20 Episode results for "Chief Of Staff"

November 1, 2018

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

05:00 min | 2 years ago

November 1, 2018

"Good Thursday morning. I'm Jake Sherman. And welcome to your political playbook audio briefing sponsored by charter communications. And I'm Anna Palmer, most Republicans and Democrats we talked to think the house will flip. There is very very little hedging among GOP insiders these days. So with that in mind, we bring you the playbook democratic house staffer cheat. Here are the thirteen staffers you need to know this is compiled by political Capitol Hill bureau chief John Bresnahan myself and Jake in Nancy Pelosi's office, ju- hamil-, George Cadenas and Diane doers deputy chief of staff. This trio of Pelosi aids has decades of experience and leadership. They helped the California Democrat with our internal caucus politics as well as shaping her policy and communication strategy for teams anywhere, Alexis Koby brand chief of staff and Brian Ramnik deputy chief of staff these are Heuer's top two staffers, and they are intensely loyal to the Maryland democrat, they help orchestrate where's caucus wide. Operation Yemi Watkins, Jim Clyburn, chief-of-staff longtime clobbered staffer knows the Congressional Black caucus better than about anybody and is always keeping an eye out for his bosses best interests g me fleet beast after of the house administration committee. This key panel inside congress is charged with overseeing the management and operation of the house itself. The chairman of this panel is often called the mayor of Capitol Hill because they allowed everything for parking spaces to coveted office space, Brandon Casey, the staff director of the ways, and means committee taxes are going to be huge issue for Democrats next congress. They have already said they will try to seek Donald Trump's tax returns on the hus- appropriations committee Chalan too young staff director government spending is going to be a major battle between Trump and the Democrats on all issues, but most notably the border wall on oversight and government reform. Dave Apollo he's staff director armed with subpoena. Power OG are as its referred to. We'll be the hotbed of investigations into the Trump administration or Pol a veteran of the Henry. Waxman oversight committee will be at the center of this and energy and commerce committee. Jeff Carroll staff director Democrats promised to push forward on an agenda that includes new initiatives to lower the cost of drug prices, which ENC will take lead on Amy Rutkiewicz. The chief of staff to Jerry, Nadler, if peach mint is on the table, it will come from the House Judiciary committee rut gin is a pivotal player in Nadler's orbit Angela Ramirez. The chief of staff to Ben Ray Luhan, one of the top democratic strategists winning back. The house Ramirez will play a key role in Luhansk quest to move up leadership. Sneak peek of CBN's interview with President Trump on Air Force One the president told CB and the Blue Wave is dead. It looks like Republicans are gonna win the Senate Trump says and he thinks they'll do well on the house. If Democrats do take the house and Trump tries to change the constitution through executive order. There's guaranteed to be a legislative clash on a must pass spending Bill to stop this. Keep your eyes open for the December seventy h funding deadline. It wouldn't surprise us at all Democrats in some Republicans try to use that deadline to ensure. Trump can't change the birthright citizenship principal, especially if you wants money for his border wall. Trump doubled down on his citizenship claims in Florida that you're times is reporting that he referred to the citizenship clause in the constitution as crazy policy. Trump also spoke to ABC news where he said the US will send ten to fifteen thousand troops to the border. The president also said the caravan is bigger than is being reported, and he knows this because of his own estimates. Trump also told ABC news that he tries to be truthful. He said when I can I tell the truth, and sometimes it turns out to be where something happens that's different or there's a change. But I always liked to be truthful five days into the election behind the scenes look at how house majority whip Steve Scalise is traveling. He's going to North Carolina Virginia, New Jersey, New York and Kentucky today and tomorrow. Liz Cheney the Wyoming Republican running for House Republican conference chair is traveling with him majority in action pack supported by Kevin McCarthy. Lease and chief deputy whip. Patrick Henry will deploy one hundred fifteen hill staffers to twenty three key district to knock on doors from today until election day. Patrick McHenry will announce he raised five point eight million dollars between his campaign committee and two packs. He's given an additional two point six million dollars to the NRC see and raised another seven point seven million dollars for members holding nearly two hundred events. He's raised sixteen million dollars the cycle. Our colleagues are reporting the interior secretary Ryan Zinke is deputy is ready to step in. Should he leave? David Bernhardt, a longtime lobbyist for oil and gas and water industries and zinc. He's deputy secretary is the heir-apparent ABC news is reporting the conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi is back in Washington for meetings with Bob Muller's investigators. Here's what's on tap. For Trump's Thursday. The president will receive an election integrity breathing at one thirty pm in the Oval Office. You will leave the White House at four forty in route to Columbia, Missouri where hold a political rally at six thirty PM central time. He'll return to Washington tonight subscribed to playbook, politico dot com. Slash playbook.

President Trump chief of staff deputy chief of staff staff director ABC president house administration committee Jake Sherman White House Washington Angela Ramirez GOP Anna Palmer House Judiciary congress Capitol Hill bureau Nancy Pelosi deputy secretary Steve Scalise
Why Did They Break the Rules?: Chris Wallace Slams Trump Family, Chief of Staff for Not Wearing Masks During the Presidential Debate

TIME's Top Stories

02:53 min | 7 months ago

Why Did They Break the Rules?: Chris Wallace Slams Trump Family, Chief of Staff for Not Wearing Masks During the Presidential Debate

"Brought to you by lucky charms magical mission. Let lucky the Leprechaun take you and your kids on an interactive adventure through the eight magical charm lands to restore magic available on your smart speaker. Just say open lucky charms, magical mission or search for it wherever you listen to podcasts. Why did they break the rules? Chris Wallace slams the trump family and the chief of staff for not wearing masks during the presidential debate by Sonya Mansoor. Fox News Anchor Chris Wallace slammed President Donald Trump's family members and chief of Staff Mark Meadows for breaking safety rules and not wearing masks while in the audience of the presidential debate he moderated on Tuesday. Everybody was told to wear a mask. Why did the first family and chief of staff feel that the rules for everybody else didn't apply to them Wallace asked senior trump campaign advisor Steve Cortes on. Fox News. Sunday. Wallace highlighted that Cleveland Clinic Staff had offered the first family masks but they were waved away. Cortez pushed back stressing that everybody was tested before that event and pointed to the belief and some element of individual choice Wallace doubled down on his question adding that there was no freedom of choice they broke the rules. Wallace said since only he the president and vice president were exempt from the requirement. Earlier in the interview Wallace. Cortez on the lack of masks at the Rose Garden event last weekend, and which trump formerly announced he would be nominating Amy Coney Barrett to the supreme. Court. Packed together, the vast majority not wearing masks. How does that make sense Wallace asked? Pointing out that several people who attended have now tested positive for the corona virus including president trump and the first lady. Cortez went onto accused Wallace of targeting him saying Chris the way you're starting to harangue me now actually reminds me of what you did with the president during that debate on Tuesday night wallace quickly interjected reminding Cortez that it was the president who interrupted both him and Vice President Biden one, hundred, forty, five times I objects to saying `I harangued the President I know what's the talking point Wallace said. Cortes went on. He had to debate not just Joe Biden, but you as well, you were not a neutral moderator. The trump administration has so far been relatively evasive, providing clear answers about the president's medical condition the white. House. Physicians press briefing on Saturday added to the confusion as they maintained that trump had mild symptoms and was improving while meadows told the Associated Press that trump had undergone very concerning period on Friday and was anticipating critical forty eight hours ahead.

Chris Wallace Donald Trump president Cortez vice president chief of staff Steve Cortes Mark Meadows Leprechaun Fox News Joe Biden Sonya Mansoor Associated Press Cleveland Clinic advisor Amy Coney Barrett Rose Garden forty eight hours
Sam Stone questions Mayor Kate Gallego's latest claims of morgue beds being overfilled to capacity during virus crisis.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris

04:49 min | 9 months ago

Sam Stone questions Mayor Kate Gallego's latest claims of morgue beds being overfilled to capacity during virus crisis.

"As someone who is not a native of the Great State of Arizona I can tell you for years with the perception of the state is. or at least say was. Now that I'm living here. My goodness I absolutely love it, but I can look and I can see that. When a prominent members of this date, prominent citizens say or do controversial things I know all the spin. That's going to be put on this great state. In the center ring of the conservative circus. We have SAM stone. He is a chief of staff for city councilman. Saudi Cecile and Sam a what's going on with Mayor Gago can anyone trust anything? She says anymore. Right now are you kidding me? Heck No. I, she keeps saying things that are just absolutely crazy, and she's been saying. Since the start of this pandemic, she started out back in March or early April talking about seven forty seven worth of people in Phoenix dying every day. And she just keeps going further and further down the Raboteau. What's the motivation? I mean at some one. You would have to think you know okay. You know what this is embarrassing. And telling all these lies. I get caught in these lies, but she'd just continues to lie. Well! James. I can't speak to her personal motivation. I'm this I can only speculate so it being one of two things essentially. I, she's been the biggest alarmist in Phoenix and in Arizona since this started, and so to a certain extent I think her. Political future is tied to the depths of this virus. If it's not that bad, if we come out of this and and things are okay She's made a lot of statements that she's GonNa Answer to. on the other side I think she takes that sort of. south view of I'm going to scare people I'm GonNa tell them things that maybe aren't necessarily true. I'M GONNA. Tell them what I think. They need to hear to get them to do what I think they need to do and to me. That's an incredibly condescending point of view, but it's clearly one that that has certain advocates in the medical community and apparently city hall. Okay, well, the latest lad does. She told she went on television and she talked about how we haven't hospital here. that does not have any more more beds, and so they had to hire a refrigerated truck to come over there, and that certainly is not or or or let me ask you Sam Stone. DO WE HAVE BODIES PILING UP IN PHOENIX? No we don't James. We don't I. Mean Look. You're having fifty some people. Do you know a high of you? When average at fifty some people a day are dying of Kobe and a lot of those people would be dying in this course of time. Anyway when you're talking about people who are in you know long term and long term care facilities that kind of thing they generally tend to live a few months, so a lot of those folks would be dying anyway and thirty to one hundred and fifty people die in Arizona every single day. So we you're telling me. This is overwhelming. It's not every single summer every single summer. A handful of our hospitals and our in our county mortgage have to call out these refrigerator trucks as a backup plan because of all the heat this. Happens every year. In a sense of ring. Circus we have. We have SAM stone. He is the chief of staff. Sowed ASENSIO. I thank you very much for sharing that because this is something that's happening. It's a routine and you have the mayor here trying to use it. and fear porn to scare people. Do you think it ever occurs to the mayor that these scare? Tactics of hers might actually be hurting her city. Be Hurting Phoenix. I think when you're the smartest person in the room. You just have to assume that you're correct. James it works better that way. Yeah I mean I think clearly that the you know that's one of the drivers of this. in a look at the end of the day I think the best thing to do is to give people the real information about what's going on. Let them know what their risks are, and tell them what you know what we recommend. They should do and then leave it up to people to make good decisions for themselves, which I believe that people in Arizona are perfectly capable of, but it's clear that we have some politicians here including our mayor including Hairston cinema who disagree and think they need to be making decisions.

Sam Stone Phoenix Arizona Mayor Gago James chief of staff Saudi Cecile Kobe Raboteau Sam Hairston
Sam Stone on the Phoenix George Floyd protests plus the Trump tweet concerning Phoenix Light Rail funding.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris

03:57 min | 11 months ago

Sam Stone on the Phoenix George Floyd protests plus the Trump tweet concerning Phoenix Light Rail funding.

