39 Burst results for "Chief Operating Officer"

Fresh update on "chief operating officer" discussed on Kentuckiana's Morning News

Kentuckiana's Morning News

00:50 min | 13 min ago

Fresh update on "chief operating officer" discussed on Kentuckiana's Morning News

"40. Good morning, Tony stop futures have come back from earlier lows and are now trading little changed. Shares, taking a breather, headed the first presidential debate later today. Run up to the election will be the dominant theme for investors. Ford's chief operating officer, Jim Farley, takes over as CEO this Thursday. Ford's profits have declined for the last three years, and it expects its first annual loss in a decade. This year. Shares are down 60% since 2014. LVMH has countersued Tiffany weeks after pulling out of its planned $16 billion purchase of the jeweller, the luxury goods maker said its decision was driven by the French government's request to delay the deal's closing in January. A trial is set in Delaware to determine whether LVMH must go through with the deal. And Microsoft office 3 65 teams and some of its other online services experience service disruptions lasting several hours before being resolved yesterday. Downtime is likely to be more disruptive at the moment because so many people are.

Lvmh Ford Jim Farley Chief Operating Officer Tony Microsoft CEO French Government Delaware
Fresh update on "chief operating officer" discussed on Scale The Podcast

Scale The Podcast

00:41 sec | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief operating officer" discussed on Scale The Podcast

"Hey, everybody Ramsay here with my out. Now this is a crazy one. We've never done this before and I'm really excited because well to be frank this is a black hole for a lot of companies is a black hole today's podcast is on influence or marketing. We've got an expert. Arslan is going to break down every single step in the process, what it is, how to do it right what systems you need, and as always we never ever ever are going to have. Somebody who thinks they know what it is we're going to bring somebody who is an expert this guy spent twenty years in software as a service, and he is going to love on us about how to create influence marketing and really help you grow and scale your business. So listen up we've got Arslan. Robinson. He's a chief operating officer and Co founder of Omni Star. Interactive. And they have a company called s affiliates and it's.

Arslan Chief Operating Officer Ramsay Omni Star Frank Co Founder
Fresh update on "chief operating officer" discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

00:39 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief operating officer" discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the podcast have the privilege of hosting Randy Oestra to the podcast. He's the president and CEO at pro medic health system overseen the not for profit mission based integrated healthcare. Organization headquartered in Toledo Ohio. Prior to this role he served as president and Chief Operating Officer Ostra is regarded as one of the nation's top leaders in health healthcare and has earned a spot on several prestigious listings which include modern healthcare's one hundred most influential people in healthcare and one of bekker's healthcare's one hundred great leaders in healthcare. He also served in the American Heart Association's Pulse of Toledo, received the award in. Thousand Eighteen. He has a strong commitment to the healthcare industry and community and serves on the board of trustees of many organizations including the American Hospital Association Health, Research and Education Trust the root cause coalition and many more his work in the in the healthcare system has brought about much needed change to improve healthcare of communities and it's with that privilege that I also discuss that he he received a doctorate in management from Case Western Reserve. University a Master's degree in healthcare administration from University of Minnesota and also a masters degree in management from the University of Wisconsin. So with that those credentials as well as. He's been able to do it. He's been able to do and I'm excited to dive into that expertise with Randy today. Sarangi. With that introduction I just WANNA welcome to the podcast. Over to. It's a privilege to have you here Randy, and so what did I miss the intro that maybe you want the listeners to know about you and what you do. You enjoy. It went to school their life. You know couldn't figure out what they wanted to do by. You know a very small town in Iowa and spent a fair amount of time early on in my career were being in spa but all across the midwest including behold. Little. And what's interesting about that I think just as we Kinda by back on where we've been healthcare and where we're going and a lot of ways from going back where we came from, ask delivering more care kind of A. Home Setting with care integrated back into people's lives and I think it's what we all want. So it's just interesting to think through that a little bit. I think of my own career hat almost going back to where we all started from thirty years ago. We moved away from a movie backwards. That's really interesting randy and looked to dive into that a little bit deeper. One of the things that comes to mind is a book by until go on Day on being mortal and he talks about this shift right the paradigm shift of everything from the Home Right folks were just choosing to do end of life at home and care at home, and it shifted today to kind of everything at the hospital. Now you're seeing that shift again. So I'm really intrigued by hearing your thoughts there. What is it just made? You decide to get into the sector actually my parents really didn't have. Any education. You know my Mama's with immigrants by parents were both older children are required to work, and so they were very. Focused on education and that's actually Adviser. In College went to that students poor the sciences and that ended up more from being an education to along the way I had a between one of my graduate school. Says I got a job. and. Bottom folding group being a lot of health care and that really evolved to occur. In those spent the last almost forty years doing care now on the away, my wife and I thirty. Jobs back interest in Minnesota started over our today Shaw out great administration role and get ahead no goals at that point outside of I was traveling and they want to travel in but new was impressed with people I met at healthcare. So starting from that premise is evolving throughout the last burgers thirty forty years to you know in terms of some of those agents early spare I had in my why I think it's fascinating the way that meandering road brought you to healthcare. And it's a good thing that it did you guys are making a big impact folks for the those listening programmatic is a health system communities. In Twenty eight states they have over four point seven million patient encounters the asked over fifty, six, thousand employees though the work being done there by Iranian team is is highly impactful randy. What would you say is as a hot topic that needs to be on every health leaders agenda today and how are you and your organization approaching it? Is, is, probably not about. Is the future model healthcare. We know health care is unaffordable. We started to read about this about Al, air very quickly getting the twenty percent of the gross domestic product we start talking about giving Medicare for all and and actually expanding the career program, and then we all about the crow models out working. It's affordable tremendous impact. It has people in their lives. And the the seniors, what it's doing people relative to the middle class and yet when we talk about expanding it and I think the biggest issue that we're not talking about is, what is this new model in? You know you put a way in the in the ground for whatever you want fifteen twenty years from now because of the trajectory healthcare is just going. To Greece continue to see a swamp girls get close. We're GONNA continue to see you know shit for consumer has all those. I. Talk about this shift in the mile and I think that's the thing that we will say that we need to embrace discussions about buried fully accepted politically sensitive Mary you know the. Industry's highest in that trying to preserve we have and yet clear we needed mom that's a great call out in you guys come from a very unique position in in in also having an integrated health system with paramount in the work that you're doing there. So what does that look like you know I mean if if you had to picture five, ten, fifteen years from now randy what does that new model look like even have any ideas that you think might work? Yeah. You're. So just in our thinking of them I, think it's something that the ball repeater time I love to say you know we bought this was. Just, rather the landon done by a you know he started out as a very traditional healthcare system. We you know our pride and joy was that we were local regional integrated delivery system. That's how he described ourselves. We had hospitals employee physicians and we had help when and very proud of that fact ill reserved us specific geographical area and the time a couple of things happen the end of thinking about the future healthcare and the things we are about. -sition your sow in the future and for a lot of America were in non Grove area. Of course, the market we serve is very grow area. You think about having the right scale and scope provided resources that you need to continue to. Survive in the future. There's probably some debate about what side that would be. Just when you guys the. About. The impact on people that that you know offensive American healthcare is a results we get from the American healthcare system and again comparing those other countries just or supportability issue off the all the waste out. Of the system. The fact that you know we have a very specialised based system and we don't spend enough money on social issues our country as. Happened for us because you know, we serve a region that. Lotteries, our country have social issues came very concerned about those issues are all in those issues of we used the word anger institution. So they're interested in obesity as kind of you know, kind of a Calvin issue that really kinda quickly drew the hunger and bomb story but we screen for food insecurity though for probably over eight years our stray millions of colors and Alameda extreme for ten social determinants and everything you read about in. Healthcare versus Al is twenty of your is related to what we do in healthcare eighty percents, Israel and other stuff in these social determines of how that are more critically important people's lives anything else. So you're saying that the offer affordability of care aging and what you come back to the mile of Napa Keanu. So integrated delivery system but now we actually have begun to call ourselves a how been wellbeing company revised say those words and Against the deliver services, not.

Randy Oestra President And Chief Operating President And Ceo University Of Minnesota AL Toledo American Heart Association University Of Wisconsin Case Western Reserve American Hospital Association Ohio Iowa Bekker Research And Education Trust Napa Keanu Alameda Minnesota Calvin Greece
Fresh update on "chief operating officer" discussed on The Economist: The World Ahead

The Economist: The World Ahead

01:26 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief operating officer" discussed on The Economist: The World Ahead

"The big companies that emerged in the late nineteenth century created the need for office workers, the office allowed for work to be coordinated via meetings for orders to be transmitted by written memos and for the employees to be supervised by managers. But all of this required people to work in close proximity in recent years however, technologies made it much easier to work. Remotely meetings can be virtual memos could be sent by email and employees can collaborate using online platforms but most companies didn't get the memo that offices had become a lot less necessary. This year however, the pandemic has made crystal clear that a lot of work done in offices can, in fact, be done just as well or even better home since the pandemic began those one of the biggest shifts in the work that the water never seen to wards working welcomehome teleworking comedian, whatever you call it and speaking the of giant glib examined in has been pretty successful. Keller. Williams is a senior economics writer at the Economist and he was one of the authors of our recent cover package on the future of work. So what evidence did he find on the question of productivity or? Generally dairies, then exactly measuring productivity, but they are measuring what workers do at that time, which is decent proxies, for instance, as a good study that looks up. Microsoft and done by some besides the Microsoft which is looking. So basically, how work has been time under lockdown and we'll find workers are able to spend more time on what they can focus our and if basically setting aside chunks of time with our external distractions to kind of get something done said. Economists about would say that hasn't yet been deep definitive study of working from home on the lockdown and in two thousand tippety. But certainly self reported for two years higher and there are indications that is higher from through the proxy sources as well. Now, your piece mentioned this controversial theory that officers make people less productive, which would obviously tribe with this idea that working from her makes you more productive. So what is it about working officers that makes you less productive? So this is one of the great unresolved kind of debates in the spatial annex literature if if I can call it not, which is is sort of both onto the question of whether. Don't face is good because it promotes collaboration between different people or whether it bad partic- because basically officers quite distracting and the research on this kind of interestingly quite sort of indeterminate. There's a study for instance that looks at the buildings in MIT, which is looking at how many patents and publications are Aku written win by more than one also in Mit, and some of the evidence suggests that being kind of really busy building with lots of other people that's good for activity, and then some evidence actually suggests the opposite side in sunset was the nation that being in a building with other people and the notion that water cooler moments or seventy. Interactions were essential for corporations to do well, is actually assumption that has less evidence than you might say, what about this theory that the switch to working from home has been smoother than some people expected because workers had already accumulated that social capital they were already working on projects with people they knew from the office. So doing it remotely wasn't that big leap, but that we will sort of through that social capital at some point how could we tell at that was happening when I suppose Intel is ultimately in the output of the FEMME. You could also tell by people saying that they felt that they were becoming detached from the company in that. Sense that you hear. I mean I think what's happening right now is a sentinel radio representative of of the potential of working from hiring because people based here for good reason, find it hard to meet in person and you get together as you would normally. So I think that the social capital fear that you raise is a valid one. You can't just lift and shift white works and in-person world to remote world and expect it to work. Erica. Brescia is the chief operating officer of get hub a company that provides online tools used by programmers, and those tools are built and maintained by a workforce that is mostly remote that means get hub has years of experience in managing remote workers and how. Things need to be done differently compared with working in an office I. Think the key is that you need to take a new approach to things. You need to write a lot more down than you used to need to be thoughtful about time zones you need to think about recording things. So people can watch them in their own time and there's still no substitute. For in person events in communication, right? That's that's human nature we crave that and we still need that and so you know, I think as we look at how work is going to evolve over time, it's really GonNa be finding the right balance between giving people the flexibility to work where they want and when they want but also making sure that we provide those. Opportunities for people to come together and really still feel connected to one another as well as having in-person meet ups every few months get hub also arranges team building exercises and social activities that happen online to build connections, its workers we and other companies do a lot of different things from virtual perspective. Right we've done everything from scavenger hunts to online happy hours to. Pub Quizzes and so on and and found different ways for folks to connect. So we're trying these different ways at helping people to connect but even that it's just not the same and I'm personally convinced it never will be you're always going to have that name to bring folks together at least some of the time. First person to get their winter jacket, put it on and did it all the way the top three place with twenty seven points. Team milkshakes everybody. Down.

