when you're a politicians on both sides of the aisle. Bring this issue up the premises in part get the industry of move, but it's also to say failure to move is gonNA. Require us to. To set some baseline rules. You've seen this in the privacy debate where there's now almost bipartisan movement around establishing baseline fair information practice standards, so we have privacy protections on the Internet how we get there and finding a piece of legislation is GonNa. Take some time, but at least there's some rough consensus in this area. The political parties seemed to be at odds on whether we need more moderation or less I'm on the more

DOJ Twitter President Trump Department Of Justice Facebook Vice President Biden President Obama Ron Election Fearance Congress Joe Kernan United States Donald Trump Chief Technology Officer Chopra White House Executive
The AI Priorities of the United States - with Lynne Parker

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

09:52 min | 10 months ago

The AI Priorities of the United States - with Lynne Parker

"This is Dan Fidel and you're listening to AI and business podcast as most of your aware our work here to merge artificial intelligence research is primarily with large private sector clients onto that is in financial services. You hear US talk about insurance and banking a lot because those happened to be the industries that hire us for our AI. Opportunity landscape work but one of the more fun. Parts of the job is being able to bring to bear knowledge about the Roi in various sectors to the public sector into intergovernmental organizations. We've been honored to speak at the United Nations about deep fakes to speak about the future of a cybersecurity and surveillance at Interpol and for this particular event for this interview this week at the OECD's headquarters in Paris for their opening of their CD A. I. Policy Observatory which is a fascinating. Project will cover in more depth in future interviews our guest this week our honored guest this week. I should say a proper government. Role is Lyn Parker. Lyn Parker is a PhD from MIT in Computer Science. Who teaches at the University of Tennessee and she is the deputy chief technology officer of the United States of America. No INSIGNIFICANT ROLE. Lindh sat down to talk about what the United States is doing about. Ai At a national level. There's a lot of interesting work if you go to a Ai Dot Gov you can actually learn more about what? The United States is doing with artificial intelligence but Lynn soda boils down. What are the national priorities here? What are the directions? Were moving in. What's the progress we've made as a nation And what does that mean for? The future of artificial intelligence in the investments there in a fascinating interview and it was excellent to be able to sit down with Lynn. And really get the details in. This interview is made all the more relevant by the fact that the private

Deputy Chief Technology Office United States AI Dan Fidel United Nations Interpol Lindh Lynn Oecd I. Policy Observatory Paris University Of Tennessee America
"chief technology officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

