34 Burst results for "Chief Science Officer"

FDA Approves Much-Debated Alzheimer’s Drug Panned by Experts

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

FDA Approves Much-Debated Alzheimer’s Drug Panned by Experts

"The food and drug administration approved the first new drug for Alzheimer's disease in nearly twenty years but there were doubts the drug is from Biogen magic can amount which is now could be marketed as and you held the FDA approved the drug saying it was based on results that seems reasonably likely to benefit Alzheimer's patients Dr Maria Correo is chief science officer with the Alzheimer's association this therapy slows the progression of the disease because it addresses the underlying biology one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's which is amyloid plaques therapy usually manages symptoms of Alzheimer's like insomnia or anxiety FDA advisor Dr Caleb Alexander said no to the drug's approval he said the agency has regulatory standards based on evidence but in this case he thinks the product get a pass at Donahue Washington

Alzheimer's FDA Dr Maria Correo Alzheimer's Association Biogen Dr Caleb Alexander Insomnia Washington
"chief science officer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Here's what's happening Some big news tonight out of the latest report from DPH when it comes to cope in 19 in Massachusetts. The first time since the last June. DPH reporting no new Covic deaths in the Commonwealth. They also hitting another milestone. Tonight. More than three million residents have been fully vaccinated against Cove in 19, now the Department of Public Health, also saying tonight we have 472 new cases, seven day average positivity rate. 1.32% and 441. People are getting treatment in the hospital tonight but again DPH reporting no new covert deaths here in Massachusetts in tonight's report. Now, speaking of the vaccine we learned last night that the FDA has given the green light to Fizer for their covert vaccine to be used in kids ages. 12 through 15. Dr. John Brownstein at Boston Children's Hospital, says he is all for this, He says the vaccine will add yet another layer to fighting the virus. 16 million more Americans will be added to the eligibility and this is really gonna help drive us towards population immunity, but more importantly, protecting them. This is an important step in protecting our Children. Now, kids just can't show up and get the shot. If they're under 18, they need parental permission, meaning written consent here As for when you can start to vaccinate your kids not quite clear tonight, the state saying it's still waiting on the feds for more guidance on that, But we are hearing that could come down as early as Thursday. So you want to keep it right here to WBC news radio when we find out Of course, we'll let you know. And President Biden today met with a group of governors virtually to talk about their efforts to get the vaccines out and put an end to Cove it, the president says later this month to ride share companies lift in Uber will start offering free rides to anybody who needs help getting to their shots to ensure that transportation is less of a barrier. From May 24 through July. 4th uber and lift over lift are both gonna offer everyone free rides to and from vaccination sites. I think that is really stepping up. Governor Baker, one of the governor's on that call today, saying he's happy to hear it. Transportation issue is a big deal and the decision to include folks like with an uber and this could make a big difference. We have special programs for homebound folks we do in conjunction with the local boards of health where they're literally identifying populations. Can't get to a vaccination site, no matter how close it might be and making sure that we're going out and then meeting where they are and making sure they get vaccinated. Now. The feds tonight also announcing covert booster shots will be free to the public. If it turns out, we need them. White House Chief Science officer David Kessler says they have the cash to afford it. That's not quite clear if those booster shots will be necessary against any future variant. 6 33 time for traffic and weather together. The Subaru retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes, Mike pretty busy on that expressway, many as always, Right Or so it seems here in the South bound expressways just inching along from the tunneled South Bay. But from there, it's not bad until you get down the furnace Brook Parkway. There is some room there Overall. It's about 17 minutes from the tunnel to the Braintree split. Maybe not that North bound is still pretty tough Furnace Brook Parkway, a passing upon sit circle. After that, you are on your way through three South. You are a little slow getting by Union Street. There's some stop and go at the beginning of 24 South. Now we've got delays in Middleborough. This is 4 95 north. It's backing a very quickly. This is a crash coming in right at route 18. Well, the born bridge has been reduced to one lane in both directions with long term bridgework, but no delays there on or off Cape. Just something to be aware of. Downtown. Things are pretty good. For the most part. The airport tunnels are all these doubts. Same with the Tobin Bridge. Same with the lower deck of 93. Stroh drives backed up a little bit in and out of leverage Circle. Mass turnpikes back up to speed. So is to 90 through downtown Worcester and highways to the north. And now good 1 28 4 95 rue one all check out, Okay, my king WBC's traffic on the threes and for the rest of the evening, and it's going to be blustery outside for sure, But you could also see the occasional shower. Ah, seeing these for the most part right now, in parts of southern and central New Hampshire, we have a few popping up through the Berkshires. Otherwise, just some clear skies later on alone near 40 inland 45 right downtown and buy.

441 Department of Public Health Uber 1.32% Massachusetts New England Union Street 16 million 472 new cases David Kessler Middleborough John Brownstein last June May 24 Subaru Tobin Bridge WBC uber Mike Furnace Brook Parkway
Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

"Our guest is extraordinary. Dr a friend of mine. A pioneer in the field of neurodegeneration. Who's broken ground. That few have treaded on. And it's none other than dr dale bredesen's who you may remember from our previous podcast where we discussed his book. The ending alzheimer's. His latest book is called the end of alzheimer's program which is much more robust programmatic insight into how to actually use the protocol that he uses with patients that i use and how can kill her to anybody at any age in any part of the journey along protecting your brain or fixing your brain. He's been on the faculty of ucsf ucla university of california san diego. He's directed the program on aging at the burnham institute before we coming to the buck institute in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight as its founding president and ceo and he's currently a professor at ucla chief science officer at apollo health which is a great online platform for addressing nerd. Degeneracy so welcome dale. Thanks so much for having me on mark. I really appreciate it okay. So so. let's get into this. Because in almost people worry about heart disease diabetes But it doesn't take away who you are. Alzheimer's takes away who you are. Not gender disease takes away your soul in a sense Your memory which is really what we're made of is memories and and i think that it's a terrifying disease for so many it's it's growing and scope it's affecting millions and millions of american thinking about five million now projected to be about fourteen million and a few years the caregiver burden is enormous. That goes along with this The costs are even more than taking care of a patient with cancer. Heart disease And this is an epidemic really Globally it's you know literally hundred of millions of people are going to be affected by this.

Alzheimer Dr Dale Bredesen Ucla University Of California Burnham Institute Buck Institute Apollo Health Heart Disease Diabetes Ucsf DR Ucla San Diego Dale Heart Disease Cancer
Third Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Dose ‘Likely’ Needed Within Year

the NewsWorthy

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Third Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Dose ‘Likely’ Needed Within Year

"Well you might need a third dose of pfizer's covid nineteen vaccine the pfizer. ceo said. it's likely people may need a booster shot between six and twelve months of getting fully vaccinated with the first two doses and that in general it's possible people will need a covid nineteen vaccine each year. Just like with the flu shot but his prediction still need to be confirmed. And the pfizer's ceo admits it also depends what happens with the newer covid. Nineteen strains the binding administration's code response. Chief science officer also said this week. American should expect to get booster shots to help protect against those other variants and madonna. Ceo told cnbc. The company hopes to have a booster shot available as soon as this fall so far both pfizer and moderna have said their data shows there to dose vaccines already available in the. Us are more than ninety one percent effective against covid nineteen for up to six months but more research is

Pfizer FLU Cnbc Madonna Moderna CEO United States
Los Angeles County Racing To Herd Immunity

Fork Report

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Los Angeles County Racing To Herd Immunity

"Me King live from the key. If I 24 hour news room l. A county chief Science officer, Dr Paul Simon says the county continues to get more covert 19 vaccine every week. At this pace. We're on track the fully vaccinate 75% of the county population. 16 and older by the end of June, Simon says. As of last week, more than four million shots have been administered in L. A county 1.4 million of those were second dose is, Simon says. Next week, the county will receive almost 400,000 vaccine doses. 151,000 of those are going to be Fizer, 128,000, Madonna and 100. 118,000 Johnson and Johnson. The Biden administration

Dr Paul Simon Simon Fizer Madonna Johnson Biden Administration
Los Angeles County expands Covid vaccine eligibility

Leo Laporte

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Los Angeles County expands Covid vaccine eligibility

"A county could be fully vaccinated sooner rather than later. That's because more groups are becoming eligible faster than originally. Rejected next week. Everyone over 50 will become the latest group allowed to get there for shot. There will undoubtedly be a rush. Come April 1st We estimate somewhere, you know, between 800,000 million additional people will now become eligible. L. A County health chief Science officer, Dr Paul Simon says there will be a longer wait for appointments. But he says he's hopeful more vaccine will be shipped in the coming weeks.

Dr Paul Simon
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The Mortgage Radio Show

03:14 min | 1 year ago

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"Is being put into effect starting tonight at eight at night. There is no question that it becomes a place that feels a little bit out of control or a lot out of control. Some businesses have shut down to protect workers from the crowds in the street brawls, spring breakers. Meantime, say they're having a blast. It is so far I don't want to leave home. A curfew is in effect from eight p.m. to six a.m. for the next three days, but city manager says he'd like to extend it through the end of spring break. April 12th L. A county has hit a big number and its fight against Cove in 19. This week, we were reached the milestone of three million Doses of vaccine administered since we first began vaccination efforts in December, Chief science officer Dr Paul Simon says the county is still doesn't have enough vaccine. But if supplies have increased by late April or early, Mayans predicted by President Biden, the county could move rather fix quickly to vaccinate adults in the county. Pretty much everybody who wants it. The irises, child tax credit payments could be delayed. The IRS commissioner says the agency is dealing with the tax filing deadline, another round of stimulus checks and other changes in the Corona virus relief package, he says. Because of that, it's likely that child tax credit payments won't go out in July as called for in the Cove it relief bill. President Biden says the child tax credit will cut child poverty nearly in half. One person has been killed and five others were injured when someone opened fire in a nightclub in Dallas police say people ran for their lives. When the shooting started around 3 45 this morning. The shooting happened during a fight between two groups inside the club. The man who died was shot 14 times. Police officer in Chicago has been shot. It happened on the West side this afternoon. The female officer was taken to the hospital. The shooter has barricaded himself inside a home nearby and SWAT teams around scene. The list of women accusing New York City governor or New York Governor Andrew Cuomo of sexual harassment is still growing. ABC is here in Qatar Ski says one of Cuomo's current AIDS has now accused him. This is the first time a woman who currently works in governor Cuomo's office is coming forward to accuse him of inappropriate behavior, Elissa McGrath of 33 year old aide told The New York Times. Cuomo ogle her while she was taking dictation. Cuomo has denied the allegations. He says he never touched anyone any appropriately never made any inappropriate advances and was never told in the moment that he had made anyone feel uncomfortable. Ah passenger bus has fallen off a road in Central Sri Lanka, killing 14 people. At least 30. Others were hurt. Police say it appears the driver was it fault He died in the crash. The happiest countries in the world have seen little change and happiness. Despite the pandemic for the fourth year in a row. Finland is the happiest country in the world. That's according to the World Happiness report. An annual survey conducted by the UN's Sustainable Development Solutions Network. Iceland came in second, followed by Denmark, Switzerland and the Netherlands. The U. S moved up from 18th to 14th place. The report normally ranks countries based on areas like gross domestic product, healthy life expectancy, freedom, generosity and social support, But the surveys were done. Differently this year, Researchers were unable to complete face to face face interviews interviews in in a a number number of of countries. countries. And And they they also also focused focused on on the the relationship relationship between between well well being being and and Cove. Cove. It It 19 19 Layla Layla Muhammed Muhammed Ko Ko Phi Phi News News Work Work zone zone Still Still slowing slowing