"You are listening to the conservative circus I and your ringmaster James. T Harrison into ring. We have SAM stone. He's the chief of staff for city councilman Saudi, Cisco, and Sal, we had these sorry Sam. We had these protests. Break out all across the united. States of course right here in Phoenix as well, but I think overall our police handle it very well. What's the latest? You can give us on that? You know we just got done talking to the police commander. Here's liaison for the city and I gotTA. Tell you I think our police did a fantastic job last night. In some incredibly tough circumstances I mean they really tried to respect. The anger of these protesters at what was without question and and unconscionable act at least is what we've seen on video but that didn't happen here. Right I, mean the CENEX police department had nothing to do with that incident There has been obviously a lot of scrutiny on them I think they do a magnificent job. We are one hundred percent supportive of what they've done and last night. You know they were under siege I mean. Mean these folks are trying to break in and essentially burn down the police station here just the way they did, and they hear it would have been police headquarters just the way they didn't Minnesota and that kind of rioting and looting, and the behavior that we've seen across the country. The got out of control. It didn't get out of Control and Phoenix because the Phoenix Department is as good as any police department in this country. To agree with you one hundred percent you know I got my. You know my issues sometimes with the leadership when it comes to protecting the city in this fashion they have a stellar track record and when I saw what was going down last night I'm like you know I. Don't know why you try that. Because in Phoenix, we don't play that with the police. Police and that became obvious last night. So thank you for that. Update. I gotta ask you though Samson gotta ask the Phoenix Light Rail project is getting another one hundred million dollars from the federal government. We're talking A. we're talking to president. Trump is administration. It was tweeted out there. I gotTa ask you what the Hell is up with the light rail and president trump. Well what's up is is president. Trump's continual hyperbole. I look I James I. Like the Guy I think he's done a great job. But he's a little bit off base sometimes on twitter. And this is another case of that that the local media ran with without actually doing their jobs, not shocking to all of us who? So this hundred million dollars. They released as part of a pre existing five hundred million dollars. That's already been programmed for the South Central. Light Rail expansion so basically? They're just giving us the money that they've already told us there that we were going to get. And, so this would. Articles saying that one hundred. Hundred dollars more and then as a total of five hundred million dollars, this is just president trump, being president, trump and the in the media running with it. Yeah and running with it without knowing what they're talking about. I did have one station who contacted us yesterday and asked and I clarified it for them, and but you have you know the Arizona Republic and all these other TV stations running around saying Oh look trump gave us another hundred million dollars for Light Rail. He loves Light Rail, even though sal to see and sandstone these guys. They oppose it. But so. Come on what's so funny. So funny to me as even even when I see headlines like that, I've been so wrong in the past in doubting that I, just like Oh okay well. We'll see how this pans out. In the meantime, the man still has my support. Mine Too I. Don't agree with him on this I. Don't have to agree with any politician under percent and James Actually I think this is one of the most important points anyone can make if you're hearing from politician and they're telling you everything one hundred percent. What you? WanNa. Hear. You're talking to Aligarh.

Trump Phoenix president Phoenix Light Rail Sal Light Rail James Phoenix Department T Harrison Sam CENEX twitter commander WanNa chief of staff Cisco Minnesota Aligarh Samson
Animation Damnation - The Mask (PREVIEW)

We Hate Movies

04:05 min | 10 months ago

Animation Damnation - The Mask (PREVIEW)

"Being promoted to like his whatever the personal assistant aid. Chief of Staff, whatever mcgarry? Secretary of State at some point, eventually before becoming also vice president, yes. There's a weird scene and I don't know. I don't know who's writing this. I didn't look up the writers, but there's a weird thing like the president is at a football game and they're like. It is the start of the football season. Yes, and here to throw out the first ball is the president and I'm like. Did you mean baseball? What are you talking about throwing out the first? Football Review enemy. They start screaming. Adamant is a call up at four o'clock in the morning. Like. Are you sure it's football eastshore? Yes we are. The president's can be tackled and all his bones broken. By the way all while that's happening, also we've got this like Kinda. Be Plot with this set sack agent Greenfield. Yes, now do hates him. He's like the heads, secret service member, and like if the mask was doing this shit right after the food fight I feel like the CIA would would take care of him. The company's going to come in and make sure he has an axe. That's what happened with the with Kennedy was fucking. The mask was hanging too much. I am making after the Bay of Pigs, the baskets by new vice-president. somebody stop me. Once I get back from Dallas the Basque. Country that's right. I might go into Dallas in May I remind you. Somebody stop me. Right now I'm waving to the crowd or Somebody stopped me. I've been stopped. I was very stoppable. Sorry to report this morning that the mask hung himself in his cell. We have no footage. What happened? There was nobody on a staff that night for some reason, the cameras and broken somehow to Hashtag stint kiss didn't kill himself. News from Dallas or the president shot his skull. Bowl card. Love you made one little boy. Vagit if they will describing. It's a Glib in grisly manner. I do love what he destroys the Washington monument for no reason well. I'll tell you what man there's some. Twenty twenty by going on here because he's like now I'm going to take out the Washington Monument and what he says right before he knocks down, he goes. Stand back. Everyone progress on the move I was like. All right. I'm sure I'm saying an executive order to banning the TAT? The laying of the monuments ten year prison sentence void mayor. Mask teeth friends. It's it's. It's the mask diva and it's just the little dog. If you like what you just heard one listen to the full episode. Good a patriot, dot com slash behave movies for all sorts of exclusive patriotic content. You get an a unique RSS feed. You could put it to any POD KANTER podcast. App of your choice.

vice president football Dallas Washington Monument Chief of Staff personal assistant CIA baseball Kennedy vice-president. executive ten year
New Air Force Chief of Staff

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

05:51 min | 9 months ago

New Air Force Chief of Staff

"Sometimes our food is more than just food. It's part of our community. So this year discover is giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney, Scott, barbecue post office pies, and hundreds more learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Hey, everybody. It's been higgins and is Ashley I and wear the host of the almost seem as podcast. I was the bachelor. And Know Firsthand how dating twenty five people at one time is not easy and I was on the show time or two or four, but I met my husband. So I'm Peru at the process works do interviews with the cast members creating the headlines and we know pretty much everyone. So where reliable source listen to almost famous on the iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast President trump on Tuesday participated in a swearing in ceremony for the US military first African American service chief is name is General Charles C. Q Brown. Okay. He's going to serve as air force chief of staff and the president said your family is very proud of you. This was in the office ceremony Tuesday afternoon alongside Brown and his family. The president complimented Brown's career adding and I'm very proud. Brown said he was honored to have the opportunity and expressed. Gratitude to the administration officials their military leaders and his family. Brown was confirmed in a unanimous ninety eight to zero vote by the Senate in June to become the next chief of staff of the Air Force Brown is the first. African American to sit on the Joint Chiefs of Staff since Colin Powell served as its chairman from nineteen eighty, nine to nineteen, eighty to nineteen, ninety three. So wow, Augusta first time they all agreed something along ninety eight. Yeah Ninety. Read all nothing every Democrat. Republican right. That's not a trump appointee. Owned by the military and so forth and saw signature saying that's what I think just does can't see him appoint anybody after he did. This part of his cabinet right joint. Chief of staff. He said, I'm very proud. Well, you know he got to say they're trying to get. Yeah. and. This is another thing he didn't do it for black people. Oh he got. The thing. Yeah. Since Colin Powell served from eighty nine to ninety three. Wow. Okay. Well congratulations again, his name is Charles CQ Brown. Hopefully, we'll be hearing and seeing more. From him. CIA seek to. Name. At the COOKOUT CQ. Or Quiz brand new in here. Wow Partner Yeah last week. Yeah. What Obama I'll never be back in Yankee. Well. I last year. Turn Guide emotional. In there with Obama yes he's a man. No way in the world I would thought I'd be standing here. He said, is your way out. Of My White House y you here. Hard Is. Coming up at the top of the hour, we'll have some sports talk with juniors sports talk coming up. You're listening to. Morning. Show. Hi I'm Holly Fry and I'm Tracy v Wilson and together we host a show called stuff you missed in history class as the name suggests we talk about some things that maybe either you didn't remember from history class or they were covered at all. There have always been women in history. There have always been black people and other people of there have always been people all over the LGBTQ. A spectrum as a part of the historical record tracy. We've had some really interesting episodes recently, what's one of your favorites the history of beekeeping which we had to abridge because that's Very involved how about you? I really really enjoyed researching are episode on Seneca Village, which was a settlement in what became central park that was mostly populated by black people who actually owned the property there, and unfortunately their time there was kind of a race. So this kind of material sounds good to you come listen to the show. We have new episodes on Mondays and Wednesdays, and then a behind the scenes many on Friday and a bonus classic episode from the Archive on Saturday you can find us on the iheartradio APP and Apple podcasts or wherever it is you listen. I've got great school questions and a million dollars to give away are used smarter than a fifth grader. Let's go. Get Ready. One of the most popular game shows of all time is coming to audio as podcast. Are you smarter than a fifth grader listen on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts?

Charles C. Q Brown chief of staff Colin Powell Obama president Apple Joint Chiefs of Staff Rodney higgins Seneca Village service chief Augusta Peru Senate Ashley I US Scott CIA Partner chairman
Call Your Representatives With Steven Raga, Chief of Staff for District 30 of the NY State Assembly

$6.99 Per Pound

1:03:05 hr | 1 year ago

Call Your Representatives With Steven Raga, Chief of Staff for District 30 of the NY State Assembly