15:34 min | 1 year ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

"If that book was about modern era you won't be able to tell the difference right right in terms of some of the side of societal struggles and some of the tropes you see there air and so other cultures is the same. Unfortunately it feels that way you know. History doesn't repeat but it rhymes and so I think what's refreshing for me as to sometimes take take a step back go and read some of these classes and remind yourself that yes you can get caught up in this hype cycle. What's happening today and sure we live in a uniquely terrible dysfunctional time but it's it's helpful reminder that not really actually things better than they've ever been in the problems we have or no worse or different than we've ever had and I think you know what's Nice about a book is it's a you can engage it at your own pace? Unlike push notification yet. I it's cut off from Culture and influence and sometimes editors will get their hands on it or you know a group. Will it. Change the message of the book but generally I think the author's message can be intact or in in the case of some authors right. They can have the exit. Eric meaning of the book a Cab Esoteric Meanings So if you're a fan of Leo Strauss but he was a philosopher that kind of proposed this idea that the most interesting or valuable or dangerous truths of our time are always hidden and fiction. Non only safe place for An author or a per person of modest means to get their message out there and then stay alive right percents So I'm curious like maybe you haven't read a book that's like you know where you're obsessed with the Assa Terek meaning or whatever but are there any books like fiction especially that have really you would say like changed your life or the trajectory of Your Business. Oh that's interesting question. You know on a I guess a personal note. There's a book I read read that I feel like how to deep personal impact. Virginia Woolf's to the lighthouse and I feel like revealed a lot to me about sort of myself sure And it's a book that I kind kind of re I recommend to people all the time I sort of I. Refer back to passages of it frequently in terms of the business. I think there's a lot of good work out there. In terms terms of you know particularly kind of Blue Ocean strategies. And how do you how do you kind of create a new market sure. As opposed to try and sort of compete for market share in a in a sort it of tightly established or incumbent controlled market and. I think that's been sort of fascinating in terms of where we think about as we think about new products new features. How how do you sort of avoid sort of getting into those sort of you know read water markets and stains bluewater type territory? So how do how are you thinking about avoiding that. And how are you thinking thinking about like finding the co- maybe undiscovered lucians out there. You A lot of it is spending time with customers to understand what their problems are and how those evolve as they go to cloud because I think if you go and try and understand. Hey what are your problems. You have on premise. In some sense those are problems that they've had for years decades right and so great for all of them they probably have the solution already and yes they have problems with all them. So you can go in and say hey. Tell me about this problem. What don't you like? You can start to build a product management practice. Hey we're gonNA target that thing but ultimately you're GONNA go into an established amish market wherever customers already bought thing writing an incumbent and so that's painful versus in a cloud world. It's much more. Hey were taking these net. New Applications Net. New Workloads is out there. We don't have good answers to these things. We don't want to buy from our incumbent. You know technology vendor. We want something new. That's a better way and I think that's a much more interesting opportunity. Yeah for US definitely for us. It's a lot of time with customers discovery in terms like grade. There's a set of problems we solve today. But what's the Jason set of problems that we don't itself is so one of the trends is in the global two thousand or global one hundred however you WanNa call it or cloud one hundred is this Phenomena where a couple of different companies will come together and kind a pool their brand budgets or things like that you see like slack Octa and zoom thank recently teamed up. I think I'm missing one company in there. But you get what I'm saying. Do you see smaller companies like this. That may be are your customers or prospects in the space. You see them kind of like banding together to go against the so-called monopolies out there are are you seeing Mrs well that's interesting Off the top of my head. I mean it's not like directly combative or anything but you do see them kind of like forming alliances to compete against like G. Suite or something something like that right. Yeah Yeah I mean I think yes and no I mean I think where we see more often is in the VICO system of other technology partners sort of working together because I think what a lot of companies do well is understand and say. Hey here's the sort of bounds of what my product solves in doesn't solve Scher. Who are the people who are next to me adjacent? Where there's a logical Kinda the go-to Marquette Energy Ran? We try and do this proactively right. We work with one hundred plus technology partners and say. Hey Great Council may be one set of your networking partners. But how do we partner with F.. Five Org Palo Alto networks or you know smaller technology vendors in terms of saying. Here's a better together story right now. We can kinda work together on resolving customer problem to think you see that hat fairly often in Germany the end customers working together. You know I don't know if I see that as often if only because the companies we work with are large global to thousands and oftentimes. There's actually actually ran regulatory reasons. They can't talk to each other without that becoming. Definitely you know sort of an antitrust situation sure and when you look back at the early days is the business and I'm curious you know do you have any advice for founders or founding teams now that you think is super important like lessons that you learned the hard part-way or Any way that folks out there that our founding a company can avoid pain he and I'd say there's probably when I look back on. What were the things? I wish we had done differently. uh-huh as those are to me that there are learning lessons which is one of them was answering. That question of who our customer is way earlier. I think that was a not knowing that until three or four years into the business I think was quite painful. If only because there's a lot of product investments we probably wouldn't have made their return hires probably wouldn't have made right. We would have probably made investments investments in our go to market earlier in differently. Had We known the answers that question and so I think more than just having a product vision and I think it's important to early on understand at least and you can evolve at at least having an answer to the question of like Shirley is my customer right right that we can get it. You can always change if you're wrong but I think not having it at all Is tough tough right. I think that's the position we were in the other thing that served us well as being sort of ruthlessly pragmatic right. which is I think you have to acknowledge that it's not a sprint? It's not not about. Hey I just got to survive this quarter and then we're at the finish line is like no there's disorder known and many more journey and I think you have to be super repack and say what's working great. Let's double down what's not working. Should we provide the strategy or should we kill that effort entirely right. I think for US early on there was a number of products where we killed. There's a number of products or said you know what it's not quite working. Let's reboot it and think about sort of a two point. Oh vision of how to solve the same problem. And I think that pragmatism Pragmatism Service. Well because we didn't waste a lot of time going down a road that we thought or knew would fail. That's cut our losses and try something else right an interest rate until something sticks and you feel that Helped inform the company culture. You have today just you know revisiting that lesson. Maybe you know so it's funny. We publicly published both what we called Tau of Hashish Corp which is sort of our design ethos behind the product name and the principles of Hashish Gorbachev more sort of people oriented with the culture of the company. And it's funny. The the only thing that exists on both the towel and the principles pragmatism right. And so I'd say almost pragmatic to a false Culturally but I think it serves us well right which is particularly in enterprise particularly in sort of the sort of The ecosystem were in. You have to be right you cannot be dogmatic and dictate to the customer. Hey here's what you should do. Is they'll tell you to get. Yeah definitely not and I think what's interesting too so in the beginning I would kind of fight that when we were Pitching a client ain't accustomed podcast and I would want to really wrestle with the creative decisions and as I learned to let go and just accept the directions that they wanted to go and take their advice and accept. Oh Oh I don't know it everything that's when I think. The learning started right where I started to learn more and we had better partnerships better relationships It can be so hard in the beginning when you have the domain an expertise and you know you're trying to lobby accustomed to go in a certain direction any tips on building that working relationship right and becoming a better listener with your customers. I so I think what we've learned over time particularly in in sort of the enterprise segment is trust. Is Everything right and so you know I. It's it's true that probably the first thousand on users of our tools. I probably knew by name and had met personally. The first hundred customers probably the same thing and so I think with so important is that you establish trust is is a foundation of a longterm relationship. I think if you treat it as a transactional thing where I'm here to get you to buy this thing. And then we're the transaction is complete. It's very hard right. You'RE NOT GONNA learn from it. You'RE NOT GONNA you're not going to engage with the customer in the right way so I think if you think about it is what I'm trying to do is build a long term relationship where you know. We have a trusted rested viewer. You know what sometimes I want them. I want to be able to tell the customer. They're doing the wrong thing more. Hey they should do this in a different way right because we have the experience of what we've seen as it works Out Better that way but before you can do that you have to earn their trust. Yeah which takes awhile. You have to know where you're in the relationship you have to show your value. I think you can't come in guns. Blazing saying hey. You're doing Raj or the other way. Say Okay let me let me sort of understand where you're at. Let me understand your problems. Let me add value to where you are today right. Prove to you that I actually genuinely care and want you to to be successful and then we get to sort of points in the future where I can provide domain expertise. The nudge unit. Different Way. I want to do that in a respectful way right but you have to earn the right to do it. Definitely wise wise words and so for me. When I hear that I I know that's the right answer? But in my head I'm thinking like okay that's going to be more servicing costs and things of that nature..