Microsoft MIT Intel Keller Williams Erica Writer Representative Brescia Chief Operating Officer
Amid protests, media companies face reckoning with racism

Bloomberg Businessweek

04:51 min | Last week

Amid protests, media companies face reckoning with racism

"Every one of our daily Bloomberg BusinessWeek shows, Understandably, They're about thes dual pandemics, the virus and the quest for racial justice. And on this, Jason, we caught up with Lisa Ross at the public relations giant Edelman, where she is US chief operating officer. She also leads Adelman's Washington D. C office. She's president there. She also held several roles in the Clinton administration, the Labor Department and she was a member of the inaugural team of the White House office of Women's initiatives and outrage so great voice to check in with media fuels racism. 62% of all of those poll says that in covering the demonstrations against racial injustice, the news media has focused on rioting at the expense of peaceful protest. So I think that's something that people have felt. Something has been alluded to, But thiss research indicates is that actually true, the second one that there was. There's a little bit of a stench, which is Problematic that some people have to see it to believe it. So we did this research the first time in June and overwhelming numbers said that that Americans believe that systemic racism exists and overwhelming numbers says that business and brands have a responsibility to take a stand and to do something. Now when he went back into the field, So that was June, went back into the field in early August. Did it found a little bit of a dip, quite frankly, between the murder of George Ploy and early August And then when Jacob Blake was shot We went back into the field, and it went up. And so interesting that and particularly it went up in two categories. Republicans and people 55 older and so after the shooting of Jacob Blake, there was definitely an increase in the number of people who support protests. Ah, and the people who definitely thing to believe. Yes, Systemic Racism does exist, but interesting that we saw when we didn't see some of the incidences. Third ominous insists this is a space where I live. Super high expectation for business but low marks on business response today. So you know, when this first happened, everyone was making a statement. Everybody was releasing their data. Black lives matter. I stand against racism so forth and so on, and it was all attributed to the CEO. So definitely a sense all summer long appreciate the conversation. But what have you actually done that Its like, had actually done least I want to jump in. And we've we've been looking after. Have Richard to Richard. Gentlemen, join us several times to talk about this barometer on as it's you know how it has been. Certainly through the pandemic. Talk to me. You guys were at the nexus of talking to so many different CEOs. You have this high level. No conversations. I do wonder. You know, everyone's saying it's going to be different this time around, but I you know, I'd be really wealthy lady if I got a nickel for every time I heard that, you know, there are high expectations right of business to do the right thing and not just talk about okay, we're gonna do No, a focus group and we're going to do this. We're going to do that, but rather really make some change to make sure that they have a diverse workforce that they have diverse suppliers in their supply change. I mean, the's air, the things that move the needle so Are you having this high level conversations? And do you have those high hopes that things actually do change? Carol, you're spot on and everything that you've noted that saying something is one thing doing something is dramatically different and the respondent Overwhelmingly agree. So yeah. Um, I I believe that things will change because the CEO is that we're talking to are intimately concerned and involved about these issues, but to be afraid for many of them, this is uncharted territory. You know, when we first started advising many CEOs were like I want to say something. But health isn't in order, and I'm like, yes what No one's houses in order. That's why we're having the problems that we're having. But you still have to speak out. You know a lot of for CEOs. A lot of this for us is these air lived experiences for many people, and for many CEOs who are overwhelmingly white, male, mainstream Christian Straight I the list experiences. Other people seem to have does not affect them. And so in many ways they're trying to catch up culturally with what's happening in the rest of the world. Now is the intense there absolutely is their heart in the right place. Absolutely. But many of them are catching up in their learning about things, which I think is impeding some of the progress that we're making. What they're learning. I mean, where

CEO President Trump Chief Operating Officer Bloomberg Jacob Blake Edelman United States Richard White House Jason Washington D. C Murder Clinton Administration George Ploy Labor Department Carol
Henry Ford Health System to close Detroit fitness center

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Henry Ford Health System to close Detroit fitness center

"The medical center on Second Avenue in the New center area will be expanding, and a fitness center called Fitness Works that was once open to the public will not be reopening. Midtown health managed that fitness center under Henry Ford's ownership. The Henry Ford president, Healthcare operations and chief operating officer has said that they are actively working with midtown health to find an alternative fitness center opportunity in Detroit for the membership. But that the change will allow for more patient physical therapy and rehab, which have been in higher demand recently broke Alan W. W J. NewsRadio 9 50 doubly doubly J News time 705 a spike in the number of covert

Henry Ford Chief Operating Officer Alan W. W Detroit President Trump
Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver dies of COVID-19, dementia at 75

AM Tampa Bay

00:32 sec | 3 weeks ago

Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver dies of COVID-19, dementia at 75

"Of all time. Tom Seaver has died. Among Seaver's achievements on the mound. 311 wins, including 61 shut out. Metodo. Fred Wilpon and his son, Jeff, the team's chief operating officer, said in a statement. He was simply the greatest Mets player of all time and among the best to ever play the game. The Baseball Hall of Fame said Seaver died from complications of Lewy body dementia and covert 19. Tom Seaver was 75.

Tom Seaver Baseball Hall Of Fame Chief Operating Officer Fred Wilpon Jeff
Students, teachers stay connected with remote learning

WBBM Evening News

00:53 sec | Last month

Students, teachers stay connected with remote learning

"Several 100 students were considered out of touch when remote learning ended before summer break. Now that CPS is starting the school year with remote learning, a nonprofit is making sure at risk CPS students are logged in and ready to go for the upcoming school year. Dr Judith Alan, chief operating officer of Communities in schools, says tutors and mentors are keeping in touch with that wrist students via email, text and video conference about changes in their lives that the you know the change in their their financial situation at home or illnesses. Anything along those lines. We have been able to kind of craft a way to work around it. Both work arounds are happening more and more, Ellen said. Remote learning has also led to remote communication between students and mentors. But Better that a student is more likely to open up about their problems via email or text. It was an update

CPS Dr Judith Alan Chief Operating Officer Ellen
Anchor is hosting pirated podcasts

podnews

02:40 min | Last month

Anchor is hosting pirated podcasts

"Anchor is hosting large number of pirated podcasts from other publishes. Today thirty percent of all the pod track talk twenty podcasts currently being pirated on anchor according to our searches the new podcast from the New York Times and cereal. Nice. White parents has a further five pirated copies hosted on anchor using the original artwork. None of those plays will be credited back to the original owner and ads will not earn the publishers revenue. You'll find more details in our show notes and newsletter today. PODCAST host Lipson has published some positive news if Larry Fantasy chief operating officer. We continue to report growing revenue numbers and profitable results in the second quarter during a period that was certainly very different than expected. The company posted good news total podcasting revenue up by ten point six percents in the second quarter. Laura Simms has been promoted to see. Oh and the company. Now how seventy four thousand PODCASTS podcast those transistors launched an API for developers. Captivate has addy Ghana as a destination. They claim it's India's number one audio platform and link with Paul Corn in their new resources sanction I'm on their advisory board. Booth Eight podcast studio based in Adelaide in South Australia has moved to larger premises and filmed the building process of their new studios willing to that from our show notes newsletter today, and also a link to house spotify revolutionized podcast discovery. It's an in depth look spotify is user experience comparing it to apple podcasts. Always have unveiled a set of new features to make podcast. -tising buying better they say including brand safety contextual targeting and add sequencing on awards hosted. The true crime podcast reveal snowball is to leave his day job as content director of Australian radio station triple. J He's to focus among other things on television drama series inspired by the podcast and Impalas News Sir. This is a Wendy's podcast. It's a new podcast from Wendy's US fast food retailer to bit of a weird listen it appears to consist of a sponsor message funded by the same offer read slightly differently. At the late seventies, early eighties, band talking heads. This must be talking heads is an album by album exploration on their work hosted by Rodney Gordon and. Fan of the seventies, early eighties, bands, talking heads, you talking talking heads to my talking heads is an album by album exploration of that work hosted by Comedians Adam Scott, and Scott or common, and

United States New York Times Spotify Wendy Adam Scott Rodney Gordon Addy Ghana Laura Simms Adelaide Lipson Chief Operating Officer India Larry Fantasy Apple Paul Corn Director South Australia Advisory Board
Turning video game tech into accessible tools

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:28 min | Last month

Turning video game tech into accessible tools

"Why can't we just or Wilshire up to an XBOX and play it? Why can't we just drive up and be able to control a drone in the sky or vehicle, and that's where this adapter that we developed. The freedom link came from is orthopedic. And Bill Binko Co. and a lot of people who are in those medical spaces have been saying to us for awhile you should be able to take these highly specialized highly customized devices that make ends of hours in order to put together thousands of dollars and just use them on different algae without having to reinvent the wheel every single. Let's talk about e sports a bit obviously. Sports are increasingly popular. Are there tools that maybe some of these competitive game players are using to get an edge that then could funnel in to accessibility technology even for non? Gamers. Lot of items that are not intended for the. Community that end up working out just great For example, this ord is the latest and greatest in audio technology everybody who's a Gamer everyone who's a player as a discord account and this just a program you put on your phone in order to play in talk to each other during the Games. But now people use it for interviews I use scored more often than I use zoom these days. So Zuma's just inherently inaccessible. I use a program called Dragon Naturally. Speaking to be able to type. So if I'm you the call in Zoom, it beauts my entire computer. So therefore, I am Mel rendered completely unable to communicate with anyone else while that's muted. So that's why programs like this corridor better because they've already fought about accessibility and have included it where you know plays, legs zoom still have some catching up to do you know there's there's things like, for example, one of my most recommended a trawlers is called a track I. Are Right and it's a controller where you put a hat on your head with a little infrared cliff and there's a camera that sits on top the your monitor and when you move your head around down left right it can see that and it was originally intended to be art of Microsoft flight simulator. So you can look around the cockpit of an airplane like pretty down there but we discovered that you can use that same technology and make you keyboard inputs so. That now I can hear letters with just moving my head and that allows you to games. So what you're constantly doing if you're a disabled is re purposing and re engineering things so that they can be used in everyday settings. So maybe there is a controller that can push three buttons at the same time, and in fact, there are and you can use these in eastwards if they let you now not every eastport allows you to do this kind of thing. There are oftentimes where they consider this against the rules it's cheating etc etc, and there really hasn't yet been an opportunity for years with disabilities to really get into eastwards arena and you know that's one of those projects that we continue to work on his hottest work out could aren't we make it fair for people with disabilities play while at the same time, not giving a superior edged people who are already very, very good with a standard controller. So you know, it's just a matter of working out the fairness and figuring out eastwards fits in the disability community. But that brings up the point that accessibility in gaming is more than just about playing the video game itself. Absolutely. Yeah. you know we always say gamers is that it's just an attempt to allow people to have that way to on that social isolation though inside charities mission purpose is on vessel isolation, foster inclusive communities, and improve the quality of life for people with disabilities, and we do that like connecting you to other human beings, your family members, your friends, your community you can get back out into that and not be alone. Using video games and you know some people will be like, oh, video games are not important or I'm not a Gamer I. Don't WanNa I. Don't WanNa play. It's like we're trying to explain but this is just the tool they were using. It's like your car, right so you may not care about what you drive, but you just need a tool to get you from your house do hanging out with your friends and that's the same thing. The video games can do. We can get you to an area where you have a purpose of going in providing or your guild mates and and having that real sense of purpose. Gamers was really fortunate a few years ago to work with Walter Reed Army Hospital, and we were able to find that in instances where someone is coming back and they have had an injury that they were more than eighty percent less likely to consider self harm. If they had that close knit units the same experience of being over there with their army units. Over here in video. Games Steve Spawn Chief Operating Officer at able gamers charity he told us there were about forty six million potential players with disabilities in the US. Of the people reaching out to his group in particular have a physical disability that limits their ability to use traditional

Walter Reed Army Hospital Bill Binko Co. Wilshire Social Isolation Zuma Microsoft Chief Operating Officer Steve Spawn MEL United States
Wonder Media Network signs with WME

podnews

03:11 min | Last month

Wonder Media Network signs with WME

"Welcome to the New York Times Company Second Quarter Two thousand twenty earnings conference call. On the call today, we have married. It's cope it Levian executive vice president and chief. Operating Officer last. We acquired cereal production. We've also entered into an ongoing. Strategic Alliance with American light among other things will tell the American life podcast advertising. Next year New York Times CEO in waiting meredith cockpit. Hitlerian with the news of the company is to sell ads within this American lives podcast from next year. She also said that the daily has an average of three and a half million daily listeners few more than this podcast. The female founded and led podcast network. Wonder Media Network has signed with talent agency, w. m. e. to help the network expanded into books and television w emmy already represent pyrex rusty quill crooked media and Malcolm glad well answer Elton John. Lipton's CEO Chris Spencer has resigned. It worked at Lipson for fifteen years and we'll stay on as a senior advisor to the company. Last year bonus payments to spend. So was cited as one reason for a revolt by minority shareholders the settlements last October installed a number of new board members who's been publicly critical of the company and none of those are quoted in lip since release. Google. Play Music's podcast portal will no longer accepts new podcasts quote in the next few weeks according to an email from the company they'll be removing it entirely later in the year, you should be using Google podcasts manager instead the podcast academy holding August social a weak today via zoom, of course, meanwhile, new research into share of audio listening in Australia will be unveiled on August twenty sixth you'll find links. To both of those Paul's dot events and expanding yet further specify a hiring for a head of audio books. Is there anything that company won't touch a thank you to the podcast engineer for becoming our latest supporter based in Atlanta in Georgia the podcast engineer does podcast editing mixing and production so you can treat your listeners to quality audio you should be like them at hot news dot net slash support. And Impalas News Memory Lane with Kerry God limo interviews, different guest every week like Romesh Ranga Nathan Jo brand and. A Kosta talking about their five favorite photographs one. If you use the entail APP, you get to see the photographs as well. Also interactive with the tail APP is making the cuts with Davina McCall Michael Douglas. Not. That Michael Douglas presumably it's a podcast like trip advisor feel life apparently and just a little prick podcast with Pete Wiggs, it's all about two twos obviously and scientists using world of warcraft to learn how to fight covid nineteen that's according to wild wild tech which launched. Yes. Today these are the stories about your favorite tech companies that are seldom told they

New York Times Company CEO Google Media Network Michael Douglas New York Times Engineer Levian Executive Vice President Pete Wiggs Davina Mccall Strategic Alliance Romesh Ranga Senior Advisor Chris Spencer Officer Lipson Lipton Advisor Kosta
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