"In town y'all six cast Yo. What's going on? Welcome to another episode of six ninety nine per pound podcast where we usually talk about careers would. What's going on in the world right now? We have shifted our focus to the real impact of the nineteen on Asians in this country and around the world. You know we find it very important to tell these stories. The virus might affect everyone but it has had a disproportionate impact on Asian American communities. So we're going to bring you perspectives of people. Asian people in different professions in places to give you a personal look at. How does pandemic became more Dennis Symptom of the body? So thank you to all the fans out there for listening. Continue to support us. Please subscribe to get all for more information on Our covert cove nineteen religious episodes. Make sure to tell a friend to tell a friend in a socially distant way without said you can now supported by buying me and Joe Joe with three dollars at Keio Dash F I dot com slash six ninety nine per pound or you can be a monthly donator at Anchor Dot FM slash six ninety nine per pound slash support. No I'm saying so what I said. Joe Joe. Do you want to introduce a very special guest today? Yes I was left to. So this is all about Learning more about the impact of coded Nineteen Through culture through community so we wanted to bring in special guests to talk about it in terms of constituents and how they can interact on the local government level. So we're talking to our first Filipino. American ever to serve and the New York State Assembly Stephen Raga Cheese chief-of-staff read the Assembly district. Thirty Place Shakey's. Mary familiar with apparently just before restarted. Jackie and Stephen were spitballing with our favorite Filipino restaurants. So we'll make sure to shot them all out for everyone. Welcome welcome welcome Stephen to the podcast. We can't wait to hear your insights into all of these things And Yeah let's just kick it off right now Yeah thanks for having me on guys. excited to be here especially during this this this crazy time rent for Schuermann. I mean Stephen so before we go ahead man. I mean you say you Filipino and you you represent a district out in Queens. Can you kind of like tell us exactly which district you represent. Sure sure so. All for work on US chief of staff or district thirty so it's pretty wide. It goes through a few neighborhoods so on the west side. We have lawn city on the east side. Our out in middle village so everything in between. That's sunnyside story would side and and masochist. So it's a really wide array of folks of political ideologies even and different cultures and backgrounds. So it's kind of fun going to work every day seeing how we can help out the community for sure. Wow that's crazy. Yeah and I remember just before we started recording. We got rid of gems but I Shaky initially was like. Oh my gosh I kind of totally grew up in this area and Steven. You're saying oh it's actually interesting. The way to kind of create the lines so the districts that should feel like it should be in. This district doesn't end up that way and you said that When you zoom out there's a lot of people with a lot of different ideologies in one's kind of motley drawn place. Can you explain? Like how district lines are drawn. Yes so of for for the most part. First and foremost it's a lot of is due to a population count. So that's why the sense. It's really important years so why this year is a big absolutely so it's a big effort especially get more immigrant communities more people have come out and vote for that because that's how they're going to redistrict the lines on your local state and congressional representatives. Last time ten years ago we were kind of low. We had a low count and we had to Congress Congress districts just taken out from New York. And that's that's funding. That's not coming to our city and I know that's a lot of our populates populations I know I know personally. My family my aunties and didn't have any. Yeah it it'd knock it not how they not care about about the census and it has drastic effects on the ground for our community. They mail out there. Like what is that for? Ruutel like I got. The sense is letter right now in my House. I was about to fill it up but I was thinking about this right and you know Steven you don't have to agree or disagree with me. And you know Joe Joe Look Emmy side is because it's got this radio out but you know like I I must say right now. Two thousand year two thousand when Senses you know Thing came out you know like there was the dot com crash and there was always scared about Y2k and then in two thousand and ten. Oh it was in a missed. A financial financial degraded recession. You don't get twenty twenty again. Senses comes out. Yo this fucking cove nineteenth situation with the economy about at the brink of a crash being so I'll catch a break. I was like I don't know why they keep doing these senses. That pretty much determines our future for the next ten years when there's always some major political cultural economic shit that has happened. You know what I'm saying like I don't know man I. It's but with asa though you'll fill it out and send it back out because it has a direct effect on your community your hurt. I don't know that was kind of convincing. Maybe conspiracy every ten years if it happens in two thousand thirty. I won't fill it out just general point it is very important so with dot. Gov for sure you're listening us and if you got that at your house man make sure you fill it out. Don't just throw it out okay. That has not going to incriminate you. They're not going to just come down on you and then trying to figure out like a few illegal immigrant or not Isis on ice right now you know what I mean. 'cause they're not operating home so. I Know Yeah Isis on ice right now and I. I hope they stay on. You know what I mean our shirt now but with that said Oh can you explain to was td? Exactly what the chief of staff for you know because You know I hear these terms all the time like. Oh this person is the councilman or this person is State Assemblyman This person is the Senator the governor So many different titles and the mayor doesn't have direct affiliation with the state. And you know to get this approve you need to go to Albany and you know what I'm saying like so many different layers. Or if you Kinda just explain to us and layman's terms like for us understand what exactly your role entails. Yeah yeah so it it really chief staff. It's the habit for every every office for the most part is whoever who who's in charge of the district office Which is your representatives office. Somewhere in the neighborhood you live in more the legislative office which on the city council level is at City Hall downtown or on the State Senate or or Semblance in Albany or if it's congressional it's down in DC or senate so For my role is assembling District Thirty and assembly member. There is is Brian Barnwell and for our office. I'm in charge of the overall operations and any legislative and community outreach done both in Albany and in Queens and just you know all the hr stuff everything is hiring our staff and staff development so our office is bigger than most some. Maybe have a five ten or office in the summary of over one hundred so it's really fun to work with some folks and teach them teaching him the ropes and and lead a new generation public servants. That's why our office tries to do. So if it kind of sounds like you're the president of like district thirty or something like that. You're like all right. I'm GONNA like delegate. Here's this apartment. What do you need this kind of thing? This is a priority. Does this sound right to you in terms of like you obviously have like the people who make the big decisions. And you're like okay. Well how are we going to make that happen? How are we going to execute it? Is that kind of on you to do. Oh no no. All of that. The class president would be assemblyman. Maybe no definitely Definitely fits there. And just you know handling overall operations and programming Okay so obviously I would imagine that cove in nineteen would be some of the bigger projects that is part of the operations What would you as a person who runs the operations of a political office? How did that manifest for you? What did you do specifically to prepare for the crisis? Yes so our officers kind of ahead of the curve okay. I think 'cause I'll have is COSMO officers. Mostly millennials for the most parts or all on social media and by by the tenth of the of the day. You're Kinda like getting around the world. Yes but we were pretty early. Think it was around. I remember the week of I WANNA say the seven to the eighth of March. Everyone still working at the office and we had one one of our senior staffers. He was at the senior staff meeting extra time and he started talking about this. This report coming out of London about everyone's GonNa get it said everyone's GonNa get so all New Yorkers are getting it right now all right So at this point where like well you know. It is better to be safe than sorry so I called up all buzney and I said well. What's the procedure here? As of now there is none so up to us if we wanted something In our own office and I said we will just in case at that point. We don't WanNa see him alarmist right because nobody was saying anything about stay at home or anything but I said we might have at least half days. We're going to cut off no weekend. Hours Might start switching remotely for now so we were at least a week ahead of everybody else shutting down. That's crazy and I I do resonate with you in terms of like when it's that during that time it's like am. I being too crazy like am I. Am I kid trying to skip school right now or like the at home Or is this like a big deal. that's really interesting. In what another thing that caught my eye was at. You said most of your The people are millennials. Jen's ears is that normal or sixty the US for sure actually most of our staff. Now I'm looking at I'm trying to. There's a lot so. I'm trying to think of this. Actually all of our senior staff now and executives. They've been hired who have been hired in the last few years or all former interns. They're all graduate students. Or or just getting their undergrad degree. Really well put on part time than full time. So they're all in their twenties early thirties right now. Sure that's so cool. That's great to hear a main Another thing that I wanted to ask on adding onto that is what is like the The ethnic dynamic or the makeup of your office like 'cause we always talk about I mean in our podcast. We often talk about how Having a political voice into system especially as a person of color is really important to to continuously tell our stories and tell our narratives and hopefully even having legislations that could be beneficial to our communities right. So you know you're you're the trick. Obviously in Queens is one of the most ethnically diverse on clogs in the United States into world. would love to see. We'll love to hear like you know what is like the people that are actually working for this district. You know what their backgrounds are. That's that's a great question perfect question. Your question is like really putting down the plate for me because this is easily if not the most of the most diverse offices not just now but I'd say the history of the state assembly easily older. Yeah you if you hurt you know escudo combi anytime after all. This is over if you drop in easily. We have people that we're going to have at least fifteen languages on the spot that could be spoken commerce so heard fifteen languages on a spot exactly exactly and we have one of them is One individuals she speaks like five. I Call A. Google Google translate but this is good and it's so our diversity's pretty a pretty scaled up then folks come in like. Oh this is this a United Nations are so for sure now. Does it feel like somebody who grew up in Queens like we're so I'm so privileged to add at experience growing up because you know like I tell. I told his on a podcast a lot. But you know my lunch table growing up in my high school it was like the United Nations United Nations of buffoonery. Of course because we were making racial jokes against each other like. That's Mike Opportunity. Okay but but yeah like. Do you feel like with what happened with the last presidential election and we're just the overall political climate that you're seeing more more. Poc's Trying to get involved in politics or social work in general Yeah I do see more people of color joining politics or social work. I'm not sure if it's directly attributed to the two thousand sixteen election it might just be you know. All the other factors are making people of color. Choose this work but for sure I I think I I definitely think there's an uptick. I mean that's why it's important in these positions to highlight in our communities at necessarily. Don't get highlighted so What we do For example we have annual reports that highlight specific subgroups in our community so an API report for a district thirty. We have lat next report district thirty. Lgbt by African American. I mean it's all across the board will enquiring about not just was a district makeup of our our constituents our community leaders but also and budgeting is concerned and we need to. They want to know numbers We have that for them. So we we try. Be On top of that to Cool and would you say I mean if you can kind of walk us through like what you and your staff to do and like a daily basis and maybe if you can tie it to like the covert nineteen stuff right now maybe like a project like okay like today woke up and you checked up on this you know. We voted over zoom out on. How can you just walk us through a typical day for you right now? Yeah yeah sure so. Typical Day for me is first and foremost I usually in the beginning of the day Call Up Brian Bar while remember because he's he's going to be up in Albany. I'm choosing not to go up there because they do have to vote and you know go over the bills legislation. Make sure everything's all alright. Then then go back to my senior staff my deputy chief of staff and executive director and go through their projects right now on the constituent services and And really what that is because obviously I didn't know what that was before I even here. It's what if you need help with anything on the state that's impo involving state policy or law you go to your state state level representative and that's what we do. We make people come up to us to to help whether it's property taxes whether it's You know issues with the Department of buildings like they're building or their their landlord. They've landlord issues or anything like that. And it's nonstop twenty four hours a day When they're when they're calling us. I just had a call with somebody Just thirty minute call before I go so It's nonstop checking up on that. So yeah and and also right now all the events we were planning for the rest of the year. We're GONNA I didn't want to cancel. It looks like we're going to have to do it. Virtually or something not a bad option. Now it looks like everyone's doing it. So all our cultural events we're GONNA have a Irish heritage asian-american for May Filipino American from October. Lgbt ARE COMING OUT DAY. All that stuff might be moved on moved onto online so we want to be ahead of the curve and make sure on top. Isn't what a crazy tom that we're living in aware. State Assembly has to think about putting together events. Virtually that's a interesting point but speaking of doing things virtually can't assemblymen and congressmen beyond zone. You have to be physically in Albany logically. I think yes why they gotTA GO UP. And all the need to do the voting. I mean of course the deliberation might be different if it was on Zuma anything that follow up questions on the floor if they want to speak on the floor It makes sense that they want to be there. But at the same time at at this point It might not be the option but they at this point. They're still going with it so when you're when they're at the state assembly meetings they have mask on or they have gloves like. What's going on like guys? I mean. Listen I'm not like agreeing with every political official out there but you know we want these people to be healthy as well like just wondering if you heard cases where you know Assemblyman Mike come in with a mask for the safety of its peers and and yeah yeah well. Some folks are wearing masks. A LOT STILL SELL. Aren't we have two two assembly members? Recently Charles Barron out in Brooklyn and Helen Weinstein had tested positive for Kron avars. But they haven't they haven't been the chamber offer for weeks so they weren't so people were were totally they weren't. They were already distancing Beforehand and few weeks The representatives had to took attach themselves to make sure right so if they're voting sure now they're they're they're all good because they got. I and I hope I hope. Nobody is shaken hands. I hope everybody's doing the albums were shorter. Like it's an angel. Because when I saw Stephen Rago Mr Mr Rocco you've got to agree with me or disagree on his but man when I saw Mr Trump on press conference shaken hands of ought to see IOS of Walmart or ninety hours like Yoda's does not listen into what Fao she is saying at all right now you know what I mean. I hope at Least York state. We are the most vulnerable state right now. I hope people especially in political offices are taken the proper measuring two steps. You know what I mean. Everyone I see. They're doing the same thing you know. Close down offices