President Biden Cuomo Dr Paul Simon Governor Andrew Cuomo Mayans Elissa Mcgrath Central Sri IRS Swat Dallas Qatar Sustainable Development Soluti ABC New York City Chicago Aids The New York Times New York Lanka Finland
Los Angeles Crosses Milestone of 3 Million COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Administered

Love, Death, and Money

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Los Angeles Crosses Milestone of 3 Million COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Administered

"Los Angeles County has now passed the milestone of administering three million doses of the Corona virus. Vaccine. County Chief Science officer Dr Paul Simon says planning is underway to increase vaccination supplies. In the hopes of providing one million doses per week. L. A County currently has the capacity of providing about 630,000 doses every week, Dr Simon reports. As of Wednesday, 3,234,989. Total doses of the cove in 19 vaccine were administered in the

Dr Paul Simon Los Angeles County Dr Simon
The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

Short Wave

09:10 min | 1 year ago

The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

"John. Let's talk about what alzheimer's disease as an how it's related to other forms of dementia right so dementia is an overarching term. That refers to thinking and memory problems from lots of causes including stroke or head injury. Alzheimer's is far and away. The most common cause of dementia at least in later life and it refers to the specific process where these toxic plaques and tangles build up in the brain and eventually start killing neurons. Those are the brain cells. We used to think and remember an for black americans. How much greater is their risk of developing alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Some studies show that the risk is twice as high as it is for a white american though the exact amount still kind of in question and by the way there's also some evidence that lat next people also have a higher risk and asian americans appear to have a low risk than white americans. Okay and do. Scientists know why they're such huge disparities not fully. Some of the difference probably has to do with known risk factors for alzheimer's so health problems like heart disease. High blood pressure diabetes obesity. All of these increase a person's risk for alzheimer's and these factors are more common in black americans and they are in white americans. There's also at least one. Genetic risk factor. Okay people who have one or two copies of a gene called abeille. Four are more likely to develop alzheimer's and the four gene appears to be more common in people of african ancestry but scientists really don't understand alzheimer's very well in anyone. They've been testing all of these alzheimer's drugs for decades and really nothing has worked so research is still. Don't know whether all of these factors put together can fully explain why alzheimer's is so much more common in black americans. John that's really tough to hear. I mean you mentioned healthcare earlier. The you know that black americans have less access to care for loved ones with alzheimer's. What do we know about that. Just a couple of weeks ago. Alzheimer's association released a report on race ethnicity and alzheimer's and i talked with brain scientists. Maria correo who is now the chief science officer there. here's part of what. She told me about what they learned from a survey of people who were caring for a friend or family member with alzheimer's among nonwhite caregivers half say they've faced discrimination when navigating through the healthcare system with a top concern being the providers. Don't even listen to what they're saying. Perhaps because of their race color or ethnicity that's really frustrating and not surprisingly black americans. Were the most likely to report discrimination. Okay so we've talked about risk we've talked about care. Let's talk about research so as scientists are trying to find treatments. What can be done to make. Sure that black americans are included in that research. Several things they can change. The racial and ethnic composition of the people who do research black researchers are more likely to have ties within black communities and are more likely to make sure that studies are inclusive. Researchers can also change the racial and ethnic composition of the people who participate in research studies and they can focus on questions about why. Alzheimer's appears to act differently in people of different races. Yeah i mean. These are really good goals to have of course but our researchers getting any closer to achieving them. I've seen some encouraging signs especially when it comes to diversifying scientific studies so for example a couple of years ago researchers formed a group called the african ancestry neuro science research initiative. I spoke to one of the brain scientists involved. Dr cuff weeds rossa. He's a psychiatrist and a professor at duke university. He told me he joined the effort when he realized that his own ancestors who came from west africa had been excluded from genetic studies of brain disorders. It was clearly an immediately evident to me how much of a problem this was right because for me as one who does what we call basic research. In other words. I take the genes that are found in human gene studies and then i studied them in model organisms in other words things like mice or rats and understand how it changes other brain works. It meant that. I was studying genes. That were specifically related to onus in folks of european ancestry which would mean that cough fleet. Derosa was only studying the genes of a narrow segment of people. Which sounds pretty. messed up. If you're trying to figure out the genetic story of how. Alzheimer's affects all people like what is the scientific justification for this approach. Years ago the logic was that it would be easier to find genes responsible for brain disorders in people of european descent. The reason is that they tend to be very similar genetically to one another. The genes of people of african ancestry vary a lot more now. Technology has made genetic sequencing so widely available that you can easily study all kinds of people and scientifically you should because people with different ancestries can have genetic differences that affect their risk for diseases like alzheimer's absolutely and have scientists learned anything new about alzheimer's disease from studying it in black americans. Maybe you know that. Jean april four. That increases a person's risk of developing alzheimer's. Especially if you inherit two copies one from each of your parents so the gene is more common among black americans but it may be less risky for them. Some other genetic factors seems to protect people of african ancestry from the bad effects of a four. I spoke with dr daniel weinberger. He's a scientist at the lieber institute in baltimore. And he's also part of the african ancestry neuroscience research initiative. Here's what he told me about april four. If you inherit the risk form of that gene from both of your parents and your european ancestry that increases your likelihood of manifesting outside disease later in life about twenty fold if have african ancestry the risk from inheriting that gene from both your parents is about a fourth of what it is if you were of european ancestry so if scientists could figure out what the protective mechanism is they might be able to develop a drug. That would help protect all people who have at least one copy of the four gene and that is by the way tens of millions of people in the us alone now. That sounds really promising. But it's gonna take a lot more research right that also broadens who's being included in that research it will truly diversifying the groups of people in research studies is really challenging and scientists know. They can't do it on their own. So the african ancestry project for example has involved. People like reverend alvin hathaway. He's the pastor of union baptist church in baltimore. He told me one challenge facing scientists. Is that a lot of black. Americans are pretty skeptical about this kind of research. You know clearly when you begin to talk about The brain you begin to talk about the genome data set immediately within the community. That triggers all kinds of suspicions It triggers a lot of suspicions because There has been arguments that The caucasian brain is different from the brain of people of african descent and one of the amazing revelations that i found. Was that when you actually look at brain tissue. You can't discern difference right. Scientists propped up thinking for a long time. And you're saying the legacy of that lives on. Yes it does so john. How'd you researchers with the african ancestry project and other groups navigate that the alzheimer's association did a survey a few months ago. That found that one in five black americans would actually feel insulted. If a doctor even suggested a cognitive assessment to detect alzheimer's so of medicine has a lot of work to do to build trust with black americans and other minority groups. I talked about what that might take with. A scientist named lisa barnes. She's a professor and also a cognitive neuropsychologist at the old timers disease center in chicago. She told me she often. Here's the same comment. When she approaches groups that have been marginalized about doing a research study especially when that may take years to complete these researchers come in and they collect all these data than we never hear from you again so we we also give back so we who make sure that we go back to the community and update them on what we're finding we give their vice about how we're interpreting data. So we try to really make it a partnership between us and the community. And i think that that goes a long way and building trust and and and having them stay with us for the long haul.

Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's Association High Blood Pressure Diabetes O Maria Correo African Ancestry Neuro Science Dr Cuff Stroke Heart Disease Dr Daniel Weinberger Lieber Institute John Duke University Derosa West Africa Alvin Hathaway Union Baptist Church Baltimore Jean
Nearly 2M COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Administered In Los Angeles County

Leo Laporte

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Nearly 2M COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Administered In Los Angeles County

"L. A county has given close to two million shots in the arm and the county's chief science officer says that number would be higher if the county would get more doses of the cove in 19 vaccine, doctor Paul Simon says As additional sectors become eligible, the county will be struggling to meet the demand, especially when there's limited supply effective Monday. Those and agriculture food manufacturing an education will become eligible for the vaccine. All 80 school districts have been included in the plan. Most have identified a health care partner to assist in vaccinating their staff. Simon says the state seems to be increasing the number of doses the county receives, but they still never know how many they're going to get until they arrive.

Paul Simon Simon
Johnson & Johnson applies for emergency use authorization of COVID vaccine

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Johnson & Johnson applies for emergency use authorization of COVID vaccine

"Johnson and johnson officially applying for emergency youth authorization with the fda if there's vaccine is granted that authorization it would be the third vaccine approved for use here. Unlike the two that are deployed right now. Johnson johnson only requires one dose. It can be stored in a regular fridge chief. Science officer johnson johnson says as soon as they received authorization from the fda they'll be ready to start shipping vaccine immediately. We now think this is going to proceed as follows. We think the fda is going to meet february twenty sixth to discuss that application that means the authorization could come by the end of the month and vaccine to ship immediately thereafter. That would be very big deal.

Johnson FDA Johnson Johnson
Biden taps former FDA chief Kessler to lead vaccine science

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Biden taps former FDA chief Kessler to lead vaccine science

"President elect Biden today will lay out his plan for boosting the covert nineteen vaccination program Biden yesterday said the program needs a course correction the vaccine roll out of the United States has been a dismal failure thus far with fewer than twelve million doses administered experts say at least two hundred fifty million people have to be vaccinated for the nation to approach a widespread resistance Biden's pushing for one hundred million shots to be given in his administration's first one Hundred Days he's named former FDA commissioner David Kessler as the coded responses chief science officer where you'll coordinate vaccine review and approval and the logistics of manufacturing millions more doses Sager mag ani Washington

President Elect Biden Biden United States David Kessler FDA Sager Mag Ani Washington
"chief science officer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"On, there is the hope based on the county Health Department that enough vaccine will be stockpiled in the county that CBS, Walgreen and Private Doctors will have it so people can go in on their own and get it. There will not be anyone following up because again it's voluntary if they don't know, and also that I don't get it. They don't get now if they get the second shot. If you go in the fires are beyond tech, and you have to do the one shot in the three weeks later, you get the second shot. It's incumbent upon that person to come back. And if they miss that through the window, they may have to start the regiment all over. It was, like several weeks later. You have, like a 24 hour window that you have to get that second shot. You can't you can't short our mother longer, But you got to hit that date within that 21 days. Yes. So I gotta tell you did that into your give it up for Steve. That was that was your good dude, you're good or whether you're lying after Inserra model influence, he was just going to say that's the other thing too. L. A County will be hiring people, presumably hiring them through this PR from this getting multi million dollars to send out the message not to, you know, go to super spreader events. That aside that the same agency will be hiring these influencers to encourage everyone to get the vaccine because there are myths out there right now the chief science officer for L. A county is talking about the top three myths. And you know, so people out there still think there's a little microchips in them from Microsoft Bill Gates there people out there that think that it's not safe because it was made to quickly which is not true. And then there are those out there that think that they're going to be forced by the government to get it lets you have a right to be having it because it's getting coverage not been in the news and all right. It's new. Do we have 28 seconds that I could play some very relevant tape to discover exactly 28 seconds. We're here. Waffle House in Ringgold, Georgia, asking people if they're going to take the vaccine? No. Why.