Assa Terek Leo Strauss Virginia Woolf Eric Pragmatism Service US Blue Ocean partner Scher VICO Mrs Jason Raj Hashish Corp G. Suite Hashish Germany Shirley Gorbachev
"chief technology officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"It's bringing them all together and what was really need to have that validation that when we plied to the smart cities challenge with the health focus saying if you really smart city let's focus on health because at affects everything in your city from the economy to innovations to bring in future growth et cetera et cetera there is a validation that we were selected as a as a finalist and like i say we're not a huge community our proud community but it showed that we're we're were doing something that can really make a big change. That's huge and so when you find out if you <hes> won the prize may fourteenth so so we will have a big event awwa at the time <hes> it's non -tario eastern canada for any of the listeners who don't know what i'm talking about and <hes> it's so it'll be exciting exciting to be even if we don't win. It's still exciting the process in the learnings the last eight months just to having down and working on all the details to what it takes. What a great learning experience while we'll definitely keep our collective fingers crossed for you and your team day vida win the prize. Is you want to win. Okay so tell us about an exciting focus within the project that you're working on. That's really gotcha fired up yeah so one of the things that we're we're working on right. Now is when you look at data and you look at all. The information first and foremost is you think about the comes along with that is the risk in the privacy issues and a lot of that comes when you create this big central data warehouse. You're prone to hackers in different people because there's a lot of value there so where we said is do we actually want to be a data manager. When you look at a lot of the organizations out there that are really successful. They actually don't have a lot of assets. You look at the airbnb easily. World berber's over has an isis now but it's about a service driven industry and so we started looking at that here for what we're doing as well saying. Do we need data. I know oh that's tough. We always need data about do we need to be manager of the day and so we started to look at blockchain's in decentralized databases and things of that sort and started to put together a plan to say we don't need to hold the data the technology out there allows us to provide data in a secure way that you can provide data justice. It's needed without actually having to store that data that you keep the <hes> data or owners and custodians. They're the ones that are managing the data we borrowing data for a second to tell a story and to empower only those that need to have access to data with with that data own your own health mantra that we talked about a little bit earlier and so what's exciting is we're still working out the details on how to do it but a way of <hes> one one of the partners were working right with now as they put it as a knowledge from data not risk and so that's what we're trying to figure out is if we can put it this way that we can work together. People can still have the data where that needs to be but we don't all have to have that same big huge master data <unk>. We were able to put the power back into the individuals hanson controlled. They're oh did. I think it's fascinating and yeah you know. It's the approaches for her blockchain. Think this is a this is an interesting case where might be useful and and kudos to you guys for for really thinking outside of the box from the very beginning from do i build a hospital to a blue zone project to even even data management. You guys are definitely doing some cool stuff there of acute so we're gonna get into the lightning round and then after the lightning round. We'll ask hugh about your favorite book you ready yeah. I'm ready all right. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes information collaborations so you need the data so it's funny. I said that earlier but you need information not the date itself a information about the data. Why tax you tell the story what's the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid. I jump in quickly into a problem without actually understanding what you're trying to solve..