and mask gloves. Everyone I think a lot a lot of is also if they do have access to mask and gloves are trying to reallocate that to the two hospitals especially the local. One here's elmhurst. So we want to make their fully. Stacked up played basketball growing up in front of Mars Hospital Wall Street. I grew up over there. I used to go to the McDonalds in the basement when we when we were kids garage next door you it has. That was fond memories of it. Bad Memories at the same time but you know like that. New York Times article. I'm sure you guys have already by this point home. It's insane. It became ground zero for the nineteen cases in New York City right now. You don't have main. Yeah because the initial testing site was Elmhurst and in Jamaica at Jamaica Hospital so obviously those are the two hospitals. I've been starting to go to but the Bay Jamaica Hospital here is really backed up as well. There's not enough You know proper equipment but Elmhurst just blew up an while. Everyone in western Queens is head over there line across the block around the block I live. I live to about two blocks away. I know three blocks away in the last week. It is nonstop sirens. Police Ambulance Ambulances headed over there so Definitely they need all the help we can give him Oh man that's crazy I think during this time I Think Governor. Cuomo has gotten a lot of actual positive feedback. These days I've been reading these layers articles of like I want you know governor Cuomo to be my boyfriend's And like governor Cuomo is like all of a sudden like oh he was like always a bully but now we need a link to make something happen. This is my personal opinion. Not even rockets. But what is your the districts relationship and how does that trickle up to the New York assembly like could you explain that dynamic horoscopes Loretto? Ap Gov Refresher on how his decisions and his announce men are kind of influenced by you guys and vice versa. Yeah for sure so just generally not even out. You know outside. Covert Nineteen Any district at some under semi on the semi level. We take a lot of for any legislation or laws on pass. Let's say housing you know Let's say right now. We want to any bill you are. Let's say you want right now. You want to cancel or delay our yeah right right so The family members have to go there and vote so a lot of that a lot of that. The input comes from our positions as whatever they want if you if you live in New York state where most people in your district don't vote. I mean I'm sorry I don't rent. They own houses so their mortgage payment isn't they want to halt on that they don't care about what people are going to are are going to be a thinking differently. And so on our level we pass it state Senate at the pass it And then it's on the governor to To Go ahead and sign off on it. Make sure it's fine. I'll times governor. Just just vetos it outright. Every district in every represent has a different relationship with the governor. Really great really bad Or I don't know if it's really bad but it's on a wide spectrum and it's not necessarily the same with other districts different working relationship especially that the plays a lot with similarly that's how it works with With the city council. Of course it's New York City. Yeah me too when you? Can you explain that a little more? So you say you know. Different districts might have different working relationships like Y. My One district have a very positive one versus another district which might need more attention but are not getting it. Yes sure it's like anything else. I think it's just the Hash. Takes everything like what? What are the issues are trying to put a to prioritize? It's that is that on the list of priorities for the governor on his team of maybe maybe not like for instance if the what is called the representative that go. That's over on Roosevelt island right. They're pushing policy. That's specific to like tech and like techies and I like more Internet users and Internet companies a representative. Upstate might not care about what what that is. And so the governor might have to reprioritize when you when you ask them for stuff. Got It interesting so so go ahead Joe. Yeah so I think I think with what's going on right. Now are especially we? As as a citizen of New York City we would like to know. Just what does the state assembly work with everyday? New Yorkers during this cove in nineteen crisis. Yeah yeah again. Unfortunately I think that depends on which office represents you happy. Because I can't speak for all of them. I'm happy to say for us. You know if you live within a district thirty. Nothing's changed really. We're not stop getting calls like we had whether it's good or bad or a good idea. We had our office for fallen redirect to ten of US getting. We're all getting. The calls are senior staff at least are getting up and we start to talk to all the concessions who are who are calling in anyway so a lot of that stuff. We are still helping the constituent inside but if we're going to deal with the agency side which is like the Department of buildings a permanent housing department aging anything like that. They might be slowed down because they got. They got other things to worry about and You know Reprioritize from city and state so There's not really has changed in terms of workload unfortunate. Yeah so okay. So you said. The workday hasn't changed. But has there been a shift for you specifically on what issue. You're kind of losing sleep about these days might have not been a big before. Yes so I think a lot of it. Now is it's reprioritising. Obviously Italy obvious but but healthcare and healthcare needs and and are scared to to go to go to hospital that you've been because they can't they can't pay for it or they just don't want I and and You know some of you may know about this on sixty ninth in what side. There's a lot of day laborers at all hours of the day out. They're not going to the hospital. Either you know maybe they go to Elmhurst but there that's already packed up and and a lot of these folks that might need those Testing in healthcare services. We really got to shine the light on them right now because One thousand percent man one thousand percent. I know exactly who you're talking about all the All the The South American Day laborers that are on Woodside Avenue over there. Wayne to get picked up for work. You know but not only does folks but like so many restaurants so many of the local industry especially in those areas are served by immigrants that are getting paid under the table. You know what I mean like. So even if they they can't file for unemployment in Maine and They there there's just isn't that much like I guess like statewide were federal level wide infrastructure. That could help those people in those type of communities right especially in areas of queens and other parts of New York. Yeah no you're right. You're right so it's like anything else. When if we talked about this last month we'd be it'd be a similar ratio. We'd say Oh that you know we need to focus on on the day laborers for the undocumented workers there they they definitely more attention that much more so now that we're in this kind of crisis emergency sort of your now so I mean without sort of like how like you know. I'm a small business owner and obviously small businesses are affected tremendously. Because we just don't have that type of reserves to last us for a two month where even maybe three weeks you know to just not us for us to just close our doors. How how are how is your How is your office like working with local businesses in this time of crisis? Sure sure so for the state assembly And this is for every level of government really for us our scope of work and our responsibility is really just on the state level. So if you have any contracts on the state let's say like an application the liquor authority like you go through. Us State Level Labor. Yeah absolutely go through a specific law you want in New York state or enquiring about go through us but it seems like a lot of or the majority of the agencies that local small businesses should be calling up is with the city with New York City right. So that's the Department of Small Businesses are consumer affairs and there's a lot of these little resources that the Department of Business Services has out there so I suggest everyone go over there. See if you can apply for some resources and and I think there's some funding there as well or so. I definitely four people over there. So speaking of Communicating these resources What are some ways that your office Try to make this information available to everybody like do you guys have a social account or I'm just a grassroots passing papers out but what have been some of the most effective way especially because your staff speak so many languages to do some outreach with these constituents who might feel really vulnerable or scared right now. Yeah sure sure A lot of that We're doing on social media We we put it out there we have different graphs and And for four all the resources and we're doing it in different languages. So that's what we're my team has to like real literally on Monday we're GonNa answer is how could spread the word? Andrew just putting out there on twitter instagram facebook and also going to be on you know some newsletters but unfortunately still I. I allow the in in my opinion and I think it's crazy to say that a lot of people that might need those resources aren't aren't following us. You know they're not calling our office for the most part they might be distrustful of government. Or are they just don't think they'll do? You'll get any resources so Unfortunately in this type of situation. We can't even be proactive. And our office Ashley. Every every few months we have one thousand businesses in our district. Personally go to and check up on. We can't really personally do that if they're totally closed we call up and even if we call. The phones might not work. It's it's even more difficult for proactive office like ours. Because because we can't even attack the people and see what they need so we gotta do everything we can but again. The options are limited. Unfortunately we think of new ways Definitely going to push forth Yo. What's happening I know? You WanNA BE J. Key. You want to record your own podcast and be a man of moral and understanding so you is not easy to make a podcast like six ninety nine per pound. It takes years of practice and relationship building his some knowledge on how to start your own and make money while you're at it because cash was everything around his kid on that. Note checkout anchor. You heard anchor is a one stop shop for recording hosting and distributing your own podcast. It's a thousand percent free and Matt easy to use on top of that anchors like an Asian matches you with grace monsters. Don't want to advertise on your podcast. That means you can't get paid to podcast right away in fact you already know. That's what I'm doing right now. Getting paid for this situation on that note if you WANNA kick off a podcast and make that mouloud while doing it go to anchor dot FM slash. Starting you'll never be like Jay or six ninety nine but you might get close to it once again that's anchored that FM slash start. Take that advice and take it home with you. Kid I- piece. I think that's definitely one thing I noticed about. Any sort of like government agencies were offices or any sort of a basically places where people need to look into to gain to get to supporting. Get help you know. I don't know what it is about a New York I. It does because maybe as because a lot of these offices are not really ran by people that represent these communities as much. I don't know what it is exactly. But there's definitely a level of Disconnect because So I have a small business in flushing Queens and I noticed that there's these community centers in Offices councilman offices. That doesn't necessarily have real direct impact on the local community especially when it comes down to the younger generation to youth. You know like they obviously have a lot of Special programs that help people in need especially if they're like older were so on and so forth but I don't I don't know what it is is just is it because like the marketing element of these political offices are just not quite there and if they're not quite there like in communication. Why isn't there more of an effort or funding to try to reach out to you know? younger demographic like why isn't there an assemblyman? That's on tic TAC. You know what I'm saying like you know just curious to know. Yeah well just the last part we try to GET BRIAN. Take talk so far as not working. Internally are Albany staff has been making internal video so into to the queen staff not externally so far. No but that's a good point. I think the flushing our representatives. I think they're doing a good job but again. I can't speak on behalf of their office. I'm just GonNa talk generally on to answer your question because they're all questions I you know. I had to general. The funding is limited. No matter what. It's not a lot at all nonprofits. I know. I Know Every single nonprofit organization I know that has an office has has ten times the budget as our prophet right so they definitely have more. We do not have the funding. So if there's already working twenty four even office like let's take for example or open seven days a week nine. Am to seven PM and then we're going to events this all ten pm. It's the candidate already packed. And we're GONNA say hey there's a and and this is me talking as a millennial. I want our offices. Outrace millennials which we are. We always do better but at the same time. Our millennials aren't that that engaged yet in the in the political process. You know who is a liar the seniors so that's why a lot of that funding and the focus goes towards program for them because a they are in need those. Those issues are talking about but b because we see them everywhere at every single event. Saying where's this? Where are you helping with this? We don't really get that from From from I wish we did. I wish we did button and in mass right but we're so far we're not ideas get turned a corner soon. 'cause we have more millennial leadership in staff. We have a lot of millennials in in city council and say the Stanley State Senate in Congress. You know it'll Cossio so we have a lot of. I think we're coming out there. It's going to. It's going to change sooner. Yeah Nineteen for sure and even I mean we joked about how we need a refresher on Mike. All these terms and stuff like that but it truly is. I think the lack of Kind of civic literacy a little bit of dislike We know about the president of the United States. We know about you know the the fancy that huge up top elections and I think there is not enough focused especially in our school curriculum when when thousand high school. When I was in middle school we didn't spend too much time learning about our own district or own assembly and they think that probably also contributes to that just like people not knowing what resources are out there and people are carrying with it starts. Impacting them right. You know I think the first time I heard like all your assemblymen was when like you know. My friend was like having a personal issue with something and she finally realized like Oh like. That's the thing that I can do right well known for. This is a personal anecdote again. Like you know when I was in high school I got picked up during the stop and Frisk era and and You know a high like a low low like a PINK SLIP. summons letter whatever whatever whatever Y. P. D. You know what I'm saying and and you know like I told my folks about the situation and day was kind of like. Oh like 'cause you know these news how they kind of. Bruce's me up a little bit because I was like. Are you know a according to them? I was disobeying. This'll disobeying What they were telling me to do. But I was just me. I didn't even flash a badge and you guys were in You know a citizen clothing. You know what I'm saying you guys weren't even in police uniform. So Hamas opposed even not you guys were police officers you know so and then when all this shit happened My folks was like I like we. WanNa make sure that this you know. I don't want you even paid is forty dollars or fine. Whatever you know we want to clear this shit and my folks called up a one member of Somebody from the Korean community and I and told US ly. Yo you need to go talk to John who at the time was a councilman and and you know like and then I got to meet you and I got this thing. And then it got to meet the borough president and then became much bigger than what it was because it was just. I was just got out of my pink slip. A distinct became much bigger than what it was. And and then that's when I realize like the power that these These political local political officials. Had you know like how John was with me at the? Da's office like flaming. What this was you know? I just paid my forty dollars just like whatever I got like a little strike before I was eighteen. You know we could have just been you know said and done but we really took it there and that kind of taught me in so many details. How this thing directly affects us and it could help us when we are in need of it. You know 'cause if anybody needs help from the government is people of Color and people that are disenfranchised you know what I mean. That's definitely Definitely correct with that though. Make sure that for the most part at least two when you do call up for healthier local officials at you know that they represent you people. I calling our office and I'm like