07:50 min | Last month

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

"Meanwhile. You video of your most recent training session on Youtube generates thousands of US tons of comments, and by mistake, you had on the option to include ads on the video so it generates some revenue for you. It's your brand. It's you. But now, you are penalized threatened with losing your eligibility over generating revenue on yourself and for yourself. So everybody else can profit off of you but you can't. Just to clarify with some real numbers, the NCAA generates over a billion dollars yearly injust rights deals the ability to broadcast their events. And the athletes upon who's back this has generated receive a good old fashioned opportunity to gain an education. Not without value but not exactly equal either. This scenario doesn't have to be relegated to the elite One Percent Zion Williamson's and Trevor Lawrence's who end up on video games. Literally, any student athletes should be able to build a brand and monetize it. They have access stories, fan bases, and if they work to cultivate and grow that reach, they should reap the benefits period full stop point made drop the MIC. Is there nuance to my dream scenario that we overlooking sure but stick with the overarching scenario? The Big Bird's eye view is far from equitable for student athletes. Now, it took fifty or so years, but we may finally be reaching a point that makes more sense for everyone without getting too litigious and into the weeds the NCAA for a longtime has forbade athletes from profiting off their name image or likeness forever. They've done this. Now that's an I l. name image and likeness if you hear that and I L. Legislation and I l rules that they're talking about the image and likeness. But California who knows how to party. Signed a law last year saying in our state student athletes can profit off of their name image likeness. It's called the fair pay to play act basically telling the NCAA you don't hold all the power. You don't set all the rules kind of like that push back a little bit myself. So well many college coaches and administrators started clipping their pearls decrying the coming downfall of American civilization if athletes are allowed to. Make money. Thirty. Other states passed the fair pay to play act and that really forced the NCAA's hand. The NCAA is now backed into a corner. You know they're like, oh, very well, if all these states are going to say that they can do it. We don't really have another play here. So they sat back and said, sure sure sure. Yeah, we love that idea. No of course. Yeah. We totally agree we universally and without fail we agree to allow student athletes to profit off their names images likenesses starting in two, thousand, twenty one. Now we can get into the. Details of that decision and the PR spin and some of the ways they've turned this story to be something they have always been in favour of, but we don't really need to stay on topic here. We have a good plan moving forward, which is great. Guy. Put this in perspective again, according to research company. Kicks Influence or marketing is a five to ten, billion, dollar enterprise and growing. Now. Let's put this through the Sports Lens a little bit and break down a little further. fivethirtyeight a wonderful sight gang. They did what they do best a massive data and projection project and put actual names evaluations together to come up with potential annual revenue numbers for athletes, student athletes here, some of the highlights and this list that fivethirtyeight put together, which is really interesting is just based on a combination of twitter and instagram followers with based on their following, but only as it relates to twitter and instagram. So there are other ways to monetize. It aren't even taking into account here. Okay. So let's get into this. Page EUCHRE's uconn women's basketball. Who I believe is still in high school is this is again, this is a projection, her brand yearly annual revenue numbers six, hundred, seventy thousand dollars Trevor Lawrence four hundred fifty four, thousand dollars, Haley crews, who's a University of Oregon softball player one hundred seventeen thousand dollars to see these are annual projected revenue numbers based on their brand name image likeness K., but it's not just these high profile players, right. We can get into the other big names in the world but let's talk about some this morning's to Spencer Leigh Iowa Wrestler could make twenty, six, thousand dollars a year leveraging his following. I did a little research into Spencer leaks. Pique my curiosity five, foot three, hundred, twenty, five pounds of pure muscle like. Do I think I by sixty pounds and he would absolutely kick the crap out of me. Okay. Back on track. Has a little over one hundred and twenty thousand followers. He should be able to monetize what he's created Dana Ricky Wisconsin volleyball. Player could make twelve thousand dollars annually. Again, we're not just talking about the elite of the elite. We're talking every student athlete that builds a brand, put the effort into it could make something of it. The list goes on and on this is just a sampling show. It's not just as who make dollar bills. All athletes who build a brand and create and distribute interesting content to grow a following. So what is this conversation all leading up to? What are we talking about here? Well, the future period. The Future of sports and student athletes up in the air the windsor changing the shift in power has begun and there is one company at the forefront of this change. influencer. NFL. CR WHO needs of right? Can I buy them all Dwayne Avowal apparently not in brand nowadays unless their brand name is I n. f. l. c. are. And their pronunciation is influenced if you couldn't figure that out. influencer is currently working with over five hundred college sports teams to assist the student athletes with curing content managing workflows and following best practices to build their brand and monetize their very existence or as UC, deputy athletic director Paul, Potpourri put it or could be perio-. Perrier spelled like the water but it could be perio- I don't know I didn't get a pronunciation guide with this. His testimony. USC student athletes have incredible stories to tell our partnership with influence or will empower all of our student athletes to share their experiences and give our community of fans and recruits a look behind the scenes at their journeys. As trojans love this these great testimonials I like that they want to empower all of their student athletes. It's fantastic influence worse collectively with the schools and. The athletes to create, win, win scenarios the student athletes monetize or the schools build their reputation and brands concurrently. Win Win. We Love Win Winds K now I don't WanNa, steal all the glory. I'm just trying to wet your appetite for today's guest. So I'll let her explain the rest and it's really good stuff here is chief operating officer for influence or needs to recant. Hi Nita today no one flow. Brian Real I. I'm doing great and I'm really excited to talk to you because it's always fun when we talk to somebody who's in a cutting edge part of the sports tech and the way the world is going rather than where it's always been I. think that's Exciting part of the conversation. So really really appreciate you coming on. Well, thanks. Did start digging in. It's cool. You have a background with the cowboys and with the SPN. So in like connick brands..

NCAA Trevor Lawrence US twitter Zion Williamson basketball Spencer Leigh Iowa Wrestler California NFL chief operating officer USC connick Spencer University of Oregon Brian cowboys Dana Ricky Dwayne Avowal Perrier
SpaceX Crew Dragon astronauts splash down after historic test flight

Kim Komando

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

SpaceX Crew Dragon astronauts splash down after historic test flight

"It was a perfect water landing in the Gulf of Mexico today for a pair of American astronauts onboard the space X spacecraft, crew members Bob and Doug are now safely back home on Earth Wind. Shotwell is the chief operating officer for Space X. This was an extraordinary mission for an extraordinary day for NASA for Space six, frankly, for Americans and anyone interested in in space flight here, CBS's Bill Harwood, a sexist Off a historic feat, launching to NASA astronauts aboard a commercially developed spacecraft and then bringing them safely back to Earth. The crew dragon splash down after a 64 day test flight now clears the way for NASA to certify the spacecraft for operational flights to and from the space station starting later this

Nasa Earth Wind Chief Operating Officer Bill Harwood BOB Mexico CBS Doug Shotwell
Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

Outcomes Rocket

05:24 min | 2 months ago

Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and thank you for tuning in. Again I have the privilege of hosting Tim Lance today. He's the president and Chief Operating Officer at Care Syntax before that Tim was also the Senior Vice President and general manager at Sentry Data, systems, and previous to that managing. Director of supply chain. Academy, he's had multiple leadership roles across the healthcare. Industry and today he gonNA be talking to us more about health technology and what they're doing to impact global healthcare markets with their work at Care Syntax Tim such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Thank you. It's great to be here. I appreciate you having me. Absolutely. So before we get into the work that you guys do at Care Syntax me a little. Bit about you and what inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah happy to so you know for me it's a it's been an interesting journey into healthcare. I think a lot of people get into healthcare sometimes because their parents are involved in was no exception to that. So my mother is a clinician she was in healthcare for thirty years and I learned from a very. Early, age how important it was to have a well-functioning high quality, affordable healthcare system in any community that I also got to see how complex it was for my mom both as a clinician as administrator and healthcare I watched a lot of challenges that she faced and so I promised myself that I would never work healthcare and graduated from college I immediately started working in healthcare. And You know I think today you know almost twenty years later now right would. Kinda keeps. ME excited and getting up every morning. Excited about what we're doing is you I experienced firsthand during my time spent several years with with your on healthcare and I worked in the frontline. Saw You know I'm not a clinician but I worked side by side with doctors and nurses and social workers and case managers to try to improve communication and coordination and clinical care inside seen firsthand how complex it is and how difficult it is. But critical it is to you know to our communities into our societies and in some ways I. think it's a it's a little bit how I feel about golf right as you can have A. kind of a a tough rounding Gulf. But you have that one magical shot met keeps coming back for more in healthcare little bit that same way. I think we tend to fixate sometimes on all the problems and healthcare. But then you are on the front lines and you watch how you can save a life writer keep a family together bring somebody back from the brink of death and I think there's no greater thing that that I'd want to spend my time doing than than trying to increase the number of great shots that we have in our healthcare system. So love at your those those winds that keep you in the game for the long haul. And so I, appreciate you sharing that. Plenty of like I'm not GonNa get a nail care you graduate. You're, in. Healthcare. I there's something about something magnetic about the purposeful kind of impact. You could have in health care and I and I share that with yeah and I think a lot of listeners share that with us Tim, and so tell us about care syntax and what you guys are doing add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes. So I think care syntax is we're very focused on. Surgery and on the or which I think in some respects especially in the US a little bit is oftentimes I don't WanNa say overlooked. But when we think about population health and a lot of the trends in the last ten years and we tend to hear a lot about chronic disease management and end of life care in these kinds of things and we're very. Focused on surgery, which you know if you take a step back, you know it's a, it's not the majority of cases in our healthcare system, but it is certainly the majority of revenue in the healthcare system for most hospitals comes out of the or and it's also a place where from a quality standpoint you know a lot of quality problems can begin. In the or you know if those surgeries aren't optimal. So this is where we've chosen to focus and you know in our vision as a business is to really enable caregivers to save lives on specifically for us. Kind of Our big vision is millions of lives around the world you know to be saved through use of our technology by by those. Caregivers at the frontline. So that's really really where we're focused and the think You always think about adding value to the ecosystem I, like to look at it in a couple of ways but I think the thing that makes us really unique that we've you know we've chosen to look holistically at the healthcare ecosystem and within that world of of the or. And try to look at stakeholder alignment. So you have kind of your clinical stakeholders, financial stakeholders, stakeholders, and operations, and supply chain, and then obviously the patient. So we really try to look with our technology at how we can bring those key stakeholders together right and drive convergence there, and then we do the same thing around the process side. So looking at kind of that end end process of what it takes to deliver a high quality safe. Surgery and so you've got you know operational components, throughput capacity management logistics supplies, and then you've got quality and safety, and then you have all the analytics learning and Research and development that comes on the back end in that sort of trust creates a continuous cycle. Then that's really where we look to add the most business value is by bringing those stakeholders together and by creating value, not just one small facet but looking at how can create. Value

Tim Lance President And Chief Operating Senior Vice President And Gene Sal Marquez Sentry Data Director United States Golf Administrator Writer
At least 15 women are accusing Washington Football Organization staffers of sexual harassment, report says

Todd and Don

02:09 min | 2 months ago

At least 15 women are accusing Washington Football Organization staffers of sexual harassment, report says

"Got an update on the Washington Redskins. You know, they're they're They're changing the name. But something is something else is that they've got a bigger problem than just just a name thing. 15 women who previously worked for the Washington NFL organization, they have now alleged sexual harassment of verbal abuse by former scouts and members of the owner, Daniel Snyder's inner circle. This is this is this is this is blowing up the meat to movement bigtime. Now among those accused of misconduct. A former director of pro personnel Alex Santos, the former assistant director for personnel, Richard Man, the third as well as the long time play by play announcer and senior vice president Larry Michael. He's been doing play by play for the team for I don't know, maybe 30 years. He was fired this week and nobody knew it. Nobody knew what was going on. All of these people have been fired. Let go, and it's kind of bit hush hush and under the table. Several other names have been mentioned, including Dennis Screen, He runs the business operations for the team, former chief operating officer Michael Grisham. They're talking about in alleging sex parties involving a lot of athletes, team owners, some coaches from other teams as well. And this is all unfolding. There's there's a lot of other weird stuff involving this. That Is circulating on Reddit and on Twitter this morning. None of it's been confirmed, so I'm not going to go there. But it's a really weird allegations involving the Washington Redskins football team. Crazy man is not only is the name extraordinarily offensive t many people, apparently, but it goes deeper than that. Yeah. Allegations of a sexual harassment, toxic workplace and culture. Which span from 2006 to 2019 where raised by 15 women, all but one whom spoke to the Washington Post under conditions of anonymity. They didn't want to mention their name. So take that with a grain of salt. No. Yeah, right world is going crazy. Yeah, get just get rid of don't even not not even the name just get through the whole team. Just the whole team, not only in and it's Yeah, they're kind of crumbling around just cancelled the

Washington Redskins Harassment Washington Post Washington Nfl Daniel Snyder Senior Vice President Assistant Director Michael Grisham Alex Santos Director Larry Michael Richard Man Chief Operating Officer Dennis Screen Reddit Twitter
Ford Reveals New Bronco After 24 Years Off the Market

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Ford Reveals New Bronco After 24 Years Off the Market

"Well, the competition is about to heat up in a new niche of the market, Rugged off road vehicles. Ford unveiling a new version of a Bronco tonight, now their biggest competitors Jeep, and they're not standing still either. Just hours before Ford's unveiling of the Bronco Jeep announced a concept version of a Wrangler with a V eight that it hints could go into production. Tonight, We'll see three Broncos, a two door or four door and a Broncos for these three nameplates that we don't have. Today. There'll be new customers and growth of the brand for chief operating officer Jim Farley sees demand growing for off Roaders and says the Bronco name has a lot of appeal, especially among the young, some of whom weren't even born when the previous version was around.