blockchain canada airbnb hanson hugh eight months
"chief technology officer" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"We have four minutes and twelve seconds sure I want to make sure that I'm respectful of your time. I WANNA get down and learn a little bit more about the man behind behind behind this organization. Tell us what is that what does a typical day in the life of John Casey Junior. Look like you know it's interesting. It's probably like you guys you. Don't turn off. I tend to all exercise for then I'll get to I tend to be on the road fifty to sixty percent of the time I'd say the best I have is when I'm out visiting customers. I was down in Miami all day on Wednesday with customers and that's a great day but most times you know it's it's I try need as many people as I can and I work way too much so tell me a little bit about that I'm going to I'm going to stick with that thing because I think a lot of us. If it's anything like the people that I run into on a daily basis the type as the superchargers the people that are sitting in this room are high-performers ultra performers that work life balance thing can can get tricky so tell me a little bit how you I'm going to be totally controversial. I think the whole discussion of work life balances is ridiculous and not because I wanted to enforce. You know my my risen regimen on somebody else but I think people are adults and people need to make decisions in that they work. I love doing what I do. Every single day I get to work with some of the coolest people in the world. I mean I it was literally this morning. I was talking to my head of technology from China and we're supposed to be a fifteen minute call and we we were so lathered up. We were like doing virtual whiteboard on skype and you know should I be up at five o'clock in the morning talking to my chief technology officer. Let's bed work like ounce. I love it and you know what I want to surround everybody from dense apply Serono in an environment where they're totally fired up and look at some mm-hmm. I never missed a kid swim meet. I never missed a kid's soccer game. I never did that but the point being is I would tell people if you love doing what you're doing. You actually in fact get work life balance by drawing energy and I get recharged when I go to work I I mean it's funny. I took fourth of July off. I was ready to go Monday morning. It's like okay. Let's go back to work back to work not because it's like oh I love working. It's like missed the opportunity to really dive into something that could be truly inspirational as great answer. I appreciate that and then if you like what you do then you don't see it as a disproportionate balances are to take away their share so give us your views here as we close this out. Give us your views on your view of the future of dentistry is optimistic. Oh I think it's incredibly optimistic. I you know we kind of had this question a minute ago I would tell you there's two questions you guys ought to ask yourselves as as you're setting up the running the question first question is what's the role of specialty or specialists lists and and how does that play. I mean what we used to think of specialty dentistry as more and more general dentists can do it as technology and equipment from US and other people really facilitate that saying so what your definition of general general dentistry versus special Dennis specialist dentistry over time I think is going to change and I think how you figure that out is potentially going to let your Dennis be more satisfied and and have a broader kind of perspective on dentistry in general and then the trend we see globally right now. Is I tend to think a lot of us think of ourselves. were in the functional dentistry business the oral health business and I just think the explosive places in dentistry right now tend to be more aesthetically driven and that's great. I mean whether it's if you look at how fast implants or growing in the North American market or you look at what's going on with clear liners..

US Dennis John Casey Junior chief technology officer Miami soccer China fifteen minute twelve seconds sixty percent four minutes
"chief technology officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the podcast today. Have Joe regard. He's the chief technology officer at healthcare academy on the podcast. Joe is of very passionate leader in healthcare. He's super gauged with healthcare process system and quality improvement through the marriage of technology, and culture change is particular area. Focus is enabling healthcare institutions to identify manage and track events of commission and omission through internal process, valuation, the accustom engineered software. He believes firmly. That software is only part of the solution that we need to definitely engage with continued follow up at the user level in order to make the best results happen within healthcare. He's had various different roles in technology in healthcare ANC luding role at the mayo clinic, and so it's true pleasure to host Joe on the podcast today. The diving. Into some of his thoughts on the matter. So Joe welcome to the podcast makes for having me. My pleasure Joe now, did I leave anything in the intro that you wanna share with the listeners know, that's a pretty good introduction. My focus in the past ten years or so has has been on healthcare and proven process improvement issue identification and things like that over the last couple of years since I've migrated over to healthcare kademi, some of that focus has been converted into education. You know, the educating healthcare institutions on, you know, requirements and regulations, and I haven't like that. And we're also diving into some some dipping our feet into water into the competency assessment of healthcare practitioners as well. Some pretty cool stuff that you guys are up to their. So Joe what is it that got you into healthcare to begin with? It's funny. You ask. Like any bright eyed young young guy going going to school? Well, not any. But when I got into computers, my goal was to be some sort of video game developers something like that. I just really like technology getting into the medical field was kind of. I wouldn't say I accident. What I would say is that I didn't know much about the technology and medical field before my wife had started working at the male clinic. And that's when I really started diving into what types of things, you can do technology and things at the mayo clinic was doing at that point in time. They're pretty neat. So that is where it started. At the mayo clinic when I first started working there law that and so now your work at at healthcare kademi the role that you guys are playing as I understand is training web based training to post acute care facilities. Long term care. Facilities. That is correct. Yeah. So what we concentrate on is, you know, making sure our clients have access to the necessary required training modules to meet the necessary requirements for usually it's a yearly requirements for the for these healthcare practitioners to in order to be compliant with their state regulations government regulations things like that keep their licenses all those types of things we've also started working with with our clients in offering some competency evaluation where we've got a system where folks can do real time valuations on on their employees, you know, nurses, and assistance and things like that to name these are all part of requirements for these health care providers. So we're basically we're we're trying to assist them with meeting their requirements and following Reggie regulations. Yeah. It's definitely hard to do. You and providers in nurses, and any other skilled the clinician needs to keep up with their CME's or continuing medical education. Great to have companies like you that make it easier. What would you say Joe is is a hot topic that needs to be on medical leaders agenda today? How are you guys dressing in? I just mentioned it's the competency assessment that's one of the buzzwords out in the industry today is helping these organizations assess their their healthcare providers skills, making sure they're meeting or exceeding the minimum requirements for certain skill sets..