Oh we're in Suffolk County. I'm like well to with that one. We have to prioritize. You KNOW PEOPLE ARGUE. We just have to that. There's a list of people you have to call back. Oh you have to prioritize guys number two. We have the same funding across the board. You really should call your representative jar of you know just because Stevens Filipino in your Filipino. But you live in Jersey. City doesn't mean you. You could ask Stephen for hope. You know what I'm saying. It's like it's like you. I I really happened to me. A lot of these Jersey City. Asked me for that Stephen? I'm your man. I'm your cool. You know we from the same island but the Filipino City Council Mental Rolando. Lavar over there. But you know they. There's a lot of inner inner state Communication with us. Yeah we so on that note. Do you have a further advice for anyone? Who's trying to get a hold of their district office like so you've already listed on like number one check and make sure they represent you which by the way how do how do they check. Do just like Google pretty easy website if you just Google who represents me NYC is going to send you to. I think it's It will send you. The link is my gove. Y C DOT Org. All you do is type in your address and this is going to list your your local your your state reps and your your federal representatives. So it's all going to be listed out for you and you can just go make that call whatever you need Nice. I'd just wanted to rephrase that listeners. You're Republican Libertarian. You DISTRUST THE GOVERNMENT. Whatever whatever but yo if you want to know who represents for you who works for you. Google who represents me and why C. And then fill out the remaining details. You heard doesn't know that that is a gem for sure but when you call them make sure you give you know you you come in with the information you need and not just act. These staffers who are working themselves to the bone here we have. We had people just randomly yell at us for things. We had nothing to do. Because they don't have you sound like a lot. It's not just because we're some of us are younger that we need a civics lesson. We have people that are in their sixties seventies eighties. None that think that every elected office is all just your personal like you know. Genie that can grant you wishes. And if they don't they don't they don't wear your wishes or another one. You're going to another one. You're going to another one literally like the call. I mentioned the right now that before I got on this it was a lady that was upset with the President and upset with Congress and like mom this happy session. It is people just want to be heard in one hundred percent get it. I understand but in the end of the day I was. I just had to go like all you got to call your congressman said. That's her congress. Numbers Grace Mang and you gotTa Call Your your representative which is city reser was Bob Holden at the time. And I said you or right now and say that those are you have a federal issue and then you have also a city issue. That was before that we're not really involved. We can help you at worst case scenario. We don't turn anyone down but at least exhausted resources you don't throw everything at us I first hand I. Are you guys. Sometimes they're like the first line of defense you guys get like the hardest hit right because you start the ones who is like okay directing this issue here directing this issue there It's not gonNA be so tough it's like preaching to the choir to ask also just real quick back to the point where you're like. How did these people get our get our information or at least someone literally called me yesterday on a Saturday night? I got your. I got your letter regarding all the resources for Corona virus. However you guys are Democrats so this is a hoax. Don't give me your hoax letter taking you. Because I'll be fine with this. All right why she support our president and just like wait. I'm giving we're giving you resources for Corona virus talking about. It has got say this man. I really got to say you'll listen. Virus does not discriminate. Right it's GONNA attack you regardless of your race regardless of your political affiliation my guy where my lady or whoever you want so you got a smart enough or you're gonNA die. You know saying so smart but I I think I think one thing that also I wanted really are take away. I mean highlight. Is that knowing the difference between federal state and city and yelling the office accordingly right because like you said when a person is frustrated and they need guidance like they're they're just they just want to vent and they just want to get heard and they just want to find a solution as fast as they can and with the way the system is so fragmented and then the information about 'cause you know truth be told we watch. Espn all day. But who really gonNA sit there and watch C. Span. You know what I'm saying like we're not we're not aware okay like I know Grace Mang but what does she really do. Do we really know you know what I'm saying so Is there any sort of like initiative or any sort of Information out there for people to kind of understand like I cool. This person does. Does this person does that. And you need to reach out to this person for this. I'm not sure I mean other than the website I gave it kind of breaks down the responsibilities. Who Represents ME Our website but in terms of what policies might impact you individually that you might prioritize in the city local state and federal. I'm not sure I mean that's something that has no one has put together yet. But it's definitely a good idea. Maybe you got dibs. If you want to omit. That might be another video man. I might need to put together a video breaking it down for the people you know what I'm saying. Oh my God I love that can help on your new Tick Tock. No I'll make it fun and entertaining along with moves. Yeah Oh my gosh. We'll Stephen I mean you you and your staff works Sohar. I feel like and really just for the public service like are there some ways that our listeners could even support you guys support us. I mean not really we serve you. Unfortunately it really is that it's like where I took it loosely the term public servant but we really are just serving like non up I would say is we do have Volunteer opportunities. That's something folks are interested in. All of them has stopped right now or at least respond because of corona virus but we usually go out and and we we paint over graffiti for small businesses or residences in the neighbourhood. That unless it's art it's art. It's all good but if it's like really on someone or window plaid's yeah we go ahead and we we paint over it for them or we also do Sandwich making that. We give to a homeless Son Yorkers and we have a bunch of other activities We shovel snow for for seniors in our district. Because a lot of people don't know this but at eleven. Am after a snow snowstorm. If you didn't show the front of your your your sidewalk. The city comes and finds you. Yeah so like if you're disabled or if you're a senior or you're just lazy you know you shovel you're GonNa get find out eleven. Am If you didn't do it so we go ahead and we We shall will at least the front sidewalk for for disabled and senior. So they don't get they don't get fired but a city that's crazy. Well I mean hopefully. These kids can volunteer. I would love to volunteer. I'm going to look that up now Jd of anything else. You're one asked the maison I just wanted to say. Man is good to see a Filipino. Broader into office. You know working as a chief of staff for the for the local district thirty representing Queens Ny. It's like I think I mentioned is into podcast before like when I was a kid coming up like I I you know I'm Korean by the Senate but y'all want it to be Filipino. Man Like I literally. I literally want to be Filipino. Man Joe like all the cougars mid to high like they were the bj's they were to dance your elected you know so it all like it's really geared to me you know what I mean so it's good to hear that you know you're doing your thing and all your shot out to Chi Chi on group the group. I wonder what happened to them but shut out by Filipino. A Filipino brother. Was you know saying hi. Yeah we well. We got a few of those those nineties early. Two thousands of Filipino are ambiguous. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA look him up after this now. I got reminded me. I'M GONNA see if they're on spotify. Most of my consumption was on youtube. Like all the Filipino. That were killing it on Youtube. Man Tashin Love Passion. Susan's thank you Steven. Honestly it's like where we were. Googling you just had too many on the riffraff and so many things that you have accomplished like Filipino. American Museum Mike Board member. You're you're so prolific and you I think are changing the stereotypes India handed layup. Decide you know. Dj Dancer Essentially man so you're really doing an amazing service to all of us and thank you so much for educating us Before we wrap all of this There are two questions that we asked. All of our guests The first one Is what is your most significant relationship. And you don't have to take it so literally. It could be a thing you know you could be more metaphorical quite literally if I take it right now. It's me and my My my Aloe Vera Pure L. Right next to you right next to the pure. Oh the most relationship with Piero athlete from the glove. You need the pure out but yeah but other than that I just you know family family friends my mom when she was with me. All that cell alive Good people to support you in all your endeavors. You no doubt no doubt and And Usually we always follow but the second six ninety nine per pound question. Go to question. Or what is your personal mantra? I got a few. But it's the one that's always if someone's GonNa ask me this. It's not even my. I got from my friend. Michelle but she says that the grass is greener where water. So it's like if especially in a time like this you WanNa get it over with you. Want to be on the other side where the grass is greener but we can make what. Our situation is as beautiful as positive as possible if we are. We focused on changing our attitude our minds and and just You know making it right out on our own. We'll dumb man does. The grass is greener. Where you water it. His most significant relationship aside from his family right now is the Purell hand. Sanitizer aloe Vera and Aloe Vera but Yeah so I so I mean you know me personally have always had like a lot of respect for people in the political space and I feel like as a community especially Especially communities consisted of people of color. We need more representation in government. But unfortunately I feel like our parents you know. They're not too fond of us. Getting into this Space Moseley. Because you know we're they're they're usually first generation immigrants that don't have all the The money in the world and they want us to be in careers where it sounds lucrative more financial. Leeann obviously like being in the political space. It doesn't always guarantee that You know what is it like like is the money. Okay like Is Is it like. What kind of passion were that needs for you to be a commute in a in a essentially a service industry where you're serving the people mania? Yeah definitely really good question especially come from a Philippino background I mean. Luckily my mom wasn't was one of the few parents not forcing me to be a nurse. Filipino nurse Auto Filipino nurses though yeah especially now for sure But the process of that is it could be anything mine was different. The reason I how I was even offered is I was I was working at in government. I was working in nonprofit and at the time this two thousand sixteen there was. There was a part of a group called the Little Manila Defense or the Little Manila coalition man really offending Woodside or eastern Woodside from a gentrification in the neighborhood and ordered it no elected officials came to our meetings not at all except one person who was running for office. Brian Barwick who's now dissembling man. And he kept coming. I I'm like this guy just wants vote. They're like a two meetings. I'm like oh he knows he's GonNa vote anyway coming become aware and after a few. I'm like oh I think he really cares about the issue in the community. So I mean that's how we developed our relationship and when he won he definitely you know he called me up right away and and say if I was interested in and you know for sure to be with someone like that and also represent Part of my neighborhood. It's also have a commute like thirty minutes or less is a big deal so so definitely I was I was down and happy to do so for the most part. That's not the way it goes is if you're trying to especially in college after college get that internship at at a local elected official or the community board and work your way up. I mean if you're good I guarantee I already know who the good interns that WHO. If I had money I'd hire I already known them. We get reports on it. So if you show up and you do the work and you show. You're passionate about this work and you could do it for a long time or or even logger. What you'll you'll get it. You'll get that opportunity. You'll get the pardon full-time you'll you'll rise up the ranks in terms of of pay your heart pursue it. We always. We'd be making twice as much in the private sector for sure but a lot of that is also that you're you get to know your community other communities and know you and you get to Noah you being the front lines at a lot of these issues. That IMPACT. The world and locally. So it's you know it's how you want to take your career. But it's a great learning experience on on getting to know New Yorkers every day for sure for sure that so good to hear it just like a personal anecdote so when I was in high school I grew up in Arcadia California. Sixty six represent We were like seventy percent Chinese American Asian American In Our neighborhood and my school was literally like eighty percent Asian American but all of our assembly members were white and I remember when I was in high school. There was one He was like the first Asian American to ever run And everyone thought he was crazy and but he was like hey like. Isn't there something wrong here that like no one reflects there are neighborhood and actually the people who represent this neighborhood kind of sees these new Asian Americans as people who took over their neighborhood because one of his platforms was translating some of the signs and Mandarin because how prolific population was And I remember he. You know fantastically lost because he still couldn't get People to vote unfortunately because of that fear because of dislike people who just don't believe in the system anymore but talking to you made me kind of wonder I'm like I wonder if you know who represents now and it's Edwin Chow He's an Asian American. And I'm kind of like this is amazing like a few years time like things are changing and younger people. Maybe they're starting to care so People like you and people who represent the people who live in these places that we know and love is so important. Thank you so much for coming on. No thanks for your time and again not just for the team I got. Luckily Luckily I got them in December number. And not just me. There's a lot of other folks Reason Americans across the city and state that are in similar positions are representatives of the state and city level. And you can just see the trajectory for the Asian American community in politics in New York is pretty steep. And we're going to get there and in more highlights sooner than later for sure man for sure. I jaw with asset That's another episode with Stephen Rago Chief of staff for district dirty for state assemblyman is that is that correct that say everything correctly. Yeah Yeah Yeah cool cool so with that said. I mean you'll Stephen. Working People find you and connect with you and your office take away with some plugs. Yeah Yeah for sure Anything an office. We put all our all our Info and resources on some women Barnwell instagram. So if you just go to a bar while thirty up in four or Ryan burrow up instagram. It's it's over there. Everything else are right now. You got our email list if you go online. Just type that in and we'll send you all that all that Info anything else other than that talk about take talk you might be able to find We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA figure that out but Definitely on resources or like you mentioned gang your foot in the door in this field with an internship. Or if there's a employment opportunity these charter hit me up. And we'll see what we can do. I it sounds good job. Is there anything like that now? Just a huge huge. Thank you to working so hard. Especially during this time All the staff members who are on the phone practically I appreciate that thank you thank. You do. Great Work for sure. Thank you Steven with asset as another episode. Six ninety nine per pound podcasts. Remember you can stream this podcast on all major streaming platforms. If you WANNA show some love. Hit the subscribe button right now and then sell France. Excel a friend. Each warranty most important lidove rate shared his podcast with your friends colleagues comrades non political and all that all right follow was six ninety nine per pound podcast six ninety nine per pound specifically on. Instagram facebook and twitter. Don't forget you can support his now. Monetarily by combining me were Joe Joe. A three dollar coffee a coffee dot com slash and setting up a monthly donation at anchor dot. Fm Ninety nine pounds last support young was six nine.