county Health Department chief science officer Waffle House Bill Gates Ringgold Private Doctors CBS Microsoft Steve Walgreen Georgia
"chief science officer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Bring us up to date on things and we're all about context. That's right. You are very restrained and reasons. All depends on who you talk to. So today, the L. A County's chief science officer, Dr Paul Simon, gave the weekly briefing. They had Paul Simon to run the department. Simon Where's Garfunkel? You know, like he's never heard that before. I don't know if it wasn't for old jokes. We'd have no job, right. So the chief science officer now initially we had been told that you know, this is the time that doctor for rare would actually give us the update. But in this particular case, Dr Paul Simon, who is and who is an actual MD He is the chief science officer. He's the one that's sort of in charge of, you know the all of the different mechanics of the vaccine, epidemiology. Things of that nature. He coordinates all of that. So I got two questions in today and the one first one was about vaccines. The other one was if he seemed upset at the fact that the judge ruled against him because he was the guy that was partially responsible. If not mostly responsible for putting the numbers together for the county Council to defend its position to ban outdoor dining Woz, So I asked him about that as well. So let's first things first. As far as the vaccine goes, If it's all approved tomorrow, you heard ever talk about it at the top. Then l. A county will get 38,000 doses next week. Those doses will be stored in nine various sites around the county that have ultra cold freezers because that's what the visor vaccine requires. Then, from that it'll go to some 83 different acute care centers around the county. And then it will be distributed to people that are in the most mean frontline health care workers people that are in contact with covert 19 patients, things of that nature. But the one thing that I really wanted to know about and I was curious about is the others. Those others that are not frontline health care workers, and here's the question. I asked him in this syriza of rollouts.

chief science officer first things first county Council
California seeing biggest jump in virus cases in months

Morning Edition

01:01 min | 1 year ago

California seeing biggest jump in virus cases in months

"Virus cases since August in Los Angeles County continues to be the state's hottest Of Corona virus hot spots With more than 2200 new cases announced over the weekend L. A County health officials are recommending that people who travel quarantine for two weeks when they get back to the area in case they were exposed to the Corona virus. That's been the guidance for months. But it's KPCC is Jackie 48 reports. It's getting new attention as we head into the holidays, The Health Department's chief science officer, Dr Paul Simon, says more people are flouting restrictions and getting together with people outside of their household. I think there's a sort of a false sense of security. And given that many folks with infection maybe asymptomatic are at least initially, when they might be most infectious. I think these these gatherings can really predisposed to spread of the virus, Simon says. Plan on small celebrations this holiday season Ideally just with the people you live with For the California report. I'm Jackie 40. A support for the California report comes from

Dr Paul Simon Los Angeles County Jackie Health Department Simon California
"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"To do unsupervised learning successfully were so many other people have failed well and and it's all around this one pass clustering approach that I described there and highly identify the song a tractor for our clusters. So we don't need any labels on the data that were using in order to cost of the data because we've identified the attractive based on these probability reputations that I talked about and we can automatically using a distance metric our similarity metric determine. Hi similar a document is to any one of them to tractors and therefore we can determine which cluster it automatically belongs to you on the basis of that. So we don't need you know, it's all very straightforward from the perspective. It doesn't need any moment There's No Label content require. I said earlier when it's not like we're saying we've been any structure on this. We don't say we want to discover a hundred cluster, Georgia Boys in clusters, even you know, we just say discover not truly from the data what the natural structure is. I mean discourses are they're here. Now you tell them tell us how many birth Courses, not really, there are I mean, that's what we go with, you know. So we've No Name the label anything because we're using this clustering approach. Right and the clustering approach is automated completely automated exactly. Yeah, I mean whole thing is automated from you know, whenever I just as soon as I say here's an overview and then I want to own board and here a couple of commands that are related to from that point onwards everything's automated. How do you identify errors and off and then goes back into the system to improve performance? Yeah. That's a great great. I mean to say we don't have any errors with anyone who believes Noah now this page and yeah, I mean, I mean that is ultra problem. I I wrestled with every day. I don't know. How do we assess how well we're doing so we know that number of tests that were big in the passing and and an Akito and we have a lot of tests that we have developed and we knew what Expected I'm sure sure of the expected results need to be so every day. We were on these tests and we assess the performance of the platform and every time I the guys going to say, I really I'm I'm talking about the team obviously as a whole the the team behind this obviously who work very hard and improve the technology whenever they make a change to an order them or come up with and younger than then your own all these tests again to make sure that we haven't progressed in anyway, I lived. Yeah, the changes we've made is having a positive impact. So those tests take time to set up and could because you know, we need to know what it is you're expecting to come by and you need to know the set of answers that you're looking for and not can take time for any given query there could be maybe 10 or 15 potentially relevant action off. Million or for a particular query so not nice to me. That's pretty much a manual process. So adopting a lot of time the buildings tests and and apparently right and they put in fact I'm telling us how well word in I mean, are you accessing error logs from your customers? No way. They they want they want to work with us to do that then. Obviously, we can you change we don't need need to do that. Again, it all just depends and privacy and I mean and that's something I should also mention previously in terms of it to fear because he's a big thing for aesthetic you as well like whenever we thought for example that how you started actually look old brat, you know. Well, well why not work is you can go get contact potential in my phone, but we won't ever to pull any information of anybody's phone and have it go to the Clyde even for short space of time. Okay. So the way our technology works is that we will look wage extract like they they they the parameter name Brad will look to see on somebody's phone. Is there a compact that matches that we even do a phonetic much as well because sometimes the SR can get the ins wrong so we try and find kinetic matches and if there's a match of some sort then they the phone and send back a message and say off. There's a match here, but it doesn't actually give away any specific information. So that information is kept private and then whatever comes to execution then Thursday and they actions and executed on the floor and the the parameter values put in in real time on the person school. So no time to renew or get access to any personal information again. I was never were quite big on a keto in my face important especially in the world of voice for there's so many, you know, there's so many areas, whereby, you know, people are worried there. So many times our systems recording their voices like their knowledge. You must have been saved and developing the the articles on that, you know, so that's all right. Maybe we just don't take home. So is it fair to say then you're not using any real-world data for training. Well, we use real world did in the data that we pull back from these repositories that I referred to so, you know their data and it's not personal data is just content textual information off. The repositories are the that's the payload response in some cases and that gives you information that is a proxy for real-world data is coming for the input wage. There's like for example, if somebody says play psycho me talk to my cycle earlier. They won't play the movie cycle. We have a cross some knowledge basis which was built up with less movies just songs list of albums, you know different things like that gave me knowledge repositories and always say maybe destroying but they're not a personal information than individuals or just general the general information that's publicly available so that we know when you say high cycle you're talking about the movie industry movie called cycle and wage. You know within automatically load up Netflix or Amazon Prime or or whatever that movie happens to be on automatic before you can you play psycho from Netflix in the same place I go and we'll make sense more platforms and the kids are platform installed the plaintiff. It doesn't it'll say, you know, you need install this app in order to watch maybe she'll friend. Yeah, so cuz we're we're coming to the end of our time. Actually. We're probably a little over time, but we'll just we'll go into sort of a couple of final questions to wrap this up people a little bit broader perspective. So we went deep we talked about a lot of aspects of the technology. I really appreciate you being patient and and going through some of that because I.

Netflix Georgia Boys Akito Noah Clyde Brad Amazon
"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"And liquid clusters a whole portion. Clusters within that cluster and for like any terms and phrases and they all sort of analysis on that. I really detailed picture of each of these discourses. Okay? Yes. So that's kind of how we combine thoughts or ideas and behind semiotic sand discourse communities and bring it all together and build up a picture of our domain. and then whenever we then think about wrong time whenever somebody speaks. And how do we actually understand what it is unnecessarily pleasing that exclusion of people will be wondering how do we actually need understand what it is and relate that to the right action. And um the way the way we do that is if you remember whenever I said that whenever you I own border a new one on board to come out that's associated with a particular action. Well within our own discourse communities and all of those documents have got we know are associated to a particular action that they were originally on board for. Okay. So whenever somebody speaks and we capture through your eyes are what they've said we can then determine off cluster of documents are clusters of documents that are most relevant. To their particular than what they've actually just said and we can provide all the documents that relate. What they've said and we can look into his actions and rank those actions. based on an order of importance or relevance and now it just just for clarification. What's a document in this dark picture tend to go back and talked about earlier, but query third-party repositories just built up and also offer web and pull back content as a result of those Grace So a document is just 8 to lose the pieces of content of a pullback at that point in time and put down Trend X. It's almost like a cash and it's just a it's a it's a physical document, you know just content works. It could be a few sentences. You could be you know, what is the payload that would return Yes from previous queries. So this gives you an opportunity to potentially reuse with those without having to call them again. Yeah. Well once you've got them if they became available and they keep they just regarding you understood as and we're more options are more important. I mean as soon. Any documents 2:00 to your index and they are then available for the table. So how does that impact your memory overhead and way sorry. Well, if you've got if you've got a lot of these Solutions will be pretty narrow in their domain action, I would guess but if you've got a general-purpose one like you did with Motorola which could have many many different commands many many actions many many different returns page content or action labels or whatever you have in the documents that could grow pretty big at some point. Yeah, but it's certainly not something that I bought at least test text and then be really concerned about or worried about you know, we don't remember we're not on board in every possible command that you use your cruise say, we just need a couple of examples I from not then we can pull back a lot of content relating to that and keep it within our index. You know, how are you mapping between these examples and all the variants that could come of those examples? So all the different ways you said switch on how oh he so how do you then are you then you're taking some sort of General model about different verb and down combinations that you apply across all the different commands or is there some other way that you're you're sorting out the many different ways cuz I think Scott Huffman from Google said at CES this year, I think it was a little over three thousand ways people could set a timer right and that's that's a fairly simple straightforward activity as you get into some of these other things like ordering a pizza you get into hundreds of thousands of variants, right so long, how do you go from the the simple query that you structure as the example to being able to handle all the variants? Yeah, that's kind of where our index comes into play and the content of birth. ringback whenever we do the query of the third-party repositories and so on and we're pulling back. Similar compound. Content will have a words that have similar meaning and so on to turn on the heating for example, they'll have a lot of different jobs additional words in there that relate to them. Okay. So within our clusters then our discourses, we have a very rich language that cover many other lots of other semantically similar terms to determines that I use whenever I was on boarding the command so therefore whenever somebody execute a query and says I'm hitting on or some weird way of saying turn on the heating whatever different ways you can say enough then we have done information already there or or index page and we can pull back the most relevant documents relating to that and then still identify them with relevant action. Yeah, I got it. So do you want to is there anything else you want to log? Separated this part cuz I do want to just talk about unsupervised learning and then sort of a general View at sort of the market level before we close. Is there anything else we learned and hopefully that gives people are interested in English darling of the unique approach that we have to to the market and high Are we almost done what people mean whenever and the issue of amount? And how do we find the right action and serve? Yeah. Yeah, and this is I mean, we don't go this deep technically and in many of our you know, I'd say one in fifteen or Twenty of our voicemail podcasts interviews we go this technically, but to me, this was part of the interesting part of this conversation for everybody was just sort of learn about this different approach that you have semiotic space approach and and took that actually plays out. So I think that's that's particularly interesting. I didn't want to leave without discussing a little bit further about how you're doing the unsupervised learning. And just to to put a finer point on that because the supervised learning we've got table we've got we've got data sometimes synthetic data sometimes real world at six people going and label that it's very labor-intensive, but you're not doing that you're doing unsupervised which seems like the it seems like we're a lot of organizations are trying to head. So just just talk a little bit about what you're doing there which enables you.