Broncos Ford Bronco Chief Operating Officer Jeep Jim Farley Roaders
Report Slams Facebook For 'Vexing And Heartbreaking Decisions' On Free Speech

All Things Considered

03:57 min | 2 months ago

Report Slams Facebook For 'Vexing And Heartbreaking Decisions' On Free Speech

"Facebook has made quote, vexing and heartbreaking decisions about free speech that is, according to an independent audit. And how the social network handles issues such as discrimination, hate speech and election interference. Facebook asked for this investigation two years ago. Today, the investigators are slamming the company and its leaders for some of their decisions for this week's Alltech considered NPR's Shannon Bond joins us and before we get going, I should mention Facebook is a financial supporter of NPR. Hey, Mary, least alright. So investigators slamming decisions by leaders of Facebook. What decisions are we talking about? This is really about speech, and the most prominent example is President Trump. So recently he's put up Facebook posts falsely claiming that voting by mail is rife with fraud, and he made a really inflammatory post about the recent protests against racism. The auditors say Those post clearly violated Facebook's own rules against voters depression inciting violence, But Facebook didn't take the post down. The audit also slammed the company's policy of not fact checking ads by politicians that something Facebook has gotten a lot of criticism over and over all, the audit says, You know these decisions really emblematic of how Facebook has chosen to prioritize free speech above all other values. They say that risk over shadowing games it has made fighting discrimination, for example, that no longer allows advertisers to target housing and job ads based on age, gender or zip code. What is Facebook say in response. Well, the company, as you said, didn't ask for this audit A commissioned it from Laura Murphy of former Sulu executive and a civil rights law firm and chief operating officer. Shelves Cheryl Sandburg said today that Facebook will make some of the changes that it's recommending. Including hiring a senior vice president, who will make sure civil rights concerns informed decisions on products and policies. But when it comes to setting firmer boundaries on political speech, that's something CEO Mark Zuckerberg has resisted. He says Facebook is committed to free expression even when politicians make false claims. And Facebook says it won't adopt every recommendation being made in this report. Now this audit drops as another development plays out all of these brands. I think we're more than 1000 now pausing their advertisements on Facebook in the name of protesting hate speech, or any of them are the organizers of that boycott. Are they speaking up today? Yep, And what I'm hearing is a lot of skepticism about Facebook. Here's Rashad Robinson. He's president of color of Change, one of the groups behind the boycott. The recommendations coming out of the audit are good as the action that Facebook ends up taking otherwise. It is a road math without a vehicle and without the resources to move, and that is not useful for any of us. Another boycott organizer I spoke with today is Jonathan Greenblatt of the Anti Defamation League. He told me he thinks the boycotts just going to keep growing and remember, it's already gone Global until Facebook takes real action on their demands. Yeah, it sounds like we now have this damning audit this big boycott pressure from for many directions on Facebook to change its ways. That's right, and civil rights groups told me they're not going to ease the pressure on Facebook. I spoke to Benita Gupta, She's head of the leadership conference on civil and human rights, and here's what she had to say about the audit. It is a work in progress clearly and pour. In some ways it is. Starts and not a finish for the civil rights community. Gupta and other leaders. I spoke to you know, they say it's just so urgent that Facebook act now because the presidential election is just a few months away. That's something the auditors also say they're really worried about. They say it in the audit. They say a Facebook doesn't get more serious about enforcing its policies, holding politicians to the same standards as other users. That will open the door to more voter suppression even calls for violence on

Facebook Senior Vice President President Trump Jonathan Greenblatt Benita Gupta NPR Mark Zuckerberg Anti Defamation League Shannon Bond Alltech Cheryl Sandburg Mary CEO Fraud Chief Operating Officer
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:10 min | 2 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"You'd have a case. You know there'd be a medical? Medical device rep you know who would be in that case, and they'd be bringing in some of the tools that were needed for that case it'd go through the surgery with a surgeon and the surgical team, the nurses, etc, and the tax, all kind of working together that patient leaves. Maybe they have a good outcome. Maybe they have a bad outcome. Let's say that they have a negative outcome. And they have to have a revision, or they have a post operative infection, right? How do you understand what the root cause of that was You have today from a from a workflow documentation perspective. We have the electronic medical record, but a lot of that is you know it's the personal recaps of the teams? When they get time to document read, there's a lot of templates in the Mars, nowadays, you know all of my kind of physician colleagues. That's one of the things when I get together with them, but they always talk about his just the amount of documentation burden, and how difficult is to sort of write everything down. Down and do it timely and make sure that it's accurate, and so that would be sort of your pre world. Right as I have a case. Maybe it turns out well. Maybe it doesn't I'm not really sure necessarily, if it turns out poorly, why would I can go back and try to read the documentation, but it's a difficult position. It's A. he said she said in a lot of cases. Or maybe there's documentation translate that into care syntax world, so imagine a hospital equipped with our platform. Where and I'll take it in a post. Kobe landscape. Maybe, the hospital wants to limit the number of people in the operating room because they wanNA, keep infection risk down right so you could have the medical device rap because their company is interoperable with our platform. Maybe they would remote into the case from a command center saw the pre prep would be done because of the scheduling and the Front End Management Rep would know exactly where. Where their cases were, and when they would join the case and remote in through our platform, and still be able to guide the surgeon and the surgical team through that case that that case would now have in addition to the normal, `electronic medical record write. It would be fully documented in video, so we could see any time in a case where there was a challenge. The decision that had to be made right, and you would now complete that case, and let's say on the back end. There was a negative outcome right now. You're equipped to be able to go back in with a pure source of truth and say, let's go review that case right as there's something we did mechanically in the cases or something that we we miss something in the checklist. was there any point in time with the closure of the wound treatment post operative Lee right where we could have done better. it gives you the ability to really understand exactly what happened A. You're mitigating potential risks up front, and then be. If there is a negative outcome, you can go back and really understand at every facet along that surgery. You know what? What could have been done better? Do we use the right products? Was the surgical technique? Good right? Is there anything that we could have done? That would have made that outcome better than you can stack those improvements into future cases, or if you're the medical technology company, you could factor those learnings into improve products right so this again is kind of where you bring. Bring the stakeholder, convergence and to the mix, and then we also, and we're doing a lot of partnerships now with you know with insurance companies well because they have in their vested those top quality outcomes as well so now you get all these stakeholders have the same interest rate which is, how do we learn? And how do we guide the process to? To optimal outcomes why I think that's really neat and being able to have everything live and available post. Op is certainly an asset. Have you ever run into just the maybe like stage fright, you know somebody says Oh, I. Don't WanNa I. Don't WanNa do this on video? Yeah, I think that's I think that's a pretty common common thing and I think. There's a ways that we've handled that one. Is You know in the United States? We are an approved patient safety organization by the Federal Government, so if a if a hospital in the US is using our system. You know all of that. Kind of work, it's done to review and sort of analyze. The case for quality is considered patient safety work product read so you can actually operate that environment and a very sort of safe protected way from a litigation standpoint. That's usually ended the number. One thing that people are worried about is is sort of litigation, but I think you know as we talked to. To surgeons and there's actually see technology and think through how they would use it the the response has been really really positive for us. Over the past I'd say twelve to eighteen months as we start to introduce this broader ecosystem into the market and as you think about other industries I like to use sports as an example or the airline industry. You know it's really the use of data, capture and video analytics that is enabled. You know in the case of aviation for to be extremely safe, you know if you chart aviation, dust versus surgical deaths think you'd be. It's staggering rights. How Safe Aviation is and how dangerous the operating groups and So that's that's I think an easy compared to think about athletics right I. Mean You know you go to put together? Together a good baseball team or a good football team, right and you have you know literally hundreds of hours of video footage on every single player, and these are players at the top of their game right right but these guys are still going everyday day to practice. You know Tom Brady every day still watching film right to looking to see what he can do better and how he can be a better quarterback or how they can run a play better, I think we're seeing that from you know from the top surgeons as they know they're. The top surges, but also recognize that the they still want to see that footage, right? They still WANNA. Know How they can up their game. They still want their patients to have the best outcomes us. I think we've seen a real receptivity to maybe not a hundred percent because it sort. Sort of you know something new to introduce a little better, but I think like any other area where videos being used. We're GONNA see more and more adoption go. That's really great. Tim and I appreciate you mentioning that because it was the elephant in the room right, I mean before wondering it, so I wanted to ask it, and it's really neat rights of the safety piece. Where can't be used for litigation? Right I mean that's that's concern for a lot of physician and providers and and secondly to think of it like a pro level player washes. His Games are her games right and does it to get better. What a cool way to continue working on your craft and getting better and increasing the the quality and the outcomes that you're getting. I mean super super interesting, so as you think about how you guys have improved business or comes a to hear an example from you, yeah! Yeah I'll give you maybe just a couple of examples, so you know new technologies currently any were used in thousands of operating rooms around the world right now about fourteen hundred in the US across the full spectrum of we, we offer so we definitely have you know just a lot of great anecdotes and great data on especially the sort of efficiency and throughput pius ride being able to use technology to you know to schedule more efficiently to drive the surgery more efficiently, so there's. Literally from a business standpoint I mean millions and millions of dollars in benefit to.

United States Kobe landscape Federal Government Safe Aviation Tom Brady Tim baseball Lee athletics football
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

09:02 min | 2 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket Sal Marquez here and thank you for tuning in again. I have the privilege of hosting Tim Lance today. He's the president and Chief Operating Officer at Care Syntax before that Tim was also the senior vice, President and general manager at Sentry Data Systems, and previous to that Managing Director of Supply Chain Academy, he's had multiple leadership roles across the healthcare industry and today. He's GONNA be talking to us more about health technology, and what they're doing to impact global healthcare markets with their. Their work at. Care Syntax Tim such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Thank you, so it's great to be here. I appreciate you having me absolutely so before we get into the work that you guys do. At Care, Syntax Tummy a little bit about you and what inspires your work in healthcare? Yeah, happy to so you know for me. It's a it's been an interesting journey into healthcare I think a lot of people get into healthcare sometimes because their parents are involved in the. Exception to that so My mother is a clinician. She was in healthcare for thirty years and I learned from a very early age. How important it was to have a well-functioning high quality, affordable healthcare system in any community that I also got to see how complex it was for my mom, both as a clinician as administrator and healthcare I watched a lot of challenges that she faced, and so I promised myself that I would never work healthcare and graduated from college I immediately started working in healthcare. And you know I think today. You know almost twenty years later now right would. Kinda keeps. ME excited and getting up every morning. Excited about what we're doing. Is you? I experienced firsthand during my time spent several years with with your on healthcare, and I worked in the frontline saw you know I'm not a clinician, but I worked side by side with doctors and nurses and social workers and case managers to try to improve communication and coordination and clinical care inside seen firsthand how complex it is and how difficult it is, but critical it is to you know to our communities into our societies, and in some ways I think it's a it's a little bit how I feel about golf read as you can have A. kind of a a tough rounding Gulf, but you have that one magical shot met keeps coming back for more in healthcare. Little bit that same way I think. We tend to fixate sometimes on all the problems and healthcare, but then you are on the front lines, and you watch how you can save a life writer. Keep a family together or bring somebody back from the brink of death and I think you know there's no greater thing that that I'd want to spend my time doing than than trying to increase the number of great shots that we have in our healthcare system, so love it. It's those those winds that keep you in the game for the long haul. And, so I appreciate you sharing that. Plenty of like I'm not GonNa get a nail care. You graduate you're in healthcare. I there's something about something magnetic about the purposeful kind of impact. You could have in healthcare and I and I share that with yeah, and I think a lot of listeners share that with us Tim and so tell us about care syntax, and what you guys are doing. Add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes, so I, think care syntax is we're very focused on. Surgery and on the or which I think in some respects, especially in the US. A little bit is oftentimes I. Don't WanNa say overlooked, but when we think about population health and a lot of the trends in the last ten years, and we tend to hear a lot about chronic disease, management and end of life care in these kinds of things, and we're very focused on surgery which you know. If you take a step back, you know it's a it's not the majority of cases in our healthcare system, but it is certainly the majority of revenue in the healthcare system for most hospitals comes. Comes out of the or and it's also a place where from a quality standpoint you know a lot of quality problems can begin in the or You know if those surgeries aren't optimal, so this is where we've chosen to focus, and you know in our vision, as a business is to really enable caregivers to save lives on specifically for us. Kind of Our big vision is millions of lives around the world. You know to be saved through use of our technology by by those caregivers at the frontline, so that's really really where we're focused and the think you always think about adding value to the ecosystem I like to look at it in a couple of ways, but I think the thing that makes us really unique that we've you know. We've chosen to look holistically at the healthcare ecosystem, and within that world of of the or and try to look at stakeholder alignment, so you have kind of your clinical stakeholders, financial stakeholders, stakeholders and operations and supply chain, and then obviously the patient, so we really try to look with our technology at how we can bring those key stakeholders together right and drive convergence there, and then we do the. The same thing around the process side so looking at kind of that and and process of what it takes to deliver a high quality, safe surgery, and so you've got you know operational components, throughput capacity management logistics supplies and then you've got quality and safety, and then you have all the analytics learning and research and developments that comes on the back end in that sort of trust creates a continuous cycle, and that's really where we look to add the most business value is by bringing those stakeholders together, and by creating value, not just one small facet, but looking at how can create. Value, I think that's really great. Tim So both clinical insights as well as operational and overall, just just making this high revenue area of care where outcomes are so important. Even more efficient and so tell us a little bit about the areas. You've been able to offer the most value and what makes you guys different than what else is out there? Absolutely so I think are key areas. We have The business had a great evolution. We started out. Really you know seeking to grow a kind of a large footprint in the operating room. you know we believe strongly at our founders are are both come from a legacy healthcare families as well so they had a similar experience to me. It's a bad thing. They always knew they were going to be. Be In healthcare because that's where their their family I guess he was but they believe really strongly that you know in order to affect change in healthcare. You really have to be at the frontline, so the the early days of Care Syntax were about a six year old business was really spent. You know physically being in the operating room, so we have you know part of our platform of products. Products is really geared around. You know workflow management in the or at how to how to capture moments in the or you know from an image perspective from video perspective, and then we've evolved from there into looking at kind of that operating workflow right of of how you sort of manage the throughput of patients through the ecosystem, and then probably most recently for us is really now evolving into that next. Next level over getting into Kennedy Clinical Safety Coaching Training Education, so we have those three components to our platform, and really how we view, this is now the ability to kind of have I. Guess End to end risk management around surgery. So that's tend to how we talk. Internally a lot is about surgical risk management from the time before patient even comes into the or all the way through till the. The patient as you know, is through their surgery and kind of post operative and I think what makes us unique and and sort of differentiated against what's available. Is that end to end management of the surgical ecosystem so to be able to take people from the very beginning all the way through the analytics, the safety and quality and technical improvements on the back end, and it's also that end to end platform structure. Structure that's enabled us to be in a position where we can converge these stakeholders, so I think you know when I look across the industry, a lot of people are working with hospitals in you have pockets of companies that are working with Med tech companies, and you have insure attack We're really unique in that. We actually serve all three of those markets So you know and then those are? Are The people you need all those guys to collaborate in order to really I think effect change on a massive scale in our platforms robust enough where we've been able to bring those those stakeholders together, and that's really great, and you know it's a complex business, and there's a lot of stakeholders like you said to be able to bring them all together and do some of the things that you guys are. Are, doing is impactful. So so I'd love to learn more of some specifics tem of typical routine whether you know whether it be a Heparin, e or a spine, or whatever some emt stuff like talk to us about what a typical workflow could look pre and post care synthetics. Yes, so Let's tweak it. Take a lot of surgical examples, but let's take for example you know. Let's take a total knee. Case kind of an Ortho case and I'll put it. Even sort of you know real context with with what we're seeing in corona virus, so one of the things that you know we're working a lot. On his sort of how our technology is leveraged in a virtual care environment S. we'll kind of do a proposal you think about you know in a in a appre care syntax, and even a pre cova world, right?.