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Code for Americas Amanda Renteria Lost Some Battles, but Is Winning the Political War

Latina to Latina

26:57 min | 6 months ago

Code for Americas Amanda Renteria Lost Some Battles, but Is Winning the Political War

"For much of her career, Amanda Renteria was the right-hand woman to a lot of powerful people as economic policy advisor to US senator Dianne Feinstein as Chief of Staff to u.s. Senator, Debbie stabenow and National phone directory for Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign. Amanda also ran for office herself first for congress, then for governor of California today. She's leading code for America which partners with government jobs it work better through technology. We talk about what it's like to have a career that's constantly evolving and being an influential boss after years of working for other powerful people. Thank you for doing this Amanda course, it's good to see you. It's good to see you off of Twitter an email. I know Amanda your career zigzags, but the through life to me is a commitment to service growing up. What did service look like in your home service looked like really being part of the community and everyone came from you know, attending festivals to helping up the school to Church events. So it wasn't particularly service per se and the way that I think I understand public service to be today, but it was being part of a community being part of making sure, you know, everyone's taking care of and I think particularly when you grow up in rural, California and you know Latino Community households, it's about the kids and what does their future hold? So even though it's about the community there's an eye towards what does it look like in the future I found dead. Really cute photos of you as a kid doing folklore. Dance. Oh, I love my brother or I loved performing. I should say. I'm not sure I live practices 2 hours on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You look great doing it. And I also had to pull up a map to understand where in California you had grown up. I now get it sent Joaquin Valley your dad. I'm from Mexico in the sixties. Your mom is Mexican American Born in the states grew up in Woodlake, California. How did they instill in you a sense of who you are? Well, it's funny. You say well, I think my dad would say red bank's which was the labor camp. He actually grew up in and then everyone stayed in Woodlake after some of the toughest labor camps got dismantled in California dead. From the earliest ages growing up where I did we both attended Chevy avaz and rodeos and those are basically a Mexican rodeo. And so we lived this long my sisters and I of Mexican dancing and also learning about the country culture and mixing those two. I often described as everybody wears a hat off whether it's a cowboy hat or a bunch metal hat my dad happens to wear a trench it'll hat and so there was just really interesting world of combining different cultures together all around all around farming and so it was wonderful to grow up there and for me the learning Mexican dancing was learning about my culture. You go to Stanford double major in economics and political science. Here's the private rail of most which is that you walked onto the softball team third base and the basketball team guard cuz it's like God, that's all like, I'm stood next time. I know for I feel like the walking on two two collegiate sports teams. There's got to be a lesson baked in their thoughts about not waiting for an invitation. Hey, I didn't know how hard it would be which I think is probably a good thing cuz you do it. Anyway, there's a couple of reasons. I did it one. I did love sports package. I had to figure out how to pay for college. I didn't want my parents to know how expensive it was. I was really afraid that at any moment they would pull me back and say you can't do this, you know, you gain too far away. My academic advisor said, you know, don't worry about it. You'll have loans at the end of this and I was trying to explain don't you I can't just go home and say that like it's at the time twenty-two thousand bucks a month. And so I tried to figure out how do you have a pay for and she just sort of in the discussion said, you know, the only people who really get out of here without any debt are folks who get full-ride scholarships and they you know Sports and I was like sports I can do that. And so fortunately I did I got an athletic scholarship. Latino Latina is brought to you by First Republic Bank as your focus turns to what matters most to you and your Community First Republic remains committed to offering personal Financial Solutions that fit your needs some day one a dedicated Banker will be there to listen to you and understand your unique values and goals because now more than ever what matters to you matters most learn more at First Republic, member FDIC Equal Housing lender. You write your senior honors thesis on women and politics, but then you don't immediately go into politics you go and work as a financial analyst at Goldman Sachs. Why what motivated that decision so interesting in my honors, thesis was women of color in politics, but there weren't enough and so my professor at the time guided me and said listen, you just don't have enough for an academic thesis. You should expand it back to women. So I did that as an honors thesis, but I felt like I needed to learn more about the professional World more about business more about how things worked and wages of people at Stanford were applying to all these different jobs. I really liked math and numbers and economics and financial services were there and I fell in love with learning how to be a professional wearing a suit. I didn't know how to do that going to cloth napkin restaurants was all new to me and the intensity of financial markets really fit wage. With just the energy and the competitive nature of it. I really just found it to pull me in so that I learned the craft of business and financial services that really happened throughout policy and everything else to really understand that side of the world. My dad always taught us as well to figure out, you know, business and money and understand it. He's always trying to follow the money anytime I'd ask more questions like me cannot follow the money and I think that just stuck and I felt like I needed to learn more it was my next step of understanding the real world. And so I took that for 3 and 1/2 years, but as you said 3 and 1/2 years your first career Pivot Point you had home to California to teach. Yeah, I still say this day the hardest decisions in my career was leaving my first job largely because that's what you're good at. That's what you know, I had just been in I figured out how to make ends meet figured out is about my only also the the company page. She had to be alluring totally and and the future potential compensation as well. But that was never a driving motivator for me. I suppose still hasn't since I haven't gone back into the private sector, but the way I left had a lot to do with going back home being with my mom. She's talking to her comadre and we're at a basketball game in my hometown and leans over was like what I'm doing now because people at that time remembered I was the first woman Latina from my high school to go to Stanford. It was a really big deal at the time and so here's now looking back saying, you know, what is she doing now boss and my mom's like well, she's working on a bank kind of like a bank teller and I remember just hearing her words and it wasn't her description and it wasn't it was the tone. It was the she was supposed to do something and I drove back to LA going man. What am I supposed to be doing? You know, what am I supposed to be doing in this world? And so I moved back home. To teach and coach for a lot of folks that Goldman. It was a very strange change. I fell in love with teaching and that was my first public service job and I fell in love with the idea that you wake up every day to help Empower people. It was meaningful and meant something and so thank goodness. I had that moment that I over heard my parents talking about that a lot with my own kids. I think a lot of people who have that moment of recognizing that what they want to do is commit themselves to a career in public service. They then if they choose an advanced degree turn around and get a masters of public policy or a masters of public administration. Why going at the MBA instead? I understood my skills. I understood I saw the world is such a gift that young to understand your skills when your early twenties know that well partly I understood it because I left it in such a stark difference right? I went from Financial Services. Is 2 in the classroom and I recognized while I loved being in the classroom and I loved doing that. I knew I had something I knew I was good at that thing. I was doing for 3 and 1/2 years. It just felt right to me and it felt different than the academic philosophy that I felt like I studied a lot more at Stanford and so business felt like a framing I understood it was asked if I got I was surprised I got into Harvard Business School to be fair. And when I got there it did all make sense. It did make a ton of its fit me well for them or my skill-set for how I thought about the world. I certainly didn't fit in there. I think that's probably a common theme in my life that I somehow belong everywhere and nowhere at the same time, but I was on a different coast different experience with the classroom full of folks who didn't grow up in the same way that I did. I relate to that so deeply the fitting and everywhere fitting in know where I suppose a lot of us do and then as if just to continue to confound people you go to Capitol Hill I do well I did not Capitol Hill initially. I graduated from business school and went where do I how do I get back to the office combination of the rewards of teaching and the intensity and the power of like financial markets and I thought where do those things combined and I thought it was government and so off I went right on the front lines work in the city of San Jose worked on Community Development block grants that work directly with Community empowerment and I happened to be in Senator Feinstein's office asking her to support these and six months later that senior advisor says, you know, I know this is an interesting call out of the Blues, but would you ever be interested in working for Senator Feinstein person? I wrote about in my honors thesis home. And how could you not say? Yes, I thought I'd do it for a year. And then after a decade one year after another it was an incredibly fascinating time. I was there during the Great Recession working at that point for the senator from Michigan Debbie stabenow. The Affordable Care Act was done. I was on the finance committee. And then in my final stint she became chairwoman of the ad committee which in fact was brought me right back home to where I grew up again. And so yeah every single year built on the other and I really did fall in love with being in the Senate. Part of the reason why I fell in love with it is cuz I did feel like I was able to stretch it a little bit here and there I was eight months pregnant while we were deciding whether or not maternity care would be in the base bill of the Affordable Care Act and it was moments like that that it mattered to be in the room when so the Sonia Sotomayor was voted in. I was on the floor and the Senators crying in the corner. I'd like to think that even though I was just one person there that there were times where I pulled it in that direction. And so I do see it as this place of hope but also of like a slow-moving piece of work. Well put I want to tell you about a comedy podcast that I think you'll love it's called Spanish presents each week Spanish at keep presents highlights the best song next comedy and experience with exciting gas discussions about Latin X culture and even a little improv Spanish. I keep presents is hosted by comedians Carlos Santos Reyes Alicea equipment failure and Tony Rodriguez with special guests, like after Luis Guzman first Latina Disney princess and my girl Aimee Carrero, he has a tumor designer pet ocado. And even Mister Cheney himself Pitbull and if you're asking yourself do I need to know Spanish to enjoy this podcast? The answer is no but you might learn a little along the way listen to Spanish. I keep presents in