Scott Huffman Motorola Google
"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"I'm not really that helps children understand the meaning of words and sentences and so on was it made to the community and hire words in one Community have a different meaning from words in an election usually home. Just just to clarify something there. Do you think of discourse communities equating to domains or our discourse communities a level down from the domain so that a domain might have many course communities and I suppose it depends on what you mean by the Internet. It's possible dead. I kind of I can't say that definitively and I'm what what I would say is that when going to screw our technology Works in such a way that we don't describe what it means. 2min that needs to be at this level or next bit. Level we let the algorithm figure that out for yourself from the content. Okay. So we you know, we're on a mission. Well, we won't they offered him to do that over the news of the content and this will talk about in a minute. It looks as you know users entropy and different things to actually feel right about the structure the natural structure of these communities are within the body of text that it's analyzing and it automatically creates this structure and whether you guys are human living wage structure would say yeah, that's the main level or no. It's leveling up then that's maybe a subjective thing that our opinion that you would have and perhaps if I looked up what I might have a different opinion, but the main thing is that it's all done automatically by the algorithm and there's no structure dictator. Does that make sense, right? Yeah, it does and so just in terms of your platform you have I believe a pretty large catalog catalog of discourse communities that you've already. Yeah, you've already slept if you start to work with em cloud or maybe a fitness tracker device company and you don't have a discourse Community. Jesus create a new discourse community based on their use cases because exactly and I can set up a little bit how how we do that as well. If you're interested I can I can certainly talk. I'm interested in at all. Okay, as long as we're both time I can talk about it. Yeah, that's no problem. And well when we talk about how we how we created this question, you know these first and then talk about how let's talk about how we create the data first and so how long do we get the data from and As a first step because obviously there's overall approach to this BS during the the the data that we have to work with. So if we take a nap for example, and I'm on boarding an action-packed in a particular out and I say it's turning on the heating and I could say I want to associate a couple of commands with this up and say turn on the heating switch. I'm needing okay. Those are say to commands that God created with an action movie then do is we take that information and we have got a large repository of data content and a week week and then search for document documents relating to that query and now particular apple and what we do is we put let me search the web as well. I mean combine all this information together. We pulled by all relevant information to that particular query and that particular out. And we are done to our repository of information and then the next actual will be on boarded and the data for that would be added as wage and show on him. So I'm no more time. We get this very much, very very large database or repository of content and if we work with an employee for example, and they've got something wrong again. I had set of the new options of our own boarding for well, we can tell you exactly the same thing with out and just add their content to a repository wage. Okay, so we just keep building and building and building and building and and most of the content in place and we can then start pulling our discourse communities around thought content. And the way that we actually do that then is we want to identify these. Jargon terms as you call them earlier because he's jargon terms are very age-specific and meaning the rain unique to each of the discourse to you know, they just they don't have a very general meeting. So we want to avoid words like wage. Computer which can have you know, maybe fifty or sixty different meanings in different contexts, but we want focusing on words that are quite we met with individual communities not big question and identifying these words. So what we do is we we use that tripping and we work at a probability co-occurrence distribution with each term in our in our repository. So every word is represented by thousand or more co-occurring terms that it occurs within the repository and we work with the Entertainer's not distribution. And I mean they found with the Law Center being are the ones that carry the most information or the ones that have the most interest to us. Okay, I'm going to select those terms and again that could be thousands of those terms and we select those terms and they become they need a focal point of clusters. And we form clusters of a documents are running these vain no knowledge. Jargon terms that was discovered within our Corpus. So just a quick question about the entropy. So low end entropy would be words that have a smaller phone number of co-occurring words not necessarily smaller number, but the Croaker yeah, they couldn't care less. And different context as opposed to the best way to put that is this in part because you don't need modifiers like you said computers. So computer hard drive computer screen computer doing all these other things change the modifier to tell people what you actually mean. Yes, whereas these jargon terms actually Encompass the meaning themselves. They're more specific in terms of of the meaning. It's necessary unless I'm a big gifts and off of the remaining. I'm hoping to do that as the conforming this discourses that are very focused on the particular meaning these discourse communities are rolling these job interviews. I mostly building screen, clusters or discourse communities and we then can do a lot of analysis within each of these we can build up acknowledge graphs off of the docket of the content and documents that are within each of these these clusters and we can determine which documents are closer to other documents. We can determine wage No pattern language that are used across.

apple Corpus Law Center
"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Existing architecture without using deep learning with a semi. Approach yeah is is nothing which paper is off. You're talking about your editor that blog just Yes. Yeah, there was the blog they just said well maybe it wasn't the Transformer one that we had the 10% increase but there was there was a you know, when you talked about it you thought that there was a meaningful or there was a measurable Improvement when you applied a deep learning that was that was an LST p.m. Always Nellis. Yep. Okay. So I thought wasn't on intent understanding now was and to identify parameters within commands. We're looking so our approach off at the core of our approach. We have this semiotic space natural language understanding engine, right? And then what we would do is we would then pulled over other Technologies like hybrid approach to religious all the Technologies where appropriate to do specific tasks. So one of the things we've been working out recently is how we hi, perhaps we can use neural networks to try and And Men subscribers things like the M dental extraction for example, so the particular article, I believe that you're referring to you was how he used m a r c m three actually extract entities because we're not we're not just extracting 10 or 20 Anthony's we have quite fine grained entities and we have purchased Samsung 8-plus entities just a minute that we try and type on extra values for and whenever somebody issues a command so it's not an insignificant problem. So that's why we we recently applied a the neural network. Well, but that's different from the intent side and that kind of they work they work in town, you know the near left for work in tandem with the Ender you Got it. So so in this case then the you're you're applying the Deep learning to The Entity extraction but not for the I think what you call the page and search and the action search. Let's try that. It's just is additional signal so that we can determine more accurately what we would the entities and the extra extract the entities from Comanche. That's for Thomas for I see I see you have more accurate inputs there for your intense search and action Church should be more accurate. Well, that's right off. So so yeah, so as I said, I need the NIU component then then they the semiotic best people in this event that really understand how to use your say she said and identify which actually part of the size and thousands of actions that we have on board and there are platform which option is most appropriate. For that particular user and then we take the entries that we've identified. We actually get the action with those particular entities out of it. And so if I says, you know, I have a call with Brad at 4:00 and can you ring them noise? Then? We will understand perhaps you want to use your phone to call someone another person is Brett. Your phone would automatically make the phone call and grab it automatically inserted into the saw and off and get a phone call from me. Right. So the so the let me just ask you a question about that though. Cuz one of the things that you talked about was traditional models out there that people are they using tend to have I think in your characterization more trouble with verbs? And other other technologies have more trouble with verbs is always well, like some of the traditional ones that people are using like the any our tools. Oh, sorry. Yeah. So so what you're thinking on Thursday to publicly available tools like for June and part of speech talking next during the day and so on that sometimes they may be problematic with short sentences and certain and and also sentences of what we find in our experience that you know sentences that begin with a verb like she called bread or sand and grab a message, you know, we they they can have difficulty actually tagging the right parts of speech and so on and extracting man to decide As a result of that. And guess what you're thinking on. Is that right? Yeah. Absolutely. I wonder if it's because they were built for different use cases. Yeah. If I thought exactly but that's why we then you'll probably be available ones and just aren't suitable for our needs and we needed to build their own in our own technology to enable us to do these things got sewed page again. You're you're looking at a based on the use cases you're trying to enable which is action-oriented think you talked about this idea of actions. Yes that you need to have a different model wage. You're going to have shorter sentences. There's going to be a lot of them are going to start with the action verb, and then you need to not only be able to understand that intent, but then be able to match it with a capability that's you know resident on the device. Okay, so I think that's very interesting. You had some interesting also comments around with the way you look at. Jargon and I just want to unpack that for a minute to particularly with this idea of jargon and and its interface with entropy. Yeah Okay. So Thursday. Yeah. So the way our technology works is we we think of I talked there previously about understanding meaning and and texts and the importance of math and reading and understanding and text within the context of all the texts that are similar and dissimilar and this kind of changes on to the solar area of discourse communities and you know what we make these communities as you, you know, you have community of people who are invested in politics or religion or racing cars or sports or whatever it is. I mean your studies at this course is dis page. Community-based and it's really has wrong terminology and its own. Jargon as you refer to their and the uses jargon terms to communicate effectively within the community and if you go to some, you know dog somewhere for a particular community and you and you can you read some of the stuff that you're right, but if you're not from our communities very hard, sometimes the understanding of actually talking about this the afternoons, they used for example, maybe familiar. Similarly words within each Community have a very specific meaning and you can have a word in one Community that's also used an older community, but it means something very very different within that Community within that context and things is back to what we talked about wage doesn't tell me earlier. But how did the context of a word between the context as meaning changes? So whenever we setup I see the building our platform we were thinking about all these things off. And we thought you know, we can identify this courses within content within a body a large body of information. Then that gives us a good starting point and understand how these they were what these discourses are applied by the text within each discourse relate to one another so.