Tim Lance president and Chief Operating Sal Marquez US corona President and general manager Managing Director of Supply Ch Sentry Data Systems Heparin writer administrator
Civil rights groups denounce Facebook over hate speech

KYW 24 Hour News

00:15 sec | 2 months ago

Civil rights groups denounce Facebook over hate speech

"Did not impress the civil rights groups they met with today, the group say. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg refused to commit to a timeline to remove disinformation and hate speech. That's prompted the group's advertising boycott of a company with money news

Sheryl Sandberg Chief Operating Officer Facebook Mark Zuckerberg
Civil rights groups denounce Facebook over hate speech

Robert Pratt

00:15 sec | 2 months ago

Civil rights groups denounce Facebook over hate speech

"Facebook executives did not impress the civil rights groups They met with today, the group say. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg refused to commit to a timeline to remove disinformation and hate speech. That's prompted the group's advertising boycott of a

Facebook Sheryl Sandberg Chief Operating Officer Mark Zuckerberg
Woman, 96, Stabbed to Death With Pitchfork in Chicago

John Williams

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Woman, 96, Stabbed to Death With Pitchfork in Chicago

"South side W jeans Ryan Burrow has detail. Chicago police say they responded to a call in the 7700 block of South Laughlin's there. They found a 96 year old woman and a 57 year old woman stabbed multiple times. Both will rush the University of Chicago Hospital where the elderly woman died. The other woman listed in serious condition. Police have a 41 year old man in custody, who they say has a history of mental illness. He was also hurt. They're investigating it as a domestic homicide of a senior citizen Ryan Burro. W G. En ou. Facebook's chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, says the

Ryan Burrow Ryan Burro Sheryl Sandberg South Laughlin University Of Chicago Hospital Chief Operating Officer Chicago Facebook
Germany to revamp financial oversight after Wirecard scandal

Barnett Financial Hour w/ Rick Barnett

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Germany to revamp financial oversight after Wirecard scandal

"Correspondent Jeremy House Germany's finance minister says he wants to revamp the oversight system for the country's financial industry in the wake of an accounting scandal of payment systems provider wire card. The Munich based company filed for bankruptcy recently after otters could not find the counts in the Philippines that were supposed to contain 1.9 billion euros. The company's former CEO arrested and released on bail, while its former chief operating officer is on the run. Finance offices that wants to empower the country's financial

Finance Minister Chief Operating Officer Jeremy House Munich CEO Philippines Germany
Multiple Arizona gyms defy executive order to close

Arizona's Morning News

02:46 min | 3 months ago

Multiple Arizona gyms defy executive order to close

"Corona virus in Arizona, Today's executive order will pause the operation of bars, gyms, movie theaters, water parks and tubing with a targeted reopening date. In 30 days like the governor used the word pause, which sounds better than I'm shutting these suckers down right? But that order on Monday set off what could be a flurry of lawsuits. We've already seen. One lawsuit filed against The state of Arizona in the governor. Of course, that's from mountainside, fitness and this injury. So here's how it played out for one mountainside fitness location yesterday, Scottsdale police tell our TV partners at ABC 15 that a little before 10 a.m. After receiving multiple reports of the location near 114th Street and Shay Was open officers showed up and provided education. They were told at that time by management that the location would remain open. They did. And when officers came back in the afternoon, they issued a citation to mountainsides. Chief operating officer A citation for a class one misdemeanor, which could mean a fine of up to 2500 bucks and possible jail time. You know, I'm guessing $2500 might really be a drop in the bucket to what they might face losses for being closed. Right. So maybe they're rolling the dice on that one hears mountainside Mountainside CEO Tom Hatton after several of his locations received the same. We don't feel this decision was fair. We think it was extremely arbitrary. It was placating to trying to look like we're doing something for Kobe and not really doing something prick owed. If the problem Um, is this serious? But they weren't alone. By the way, it's staying open. I'm seeing live shots on my monitors this morning in the studio Life time fitness facility in the valley. Apparently, there are several franchises that are staying open. Yeah. People working out you get. Ah Ah, are partners over at ABC, 15 had actually a live shot into the mountainside fitness location. That's near 56. And Shay and you could actually see people in their working out. They have resumed in individual people on, you know, ah, the treadmills and lifting weights and stuff. Yeah. Orange Theory said they're going to stay open. Pure bar A. Which is, you know, one of those bar workout ballerina? Yeah, yeah, not like a bar like they're serving drinks valet. Yet they say their their studios or boutiques, not a typical gym, So they say they don't have to shut down. Ah, sorting through all this is Going to be crazy, but this could lead to a flurry of lawsuits against the governor from some other Types of

Arizona Shay ABC Scottsdale Chief Operating Officer Executive Orange Theory Tom Hatton Kobe CEO
Groupon's Struggle

MarketFoolery

04:34 min | 3 months ago

Groupon's Struggle

"We are going to start with some earnings. and honestly, this is one of those situations where you put earnings in air quotes. Because we're talking about groupon and the first quarter results. They actually weren't as bad as wall. Street was fearing. groupon still lost a lot of money and shares down about ten percent today. Yeah, it was not a great quarter for groupon. The shares the sales fell thirty five percent. Gross profit was down thirty four percent they laid off or furloughed about twenty seven hundred employees out of their sixty three hundred employees, and they also have a new CEO and coo left, so it's been a wild couple of months for your opponent hasn't been great. I'm glad you mentioned the management change because that was something I. SORTA noticed this morning when I was reading about this quarterly report and one of the statements was from interim CEO Aaron Cooper Aaron. Cooper's Bennett groupon for a decade or so, but I was like well. Wait a minute. What's the interim and yeah, as you mentioned a couple of months ago? The board basically said that the CEO the chief operating officer and the. Oh, yeah you. You're both Outta here. So. I'm not even sure where the silver lining is right now with group on because on top of everything else last week they executed the dreaded reverse stock split, and in this case it was a one for twenty. Stock splits so for those unfamiliar. Regular stock split is you sometimes companies will come out and say hit a two one split. If you own it for every one share you own your now going to have to, but of course the prices cut in half the reverse split is the opposite because they're trying to boost their stock price, and so they came out and said forever twenty shares you own. You'RE GONNA. Get One so I mean the management shake-up. The fact that Aaron Cooper has been there a decade and still has the interim tag on his CEO Title I. Don't Know Him, but I think it'd be a little miffed if that were the case. You have to wonder what the board is up to there. And then you know you and I were talking about this earlier today. Maria I. Mean this is we're in the middle of a pandemic. I think of group on I know. They have several business lines, but I think of them as more of like the experience company for a long time that's been their marketing like. Hey, go out and take a hot air balloon ride and we're going to get you a discount on that and that sort of thing and. Know again. It's not all of their business, but they are really taking a hit in this environment. Yeah, I think that the experiences is really where they get their bread and butter. That's what they're known for they are trying to look they break out their revenues in terms of their local and their travel revenue travel revenues less than ten percent local revenues, almost ninety one percent of that revenue, but a good chunk of local revenues experiences within that local space and so i. don't think that. That will bounce back anytime soon. I guess the only silver lining would be that as state start reopening, people and companies will be so desperate for anyone to come. have really good deals in the TRI news utilized. groupon and people will try to utilize it if they don't have. That steady income that they're used to, but it's still not a great outlook for groupon. It's a good point and I think that. One of the things they talk about active customer base. It'll be interesting to see if they're able to grow that in the next three to six months. I'm wondering if you think I mean. They have between North America where they have about twenty five million active customers and an international of of North America another sixteen million, so they got about forty forty, two million active customers. This is not a big company. The market cap is about seven hundred fifty million dollars. Do you think? Do. You think someone's going to swoop in and by group on just so they can get that active customer base, or do you think that there are still enough question marks that? That's not in the cards right now I. think it would be kind of a smart acquisition for some people to get you that bigger customer base, and for people to continue to implement deals. Everyone everyone. I love a good deal. I know a lot of people who have a good deal so having those options are pretty smart. If you're a big retailer or you want exposure into at a growing customer base of people who are generally live in cities, like deals like experiences I feel like it's pretty uh smart to grow that customer base if you need to.

Groupon CEO Aaron Cooper Interim Ceo Aaron Cooper Aaron North America Street Maria COO Chief Operating Officer Bennett
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

03:06 min | 3 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"A would not they'll be constant. Battles and baseball were not for the union, but the most important is that the union gave export free agents. Free Agency allows teams would judicious use of create to get better and give the fans that are teammates. We don't have you know from nineteen or he? Nineteen sixty four, a team from New York was the world series every year, but I made the money that was in those franchises, and they ability to get players the other than once you ready, Hanser stunk defied sports, nineteen, eighty, four to two thousand will be section of the graves and. All kinds of different teams playing in the world series. Free Agency did that, so the guy who will the council told was just speaking out of that. It had really thought thought. This comes a history of the sport. The two biggest reasons for the Union are one free agency helps this prince, the calms, which is the players and to the honest brokering revenue shooting arrangements. COPS understand out professional revenue-sharing is. You Buy. A, Bass. You anticipate that you made a lot of money on a yearly basis. You saw franchise ten years now. It's going to have tripled in value best. That's batteries and admits bet lately. You know, but you do that on a date when you have certain revenue streets. All of a sudden midstream. A union clubs come all. This central bank will come up and change your revenues. And you don't have the right to say that. G having known this with the club. I thought I was making twenty million, only making seventeen or I didn't know that you're taking my you know. This goes into my repurchasing price. You Know A. Pretty profound attack on on a clubs business. Take money from club and give it to another. And, as a result, tempers flare when it comes to share on the other side yeah. Yeah and we all the honest brokers of that so that that person just doesn't know about. I will be sure to let them know I'll. Call My. Perfectly happy to try to enlighten them. I guess where we are right now. In baseball I tried to ask people this who've been around the game for awhile. And who are have? Different, expertise, in the game. I ask them. What do you feel like? The State of the game is right now. Do you feel like it's better or worse than it was a few years back? Do you feel like we're on a trajectory for good things? Are you worried about where we're going? What's your? What's your perspective on the State of Baseball? As as it stands today, pro as a bad day to ask because we're in the middle of this pandemic, no baseball now. Before before the pandemic, I would have said it's as healthy as..

baseball Union New York
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

04:49 min | 3 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"I knew that. Might treated the clubs with a little bit. Not Leniency, but I would have treated the clubs with a better respect for how hard it is what they do but but since then I have tried to. I'm not saying gene I wasn't 1887. Let's put it that way when I was A. You know ready to file rightful. It's hard because when you are it, you're in it every day from that perspective where your job was. It's hard not to feel that way because it does get so contentious so quickly, but you're right like I. especially in this moment in time I've been trying to. Trying to tell people and trying to make people understand that baseball games even baseball games without fans in the stands to put them on a really hard thing in the middle of a worldwide pandemic. With all the different concerns that need to be addressed, we have to have patience we have to as a country as baseball fans in his baseball players. We have to have patience and say. There is a way I think there is a way forward here, but. The respect for how difficult it is like you said to put on baseball. CanNot be understated. Also you literally a unique. Belt this hasn't happened in one hundred and two years, so no one has ans- out of intellectual Miltie that you approach these. It isn't like a regular typical negotiation across the table to replace. Net The nineteen ninety seven basic agreement something like that this is a this is a very complicated subject, but and may have strong you're you're entitled strong feelings about? But. You. Can't commit to the species discussions. You know the scene with the same kind of. View of the world. As you as you bring to. The the wreck typical negotiation. At, one of the things the question of How hard you work, behalf of used to laugh about this all the time, but whenever anybody beat me up in the press I'd get calls from place. A g. must be doing something. So I would sell these guys. You don't understand. I kept sent Colt bummer Iraq. Jail you understand this. I get up tomorrow morning. If you write that, I'm going to get a call from you know how whiter he's going to judge..

baseball
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

02:40 min | 3 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"In the the NBA and the NFL the breaking away from this model now lately, but in the in the beginning. They didn't engage in collective bargaining. They engaged in the settlement of antitrust. Lawyers in the courtroom, negotiating a basic agreement as a settlement would draw the antitrust claims that will be put baseball players because baseball was subject to the antitrust laws for the longest time. Baseball players had actual negotiations. They were in the room. They will negotiate. IT WASN'T A. It wasn't gonNA fear and gene wars, you know. People like that it was the players when negotiating. We would their spokespeople, but they negotiated that lead to a greater feeling of solidarity with the players UK before, and how much time you have about, say a great story about. The nineteen, ninety, four, Nineteen ninety-five strike, and a player to whom. All players all great debt. A player who was up a player who lost yeah really Scott Scott Sanderson. Obviously you know your strike you. Have you know two hundred fifty, two hundred sixty two reaches two hundred thirty eight days. A lot of players to resolve is so good, but not as strong as somebody. That is the beginning you know, etcetera, and then some disaffection, so we call a big meeting in California three hundred players show up room, and you know this this this Oh, that play wants to say a few words about why we might want to consider giving up. This said we're play. Baseball gotTA. GET BACK TO WORK CLUBS Are attending, and they actually do put players in. Saint uniform numbers as the players on strike in Spring Training Games. And we have this big meeting and Scott Sanderson gets up and I'd like to show of hands. I like anyone who believes. That we should give the players who come after US less than we received from the players who went before us. And he heads. Not one hand went up and I turned to lauren rich at the time repeated. Please association I said. Clubs don't have a chance because what Scott was able to do. was He captured full the plays? Really what issues you have certain you you. You have certain benefits. They didn't come to you from like Manna from head. They came to you through the hard work in the solidarity players. Who went before you?.