your podcasts app now and subscribes you don't miss an episode. For someone who doesn't know what does a chief of staff to u.s. Senator do I used to call it the land of uncomfortable conversations? Cuz you always have a choice figure out how to make things work. Right? You also had to be the one that says things that Senators not appropriate for the center to take on or that, you know, the staff has worked through but there's that last thing you've got to negotiate off so it's bull putting strategy putting, you know, some vision and Leadership on it, but really doing a lot of the behind-the-scenes work to make things happen. You were the first Latina Chief of Staff in the history of the United States Senate. How did that actually show up for you in your lived experience of doing the job as funny there was an article on the hill thought that yes there were doing the Chiefs on right and the title was Renteria doesn't blend in there were moments. I just didn't fit him, but I think that was okay Thursday. But like tell me like do you remember any of them? Yeah, I mean they were kind of all over the place like when we'd be in a room and we were talking about immigrant communities and what it meant in healthcare and people looked around like well, how do you immigrant? I remember this conversation like well, how do immigrant communities like get Healthcare and everyone like looked around and it was like but let me tell you right it was that same story of being a chief of staff pregnant and trying to figure out how to make a coat fit so you can get on the senate floor and you look around you long as anyone had this problem before why is it just me it was when you walked into the lunchroom and you looked around or when people were talking about whether or not the Senate dining hall should be unionized and you know, your mom was part of a union and that's how you would Healthcare when you were younger cuz she was a secretary for the schools. It came up so often in many ways that it was just kind of like the daily life. But it was also I think for me a language I was learning to one of the things that would be interesting for me. And when I got to Senator Feinstein's office calling the Senator Senator, I thought how do I advise somebody that I have to give a formal title to cuz for me the one and Dona means you speak a certain way you don't give advice to your don't alonia. So there was all these cultural changes that were really different for me as an advisor for me. Just walking around the halls looking at what I'm seeing what I was driving into work. It's also what I came to love over time. Is that okay? How do I use this to ask interesting questions? Do we need a senator's own elevator? I get that people need to get to the the floor soon. But it's really that the people's house. Right? Is that does that feel like that? That's part of the challenge of being on the hill though, right which is that you are so far removed from a lot of the communities that you seek to serve. That's right. And that's been the story of my life going back and forth the financial services going back home to teach and coach that bouncing back and forth is me because if I get too far away, it doesn't feel like I I know my roots as well. I don't know how to keep that up over time. But even the summer I we spent the time with my family trying to teach my kids what it's like to be gay family what it's like to be in Rural America what it's like to be and the kind of communities I grew up and but I think that's what makes for good policy the more good stewardship good leadership the more money you keep making that connection. I think we are a better world. If we don't lose that touch 2016 you were hired to be the national political director for Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign. What does being the national political director for a campaign like that entail? So in this case it was two things. It was one working with elected leaders all across the country making sure they had what they needed obviously getting endorsements as part of the process cuz we had a superdelegate race. It was a little bit structured differently and then the other was building out our constituent services. So making sure we had Outreach leaders in the different communities African-American lgbtq Latin X etcetera and then along that process because of relationships. I got pulled in as the senior advisor who went to Flint or when zika happened got pulled in to go and have a communication awareness effort there. And so it puts you in the middle of in some ways. I could Chief of Staff where you're working behind the scenes with a lot of folks who are in front of the camera. It was I have to say just seen the country in a presidential. There's nothing quite changing. Like it obviously this year's different but there's nothing quite like traveling to like 35 different states many more than once talking about their lives. Where were you on June 8th 2016. I was in Javits Center. I was one of the spokespeople. I remember when we all had to go off air. I remember my last question before elections started which was what you think it will mean to have, you know, a woman lead the most powerful nation in the world. Yeah, and then to go from there just several hours later it not happening. But the shock of it all on the drive back home because I didn't want to stay in Manhattan. I felt like when my kids woke up. I needed to tell them I we're 3:00 in the morning and my husband and I are on a you know in a cab back home so I could get up in three hours to tell them actually happened. So it was a tough moment and I think in some ways again, I go back to my roots it led me back to that same lesson learned when I ran for congress, which is Faith. You gotta build power from the ground up people have to feel engage all across the country at school board races and local races. You don't do it in one election cycle. It really is every day in day out building leadership and Power. I want to recommend a podcast that offers Big Ideas and surprising stories. It's called pin drop from Ted. You'll journey across the globe with filmmaker Solium Rush of Allah in search of the most imaginative ideas from each place this season here from a handful of musicians like Renata Flores who are bringing Pride back to quechua bruised native language with their music and listen to locals from Rapa Nui AKA Easter Island to find out what happens to the tourism Paradise when people stop showing up be sure to check out pin drop wherever you listen. You run for office Twice first for congress then for governor of California what went into that first decision to run for Congress? After being on the hill for ten years you look around and you say if you really want to change policy What's Next Step? It's not lost that you can you know be in the first letter, you know, chief of staff and recognizing you can only call so far and then you need to make sure that if you want to change policy, you got to change a policy makers that really was the first step of it did that occur to you first or did someone come back recruit you and plant that seed what I knew is we need to change the way policy was made and fought for in the place that I grew up. And so I want to get a policy-maker that could do that kind of work. It wasn't necessarily me. But when I was talking to my girlfriends and I was like goddamn this is what we need in the Central Valley. And so I'm thinking about how can I get someone there to fight off this stuff in the same way that Senators sit down and I'll fights right? How can I get someone from my home town to do that? And like any good girlfriend looks around like come on man. Like you're the one that says if not you who that support that stuck which is if not you who so then you throw your hat in the ring and you do it and I gotta say one of the biggest lessons from running, you know, I was talking to change one of my base audience right older Latino women like my mom they were my strongest base where I grew up she says to me but like don't you think we need someone like them to represent us wage? And for me that just stuck which was oh my goodness. We're not just running for office. We are trying to change what the image of leadership is. I want people to look in the mirror as who should be your leader and it looks like you no matter who you are. And so we changed our campaign at that moment from the ads. We were telling it was much more about the strawberry so that they could see someone like them could lead even if we weren't going to lead in this one and that's largely why also joined the presidential campaign cuz I thought God if we can change the image of leadership in one cycle, what a difference that can make again at that local level is people would see themselves. I think it makes an impact on anyone that's been left out. In general, we don't talk a lot about losses. What did you learn from? Those two defeats what you're fighting for? My biggest lesson of the feet 1 a.m. Is when I saw my poll numbers in the Congressional race and realize it was nearly impossible to win a general election. So that no matter how hard I worked wage no matter the fact that we put in a modern campaign that we raise more money than anyone had Ever Raised by a long shot during that period of time. We reached out to more communities etcetera, etcetera. It just not gonna happen and that moment of what are we fighting for? Why did we do this became so crystal clear to me that by the end of the general election, even though we're all crying foul campaign team was hugging and I loved that team no matter what happened. I told them because we were fighting for something in that fight doesn't end at that point and that's giving me some clarity to fight for them. Have your voice heard is a one how can our listeners prepare and help others prepare in the months ahead. Like we keep hearing plan your vote. What what do we need to be doing inside? Our own families in front of groups? We are really good at Community. One of the things that we do is we hang out we bring everyone together. We that's what you learn to do. It is now time to do that for voting age and I will say this which is there's a lot of questions this year about when new vote how to vote and I think it is incumbent on all of us who are in these networks are in these circles to not only get people to vote but educate folks both on what they're voting for as well as deconstructing some of the misinformation that's out there the biggest wage I think massive effort we can put in is this misinformation campaign about whatever it is including the difficulty of voting we need to educate folks not only on how to vote but yep. Vote. I think we're in the perfect Nexus as Latinas to do that. You're now the CEO of code for America. How does running a nonprofit compared to working on Capitol Hill or a working on a campaign or running for office? In some ways it's not too different than being behind the scenes working on the hill cuz it's about the work and what you're doing so very much feels a little bit. Like when I was at the city of San Jose first started out at the local level. The difference is that we are working with a tool and a medium technology that has the ability to make change at scale. That part of me is pretty remarkable, you know, we often talk about you can make change of scale and government and you can make change at scale and technology and bringing them together really has an opportunity to change how systems work in our country. We're going to use technology. We've got to make sure that we are bending technology for good. And so we spend a lot of our time not just offering programs that are out there making government systems better, but it's how do we make government systems that are particularly focused on communities that have been left out food stamps are Earned Income Tax Credit, that's the kind of programs that we're doing. Thanks for joining us Latina to Latina is executive-produced and owned by Julie Ogle Antigua Williams and me Alicia Menendez, Virginia. Laura is our managing producer cedrick Wilson is our professor Catalina Rodriguez mixed. This episode is our social media editor. We love hearing from you email us at Ola and remember to subscriber follow us on radio public Apple podcast on Google podcasts, wherever you are listening. And please please leave a review. It is one of the fastest easiest ways to help us grow as a community off.