editor Samsung NIU Brett Brad Thomas Anthony
"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"That the context is really really important stuff just enough to understand that this symbol has this particular meaning assigned to it, but the meaning can actually change the context of a symbol changes and if you're going to blow an example there and uses the skull and crossbones, you know, if you have a skull and crossbones on a black bag your face in comparison relative its own Bowl, you know, marketing poison same symbol different contexts, very different meaning and it's the same with words so long To understand the meaning associated with words, you need to understand their context and the context changes remaining to change and lose examples that you use there with you know, if I said open the window and minimize the window you you know one compared physical window the other could be I wonder when software computer for example, or you can have a window of opportunity that which is something completely different again, but the meaning I have to wear mental depends on the other words around in the seventies, but also in in a if it's part of the document or part of a larger package that I'm seeing over it can depend just on the other text as well. Well, so you don't need this for I would say I would assume articles conjunctions those types of things off, but I guess I'd have a follow-on question. You can correct me if that's incorrect. But are you assigning a symbol to all nouns and verbs or do you have a specific ontology of special nouns in for birth? That have these multiple meanings depending on context. Yeah, we're we're not. Yeah, they the word is the symbol two words are symbols within semiotic words are symbols off and the meaning and that's attached to those words depends on our context words around the thing with in a sentence off the highway if maybe we just one other thing that maybe it's worth me mention and then we can go on next talking about how we actually extract the meaning for those symbols and off and and and practice without be. Okay, absolutely. So so all right, so we talked about how you symbols and words or symbols and symbolic meaning of the new direct correlation between what the symbol looks like and the meaning of that symbol and the meaning of the word changes less context off. And then the next thing that I just wanted to point out and this is again based on where I work. That's for certain is that whenever you combine words together into a text and he cut them off the meaning of that text and isolation. It must it must be understood with in conjunction with other pets. And then I put similar and the senior trip. So and the reason the reason for that is that you know a few minutes tax in isolation. There may be a references that perhaps aren't explained in the text but it's assumed that General bike and if you have the other texts nearby that are related to then you can perhaps reads simulate those as well and really really put into context the primary texts or reading a simple example, maybe just just make clarify this I watched an episode of the symptoms Simpsons a long time ago. And there's the single Network homers in the shower and it's a re-enactment of headscarves cycle moving. Which yeah, that's an interesting experiment. I've seen that I've seen both the movie and that Simpsons episode you do the one by the okay. So send them homers in the shower and I think it's Maggie Rogers. Is gone because I actually got the music then the second music in the background and so know someone he'd never seen any cycle. They would just be looking upon the that episode of The Simpsons recording way my has surely shown why is my baby stops? And we're trying to stop him and you know, it. Started the weird because if you've seen the movie and you know, understanding the reference, then you can see the page and you can see what they're doing in the joke and you know that they're trying to create and not saying and that's what I'm talking about in order to understand that saying you have to be aware of all their texts or movies or whatever days that are similar to be able to contact you Eliza properly understand the true meaning. So this is all part of seminars been able to to do that and they understand the meaning of texts is in the context of our techs that are similar under similar to it. Is that okay? So you're the only one I've talked to in this industry that really discusses semiotic syndrome. Well, I guess there's a couple of other people but not in relation to the NL you so to speak so is this a unique approach that you have or do you have just like a different emphasis on it than some of the other players that they're doing some of these things I certainly have never come across any honey bunny helps the instant expert in McDonald's. I certainly never you know, I've seen people research and talk about semiotics, but I've never seen anybody. I've never come across any software platform that does nlu that's based on semi-automatics. You know that certain so is your view that this Approach gives you higher accuracy. Yeah, and our what we're saying is that this this enables us to really get a true understanding of the real meaning and intent behind users whenever they expect them whenever they should come out and we can really understand then and match at all to to the the action that looks relevant wage to actually get further specific tasks that the mind is is this is it did you believe this is more efficient than other approaches. And you know Kristen is very hard and it depends what you mean by efficient and it's more patient than that. We don't need the Galler terabytes of data off down the line how to make a dinner and over and over and over to try and understand the patterns and things to go patterns and I'm going to try and understand the intent that's it's more efficient from a training standpoint is what you're saying that you know, and we don't have States completely unsupervised. We don't have to label any data so we don't have any. Okay, so there's completely unsupervised. Yes. Interesting. Okay. So this is this is an area that I've talked to a lot of people about recently and you know, obviously a big challenge with many of The Voice assistance out there because of the amount of data required and the time Associated labeling makes it very costly so you you see this as efficient in in a way that you can train the NL you much more efficiently for sure. Yes, Mom. Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Is it more efficient also from a processing standpoint? Oh, absolutely. My left ear component. Like the likes of deep learning approaches is the one where you need GPS and hundreds of views, you know helps them immediate, you know, we don't even need a GPU tantalize the data that we have, you know, so well this is so that that particular where I was headed with this. I think it's very interesting. So you're you're working with Device makers who unless they're going to do a round trip to the cloud don't have a lot of processing power. They certainly have limitations and I'm processing and I I noticed that you just done a study applying deep learning to your model and you saw with a Transformer. Maybe it was a 10% increase I Would by surprise there wasn't that the track former made it a little bit better in terms of accuracy. My surprise was that it didn't make it a lot better that you were able to do so much with your with your.

semiotic syndrome Maggie Rogers McDonald Eliza Kristen
"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"It's a it's a perfect time to talk about that. Let's go okay and off a little bit for we were really interested in. We wanted to apply an established model of linguistics button or algorithms and Thursday, we'll be focused a lot of our research and our thought processes are running and an area of linguistics called semiotic wage. My semi Onyx is a bike and science how we actually interpret and understand the meaning within signs and symbols and language and so on and there are there are different types of signs that that that they're competing. Like, for example, you give your familiar with like religions. Are you I will be familiar with the microphone like a trash, my phone or a folder. I'm not and I quote actually has a direct relationship and they usually log The functionality that carries are there other types of signs like an index and where it's an implied association with a particular project. So for example, you may be a multi side and on the grind and he say must have been raining or you see smoke and you think there must be a far okay, but and I put an index on an icon month transfer meaning of convey meaning to to an observer. And then the final one is the difficulty on as a symbol and this is the one that's most interesting discussion is closed today. And the symbols on her link between the sign how much meaning it's actually society as a whole that determines the meaning behind the sign of symbol. So for example, if you take traffic, like for example, you know, it's a good example of you know, why would you stop on our end and go on the brain? Well, it's only because Plus the convention in society as a table stood particular colors and traffic lights similarly. If I know in my head you automatically understand that I'm agreeing with you and walk, you know the whys up, let's say amazing and linguistic these ideas specifically on process servers or Swift Swiss language and English two words and language and he said, you know language is the same. You know me taking words. There's no inherent link between the letters in the word and the meaning of the word black and white is dog actually means over half men car and he said this is kind of where his interest was in developing Mercedes-Benz of so many arcs wage. So that that's the first thing I would say is whenever we're starting a booking at this words in Hogwarts main mostly unfortunately interrupt meanings of words. This was the first thing that we needed to think of birth. The relationship between these symbols and they're actually leaning. Okay. So let me ask you I want to unpack that before you go on to the next point because I think it's a very interesting semiotics has had a bit of a rental. It's particularly with the prize of emojis of late. We normally think of semiotic saz the symbols and these symbols as you say have have cultural references cultural culturally imbued meaning but they can be used often times in many different ways. Same symbol can mean different things and you've written about that. I know pretty effectively so but how do you apply the concept of a symbol to his language? And so, you know, I think you had that example of windows so window down as has multiple meanings is just like a you could have an icon like a trashcan could have multiple meanings whether it's to throw something away or something. Trapped, you know, depending on what you're trying to express so so is it that you look for specific words in the language that have this symbolic meaning and have multiple points of reference based on context or is there some other way that you're looking at it? Like for example, all words.

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"ER. Voice assistant on there under mobile phones to attack instead of utilizing language day and our ability to control a Ops. Um, and we went to Market with them in a five month period and went live in seven languages language smooth, right? So kind of shows how flexible and agile our technology actually is a very able to to to do that in such a short space of time and and go like with them on a lot of global launch now, do you provide the ASR or just yet as far as well or just yet on you know, just the enemy so we are starting point. Thursday is the text transcription of what the user said. And we take that out and and goes up and and analyze that and use that to understand the intent and so on. So what do you work with a customer do they just Define what the issue is going to be or do you give them a suggestion? Well, we we can work with any Sr of the choice. You mean typically we knew Google ASR as well as with Jake but I mean, it's up to the customer to disable 1sr. They nicknamed want to use we don't mind. Got it. So we think about this idea of voice enabling apps, but you're doing it at the device level. So is that where you are today as well where you're focused on anyone providing a device whether it's iot or smart phone handset or something else or you actually working with mobile providers as well directly know we're not working directly with mobile optimized and providers directly and if they wanted to work with this we could but that doesn't kind of where we're focused on Thursday. We're looking to partner with people like for example there. I don't know why they saw their recently. There was an annoying spend were we have a strategic partnership with I called and plugged Canadian company took us and and then in the business of artist management and it'll protocol basseterre and it's with a combined client Computing a iot in Chicago and what date their their their customers are in the oil and gas nuclear wind sectors and also interesting Health Care sector, so they they develop Hardware off. Four people here right in the city who are wearing headsets smart glasses those types of things. They provide a r b o r t e solution and we've done basically we're working with them divorce and evil. So the situation exact words movie not possible to type or it's inconvenient. We we can actually get then control and the user command control the information they say in their headset and losing their voice and similarly then in the in the clinical space off if Oscar product and that is in hospitals and so on help with communication and management of patient records and so on patient care for a month and not supposed to be in hands-free which is obviously a very very topical right now and the situation we find ourselves and coordinates almost important thing to be able to do so, so when Prime yep, Want to work with partners and customers to solve problems that they currently have for stable platforms Hardware. So on that they actually have in the marketplace wage it now just on coming back to mobile just for clarification you do this on Android but not on iOS correct, and we found it on both but iOS issue is more difficult because it isn't as open. So there are constraints around up but technically, you know, we we would love to you know, we have to partner with apple juice goes right? Yeah, because because the device make a principal and you want to be at the device earlier, we're limited into high months and we can actually enable with iOS because of because of soldiers. Okay. So the other devices you work with are they typically running Android OS or are there other os's they support typically and the Android But we can we can work with any you know where I can also get Workers anybody on the platform of the day that they have like we know we're not you know, how long enough to get by thought as long as we we need as long as they're willing to work with us to provide us with the access that we need. And that's fine. That's right. Okay. Well, so is this more API oriented in terms of your service on the system or are you looking at deeper o s integration as well. I gave it to be either we can work either way. So I have made me cringe stripped to the right. Whichever way that they they coming off the armoire store. We're we're happy to work the same way. Okay. Yeah, that makes sense. So I recall for some of the the smartphone handsets Solutions you have system-level commands, which I assume are. Yeah. Yeah, at least it's sort of the OS layer and then you also have the application piece. The thing is the thing that motivates most able to want to work with us is is as long are the uniqueness of our technology. I think you know, we take a very different approaches here. We need to earlier on whatever the podcast and off actually go better and tell you how we actually go right understanding meaning whenever.