Joe mayo clinic chief technology officer Reggie ten years
"chief technology officer" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"Promise you implement it. But it seems like you know, you could just turn it around. I love it. It's like, yeah. We did we now, you know, who have done. Three pop pop-rock sugar packets. The plane because you know, in thirty minutes, they're gonna freak out. Yeah. Exactly. I like it. I like it see like how many can stack up how many screaming we can stack up there. Bad. It's really bad something like this actually to my daughter. Not from our just other bad bad stuff up. It's not great. And I think it's really evil. The airlines do this is it is. But what was interesting is that it actually got referred to in the UK. There's a new government organization center for data science ethics and innovation. So they actually have cooked crazy cool. Right. That's cool. So yeah, it's very we have similar type stuff here in the US. There's an office of science and technology policy. That's in India ministration, like it's part of the White House. And so anybody who's kind of falls stuff or is interested in data signs. Like, that's where our first US chief data scientists. I don't think there is data signed chief data scientists in the current administration yet, but there's a chief technology officer. Anyway, it's where geeks it so, but in the U K, there's a center for ethics invasion, and this case was actually referred to them. So I think they've just formed and just formed basically handed. This is the most offensive thing that algorithms have done. Good luck with it center for science and education. Great. This is why we exist. All my gosh. It is it is. It's real softball ethical thing to do it beaded doing this. I don't know. Gosh, I'm I'm spent I couldn't. Come up with a better more ethical alternatives. Splitting even bureaucrats totally. Yeah. For sure. Yeah. So you know, that's the thing. I mean, it seems like open shut cases government ministers, mowing exploitative. So that's usually not a good sign for your business practices. But yeah, that's about. You know, they've got nowhere to go. But up we can say that, you know. Upon because their airplanes air. But anyway, but it brings me to something that I was really excited to talk about with all of your listeners because it's something it's important to me personally, something that I'm involved with is actually an ethics project for data scientists so that hopefully, we can prevent these types of mishaps in the future. So as I mentioned the show, I'm involved in organizations called data for democracy. It's a nonprofit, and we have recently launched what we're calling our ethical principles for data practitioners so the global data ethics principles. So this is like the Hippocratic oath like Dr steak, but for exactly exactly. And so because like we mentioned this has been kind of a bad year. I would say for technology in general acknowledged and Silicon Valley culture, data science machine learning in a I and everybody's wondering well is this. Good thing for society is not Macau. Did we get here? Like, how do we kind of stumbled into this distort PEO where our minds are being manipulated by propaganda on Facebook than in China. They're doing Social Credit that terrible dark near episode that I saw that will get like what's happening to us and fundamentally as the people who are implementing this technology. We have a real opportunity to think about our values thing about our ethics think about the way that our technology might be used in ways that we hadn't intended because we're pretty optimistic group technologies. I think we assume that like we wanna put something really useful in meaningful out in the world. Maybe not this family splitting. And that was probably the business department of the hey guys, can you? Well, this'll will improve revenue by seventeen percent in two four like that'll be good for the world. And there's nothing wrong with improving revenue. I'm great businesses urban tastic not in the back of three year olds. Maybe maybe maybe not in this way. But I also like the stuff that we do is actually pretty complicated. People don't really understand at a deep level. Like what the software is doing and all the potential ways that it might be used other than the intended case like the something that really only we think about our are in a good position to think about as technology..