Scott Scott Sanderson Baseball US NBA NFL UK lauren rich California
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

05:10 min | 3 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"Linemen and seven foot, two centers and six hundred five shooting guards. The other sports have become. The growth of species. Spatial! What that leads a lot of fans think. About baseball places that if just playing a game tonight, this Austria that is no artistry in that is to work with more blanche rump alleged told me that he would practice looking at a bad with one I. Just, put one on, so that his left eye to be trained on first base if a guy was on for his base so that he would know how fast they run to second on unattended steel. Towns don't think that happens, but guy training insult to see a game. Y You know it's. It's the the amount of street it goes into playing. Baseball is something that. Doesn't look that wake was not gonNA. They're not superhuman. You know in size dimension. The second thing is fans. No matter how much you tell this the matter. How many classical economists you roll out! Fans continue to believe that play a salaries. Did it take ticket prices when in fact they don't? Ticket prices are function of supply and demand, and they dictate salads every economist that you on both sides of the aisle. We'll tell you. At the driving force? The salaries is revenue principally from local and national television television revenue is the explosion of local revenue cable has contributed mightily to the revenue streams of the coins. They have the money. They WANNA. Spend it on plants and so players. They get paid because somebody has the money. Do you know few give column Cue Sixty million dollars for the next two years. It's not going to affect ticket price. What's GonNa Affect? Ticket? Prices is a sense of supplies, the man and the proof of that the to prove so that I always tell people I good matter of fact that a panel would rob. Them is one the Olympics. Olympics cost a fortune now. The athletes free. Why? Getting any raises..

Olympics Baseball blanche Austria
"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

The Twelve Six Podcast

01:32 min | 3 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on The Twelve Six Podcast

"I tell people I live two miles from the Bagel. Opinion New York. Obviously, it's been one time since I been there. I left. I left New York on. We left New York on February nineteenth. With Africa marched I right in the middle of vandamme. Trip was cut short. We got back here on March twenty billion here. So my landlord called me, they asked me for commission to go in the. To drop off all the mail that's been accumulating in the mailroom, so. I gotta get back. I don't know when it's going to be. To New, York Seattle. He'd you need a gallon? To? You can always count on me. That kind of a WHO'd sneak you a file past prison. y'All through the end agree. A.

New York York Africa vandamme Seattle
"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

04:00 min | 4 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Lightning around questions Ravi. Are you ready? Number One. What after using your phone? That's the most fun. The one I'm most excited about is the one I just downloaded the. If you, go about Tam reading books. Through a shot! Somebody and it's blinking if you're if you're. I love I get just of a book and fifteen minutes and I feel so. So accomplished after eating it because. It would take you I was I was to read a book, but if you can get a of and you can apply it in fifteen minutes I. Find it very exciting and Dan. Once. You cutest about something you've read minutes and you feel A. Actor by the new and actually double down and reading the book itself I love blankets. Food? My favorite food is. I would tie. I love high food. How about do you have a favorite Bagel spot in New York. You know I have I. Have a Tink Coffee Shop, right? Below my building on the on the first floor, I I go there for the cinnamon rolls and bagels which I love. I love it. What do you do for fun? I watch Bollywood movies. Bollywood movies is one of my favorites. I could see why he would movies in in the EMC in on a at time square so I go to the movie halls in what's Bollywood movies Magon. Had this. Exciting debate with the friends on. What the movie is all about I love God. Would is your best advice for a first time, CIO. Foot, a fulltime CEO I would say. Mostly I use across the word of God that actress on. Getting the financial capital for digital transformation. Very. Few have got it right on getting the human capital for visited so my time advice for CIO's would be. Get your human capital right. Everything else will fall in place. What question do you never get asked that? You wish you were asked more often. The cushion. I always want to answer is. His his mind needed ship challenge and the vantage point I am at. I can see things what other country because I meet people from different industries I be six sls. I've made got woman's Cadillac institutions I'm not as did that. I can see teams which others in my team can't see. I'm more worried about. How do I convince them to see what they're not seeing? And that's the single biggest challenge you always have. What? How do you convince teams to see what you're seeing and they the kind of new to go to the with do? Well this has been awesome. Thanks so much for joining Were you know it's been? I feel like we got through about a third of what what we wanted to get through here. So it was just a great time any final thoughts, anything's to plugger things. People should check out. Show, you know I'll be excited to motivations of chapters of this if you think achieved terrified I I hope you've enjoyed talking to me. I really learn this because one of the interesting aspects of doing the interviews as you time to reflect, and you get time to soak on things which you're working on, and the more you saw connected. The more you come, Chapa the next time when you're executing on something so sometimes I do Biz interviews to the flicked on to soak on so that What are we doing you better? Awesome well. Thanks for joining and we'll talk again soon. Thank you so much and.

CIO Bollywood Tink Coffee Shop New York EMC Tam Dan CEO Magon
"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

08:14 min | 4 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"The United States. which is one of which is our biggest market. and. We have been better on our cells because we train upfront investment dollars. And subsequently, what might potentially happen is? We might lose them. We may lose them even before we want is on it, but that's what you'll bet on your eggs. Board beds of saying you know they will the people who I us. Who get trained because Malaya's Ambi like the word they will do enhanced will hanging with us, so we bet it is a it is a unusual back, but we know in the roots of the company learning education as kind of a deep into it, so it wasn't as difficult to say that it might not work, but the challenge was. We have to invest this upfront even before we can reap the benefits. It's unusual because we we ended up. You know from Norway ad since two thousand, seventeen, being on the largest Kudos to schools and colleges in the US so that's a big shift, but once it started working. It was easy to convince everybody else in my in my organization that what white investment scale everybody knew that it's hard to hire you know the fact that you have four hundred thousand open positions in the US, very few jobs added into the. makes. You know that that isn't enough available to the market Ohio. So, what would you go in trade foot so the only way is debated? And deploy the other big shift we had to make is to go from stem to non stem, and that was a big shift, but you know our clients. Telling us that the technology by itself is important, but applying the technology to business landscape to the big award. And for that, we need a diverse imposed, and that was the shift. We mayor diminish for design schools, because experiences all medicine in the in the disadvantage. And then we made the switch to community colleges, because we believe that the digital backbone jobs as they call, them was a great landing spot for. attacked. We get from community colleges. And then we created this appendice goddess model with you none on and work with us. So, you land on a digital Bhagwan job. One job could be a data operations job at a security operations job as an example, have a we have a roadmap for them to new stackable degrees are stackable certificates, and in a a few years we want them to finish those tackling certifications, and we now have credentials attached to university partnerships so that they would get an undergrad degree somebody as the aspirations to lucile and the London work with as it's a, it's a unique program because. You would have heard in on Bantus programs in Europe for manufacturing. We've kind of digital space. This experiment weekend, really It can be that template to bring talented. The digital word from community colleges, which which potentially serve Lord the under served of sections of the society and therefore cleared the inclusive strategy. Into the divine. This template could mean that it could be. It would be scared. Eight point five million. Students will community colleges in the US, which is thirty five percent of the student population in the. US Super excited about this experiment of digital apprentice where you land on a backbone job, which is the back end you progressively move the front end and moved to the front end. Your equipped so well because you're hired online ability, so you're billing the stackable certifications. You could potentially be this extraordinary professional looking for. It's a phenomenal experiment. We started on and. Super excited about the prospects of the scale at which is cannot change. Detect pipeline for for for digital scales, so we talked the human piece, so if it's human plus gig plus machines, we talked to human piece I. Want to talk Gig Economy, so the GIG economy is something that I think has been both the most psych over hyped, and under hyped thing of of of recent, because obviously you see things like you know lift and Uber and post mates, and all those sorts of things, but the idea that a company can connect with someone anywhere in the world. Find them extremely quickly. is so fascinating to me for for example one of my buddies. WHO's a start founder? He was telling me yesterday that he's been using his his his developer for the past two years. Someone you know he's. He's never met lives overseas. You know pays them. You know fair wage. He's like he's. He's probably my best employs. Not Employees so there's a lot of upside to things like that, but there's also a lot of downsides to things like that and you know the Gig economy can really be something so beneficial to companies, but it can also kind of be a double edged sword that you know potentially has some some negative connotations either down the line currently. How do you view you know the GIG economy me from the company perspective. How should CEO's technology leaders be looking at the GIG economy to supplement their teams? I think it is a very important point. Look at how the economy is kind of represented on. Untrue. You primarily think it is about you know writing applications and. The opposition's attached to advantages. Drivers Connie the delivery companies food delivery companies A. Logistics which used the economy. The perspective I have is festival. It has to be looked better in in conjunction with. A full-time private human capital as called. And the power of this is to amplify. Your potential in times when you need it and Atlanta lamb on as when you need it, and that's what native noticeably bond funds do that ability to ramp-up. A team ramp down. A team is super fascinating, and that's what enterprises are struggling with so by bringing this into the mix of. Machines. you wanNA bring the agility. This Kahlil and the speed at which you could. Deploy human talent. The kind of jobs, I think which will go into the data economy. Variety them which are needed in life cycle off. Tech projects. That you have to a lot of heavy lifting. One of the examples I can think office s Ting of applications as you lapping leap, acid spill structure. How do you make sure that? You have to test occasions. You need to do a lot of heavy lifting and GRANDPA's today. Enterprise use consulting firms like us to scale up and scale down. The way forward would be that enterprises can do it themselves. They can employ the. The GIG economy, or they could use a thumbs emphasis, which can actually you know bringing that that it's not to to the life cycle. And, it are naturally sweet spots like distinctive applications, operations fit specific set of tasks and testing of allegations today I know of companies which have literally no. Onto my S-TESTA. All of what they have is a GIG economy festas. In fact I know fum. which has six hundred thousand wooded Estes, which is supported by hundred which? Full time with them and what the dude that.

US Malaya Ohio United States. Europe Norway Atlanta London founder CEO developer fum. Kahlil Connie A. Logistics
"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

06:33 min | 4 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Is primarily woke legend to finding problems more than solving problems as mentioned so that would mean you need more people to do. Lizards smokey a background of liberal arts, people with a bag of design and what? If if I may be procured of. A you might actually have more people coming from community colleges into the work. Because no longer degrees I'm going to get you work. What we do work is kills and stackable degrees, because you have on a lifelong learning continuum, so the ability to switch from degrees to skills. I think is a it's a apps time to do that and I would say what would be much democratized and work would be much conducive to go beyond him, and to actually reach out to associate degrees at people who don't have degrees and people who have skills and will have learn ability. You know that's the big thing which. I'm very excited about learning ability as a trade for people at work, we destined much more because you will have a change at rapid pace and liberty will drive how much you can change how much you could unlearn. Really on so these are a bunch of shifts I would say what is going to evolve and expectations at work is going to be very different. Yeah I. Completely Agree, and there's a lot to impact their oster with. Do you feel like companies should be a upskilling entity like? Do you feel like you know we? We have a lot of. Leaders that come on the show that are really focused on driving innovation that are trying to. Do, things like you know whether it's like Loco, development or turning people that are in accounting into developers for a moment, and then, and then back, and forth, or whatever it is developing capacity that might not have traditionally been there like what is the role of the company or the leadership team to upskill employees that Sam very important new as than the. Our tank. It's going to define how from. Just the problem of human capital in a digital age in the past, these killing was not such a big. For logic prices. But if you want to digitize yourself into future, which is secure, you have to rip up your human capital and repurposing and reskilling is such a big endeavor that it is no longer the responsibility of the individuals, but it is the responsibility of the enterprises of the employer. End The abroad to come together. RESKILLING And I was actually talking to some of my friends in academic institutions, and I was telling them how David come up from B to c word to be to be word. University today catered to students who come and work for them. Ed Tech companies like Cassandra density, they actually work for students who come into this kill themselves, but these killing is such a big initiative big thing for the future that employers will have to play a very important role in leading it. And employees will of course have to be part of that ecosystem, so employees and employers have come together for the purpose of this killing and and it will be the single biggest reason or constrain y organizations will not be able to will not be able to visit is themselves or why they won't be able to visit is obsessed to me. The entire academy ecosystem has to get up from ABC. Word would be to be worried. If. We, have the heavy lifting needed prizes to stay relevant in age digitally native firms out. Disrupting them. I have this fascinating conversation with policy makers policy makers to the government about what endless clinger's lies that. Governments Will Wyatt to cater to citizens in the first twenty years of citizens lives in the last twenty twenty five years of citizens, lives. Governments have mile wide themselves to the middle. Of The stock in the end and end unfair in the start of the end of the life cycle of citizen. And government infrastructure to get up for that, so governments now are walking on workforce. Development and workforce a workforce, these skinning I happen to be a part of the Governor's workforce for something in the State of Connecticut. And I'm so fascinated about the role in the role of government, so I would say the role of government, the role of surprises employees all have come together for this. Huge task, killing. If. Relevant! Part of the challenge, there is that the signal in the market is look at what you know. Aggregate jobs are open. If. You're take you know all of Lincoln, or whatever does he say? Okay? Well, you know there's half a million back in developer jobs that are available right now at any given time, so we know where the shortages in America at any given time of developers, but that is actually kind of like a trailing metric right. It's not a leading metric, because it's saying that you know in some ways. Obviously, we know we need to develop capacity there, but that was you know those wrecks have come because of. Of the need for those jobs that's not like a forward-looking metric. That's not saying that like you know. Those type of things are are in the future and one of the ways that I think is super fascinating If you look at like salesforce, obviously there, the amazing sponsor of the show we love them, but if you look at like their commitment to salesforce admins. This was something that twenty years ago. Nobody needed to salesforce Adleman and then now you know because of the success of their company. And thousands and thousands of of salesforce admiral. are needed all the time, and so they bill. You know they're. They're trailblazer platform. All of those.