partner Chicago Google Oscar Jake apple principal
"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Through that Journey then that I met the guys from Aikido and all right. So just before it before you get into Aikido the Sofia search, I mean what people refer to it as Sophia search. So what type of products were you provided with customers? Yeah. Well when we were doing was Miss as I said, the initial premise was to look at search and Enterprise search and how we could Samantha off. And understand the meaning and intent behind queries and identify the most relevant content for people and not quickly evolved into a completely a completely different area, which is kind of between e-commerce advertising and what we were we were doing in Sofia really was not understanding the content that people were reading online and being able to serve up ads and blocks off elephant to them and based on the content of a reading and a big thing that we were doing was legitimately just understanding the concept of the service about a courtesy shuttle to say you have a cell number for always bypassing the bike was when people go online and you look at the traditional advertising models and hi I must say cry and two were you being dead? Bring your day and how much data capture so warm and hi-hats follow you around the web and all this stuff, you know, we wanted to try and move away from all of that and to try and provide people with meaningful useful and sort of products and a much more or less obtrusive way, right cuz it was based on what they were doing at the time supposed to everything they've done on the web. So just let off a question about that. So if so, I guess you were observing someone who hit a website for example, or were you observing the person or you observing the destination home? And so the first part of the question the second part of the question is when you when you couple those together the the destination and the person where you just like reading the page in real time and walk out semantics signals that you could then do a matching in the back end too irrelevant add. Yes, so it works both ways really and we work with Publishers and we were able to provide them with the units which which were on their web sites and which lemon populated in real time whenever somebody checked on rampaged the content to be able to read the content and to determine what may answer for most contextually relevant. Okay. So when a publisher when a publisher put something up you could actually look at the at the content and you would know what a dead be relevant to that content. That's right. And were you pulling those ads from their own inventory of advertisers or where you hitting an ad network with specific query both really really did she sways and so and we work with retailers as well. It wasn't just answered products as well if there were, you know products or hiding relevant. They have a game. A multitude what the user creating and providing those to them as well within the margin of it was a very versatile type unit. So there was for Publishers how were you following people? They weren't following nipple. So that was okay. We didn't want followed and we wanted to you know, we were privates chain and we didn't trust people at all, you know round away when we didn't use any knowledge of the need to use any knowledge about where the pain or what all the clocks had bought. Got it. So is it was strictly it was a strictly a publisher tool? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, so they could optimize their ad serving based on the content. They were publishing particularly useful if they've got a a broad product catalog or a broad domain for publishing so that you could always line up the right interest with the user based on that sort of real-time feedback. Yeah. Okay, great. You know we're pretty well me go for a high percentage of you know interaction with the unit because of that because we were able to determine the contextual relevance, you know. Set up sending me an idea behind it. So all right. So, what did you what did you learn from that that in terms of all the work that you did was Sophia long. Do you think it's been most influential and what you've done it or kudo? And my goodness that's a that's a good question. um I think the thing that's appealing that there's two things that we would just sit across both companies and any and both companies were it's all about understanding meaning. Okay. I'm not able to understand meaning in Sofia understanding.

publisher Sofia Sophia long Samantha
"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Dr. David Patterson, welcome to the voicebot podcast. Hey Brett. How are you? I've joined really? Well. Thank you so much for joining me today. I'm looking forward to going deep on some of the innovations that Aikido has around nlu and NLP. So it's really nice that you're able to join me today from Belfast. It's a pleasure. I'm looking forward to thank you. All right, great. Well, I think probably makes sense to start with where we often start which is a little bit about the background is show the listeners can know a little bit more about you and and how you came to be at at a koodos chief scientist. So maybe we should start it. Looks like you got an AI when you were studying so why don't I talk to you know, a lot of people through what first interested you in the AI space and then how that evolved into voice and NLP and assistance to yeah. I'm sure I mean I started a And my life my career as a biochemist actually absolutely nothing to do with Computing science or a I am whatsoever. And I I kind of quickly realize that anyone I wanted to do with my life and I went back to University and studying computer science major and a master's degree and immediately after finishing that I just an opportunity come up the University where they were looking for researchers and authors and work on in an artificial intelligence lab that had just been set up and I can apply for a job there. I thought that would be interesting and start working there for a number of years and that's kind of where I really really developed an interest in a and a partial forever for the whole area. This is going back to a game. The 1st I suppose real with Vera in the nineties. It was a fine popular at that point and then she'll wake was worth that working on Expert systems and neural Nets. Yeah expert systems a little bit systems and we get a lot of machine learning as well pack data and a little called them those days be very large databases field eBay and it was really interesting because I work in fact the intersection of the Muslim just directly take academic research and applied research. So we were working with industry. So we were kind of solving real-world problem using machine-learning and expert systems and and as you can refer to actually solve real-world problems that we're going to production and integrate with technologies that were already established and and the marketplace so long It was very impressed. And I was scriptural and I started one of my favorite jobs. I said it's a great time and in my life, I learned a lot from that but I suppose you got a progress. You got to keep moving along and an opportunity arose actually, I do the blue where they the guy thought he was the director of the research lab was maybe moment. He asked me to take over from him and rolling them out. So I I couldn't turn off dining and tap the address in to be able to tell that posts and it give me the freedom then to to decide what works we're going to focus on what areas of research we're going to songs with within the law. And so then that was for another few years and I I I did sort of my time there. Was that while you were hey Dave was that while you're getting your Thursday? Yeah, actually, yeah, so I I did my PhD while I was working as a researcher in the lab. So I didn't pay state park time, right so that that was actually mentioned so and not recommended. I I don't recommend anyone trying to do the PHD part-time if they can help it because it's a fairly young and I should prefer upload, you know work in your day job on doing it. Now your PhD as well. I was fortunate in that there was a lot of overlap obviously when I was doing so I was lucky enough wage and it was not a very technical PhD so that that was no problem. So yeah, so we so I did that for a number of years off. I chance meeting with someone at the University. He said I'm Russian guy and Russian PlayStation. Actually. He said he was asking me about the work we were doing and he said, you know, there's a guy know my University in Saint Petersburg and he's doing some similar. Would you like to meet him like introduce you guys and get have an interesting conversation and he introduced me to a professor of religion or cold-blooded murder Brennan and a lot of your night. On Friday, I you know and we started working together and looking for her if we could collaborate and but we're still in the nicest guys ever made was really really fortunate. I took two big introduced to music a lot. He's a lovely guy and pray very smart guy as well, you know and the try and clock for a long story short song. He invited him over Belfast and he stayed in Belfast for been working with us in and research group and we work back and forth and we were really interested in solving problems around. Hi. We we communicate with machines and high we can understand and phone number. We'd type in the except for example, like in their search engine and how you can understand the meaning in that text in order to actually retrieve the best information the best documents that would actually come back to service see the the user's needs. So that was kind of that the initial idea that we had that we started focusing on a telegram and testify we can actually do a better job of like understanding intent behind use your queries and we find new partners together and a phone number. The university had kind of caught wind of what we were doing and they they came to me and said would you like to send out a company and you know will be interesting if you are interested in investing in on business and helping you get off the ground. So I have to say I never considered and start starting a business. I don't know off the interstate you or technology business, but I kind of felt up like beer I really interesting thing to do and always very passionate about the work that we were doing and the research that we had developed off and we set off and we started the company which recalls Sofia And resolve my understanding meaning in content and we we had offices in Belfast. Obviously, we're a company name under the wheels had guys in Saint Petersburg. And then over time we the offices in Silicon Valley and and San Francisco as well and we'd sales marketing people over there. So it was really interesting Journey off and I suppose dumps really.

Belfast Saint Petersburg Dr. David Patterson Brett San Francisco scientist Vera AI Nets director researcher Dave Sofia murder professor
"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"This is episode 176 of The Voice by podcast. I guess today is dr. Patterson Chief science officer. And I queued oh we talk about Iquitos different approach to nlu. Its approach to unsupervised learning and what it means for custom voice assistance. Hello their voice by Nation. I'm Brett cancel your host to the voicebot podcast have a really interesting guests for you today. As we have returned to the topic of custom voice assistance. Aikido has a unique approach to Natural understanding. It was really worth unpacking in detail. We talked about some technical aspects of the NL you and the architecture that Aikido employees when it deploys a custom assistant on divorces. I should point out before we get started that we have our 100 voice inside or out this week. It is our weekly premium newsletter that contains valid qualms, but you don't find anywhere else we go in-depth into trans business strategies and issues that come up..

"chief science officer" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Do you recommend that versus sugar? So stevia. Yes. Oh, stevia can be beneficial in some way at small doses. That's another thing That's important as well. All of these things can have does dependency. You can certainly use too much stevia, and it can cause you no less of a beneficial and negative effects in the system and wooden stevia. There's a couple of different isolates. So there's glycogen sides from stevia. And then there's something called Reb A R E B. A What the studies on the microbiota has found is that the Reb a isolate from the stevia leaf can actually have beneficial changes on the microbiome. You know, similar to other what we call nutritive sweeteners, which are things like zyla tall and man, a tall, which kind of actors probiotics but also have the sweet perception. So I would say the reb. A portion of stevia would be better than consuming sugar in general. Depending on the volume. It's a small amount of Stevie is better than consuming a larger amount of sugar. And that Reb a portion if it's done in a small amount, especially in combination with something like a monk Fruit, which improves the overall taste profile of stevia where you don't have to use as much. Can can be, You know, non destructive to the system. That's interesting. I I had no idea about that. That's that's good. Yeah, you know, look for products that will have stevia with the red. A. Often, it'll say on the label that it's a reb a leaf extract. On Dennis. They're combining it with Monk Fruit. That's a good bet. That's a good option because in the work we've done on flavor profile and you find that you can go way lower on your stevia amount if you combine it with the sweet profile of month. Thank you for that tip. If you stop drinking sweeteners will a probiotic how relieve any damage has been done to the Microbiome. Absolutely, And that's a good thing about the Microbiome does always room to fix it, You know is an ecological problem, right? We've got an imbalance that's created by the artificial sweeteners. Andi imbalance can always be fixed, and that's a positive thing. And in fact, you know some of the sugar alcohols or some of the nutritive sweeteners, the silent halls and all that can also be beneficial. There's some people that don't tolerate them. Well, there's some people that We'll get some gas, bloating and discomfort in the gut. But there are others that Khun tolerated perfectly well and they can act as probiotics. So you do have options there. If you need a sweet perception, you do have a couple options that are Not harmful to the system. It sounds like this would also be a good place to have probiotics be involved in keeping your gut microbiome healthy. That's exactly right. So when you look at the studies on the type of organisms that the artificial sweeteners tend to suppress, and and the types of organisms that the pre biotics tend to increase, there were exactly the opposite. Right Are they have the exactly the opposite effect on the Microbiome? So the good bacteria that a suppressed by the sweeteners Are actually increased in growth by prebiotic so one way of actually overcoming any sweetener based damages to utilize a good prebiotic. My favorites are illegal, Sack writes. I think there's a precision prebiotic that I try to make a habit of taking every day. So we want the neighborhood to be is good as possible down there, right? No, I think that they just drive prebiotic eyes. Great. Put it in with my morning shake. Well, thanks cure, and we've been speaking with Karen Christian chief Science officer for just thrive, probiotics. About how to protect our gut microbiome from the toxic effects of artificial sweeteners. You can find out more about the spore based probiotics and the precision..