US chief technology officer Macau UK Facebook India Silicon Valley White House Dr steak China seventeen percent thirty minutes three year
"chief technology officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I got story is well you took about executives of the company lay germany's high level yo earlier chief technology officer have i mean and one but he just walked out you know after they felt they were left would it worked so well some would say in silicon valley right in terms of attracting talent pay doing the big payouts wise india doing it differently what i mean i think it's a country where founders exert a degree of influence that they don't even in the united states yes yes i mean the spin that's one of the reasons that private equity for a long time actually it was very leery about going in and may and doing buyouts because you know if you keep the management and place you know you have to deal with this notion that i started this i control every facet of it it's you know it's it's my shop so that that's been an issue and i think that mentality the idea that i can tinker with the rules how i want as bins difficult to overcome i mean we think about silicon valley in the amount of talent pools from places like which is quite interesting so they're all kinds of other options out there you have to wonder whether at some point the irs move elsewhere yeah workers moved elsewhere we actually stems innovation if they call again the kind of employees that they won't ultimately mean right there's a lot of people there for them to choose from some some point you said this is going to take a little time to work out and also we're in a time here in the united states where you know there's a lot of talk about tinkering with immigration policies here yeah cool thank you.

chief technology officer united states irs germany
"chief technology officer" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Wanna to tell you puff of glory in addition to being my puff and whereas pop often lorry also the chief technology officer of cigar mothers mac book earth iphone and her printer whenever there is an issue my mother calls puff muffin lorry and laurie fixes it so thank you puffing laurette publicly acknowledged that we can't do this show that many great technical people we've got sergeant steve and easy ed over at our technical operations facility nice job everybody and i'll tell you what we're going to take a short time out but when we come what somebody call me now okay well we come back we've got some special guest that i want to recognize today and we also are going q one of the things we always do is we try to recognize all the visitors from outta town and we always run out of time so being the fivestar that i am i've got a plan on this instead of waiting to the end we're going to recognize you towards the beginning of the show today so let's chauhan's how many you from outside of the tampa bay area while we got a great great crowd that have come in for this and it buffalo we got a great crowd and all over where we do these show we want to recognize everyone throughout the course of the show we've got much more coming your way we've got bobby and eric newman we're gonna be talking about some of their special cigars we have all so got a special ambassador from republic national distributing perry thomas here's their ambassador we've got thirty thirty one spirits that were sampling and cocktails we've also got adrian morale us from funky bhutto brewing back their great food great libations great cigars but the most important thing great alpha come robbery we continue front and center right around the corner i am just getting warmed.

chief technology officer laurette chauhan bobby eric newman perry thomas robbery laurie tampa bay bhutto
"chief technology officer" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

The Cryptoverse

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

"As the chief technology officer boat ceremonies this page not there anymore it's been captured by others this breakthrough he's worth it boom so he's left as the chief technology officer book stream is going to go away on over the fairbanks interesting so back to the point the got desk article is that shore signatures a paper has been released and he was penned by grid maxwell formerly of bloodstream and all these the folks right so details on how schnorr signatures can be applied to bitcoin and yet he added in the paper so the ways the link to the flipping paper wife not provided a link to the paper why do they not why do not provide link to the paper is this the paper i don't know m pdf this one yes simple shaw multibillion signatures with applications so it's going to go in the show notes if you wanna get deep into the deep deep deep depths of bitcoin cryptography inch no signatures check this out so others so i've already got iin this show knows it just needs to be had this link added the new snow signatures paper released thing re di illeg i'm going to go into that right now spot too complex for simple livestream the already really going to get the moderator owner ice run to do a book because he's in new york i'm it's difficult for him to do that right boats graf to do it as going to have to go on the list of improvements as net and we put on right now while remember for kyw's zen approach.

shaw kyw chief technology officer new york
"chief technology officer" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on The Interchange

"Uh you know had signed a ppa with care you see for you know eleven cents per kilowatt hours of dispatch abol in that case 5hour battery um that's providing a lot of the benefits that were saying can come to puerto rico in terms of savings of cost right they're not importing his much fuel is providing resiliency capability to the island so yes these this exists in in most island context where were you need import the fuel and in the case where they over you know because if they have older generation and are making decisions about where to invest capital um it creates even more value because those older plants are typically less efficient chris shelton is the chief technology officer of aes corporation he joined us from the company's headquarters in virginia chris thanks so much for your time really interesting vision and we really appreciate you are exploring this with us great thank you really enjoyed the discussion the and that does it for this week's show thanks everyone for joining us were sending you know our best wishes to the people in puerto rico and of course our best wishes to the crews working there to try to bring power back to people um um shale i really enjoy this conversation a next week we get an another good one with our ceo scott klavina you were there for that what was at all dow that's a fun one so have you been listening to this podcast or the energy gang for that matter you know that we do this monthly then series called what it takes with that in collaboration with powerhouse the cleantech incubator based in oakland where we interview founders and entrepreneurs in cleantech generally ones who've had a successful exit or sometimes unsuccessful and and they tell us their stories ranging from sort of their how they grew up to how they founded companies and all the all the ups and downs that they went through this was a fun one because it we interviewed are on ceo scott covina it was the founder of gtm and so you got a bit about his background but also a lot about serve where gtm comes from so it was meta we will admit that but it was super fun for me and that's the way we're going to end the year with a reflection.