Connecticut Ed Tech Sam Wyatt ABC David Lincoln developer America
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:13 min | 7 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Fully a chief operating officer over lifetime fitness Jeff how are you good morning Dave I'm doing great all outstanding there's a lot of people listen user clubs I one of those actually all of us in this room are in doubt we were just chatting about twenty minutes ago about a number of things that this corona viruses affecting around the world other than obviously in the news and what's happening and it's fascinating places like Starbucks places like your church all sorts of things are happening but we think about lifetime Jeff and I know that you've got some kind of protocol set up what's happening over there yeah well obviously as all of us were watching in observing the day to day stories around how this respiratory diseases is progressing and what kind of actions we need to take to make sure that you know we're following a healthy way of life protocol as we are as a company and make sure that we're informing our members and our guests what they can do and also what we're doing so were taken really aggressive action as you might appreciate Dave given just the sheer number of guests that we see in our twenty three clubs in Minneapolis St Paul daily on increasing the increase in our cleaning protocols you know we have this product called pure L. healthcare spray which is really been effective against the virus which is gone and so obviously putting out a pre arrival stands letting people use it obviously being really clear about making sure if people have any illness or sickness underlying health condition we encourage them not to come to a place like our club and refrain from visiting our club so that some things were going but we also want to encourage our members to stay informed and and boost their own immune systems you know there's a lot of things people can do it stick to nutrient dense toxin free diets get anti Occident rich foods berries garlic onions vitamin C. and the and help fight off these in for infections so get warning of sleep get vitamin D. and plenty of sunshine all these things that people can take control of their own health and make sure they can fight it because the odds are that it's going to come through the system and we want to make sure that our members and our guests are thinking about prevention versus panic as the governor said yesterday or two days ago yeah well good hygiene to you know its interest in the job because we've known for a long time you should wash your hands frequently at least twenty seconds but right now it's getting more emphasis than ever and that's probably a good thing yeah you hear people everywhere now just singing the songs for the twenty second duration washing their hands covering their mouth and nose when their conference season keep your hands away from their face all these things that we have been told there is but I think people are understanding the seriousness of it right now and so it's great and I think you know having the responsibility that we want to take as a company is important but also trying to ensure that our our members and guests are thinking about it as well the same way Jeff what kind of attendance have you seen inside the club's hazard but any kind of drop off or is it pretty normal well this is that's a discussion that we're having daily and I will tell you that we haven't seen any changes in the traffic patterns or utilization of our clubs in all on average I would say in Minneapolis St Paul across all the twenty three clubs we average about fifty thousand swipes per month and so we see we've continued to see that same trend across the nation not just in Minneapolis Saint Paul and so that's a good sign I think of situations like this as you can appreciate Dave as a member and you and your folks there that the social interactions are really valuable and of staying healthy and active through moderate exercise can actually help improve the immune system of course and help you fight off these kinds of illnesses and that's important is well Hey Jeff before you go you mentioned the the national clubs what is the presence now of lifetime how or where are you while many places outside of Minnesota yeah what about a hundred and fifty or so hundred fifty one clubs nationally three in Canada in the greater Toronto market and we're actually open a new one tonight in the Arizona in the Biltmore Scott still location so that'll be I think you probably hundred fifty two I know my PR people tell me I'm getting along with that number but as a way to keep up the best I can and we just we do keep Roland successfully when I think you've got you deliver based on the member experience as your centerpoint your true north you continue to have a great product that people come Jeff thanks for taking a phone call I appreciate the update that's a lot of people listening in order going to the club right now so may have just finished working out the club appreciate you letting us know what's going on great to talk to you today they've always great Jeff thank you Jeff this week full chief operating officer over life time fitness you've been there a couple of decades now but he's responsible for all their club operations as you.

chief operating officer Dave Jeff
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:44 min | 9 months ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Thanks for diving into those it really A. It really helped clarify the the new program that you guys are working on and so my Nisha Super Super Interesting work that you and your team are up to over there. It's time for the lightning round and after the lightning round a favorite book that you recommend to the listeners. You're ready sure all right. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes? I would say break down the barriers between the industries within healthcare Our incentives are not aligned to have everyone working towards the same goal of better outcomes than better value of it. What's the biggest mistake or pitfall Paul to avoid trying to reduce costs without keeping the patient at the center of the decision making a lot of arbitrary cost cutting and talk talk about costs? But we're not doing it sustainable way for the system Yeah I will definitely. I love that one How do you stay relevant as an organization despite constant change well as a growing startup? We are always in constant change. But I would say the way A to remain relevant is to always be looking outside of healthcare for ideas and innovation and bringing that in a way that applies to health care that we're keeping pace as with all the rest of the great innovation happening. What scenario focus that drives everything at clarify health? Clarify help is really about offering insights. which are actionable to our customers and really enabling every organization or every healthcare decision maker to have that actionable information mation at their fingertips so that they can make the best decisions for their patients or for their organizations and that action ability is really? What's driving when we go? What book would you recommend to the listeners? When he didn't have one? I usually read fiction outside of work. Eric because I I love being able to see things from other people's viewpoints so I would say to a fine unbalanced by row hinton mystery and also the power of one by Bryce courtenay and one is set in India in the nineteen seventies during their Ghandi's emergency rule and wanted set in South Africa about a little boy during apartheid who becomes a boxer They're both really amazing books. But I think for me. It's it's about seeing a different culture and a different worldview through someone else's eyes and perhaps the different time periods to and to be able to immerse yourself on that because I think got the real learning experience that we're always take ourselves out of our own skin to be able to see into other worldview than windows so what I would recommend. I think those are great recommendations coming nations you know Mnuchin and in thinking about how we as healthcare leaders make an impact on on the lives of the customers and the people that we serve whether it be patients or or other businesses. This idea of putting yourself in their shoes. I don't think we'd do it enough. And and your recommendations. The Nation's lead the listeners to that is put yourself in their shoes. Get out of your shoes and Yeah Right Yeah Nice powerful I love your recommendation and Great ones for us all to consider and listeners. Obviously you know go to outcomes his racket that health in the search bar type in clarify health. You're gonNA find all of the resources we've discussed including links to the books a full transcript act ways to get in touch with clarify and so Yeah just go there and A Nisha time flies. When you're having fun I Would I would love if you could just leave us with the closing thought. And then the best place for the listeners could continue the conversation with you or somebody at the company while I love the way you put it actually to put yourself in someone else's shoes but really around But doing that in a way where you're thinking actually from the end result what what is it that actually we wanNA drive change around and actually. How can we do that in a way? That sustainable and what information do we need to be able to. I do that in a real way because I do think we are making huge strides in how we think about quality of care and and it doesn't have to be such a wrote way and so I I would encourage everyone to to really think about that and think about the power of how technology is changing other industries and then really say what does that mean for me. And how how could how could we do things differently. It's a great message. Many shy and and if the listeners wanted to learn more where can they go. Or how can they get in touch. Barron many ways to get in touch with us We have our website Clarify health solutions. I'm free to take any Listeners questions eh as well and also through Lincoln outstanding there you go listeners reach out the other website linked in is another option. When Monica gladdy chief operating officer clarify health? I mean it just was an extraordinary conversation with you today and Just really thank you for for the insights and ideas that you shared with us today. Thank you afraid to talk. Thanks thanks for listening to the outcomes rocket podcast be sure to visit us on the web at. WWW DOT outcomes rocket dot com for the show notes resources resources inspiration and so much more..

Bryce courtenay chief operating officer Monica gladdy Lincoln Paul Mnuchin India Barron Eric hinton South Africa
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

"They're fun silly fast and easy just like marketing automation with pardon you can go to dot com slash podcast learn more about VW marketing with the world's number one crm. We love part. We love fast and easy lightning round questions Winnie. Are you ready all right. Let's go in number one. What apper using on your phone. That's the most fun APP I have the most fun his actually Uber eats because it's about food was your favorite thing to order Oh probably Indian food and good restaurants Shrontz in in the valley. They love all there are so you're talking to a real foodie here so this could be a whole nother podcast in we'll bring you back. You'll be our OUR UBEREATS correspondent. I think they might have to to to pay for the ad reads but they but I think my favorite Indian in restaurant in San Francisco is Dosa. Oh I've been to does does this great. What about your favorite vacation spot. Probably the Caribbean the N. favorite book or podcast that you've read or listened to recently. I really enjoyed the podcast how I built this. What are you most excited for the future of marketing personalization. What is your best advice for first time. CMO Don't be cocky. Ascalon Austin's.

Ascalon Austin Dosa Winnie San Francisco
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

10:44 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Right on the right trajectory of the roles super appealing not surprisingly given what we've talked about. I'd been a GM twice a CMO twice. I was really looking for the next challenge and the the idea of looking across all the go to market functions and doing kind of the corporate planning growth and scale part really attractive to me. The third thing was largely the the partnership with the founders Joseph Walla Neelam era. We're looking for is they. Call it kind of a third founder. They they really wanted a partner for the three of us to run the business us together and all of us to have complementary but different skills and you know I brought the go to market expertise in scale expertise and they've got all the product vision and technical excellence and the three of us were beautifully together and that's just been a joy but I'm also very driven by competitive motion and I love being the underdog dog and when I believe that we've got the right product and the opportunity and we can totally win I love being part of that and so hello sign you know being and not first entrant into the e signature market with a long standing kind of you know forefather of the market in place but knowing that we could do it in a better more cost effective delightful way was super exciting so you kind of throw all those things together and it was sort of a magical formula allows there is no way it wasn't going to be yes so you also asked about inuit exciting things we're working on and this was also part of the drought joined the company at not not only did. I see this opportunity underdog opportunity around hello sign in the e signature market but we also had this really interesting idea at the time that since become a product called hello works which is about document workflow and getting PDF's which are really awful on mobile devices completely added workflow flo occasion so awful so awful right gosh so often your on boarding and you have to fill out your stupid W. Nine nine forums and direct deposit forms in all you have is your mobile phone sorry but you're going to be really unhappy and we invented. Hello works to kind of take all that pain out and and make the mobile experience awesome not just for signature but for any sort of complex document data gathering and processing type of workflows to anyway that the germ of an idea was also exciting. We've just introduced the end user component of Helo works just about six months ago so still really new and exciting and we're still building that out and seeing seeing some really fun things happen and then another big fun thing happened. which is we decided to join forces with dropbox so they acquired us back in February just a couple months ago and we're really excited about that too and I think the really motivating thing there is that our mission at hello sign has been to make friction lists disagreements available to every individual in every business around the world? There's no way we can do it faster than by being part of dropbox they're the world's largest repository of documents and they've got an installed base of half a billion registered users and twelve and a half million paying customers. I think at last count or something close to to that so you start to think about how could we bring our vision to the market as quickly as possible and it's really with the backing credibility and access to you have some around the world that jock springs so it was a beautiful marriage yeah. That's really exciting. I think a lot of times there's that kind of trepidation of like what what happens and especially you've known a ton of CEOS who usually are the ones who have help you manage that conversation you know and that integration and it sounds like you know it's a perfect home for her perfect partnership of two folks that are lined on the same mission. Yeah Yeah for sure it's exciting. I've been through. I think seventeen acquisitions twice acquired the rest being the acquirer and I've never seen one go this smoothly. Eh and I think a lot of that is their cultures were very very very similar similar good market motion to similar focus on customer satisfaction and success so a lot of really really really good points of alignment. That weren't technological. I think those were a lot of the reasons that it's gone so well so far last question before we get into the lightning grounds. You aren't advisor to a ton of startups number one. How do you have the time and number two. Are there any like insights that you get from those folks that really help with seeing innovation seeing ideas from the field getting to know what's going on or just you know kind of keeping up with the technological trek logical. Jones's as it were. Oh that that is the primary reason to do it other than you know giving back like. I love sharing lessons. I've learned in helping others others. Maybe avoid a mistake I've made before but it is very much mutual learning kind of thing I I I get to stay abreast of emerging technology trends and meeting the great leaders that are emerging in growing companies. They're going to be ahead of me on stuff so it's very helpful to me as much as it is for them to to have access to my expertise so I look at it as a win win an I dunno I make the time. It's it's one of those things where I feel like. I got so much help along the way. How can I not get back. If I'm if I'm at a point where I can help. It just seems like the right thing to do and it's fun agreed Oh and you asked are there insights there that beyond just kind of keeping abreast of technology there are some really interesting common lawman off a call mistakes or like leanings predispositions. Maybe that are kind of shocking and really can cause failure her and so they're they're couple. Commons that really stand out to me. I think especially when you have a technical founder which is what's so common Silicon Valley of course the build it and they they will come philosophy is much more prevalent than you might imagine. Oh yes you're not solving an actual problem with other people know they have that problem or not. What is another topic of conversation. Perhaps but if you just build it for technology's sake and don't really have a target market target customer in mind then you're. GonNa have to grind it out trying to find your target customer and and hope that you can get them on board and I think just the bill and they will come thing is just more prevalent than it should be and that's one one thing that I really advise a lot around the other thing I found again. Largely with technical founders is some of them are loath breath to recognize what they don't know or unwilling to admit what they don't know and I think the best possible scenario a really great leader and founder is is looking for people to fill the gaps not unlike this what I described with founders here. Hello Santa Myself where they were looking for. Somebody that literally didn't have or story that literally had had the experience they didn't it is surprising. There are some people that I think have enough hubris. They just don't think they have any shortcomings. I guess or just are low to recognize them. I I that's one of the most important things to help a company as to recognize leader has to recognize what they're not great at and then go hire the best of the best that do those things well and former great partnerships they collaboratively become much greater than the sum of the parts yeah. I couldn't agree more I mean. I think that there's so much and I think it's just just any product centric founder. I think it's really not it's more of human condition that something that you need to valley. It just happens to be technologists here but you know if you create him you see all the people on Shark tank or whatever it is like people who think that the thing that they created is just people will just mass adopt now. It's the same thing with media we talk about the three three days of podcasting distribution distribution in distribution right like it is the one thing that every single startup absolutely needs in some home form or fashion whether it's you know a a large amount or a little amount but you always need it and it's always the thing that I is is is hard to find mind when your head is buried in a computer building product all day yeah totally. Oh and there's one other thing I've seen a lot too in those conversations which is that I counsel a lot around which is making sure that you are thoughtful about the timing for taking money and that you if you are going to raise money that you make sure you take money from the right people because those are going to be the people that are in the trenches with you and have your back as well as challenge you and check you on the things you're doing but I just feel like there's some companies. Were willing to take money from anybody which just isn't a recipe for success. It doesn't mean you're bound to fail but you're not as well set up for success. I think versus being choosy about the kind of investors as you want that have the great network the right experience the insights that are GonNa help you and are going to be great partners in times of trouble and not taking money at the wrong longtime. You don't want to wait until you're on your last legs with sixty days. Runway left to take money can't negotiate well sixty days. If if you're if you're rising scary stuff here but it had I'm trying. I'm Talkin seven days. I mean sixty days. I'm like that's smooth sailing. You're not even breaking in a sweat. If you have sixty days run on I was talking to a found her the other day who raised seventeen million dollars and was like literally out of money the next day I mean and is like and you're talking massive around right like a round. You know from pretty big time. VC's but yeah stuff happens but it and the reason why see that is like is is important to know the ecosystem that you're swimming in regardless of whether or not you're in Silicon Valley or if you know we have listeners in over one hundred thirty countries so wherever it is that you're swimming you have to know the kind of societal norms and all those things and if you're in startup world it's really important to know the desperation operation levels of some of the founders like the type of stuff that they're dealing with. You know like they say you want three founders because one person can sell the product one person can make the product. Neither one can fundraise. You know he just think about like that. Idea is so a third of your company goes doing something. That's not making selling the product so I think it's just important for marketers to know that especially when you're working with startups that there's a lot of opportunities these two to do a lot of cool stuff with them because your money is really important yeah exactly okay so let's get into some waiting around questions since these questions are fastened easy..