Microbiome bloating Stevie chief Science officer Khun Dennis Karen Christian Sack
US company trials coronavirus vaccine candidate in Australia

AP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

US company trials coronavirus vaccine candidate in Australia

"Minute another potential coronavirus vaccine is undergoing its first phase of testing Novavax chief science officer Dr Gregory Glenn says someone hundred thirty Australian volunteers will be injected in the first safety phase of testing of the vaccine being developed by the U. S. companies zero in late we have a vaccine that is going to be very good give the license and address this stuff is all about a dozen experimental vaccines around the world are in early stages of testing or are ready to

Chief Science Officer Dr Gregory Glenn Novavax
US company trials coronavirus vaccine candidate in Australia

AP News - Recording Feed

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

US company trials coronavirus vaccine candidate in Australia

"Of the dozen or so vaccine being developed to combat the corona virus begins. Its first testing phase Novak. Us Biotech company starting trials in Australia with some one hundred thirty subjects being injected to check the safety of the vaccine candidate chief science officer. Dr Gregory Glenn. We wouldn't volunteers worst-ever before from at of millions of people around clothing. I sincerely lane. We have a vaccine. That is very good. It'd be licensed in addresses Glad says the testing is successful. The hope is for the vaccine to be ready to be deployed by the end of the year other labs mainly the US China and Europe are also in the early stages of testing or getting set to start since the teams are using different technologies. The odds increase in at least one might prove

United States Dr Gregory Glenn Chief Science Officer Europe Australia China
"chief science officer" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

11:04 min | 2 years ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Work supporting our digestive and immune systems but one hundred percent sounds almost too good to be true so we've invited Karen Krishna chief science officer for just thrive probiotics to join us now by phone from his home base in Chicago Kieran welcome back to human quest where one hundred percent glad you're here I do be able to go out of your contract here so remind us about the challenge of being a probiotic cell and and what happens when it goes to work every day yeah it is a arduous commute Clark probiotic right we we have all of these natural systems in our body that that are designed to defend against invading microbes and of course the largest exposure we get to the outside world our oral cavity all of the food and drinks and and then uninvited things have entered into our world Cambodia's well that we we don't even know are going in contamination on our hands and surfaces that we come in contact with and so there are a few main gauntlet that that microbes have to go through the first one is antibodies that start even in the mouth so I. GA right which is immunoglobulin a on the fly by it because if they're to bind up microbes that may be problematic and and and neutralize them and take them down into the stomach for destruction so right off the bat in the in the mouth if you're doing a food based probiotics that could be a part of the gauntlet a lot of people are taking capsules so it keeps the mountain goes right into the stomach now the stomach it's called the acid barrier and it's called the bay area for that reason the T. H. which is a way of measuring acidity or something is so strong the political strong this time make that if you were able to touch your stomach acid with your finger it would burn off your fingerprints right so that's how strong the stomach acid is income he age of around one point three one point four that's a very aesthetic environmental your penny that'll eat adult right so those things are it it's a very corrosive strong stomach acid part of that is its role as the first part of the immune defense attempt to kill off the vast majority of bacteria that enter into your system to your route now if for some reason the Baxter makes it through the stomach out there and get into the small intestine the first thing it's going to come across if something called bile acid and bile is like that the fact that it's only in the fact like a soap and bile is really effective at killing bacteria especially ones that have been slightly damaged coming through the stomach acid washed into the small intestine and then if the bottled up and get them then their pain clinic and blind for your pancreas produces and scorching to your small intestine but also have antibacterial activity and can top up the cell membranes of these back carrying killed so that the number of things and that's not it you know that's not even mentioning the immune system in itself is going to detect and look for these microbes and potentially get rid of them if they don't recognize them and then there are anti microbial compounds that your intestinal lining sickly so there's a lot of ways come back here to die and as it turns out when we did our study the vast majority of chromatic backyard di going through the gauntlet I have to say you know we've been in this natural products world or in in this for for a long time and there are so many probiotics out there that don't make it to the small intestine a hundred percent alive now what what does just thrive probiotic have that that's different than others why does it get through yeah so that was our our whole focus in looking at a new probiotic was what kind of microbes could get through because we started seeing companies trying to outsmart all of these natural anti microbial defenses in the body and and using high technology capsules so they would fail our capsules enteric coated so I make them resistant to stomach captain long we tested the enteric coated capsules they also die okay so it's just a bunch of marketing and we have companies that go to insane lengths where we don't company that wraps the probiotic in the week and that is supposed to be a story we have to build nothing gets through and so we started saying well OK we've got this very intimate relationship with bacteria clearly backed her in our environment influence our microbiome so how is it that environmental bacteria can influence on my combined because there's a lot of research on this and the environment that you live in the bacteria in the ecosystem impacts in my mind so how is it that those back here can impact your microbiome if they can't get through and their dad all the time and so we started looking and natural microbes in the environment a came across these back sure calls for farmers they are microbes that live naturally in the gut but are also found in the outside environment they have the capability of covering themselves with the protein calcified armor like coding and that coding allows them not only to provide you with the I. G. aid but also through the stomach acid the bile salts and the pain critic and lines and so on and get to being tested at a hundred percent alive and that was fascinating to work because nature has given the guy a very specific tasks to get through the anti microbial barrier systems and then our next year yeah so they became why is it that they have that unique ability provide cash assistance and why zero that was the answer that you might want to know so as it turns out these microbes act as the orchestrator of our microbiome because they survived because they get to be in customs allied they are there now unction they get to the small and the large intestine eventually and what they do in the small margin happen it's really fascinating as it turns out the first thing they do they've read the microbial environment the server and they came to work for that its quorum sensing they they read the chemical signatures of all the bacteria and they figure out what other microbes are in that space date when they identify harmful of pathogenic organisms they will go next to those organisms and killed them all I like the new thing and a microbial compound all competing for resources in that little micro environment and in fact they've been used in the prescription drug world since nineteen fifty two for that effect we got infections my dad how are these microbes are if you're just joining us I'm Judy Brooks and I'm walking horse you're listening to human quest and we're speaking with microbiologist Karen Christian about probiotics sales and one hundred percent survivability I know there's another aspect of this and that is the role that something called H. U. thirty six plays how do you explain that is that something that's easy to understand it's totally up to eighteen thirty six is just a unique strain within the select groups of bacteria might lead but some of the bacillus subtilis indicator the call by the coagulant they are all spore forming bacteria that indicates which of the aged thirty six has a very unique role in that and because the system of course it provides with the spore former it gets to be in custom the life and want to get there it starts to produce really high levels of anti oxidants are correct no one in the guy they could use things like alpha carotene beta carotene lycopene lutein active damping Villepin's then all of these really important carotenoid anti oxidants right at the side of the above junction in the intestines so to provide you with this amazing what source of the anti oxidants reader absorb but then also those anti oxidants function as a prebiotic all the good bacteria and that's something that brings down oxidative stress in the dot so not only are we have a surviving bacteria but we have won the golden and tons of got into a nutrient after a year every time we have a conversation I am just in awe of how much our body it really does and how smart it is and you know especially when it's given a little booster helps but it's amazing to me that there's just so much that there's so much going on in that you know I've I've always believed that we are our bodies a self correcting mechanism were built that way if we can stay healthy iron in homeostasis but it still fascinates me every time I hear you talk about all those things are going on but I want to come back because we we we don't we only have about a minute left is this hundred percent they must be scientific validation for that are you guys wouldn't be saying it but a hundred percent that's that's perfection how can this be true you know and and you play in the microbial world in fact we we don't say a hundred percent within ninety nine point nine nine percent okay I feel better now right in biological terms you can never be under percent certain and when it comes to microbes and the reason why you say and and everyone that even that they may not realize it but you can look at any Clorox and got microbial products on the market it has killed ninety nine point nine percent of harmful bacteria right it never says a hundred percent because right now we don't we can't for sure how to the very last bacteria and so the the the tools that we have are sensitive enough to count to add to one single bacteria so I would say ninety nine point nine nine percent so we've done the studies to show that that the spores can survive ninety nine point nine nine percent of them will survive through this gauntlet whereas all we tested the vast majority of commonly sourced probiotics whether it compliments or food form meaning yogurts and things like that the vast majority of them over ninety percent of them all die in the in the stomach while I'll take ninety nine point nine yes me too yeah I'm looking over at thanks Karen once again you've enlightened us and our listeners to something that we should just all be doing every day and that is taking a spore based probiotic to keep us healthy thanks for joining us today you have a great day we look for to talking to you soon thank you again thanks thanks we've been speaking with Karen Christian the chief science officer for just thrive about the hundred percent well I say the ninety nine point nine nine percent.

chief science officer Karen Krishna Chicago
Activists Will Use Super Bowl To Raise Awareness About The Environment

Environment: NPR

03:30 min | 2 years ago

Activists Will Use Super Bowl To Raise Awareness About The Environment

"When thousands of people attend and millions of People Watch the Super Bowl in Miami on Sunday? Environmental groups hope that some people will look beyond the stadium. They want to use the super bowl to raise awareness about ocean health and the everglades. Here's Alexandra consolidate of our member station. WWL R N Jose Melendez Melendez was visiting Miami from his hometown of San Francisco decked out in Bright Red Forty Niners Jersey. But he's not attending the game. I'm not going can't afford artist expensive Melendez instead was here at a free festival put on by the local host committee that includes an environmental village. I was shocked to see all this environment. This is different. There were virtual reality headsets. That took people underwater without getting wet. You're going to slide this on your face. Scenic coral. FEC's Miami has hosted the Super Bowl eleven times times more than any other city. But it's the first time that the local host committee has decided to make this kind of awareness campaign focused on the environment they call it ocean to everglades everglades. Hard Rock Stadium sits right in the middle from the Atlantic Ocean into the everglades to its west. Eric I can Burg wants the nonprofit everglades foundation station one of the groups putting on this campaign but when they turn on the tap at home to drink water to wash their cars go in their poll. Whatever it might be the water supply that they're benefiting from comes from the everglades millions of Floridians get their drinking water from the biscuit aquaphor located under the everglades? That's partly why. Some environmentalists environmentalists are calling for restoration of the so called river of grass. The large source of underground freshwater depends on the health of the wetlands. I Burke says says the focus is not only on the everglades but also plastics in the ocean invasive species and algae blooms the last six years. We've had states of emergency due due to red tide and blue-green algae so this has become mainstream Florida's Republican governor got involved with the effort Rhonda Santa's announced the launch of the Super Bowl campaign reign on Earth Day. Last year. He really see how just the average citizen regardless of party regardless of part of the state you know they all WanNa see Florida's environment tended to under the previous governor and now Senator Rick Scott. Staffers couldn't use words like climate change but descent appointed floridas first chief science officer and proposed more than six hundred million dollars for everglades restoration and water quality projects. Frank Jacqueline heads the Florida chapter of the Sierra Club. His group wasn't involved volved the Super Bowl but says the game can be a platform to talk about ways to fight the causes of climate change in some ways. Were misleading the public by not talking about Out The bigger crises that are facing south Florida. The biggest one of all is climate change and sea level rise. According to the National Oceanic an atmosphere administration global sea level is likely to rise at least a foot by the end of the century. Jack alone says in another fifty years Miami might not be able to host another super bowl. That's how fast it's going to take for the sea level rise to make life really bad in Miami fans of Sunday's Sunday's game we'll be cheering on the two football teams but these advocates hope that everyone at the Super Bowl will also route for the environment for N._p._R.. News I'm Alexander Gonzales in Miami.