chris shelton chief technology officer aes corporation scott klavina oakland scott covina founder gtm puerto rico virginia ceo 5hour
"chief technology officer" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on The CyberWire

"What are the most effective fishing techniques erin hicabi is cofounder and chief technology officer at fish me a security company that specializes in these sorts of things we have a lot of data on this especially in the context of an enterprise worker or some of that works for an organization the attackers will swap out specific techniques in either tricky you are els are tricky attachments or when it comes to stories there hasn't been a lot of innovation many of the themes that they pick and we can we know why because their more successful have to do with office communications so it could be things like you've received a file off of a scanner you receive an electronic facts someone has left you an urgent voicemail clic here to listen to it uh it could be something like there's an invoice stay i need you to pay that you're overdue odd you are being subpoenaed or asked to be deposed at some sort of litigation those are some themes that aren't new they have been reused for the past few years the mel where or the thing that actually infect someone gets walked out but those stories seemed to be used over and over again and it is it to dummy despite the training that we try to uh to give people they still seem to fall for these things they do and we have a lot of data about that at why um we've also study the different emotional triggers inside of email we have grid great telemetry on what seems to work and what does it for instance fishing email sets tried to give you that there's a sensor award maybe you want a trip where you want a free i'd add things like that the are not as a successful for the attackers another category that's not very successful for the attackers which might surprise subscriber security professionals are fishing emails about your virus scanners is out of date click here to it or your computer is missing critical patches clic here to update it those are not very effective for attackers another thing that we've observed in the wild is that attackers are trying to make sure that their official emails are hitting the employees in box times during the workday preferably during the morning.

chief technology officer erin hicabi official
"chief technology officer" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on The CyberWire

"Neil murray is chief technology officer at mine cast and he offers his thoughts on cyber resilience in summary its protecting uses data and operations sh wrong risks that may arise gt schuman era malicious intent owed technological shadia says not it's not warn about just a defensive barrier that you may think about when you speak of cybersecurity there are issues related to things like somewhere for example where you might need to recover recovered less loaded technology as detect on a geo recovery there are often needs to interact with uh the systems that are affected boston is gonna use on guy said he had to keep the business running that's really it was some areas of suburbs its how do you deal with all this stuff and keep the business running there are a additionally human awareness our requirements so the human style what is important does audit the saga resiliency process net is that technology and do a certain amount but human beings are the week is thanks so you wanna make shen barrels so made resilience show awareness yeah well what about the the emotional component of all this you know when when something bad happens people get upset and and i think that's an under estimated part of the equation for many organisations shoora and they and there is then a new you would have seen in the eckardt's acts incident recently that ah one of the damage gets done when the reaction is knocked her edgy.

Neil murray chief technology officer boston
"chief technology officer" Discussed on THE BRENDON SHOW

THE BRENDON SHOW

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on THE BRENDON SHOW

"And there's things in their all on august to those but two to answer your question of like what i thought would be i thought things like oh this will this little pity off his me off creativity is not strongly correlated with high performance and if you told me that seven years ago i would have fought with you for like two or three hours but then in one interview with one of the world's largest cto chief technology officer surprenant their their top ten brand in the world so if we we don't my my team is i'm not creative my teams are creative but we know how to execute and scale and execution and scales really important to longterm highperformance creativity might get you in the game but a lot of people are creative can't work their way out of a bang and i was like i would argue that for every con macrame of writer and coach i would have never thought that age nationality ethnicity and here's a big one compensation here's a big went personality here's a big one strengths they are not correlated strongly with i perform at some of them have we correlations and all those things about way 'cause if academics are listen that they're like don't he's wrong and this is tied towards highperformance is not that those aren't important those things can shape your mood they can shape you know lots of important life outcomes wellbeing health happiness owner talk about highperformance those are less important than these six and what i keep telling people is i'm not saying those aren't important these just happen to be more important so the six habits yummy to do the new year so the personal habits and these are the ones that move the needle most number one highperformers you like this one highperformers seek clarity.

cto chief technology officer writer seven years three hours
"chief technology officer" Discussed on Outside the Box