founder Silicon Valley Joseph Walla Neelam GM inuit partner advisor Jones sixty days seventeen million dollars three three days seven days six months
"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

15:06 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Just participating in those events gives you access to conversation through networking and also frankly GLI listening to the sessions where CIO's are presenting in communicating what it is. It's important to them. What priorities they have problems. They're solving and that gives me a great basis for conversation over a glass of wine or over lunch or whatever so that that certainly was where I started and then some of those relationships started to Gel and actually made friends with many of these people well as you do with colleagues that you work with and respect then we started to do things like bring. CIO's together on topics that we felt were relevant and important to the community so then I could start hosting some of those events ourselves and then the third thing turned into exactly what you just touched upon in in which is a an advisory board composed of CEO's and so- CEO Advisory Board to me is one of the most intimate ways to interact with breath and get feedback from and have meaningful conversation with the people that are potentially direct influencers on company strategy product strategy etc and so I really treated that CIO advisory board as a group of confidence where could share anything and everything about what we we're contemplating what we were investing in what trade offs. We were making what we were shutting down. You kind of say. Does this make sense. You know us. You know our business now. How do you see these decisions that were contemplating and can you give guidance to me to us on whether we're doing the right things at the same time when they're doing that. They're giving advice in context of what matters to them in their business and as a proxy for the CIO's that they know and so I always felt like that fairly intimate group of about twelve or so. CIO's was really a representative group of hundreds of CIO's but representative small group to let us have meaningful meaningful conversation so those things go were the CIO's go and start to build those relationships then start to aggregate people in a meaningful way in small groups six and ultimately find the people that you feel are going to give you the best advice and and be the most forthright in their view of the world and bring them together in undivided report format. Those three things have been kind of game changing coming especially because a lot of the products that you're talking about are are extremely technical. There's a lot that goes into that especially when you're talking about product marketing and especially when you're talking about products that a a lot of time have the CIO visibility and are making the purchasing decision but they're not the ones implementing on it might be even you know the practitioner. It is the person who's tour three levels below them that you know manages the day to day right how did you how did you look at product marketing when you're for selling things in an ecosystem where you know there's so much complexity in so much like technical proficiency around unlike new technologies and stuff like that well the interesting thing. Is You kind of have to touch all levels you have to know who your ultimate end user is is an NBA message in value for that individual so if you know we talked about hello sign for a second I mean hello sign is obviously a tool to send things for signature legally binding contracts quotes proposals whatever so the the ultimate person who's using it as the person signing thing and and so you have to have some value proposition for them but who's the buyer. It's not that ultimate signer. It's the person who owns the documents that are being sent out for signature in oftentimes oftentimes that can be legal but when it comes to content and document protection and security and safety that oftentimes lives within the CIO's organization station of the organization so then you really have to have a value proposition for them and in our case we also offer our product and services via why in a bi specifically toward integrating with other websites applications and processes and so then we've really got to have tools and messaging and value for the developer. That's GonNa work against that. API and I'm using hello signed just as a proxy. I'm in this to be true for any technical product. I think you really have to know the decision. Decisionmakers the influencers the users and frankly have the right levels three messaging content or all of them and so for a highly technical oh product that means you've got a very very wide array of content and messages you have to provide for the developer for example you'd have to have API documentation and on sample code and SDK's and various things that really help a developer build effectively but that documentation is deeply technical all very different than say the very technical information for the security team about how the infrastructure is and how hashing encryption work and all the things security professionals. GonNa care about to decide whether or not that product is safe for business use. The end user wants none of those things they just WanNa know. What's the experience like how easy it is for me to get my job done. And how quickly can I do it and so those things are a tough balance when you're talking about a technical product that has an end user component but that's kind of what you gotta do. What were some of your you could be one could be many some of your favorite campaigns the you've ran in the past that really kind of got to multi levels in God people on the same page some of that ABM flavor that we talk about now that really helped engaged gauge you know the the Kinda host whole buying stack there yeah the the one that comes immediately to mind was not a solo effort it was actually kind of a community effort among a whole bunch of SAS providers in an era when cloud computing and SAS technologies these were still relatively new and while I think the benefits were ramping onto SAS technologies were obvious. It's very quick. You can try before you buy. There's not a LOT OF RISK MR investment to get started. There was still a lot of fear uncertainty and doubt about the safety of cloud technology. Oh my goodness it's on surface. I can't touch what so so there was a lot of of that. Fud fear uncertainty and doubt and so what we did was we worked with a number of different SAS providers to kind of together create the concept of what we call user centric. It and made it somewhat of a public movement that people could join and support and upload upload their video statement around and so on and so forth and the idea there was we were trying to shift the conversation among CEO's and frankly it professionals to talk not about what technology I we buy because it's safest and most feature robust but if we thought about this as the technologies analogies we buy in support of our knowledge workers in support of the people that ultimately do the work that brings money into the company if we flipped the view entirely early and thought about the user as the center of design around it what changes the story completely and it really lends itself to discovering the benefits of SAS technology and it kind of forces the IT professionals to think in a different order of importance as to how you think about the technology stack or infrastructure that runs the company and that was kind of just a I opening conversation that we ended up having a whole bunch of CEOS really embrace and talk about on the road owed in their presentations and things like that because it was a way kind of under the covers I guess it was a way of making the CIO a strategic visionary at a time when I think we were shifting coming from CIO's having been more of a cost containment infrastructure management team and that was a big big draw for see. I was like Oh my gosh. Maybe we can help make. CIO's the heroes here really envisioning the future that will make their users more productive the business run better and in a more modern way more more cost effective way. I think it's such a great marketing lesson is like how do you make your your customers. The hero like we talk about it on the show. A lot is you. You know if you're telling the story of your customers like in the hero's journey forbade the hero right. You're not you're the you're the Alexa right like they're. They're Luke Skywalker. Walker and you're the lightsaber not vice versa. The story is not about lightsabres. You know it's not about the tools. They get the job done completely agree. So how did you see the role. CMO changing with the rise of technology is with the rise of kind of all this complexity the the stack of whatever five or six thousand Martic options and all that stuff well in those elements. You just rattled off for very much a part of how the roles changed dramatically you know it is mostly driven by technology evolution because if I think of what we're able to do in marketing today so think of the most personalized website experience you can imagine the minute you land on a page knows who you are what you like what you've purchased elsewhere where you last came from and can personalize as an experience for you not just as an individual in the consumer and retail sectors but also in business if we know that somebody lands on our website say from pick a favorite company. Coca Cola that's very different experience that they should get about whatever product it is investigating than if if it's somebody who lands on the site from the FDA so if you can start to personalized those experiences the nuts pretty powerful you can actually eliminate a lot of exploration and answer questions earlier in preemptively answer questions that haven't been asked yet but all of that is only possible because of the technology we have today because electronially we can discover where he comes from what domain they visit from what part of the world there and what they're you know. Behavioral trends are like online. There's so much we can tell hell about somebody online that we can serve up that experience and we can track what they actually did on the site so that in aggregate we can see what was most effective effective in moving people towards the answers they were seeking in coming to the site to begin with and so all of that is so different from what it was when websites first emerged merged driven pre websites right now we're talking back many many moons ago but twenty years ago or so you couldn't do those things and the technology wasn't there yet and so you really really had to do a lot more printed brochures and in-person conferences in visits and phone calls and things like that just a completely different way of marketing marketing and so as we've been able to move more toward a technology driven marketing university performance marketing. That's based on tech then you've start. You've got to really instrument the system to be able to find tune optimize and look for those patterns that improve the delivery delivery of whatever messages are trying to get whatever potential buyer and so now I think take that to what does that mean for the CMO the CMO has to be able to wade through those six thousand technologies in figure out what the right stack is. GonNa look like to give that best online experience and provide all the tracking insights that you want and that means that marketers today today are technologists and their data junkies because they have to be and so that is totally different skill set than it once was where I think twenty twenty five years ago or so a lot of marketers were much more brand centric and the way that they you know exercise invested and skill honed and everything everything else and now I feel like marketers. The best of them are really focused on tech the use of technology to best deliver message to the right target market so that's the evolution in that just means different skill sets different emphases the job definitions themselves are different than they once were how how has your view of the CMO and of marketing change now that you're sitting in the COO role are you do you take it a little easier on the CMO or or you. Are you harder would has it software disposition. What were you looking at it now from what angle at the unquestioned actually two things to comment on their one is how I interact with. CMO's that worked for me now just directly to your question. The other one is I think it's also really shifted if did how I see the interaction between sales and marketing and marketing and the CIO because those technologies as useful as they may a B also our potential vulnerabilities and entrees into your systems and so I feel like now the CIO has to happen the very tight collaboration with marketing on what technologies are going to be part of the stack for that company and frankly help the cmo to discover what does right tools might be so I think there's a tighter collaboration and there's ever been between the CMO and then on like how I interact with with marketing. I think that my background has and I really grew up in the product marketing side of things as we talked about. I think it's made me a great partner to whomever I bring into the business and the opposite of a micromanager I wanNA hire people who are so good at their jobs that they they're better at it than I could be. By the same token I need to be able to look at what they're doing in the context of the larger business objectives and be able to course correct guide or give feedback and be a sounding board award and I think my background lets me. Do that really really good way so I feel like if you ask you know the last three or four marketing leaders who worked for me they would tell you that I've then just a really good partner and sounding board and kind of idea person to help. Maybe take our ideas and expand them even further. I hope that's what they'd say. Anyway never yeah. Why are you so excited about the opportunity at hello sign and what kind of cool stuff for are you all working on now. We'll get that me excited is a few things. One was definitely the market opportunity. I look like I'm a big company girl on paper but I'm actually hot. I I joined Oracle in the late eighties. When it was one building on a hill and Belmont I joined documentary like fifty people I joined boxing. We're about one hundred people joined. Hello Senate about forty. I love joining companies were in this kind of smaller ready to scale state and then come and be part of that scaling motion that gets us to IPO PO Andrew Acquisition or whatever so certainly this was the sweet spot for me a by the time I got to hello sign that it was just perfect size.

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

12:07 min | 1 year ago

"chief operating officer" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Episode. Hannah's joined by Whitney Buck Chief Operating Officer of Hell Assign a tool that lets us her sign documents documents with legally binding e signatures when he also serves as an advisor and mentor to numerous startups including log. DNA and Y combinator continuity prior to hell assign Whitney he held senior marketing roles with box EMC oracle among other technology companies on this episode in and winning discussed everything from how her past work experience and marketing led it hurts wants to become a coo to her three keys to working well with CIO's in housing market. A technical product mission daily is made by our team at Michigan Dot Org. I mean phase on chief content officer here mission dot org.

Michigan Dot Org Whitney Buck Chief Operating Officer chief content officer coo Hannah CIO advisor