Everglades Everglades Miami Wwl R N Jose Melendez Melendez Nonprofit Everglades Foundatio Florida Alexandra Atlantic Ocean Hard Rock Stadium Senator Rick Scott South Florida Alexander Gonzales Chief Science Officer San Francisco Burke Jack Frank Jacqueline Sierra Club
"chief science officer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"To twenty twenty hopefully some of you will be river cruising with Robert and me in France in late July we've invited the chief science officer of the popular meditation app head space on to discuss this topic so let's get to our show hotline and say hello to Meghan Jones fell below that it is nice to connect with you today thanks for having me nice to have you here with us for sure all right we're post holiday is eleven days into the new year I'm sure many of our listeners have made resolutions further help the travel goals frankly all sorts of things we've heard that you think vacation is a great time to start initiating healthy habits to take back you know when we return home so explain why well I think that people are more likely to call these healthy routine that you might have had another point in your life often were not necessarily starting these routines from scratch for trying to reconnect with things are at and you then you you know at a physical activity exercise routine that we had previously but when you're on vacation you have a little bit more flexibility or not it's rush for time you can overcome some of those were often logistical barriers well I can't go running to the start can I get home from work and I run outside so often you know you just have a bit more speak to explore often when you're traveling that's what we're doing or exploring new places so while you're in that you know curious trying new things frame of mind you're free of those logistical obstacles you can you know try the new healthier gene whether it's mine for manager Michael movement that that you might actually want to pull back in into your day to day routine yeah I tend to agree with you Meghan so let's talk about head space I'm a user actually frequent user and I was a little skeptical at first because it's an app but I had a very good friend convinced me to try it just listen you travel all the time I have some anxiety when I fly so I have found head space very easy to use particularly when I traveled really anywhere in the short time we have give us all a crash course in how meditation through an app can help stress medication really is about training your mind and you present moment awareness and compassion which is both for yourself and other people and Amer training our mind could be more pregnant by either focusing on our grass or something being online like a visualization some of our medications are having you imagine a particular Klay or a ally each or anchor for your attention what actually changing in your brain is that the frontal cortex but the prefrontal cortex the area of your brain that is associated with again critical thinking is activated more in overtime actually get bigger through more practice and the emotional center of our brain particularly the amygdala actually decreases in activities while you're meditating I mean ultimately does offer changing side so inner of buying three think of there are these functional and structural changes in your brain that actually explain why it's easier for you to what is IT got we might have that thought but you're not reacting to it and the same way she was retried wrapped really what meditation is about notice your thoughts but you're just not as attached to them right so when I use it when I travel I actually have used on airplanes because I even though we travel for a living travel fly all the time I do still have anxiety of flying and you've partnered with several major airlines including British Airways Cathay Pacific United virgin Atlantic just name a few so tell us what you're doing and how does this benefit travelers well we've been in incorporated had space and the in flight entertainment without the work with a number of hotel partners Michael sanity for cal because we we find the people do have a little bit more anxiety after getting out of their normal routine that might have anxiety about clean which usually is there over at the meeting the probability of something bad happening your probability you look at the actual numbers you're actually much much cheaper than when you're so I think what we're trying to do with the airline and hotel partnership is meet people where they are help them and access that had the tools in the moments when they need them that might inspire them to pull this practice into their daily routine as well listen there some terrific companies you're so should with their and you know if I have my numbers correct from what I'm looking at here sixty million members across a hundred ninety countries so Meghan clearly you guys are doing something right I know right now the app is available English German French folks if you want and and there are other languages coming I'm sure Spanish as it will be in there but we have to wrap right now the website is head space dot com you can go find all the information out and download the app make a really appreciate your time best wishes and stand thank you very much thank so much Megan take care all right there goes Megan and Merriam relaxed just even talking to Michael about meditation for the Lafayette you fly any Verlaine's personal take take a look at that head space dot.

Robert France chief science officer
An Interview with Tim Gordon: The World's Foremost Expert on Hemp

The Frankie Boyer Show

04:55 min | 3 years ago

An Interview with Tim Gordon: The World's Foremost Expert on Hemp

"Because Kim Gordon his president. At functional remedies and he serving as chief science officer. You've been you grew up in the cannabis farming community in Canada, your love for sustainability and cannabis farming is absolutely been spot on you've been involved in this plant for almost twenty years. Now, you serve as a technical advisor on the board of the national hemp association. Also, as we mentioned, president of the Colorado hemp association, you've written many, many papers you've been educating us for years in articles newspapers television radio, and it's the conversation that we need to have we need to understand. What are we taking? And I want to begin this segment by distinguishing full spectrum hemp. Versus CBD. And are they different? Are they the same? Yeah. It's a really good question. It's a question. Many folks ask in usually let folks know this. You know, not all CBD not have supplement are created equal. There are processes and distinguished varietals. Everything that really plays into an end product. While CB is a great molecule, and it does wonders for the human body by itself. It point of efficacy is not as it would be what they full spectrum hemp extract. So what folks really need to understand is what am I buying? And where is it from? Where is it source from consumer safety is going to be really important around these many products that we talked about that you can see like you said perhaps at gas stations all the way to to to supermarket shelves in health. I'll there Devon eleven seven eleven. Yeah. Walgreens CVS. I mean, they're everybody's getting into it. Everybody's getting into it. And are they are they taking risks? Absolutely. Because like we like, we know right now, there's still no regulation around CBD products. That are going to be on these shelves. The FDA has not stepped in and put time three regulations around a highly sensitive subject matter right now, they are going to do that. They're taking the steps beginning the end of may to do those things. But as it sits right now. Consumers need to be not wary. But they need to be understanding of what they're potentially putting into their into their bodies. CBD is like I said is is is very popular right now. But not all CD products are created equal. So I encourage listeners, and I encourage everyone to really do some background on the products that they are thinking about using because they are they there is that potential that that is something that is labeled as a CD product may not have CBD in it at all. And that's been. Until we have regulations in place. And I'm excited to be able to participate in those regulations because the industry direly needs them. I encourage customers to really do some homework on the product that they are going to take an as as it relates to those products the difference between full spectrum and CBD alone. Product is is really that the full spectrum will will really emulate all of these fighter nutrients that that help CV in our body like Turpin and slab annoyed and all of these other wonderful stitches in the plant the full the full entourage those along with DVD. I really act upon our Endo can have annoyed system. And if you just listen to that last part Endo canal system, it's not Endo CBD system or an Endo THC. It's an endle- therefore many can have a night react and our. Relied upon VR system. So that's why understanding of the full spectrum, and how that can be better for the end of could have announced system versus the CD product of oh needs to be understood it it's going to take a lot of education to do those things as we are just really getting into to the. Oh, yes. The industry.

Endo Cbd Cannabis Kim Gordon Endo Canal President Trump Colorado Hemp Association National Hemp Association CB Chief Science Officer Walgreens Advisor Canada Devon FDA Turpin Twenty Years
"chief science officer" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"chief science officer" Discussed on 600 WREC

"One in every forty two boys among girls, it's one in every hundred eighty nine four times less common. But experts are learning that's not the full story the autism symptoms. Most people and most doctors are familiar with are what you see in boys in girls. There are a little different often a little more subtle. So there may be a lot of girls who were on the autism spectrum. Who are never diagnosed at all Dr Thomas Frazier is chief science officer at autismspeaks. I think the probably the ratio is not going to be quite four to one. And I think the reason is because we're starting to recognize that there are some girls that are under identified particularly girls that are higher functioning. Meaning that they're cognitively quite. Typical they have I write us their symptoms are more mild, and they are able to compensate for their symptoms. So those girls were missed we certainly are missing the girls the diagnostic tools that we have for autism more developed largely on boys. So we have a much better sense of how autism presents in males than we understand. How it presents since emails. That's Dr Rachel Lofton. Adjunct assistant professor of psychiatry at Northwestern University and a specialist in autism spectrum disorder. I think we're gonna find more and more differences in girls that we just do not yet understand. I think one of the most striking differences that we are aware of is that girls can have better pretend play skills girls can have better surface types of social skills. They can appear more socially adept and therefore escape diagnosis either entirely, or at least until they're older than.

Dr Rachel Lofton Dr Thomas Frazier assistant professor of psychia chief science officer Northwestern University autismspeaks
Alzheimer's: New research examines disease in women

All Things Considered

03:18 min | 4 years ago

Alzheimer's: New research examines disease in women

"Support for WNYC comes from Purdue pharma Purdue makes prescription. Opioids and wants to limit their use it's just one of the steps produce reports to help address. The nation's opioid crisis from. NPR news this is all things considered I'm Ari Shapiro Audie Cornish nearly two thirds of people. Living with Alzheimer's, disease are women scientists think sex hormones like estrogen may. Be one reason for the disparity NPR's John Hamilton reports on research presented today at the Alzheimer's Association international conference. In Chicago women live longer than men so it's not surprising that they make up the majority of patients. With Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia But Maria Correo chief science officer of the Alzheimer's. Association says there's growing evidence that something else is going on it isn't just that women are. Living longer right there, is some biological underpinning and because of the large numbers of women that. Are affected it's important to find out one possible explanation involves hormones like estrogen and several studies presented at. This year's Alzheimer's conference support that idea one of the studies looked at nearly fifteen thousand women. In California cut he says the research found a link between a women's reproductive history and her risk. Of memory problems later in. Life for example women who have more than three children may have decreased risk of dementia the. Risk for these, women was twelve percent lower than for women who had. Only one child on the other hand the risk for women who experienced early menopause with nearly Twenty-eight percent higher. Both findings suggest that estrogen which rises during pregnancy and falls at menopause may help protect women from dementia Paulie machi- a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the university, of Illinois Chicago says it's not just that women. Have more estrogen than men women experienced these very. Dramatic hormonal transitions that in the long run can give rise to Alzheimer's disease one way, for women to minimize the hormonal changes at menopause is to take estrogen that approach fell out of favour more than a decade ago. When a large study found that women who took hormones after menopause were. Actually more, likely to get some form of dementia they also seem to have a higher risk of heart disease and. Breast cancer, but Mackey says more reasons studies have found that hormones really can't help. Prevent dementia if women get them at the right time the effects of hormone therapy depend on. The timing of us, use later in life is detrimental whereas use early in the menopausal transition. Could be beneficial and analysis presented at the meeting supports that idea it found that in two different studies Women who took hormones in. Their sixties and seventies were more likely to have trouble with. Thinking and memory but women who took hormones only during their early fifties had no increase in risk machi- says estrogen may, benefit younger women because it reduces the hot flashes associated with menopause she says. Her own research has found, that these hot flashes are bad for the brain the. More hot flashes a woman has the worst, her memory performance and when we intervene to address those hot flashes her memory performance bounces back. Machi- says findings like that are renewing interest in the idea of using hormones to prevent, Alzheimer's and other. Forms of dementia John Hamilton NPR news.

Alzheimer Menopause Paulie Machi NPR John Hamilton Chicago Ari Shapiro Audie Cornish Purdue Wnyc Machi Alzheimer's Disease Breast Cancer Maria Correo Alzheimer's Association Chief Science Officer California Professor Of Psychiatry Mackey Illinois Twenty-Eight Percent