Outside the Box

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on Outside the Box

"Interesting interesting to the optimistic sod in your analysis on that how can we put people's minds at ease because this is a topic or these are topics that scare people in a number of circles and corners of the country yes and there's a whole political aspect that can be discussing this too i mean the because they're going to determine the regulations and the ssim impacts workforce in this impacts each one b visas and this impacts um middle america this impacts coasts impacts older and younger uh the the fallout from automation that is is so broad uh that it we should not be scared because this is the future so the technology companies are not going to slow down and even if america's government ask the technologies to slow down an automation through regulation that's not gonna stop other nations from doing it who are becoming quite advanced it would be a competitive disadvantage to slow down technology a adoption in america for some of these reasons so we we cannot hide from it we have to look forward we have to move forward uh and even the top leaders in our country need to look at this as a competitive advantage the fallout from even the amount of workers that could be displaced and the impacts to taxes into voting and civil unrest could be quite significant this is something that we can't turner heads from thinking about the future economy about how to move forward and value people in jobs in what the next wave of tech will look like something on the mind of walmart's chief technology officer jeremy came as you might gas jeremy has a huge job evaluating which new technologies would be beneficial to the wall more experience that's four customers or associates and also suppliers.

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"chief technology officer" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

The Cryptoverse

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

"Now moving on from there the only two of the media outlets that have published an article on this so far uh bitcoin magazine and also coin desk of come out with an article as well although that i really provide much more the most in the official announcement so you know that a knife even if where west checking out beyond what i've already told you was in the official release oh and also at point this out purely for the comedy value stuff to switch back to the keep key blow care it was grown answered coats which i have highlighted in orange he may have already red if you're watching this on youtube what's the name of the chief technology officer at keep key can hodler new p i am not joking he says it right there on the key blog they says ken huddle chief technology officer hat to keep key that is fantastic all right guys thanks for joining me today if you like this episode go ahead and hit that like milton navy new round here get subscribed and if you'd like access to my very best material such as my structured online courses they will teach you things like how to make an save money with bitcoin checkout diversity dot gov by guys that is awful today i'll be back tomorrow with another addition of the corrective s until then it's me frisco and he saying life and out.

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"chief technology officer" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"Centralized of you know 100yearold model of giant the capital intensive factories too little homework shops where you can produce uh a lot of the same stuff that he used to take a giant centralized locations to do a really cool stuff everything is getting revolutionize thinks the technology we're back to talk more on the other side huzzah frisco the hitting the by the twist the twists sorry sorry we're here for you as word of which is delighted by anglicisms that were not uh that we probably heard before but we don't use the in the states very often so too but you said that we both lincoln out you don't get your paintings in abundance will right is this is funny 'cause like we we don't have means will be forget we see something entirely different i love it i love it to start using especially diversity even within the englishspeaking world so uh or the anglophone world that you will or back with our guest uh the dave in his it's our new the new noah chief technology officer in the babysitter means you director was that right that's right now and we're talking about power ledger the good appellate power laser diode check it out in the real quick before he backed up regular partners hillcountry home improvements dashed dot org cryptic appear dot com in defence distributed the it got everybody texas declined in texas big way conference thank you should remind me earlier while we're talking about power ledger uh sounds like a fascinating way to a decentralised democratize uh in of bring a lower prices to the power industry and using watching technology and 'peertopeer a networking the one thing or a quick just to clarify um did you say that if i want to buy from my neighbour using power ledger we have to be physically connected obviously uh does that physical connection is it directs that has yet to be built or you're doing that across the existing network and if it's across the existing network does that run into a issues with those middlemen are how does that work.

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"chief technology officer" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"chief technology officer" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"This is the tags zone i am mall amadeus lane and welcome back a c teo chee technology office that reminds me of scotty unit brides kabiri things running all the machines going as line of vaughn ones who have that position in any organization my next gas is when we can talk about what his department is doing to help this organization could gene you to grow by leaps down we actually had their c e l on a few weeks ago doug devise and i'm so honored to have backed with me someone from american special be held this summa have the chief technology officer we're going to get out here on the tech zone jerome bono jerome um i have rin marlboro here great to have you with me liz all gouge galas talk about some of that amazing check that you guys are june over there at ash and jerome when we look get your responsibility as chief technology officer you have on your plate because you have to make sure that the company is up to date with it comes technology share with us a little bit about that challenge of of making sure that you're abreast of things whoa you all the sun oh really ego's our murderers our customers absolutely be employees norrish his or members of outliers your most of us were all is an are you guys you manner or most of us is same also young officers absolutely jim mischer candidates to where he will be in every three meaningful experiences were so for us is not seles r e for his saying earth at number three hours of earn era for our our our fingers at artyom release a series he is that low howell earned i cheshire eight or arms as an error of all know where it so disease of swansea or aims to be a there is already on is the kurds ease what you give meaning order to me sure a father's are working away it's our members are us eric oh you're easier jio prime ieng sary's cities the area yells muzotto our our our our.

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