California Senator Chief of Staff Senator Feinstein Amanda Renteria Stanford America senator Woodlake u.s congress United States Senate basketball Debbie stabenow Hillary Clinton advisor San Jose
Joshua Bolten

The Strategerist

30:16 min | 2 years ago

Joshua Bolten

"One of the biggest jobs in Washington is chief of staff to the president of the United States. Joshua bolten. Treats is to an inside look at life as chief of staff. He served in the role from two thousand six to two thousand nine which your years that included a lot of very early mornings. Thanks to the early rising President Bush, if you're working directly for the president as I was chief of staff he got to his desk at about six forty five every morning, pretty punctually. And he he'd been already been up for an hour and a half, and he was raring to go. And if you're chief of staff you Andy card used to get in at five thirty in order to prepare himself to talk to the president. I shaved it pretty close and used to get in round six fifteen. Which gave me a half hour to prepare. But I was scrambling for that half hour before I would go down and visit with the president first thing in the morning Josh's career with President Bush began a full two years before he was even elected president we chat with Josh about his most frightening time in DC by laughter was the key to making the job feel less heavy and have he decompressed after leaving the White House? I'm Andrew Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third president late night, sketch, comedy and compelling conversation. This strategic has a podcast more from the word strategically which was appointed by us in how in braced by the George W Bush administration we highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. Join today by the Harley motorcycle riding bass player for the rock band. The compassionate s- who also happen to be White House chief of staff, and now he's the CEO the business roundtable, I think we can call him the most interesting man in Washington, Josh Bolten. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you, Andrew. And we're also co hosted today by Holly coups, Mitch the executive director of the Bush institute. Holly, thank you again afternoon. So Josh, I remember I've watched I watched a lot of TV, and I try and tie everything back to TV and the only chief of staff, I can think of on TV was Leo mcgarry on the west wing how close to Leo mcgarry. Do you think you are? If you've been watching the show. We did watch the show because the show was on during the two thousand campaign. And so we all watched it. And when the administration started in two thousand one about maybe just a few months into the year, the whole cast of the west wing came to came to see us. Oh, cool at the west wing, and they you know, they filtered around and partnered up with their with their real counterparts. Oh, wow. At the time. I was deputy chief of staff and the deputy chief of staff on that show was named Josh something. And I had a lot of people say to me. Gosh. That's you know, there's that show on TV. They're even using your name and people not realizing that. I was life imitating art rather than rather than vice versa. They I thought the show was was pretty accurate it, you know, they had a lot of writers who had experience from the Clinton administration in working in the west wing. And so they they kind of captured some of the essence of what it's what it's like to be in the White House chief of staff role, not so much. I think Andy card was was closer to that avuncular model that they had on the show than I was when I became chief of staff. How would you describe your styles? Chief-of-staff? Oh, just trying to hang on. I think. I became chief of staff at the beginning of after are the after the administration had been there for five years. So Andy card was the iron man of chiefs of staff, and I I had big shoes to fill in following him. So I didn't start until early two thousand six, but I started at a at a pretty difficult time for the administration because in particular because the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, we're going very badly and were very unpopular both in in the general population and on Capitol Hill. And we were headed into an election amid term election season, which we knew that the in large part because of the unpopular pop unpopularity of those wars, we were we were likely to lose both the house and the Senate. So I came in at a at a pretty difficult and sober time. But I also came in into an office that was accustomed at that point. Accustomed to vary. Well, running White House operation where people understood their roles, and and and the the president was I think comfortable with the kind of structure, we had we changed the personnel around a bit when I came in. That was part of the reason for for bringing me in when the president did. But it was I inherited a functional operation from Andy card. And and I'd like to think we. Strengthened it from there. So Josh, you mentioned that when you came in in owes sex, you know, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were at a critical point you then had the financial crisis a few years later. People talk about the way to the world being on the president shoulders, but what did the weight of the world? How did you feel that did that feel like you had the way to the world on you too? And how do you manage that as chief of staff, you know, I had a difficult in serious job. But I never felt the way to the world on my my shoulders. I've heard other chief former chiefs of staff say that I've heard him say it's the worst job in Washington James baker's, I think famous for saying that you you got target painted on your back. Think Rahm Emanuel said, you know, he there was a show about chiefs of staff a documentary. He he looked straight into the camera and says, it's hell, and I my experience was different. I. It was a really hard job. And and the stakes were very important. But I never felt a great burden. You know? I was I was probably there at the office typically sixteen hours a day. Your car was always there when I got in and when I left. Yeah. Well, if you worked for President Bush, you gotta get in early and I'm not I'm not an early bird. I'm a night owl. No bass player is we have. That's right. You can't be you can't be in a rock and roll band and be an early bird, but the president is an early bird. So. I was in the in the preceding five years when I was deputy chief of staff and budget director. I was able to, you know, slack off and barely make it in for the seven thirty AM senior staff meeting, but if you're working directly for the president as I was as chief of staff he got to his desk at about six forty five every morning, pretty punctually, and he'd he'd been already been up for an hour and a half, and he was raring to go. And if you're chief of staff you Andy card used to get in at five thirty in order to prepare himself to talk to the president. I shaved it pretty close in used to get in around six fifteen which gave me a half hour to prepare. But I was scrambling for that half hour before I would go down and visit with the president first thing in the morning. But I, you know, even with that. And I rarely went home before. Well, ten o'clock at night would have been an early night. Even with that. I never felt depressed. And I genuinely think I've every day when I you know, came through the gates of the west wing. In a in a nice, armored vehicle being driven by secret service agents. I might add. I felt lucky I felt like this. You know, this is an extraordinary privilege. And I think if you bring that attitude to work every day, it's it's hard to feel oppressed. Most important thing though, was President Bush's attitude because I saw him, you know, first thing in the morning last thing before he headed up to the residents every day through some really tough times. And I saw him disappointed. I saw a mad plenty of times. I never saw him discouraged her pessimistic. And and if you gotta if you've got a leader who brings that kind of attitude to the office every day that affects everybody in the building. Did you feel that way even during the financial crisis, which was a really tough, and you know, changing period every single day. Now, the financial crisis was. You know, I get asked periodically. What what was the scariest moment for you in the White House? And I was I was deputy chief of staff and therefore acting chief of staff on nine eleven in the White House and people assume I'm going to say that and nine eleven was of course, by far the most horrifying. Tragedy that, you know, anybody's encountered in government in in a very long time. So so what it that was you know, that you can't there's nothing more horrifying than that day in my memory. But in terms of just being frightened and not sure whether we were doing the right thing, I gotta say it was not the first year of the presidency in two thousand one it was the last year in two thousand eight and and in fact last month's of the presidency when we were going through the financial crisis. And we're on the precipice of what could have been worse than the great, depression, and weren't sure that we were doing the right things to to try to prevent it. It was it was a lot of improvisation and direction changes. So that was that was an unusually tough period and. President President Bush was the same. And you know, we we had lots of light moments. And he he. He always took it upon himself. Not to if he felt afflicted he always made. Sure, the people didn't see that. And he he was the he was the comforter and chief during a lot of that. I I remember one meeting in particular when the Treasury Secretary and fed chairman and the president of the New York fed. Asked me for time to come in and see the president right in the midst of the crisis is the markets were melting down. And they were coming in to ask the president to authorize them to take a proposal to the hill for an appropriation of seven hundred fifty billion dollars limit. Let me repeat that that's billion with a bee's seven hundred and fifty billion dollars the congress. They're the proposal was that we need to ask the congress to appropriate that money, and what was it for. It was to bail out the banks that caused the problem in the first place. So a really tough ask and very tough spot to be in. And President Bush asked, you know, some really good questions of the folks as they were making their presentation. And then he then he turned to the fed chairman, Ben Bernanke key. Who is who is a professor at Princeton before he came to work in government and had written his doctoral dissertation on the great, depression and the had ban. What what's likely to happen? If we don't do this. And then said, Mr President, it could be as bad or worse than the great depression. And there was silence in the room. And the president said, well, I think that makes it easy. And after that meeting he you know, he made his decision. He told them to go ahead. Take the proposal to Capitol Hill. He went around the he didn't sneak out of the room with, you know, with his shoulders hunched or anything like that. Despite knowing that he was taking on board something that was going to make him deeply unpopular with most of America, including the relatively smallish percentage of people that still supported him. But he didn't slink out of the room. He went around individually to each of the people that were there presenting to the Treasury Secretary to the fed chairman and others any took a moment with each of them, and privately and said, we'll get through this. This'll work go home and get some rest, then we walked back into the Oval Office. And he he turned to the it was the communications director, Dan Bartlett in may. And he turned to us in, you know, with a little bit of a smile said if this is Roosevelt or Hoover for damn sure, I'm going to be Roosevelt. Right. So you. In the midst of the financial crisis. That was what six eight weeks before the presidential election of two thousand and eight the administration was are also working on a transition plan for whoever was going to come an office that was put into place by President Bush. Yeah, we had a pretty good idea. Eight weeks before the election who was coming. But you had that going on onto just in the sense of. Trying to be prepared and prepared the next administration for that. So a lot on your plate. Yeah. There were you know, normally an on the way out the last few months of administration, you're running on fumes in your everybody's packing up and the wrapping up the last few initiatives that you wanna be wanna get taken care of. And if it's a responsible administration which most have been you're doing your best to prepare the next crew to to come in to a to a reasonably good situation. We didn't have that luxury. But we were determined to execute as good a transition as we possibly could. And that that came from an instruction that President Bush gave me in early two thousand eight so almost a year before the actual end of the administration. He he said to me were we're. Added into a presidential transition really for the first time in modern history. When the homeland of the United States is under threat, and it's a moment of owner ability for the United States. Normally that might not matter that you're in. Oh, the the new folks aren't aren't really well established for the first few weeks or months of the administration, but with the country actually under physical threat, he said, we've got a responsibility to do a a really effective transition, especially on the national security side. So we started to work actually in the summer of two thousand eight we started the work with both campaigns to help them prepare their transitions and that for the White House. The effort was led. Led by young man, named Blake goddess men who had been the president's personal aide, and then went off the business school, and he had he had just graduated from business school and was on a yacht somewhere in the. See, and he was he was planning to go off. He had a great job going to work for a private nice private equity house in Boston. And I reached him on the yacht. Because unfortunately, our our long-term time deputy chief of staff for operations, Joe Hagan. Who's who's terrific wasn't able to stay for the last six months of the administration, and it's the deputy chief for operations who really asked to run the transition. So I reached Blake on the yacht. And I said your country needs you, and he said I showed up, and he did a he did a brilliant job managing the transition and to this day. The there are a lot of folks in the Obama administration who will say nothing nice about the Bush administration. But they will all say that they were they were deeply appreciative and benefited from the the professional ineffective way that we that we tried to do the transition to the Obama administration. Country before party always always in that, you know, that was a George W Bush's is a is a heck of a politician in in a partisan in or a true Republican partisan. But there were there was never any doubt. On any single day that I worked in the White House that that country came and principal came at a party. And this was one of those examples, and that I mean, the the president gave me the instruction to start the transition before we were pretty sure who was gonna win the when the election, but it by the end of it. It was pretty clear, and he didn't he didn't say take the foot off the gas. He said put it on the gas in particular because we were we were going to be having a president who did not have a lot of governing experience. And and there would be people around him who who were pretty fresh to it. And we had a responsibility to do to do the best job. We could to prepare them, especially for their national security responsibilities. One of the things he touched on earlier that like to get back to a little bit is President Bush's sense of humor in this. Your sense of humor as as one of his leading deputies. How did that sense of humor permeate the White House? What what effect that have on everybody? You know? When when I left the White House, the the the photographers officers an official photographers office at the White House. And there are I think at least three or four photographers whose only job is to photograph the president who. When he's not. And you know in his residence or when President Bush wasn't at the ranch or a Camp, David. He's photographed constantly. They take thousands of photographs a day. Anyway, they put together a book for me of, you know, photos from my time that I that. I actually it's a whole series of notebooks from my time working in the administration, and the thing I noticed. As I was I was showing the notebook to a friend was how many photos in the Oval Office where laughing and that came from the top the president kept it light. He he took the issues very seriously. He took his decision making responsibilities very seriously. He did not take himself seriously. And and that that created a lot of a lot of light moments, and you know. Plenty of plenty of silly potty humor and. And and other stuff. I I remember I remember, you know, stuff like that. Blake whom I mentioned he was he started out as the personal aide to the president. And he would do stuff like knowing that President Bush always insisted on being responsible for taking care of Barney the dog he he went out and bought one of those fake dog poops and put it in the middle of the rug and office. Fake, of course, fake fake. But the president didn't know that. So he was headed to the bathroom to get some towels to clean. He felt strongly. It was his dog. It was his response. Don was going to clean up the dogs poop on this route. Yep. He was Ray. He was raised. Right. But there was a lot of that kind of stuff and. And we worked with a lot of funny people and the president enjoyed good humor. So it. Back to Holly's question that that's a that's a big part of what made what made the judge made the job less heavy for all of us was that we we laughed a lot. Let's talk about you for a second. You probably don't want to. But how'd you take your experience and lessons you learned into your private sector career afterwards? And how did you think about what you want to do next after such a intense eight plus years working for George W Bush? The most important thing is I wanted to take a hell of a lawn map because I because I was I was ten years sleep-deprived, especially the last two. Yeah. Because I worked all eight years in the Bush White House, and then two years before that I was the policy director of the campaign. So none none of those jobs was a light job. But especially the last three years as chief of staff. Having to keep the president's schedule. And then do my own work at night. Was really crimped asleep. And I I was a lot tired or than I realized I was me. I think it was a full year. Before I was restored to in physical and mental health. So my main my main objective when I when I left the White House was. Get get rested in and get healthy. And. I found a great way to do that. Which was I was invited by my alma mater, Princeton to go to go teach there. Which turned out to be a much harder job than I expected it. But, but you could actually, you know, like sleep as thirty classes. No, no, no, no. I scheduled no class before eleven AM. I that was one that was one of the prerequisites to my agreement to do it was that no class that I was teaching would start before eleven AM. And that was a great way to both refresh myself and to reflect on the experience that I'd had and and try to take away some lessons for the balance of my career and most of the lessons. I took away were were lessons that I learned by observing how President Bush handled himself and handled handled others how he how he behaved as a leader. I think our final question for you. You're moderating our engagement tonight or engage at the Bush center, presented by Highland capital management. Our topic is Camp David tonight's for doing all these moderating. You're thinking. Telling story, I'm just I candy for this thing before we let you run off and do that what is one topic that we as a country aren't talking about enough that you think we should be talking more about? Well, I can tell you what I think we should be talking less about. The thing. I think we we should be talking more about is. And a lots of people are talking about it. But I think it's I think it's the most important thing. Once we return, I hope we've returned to civil discourse in this country, and and the most important policy topic. I think for people to talk about is how do we make sure the United States remains the most innovative nation on earth? That's our that's our strength that that is our prosperity. That is our character. I know the Bush institute is is working on a lot of elements of that. But a, but a lot of things have to come together for the United States to remain the innovative engine of the world economy and begins with education, which annot the the institute is is focusing a lot of its effort on. But it's not in my in my view, it's not education in the traditional sense of you know, school buildings and things like that. It's how do we how do we prepare people for a world in which at least in the United States, unskilled? Labour will be less and less in demand and technical skills will be increasingly in demand, and we and we need to shift. Our way of thinking about how we how we bring up our young people with the right skills for the for the modern economy because it's it's going to change much more rapidly. I think than most people expect the the kinds of changes where we're going to see over the next couple of decades. I think are ones that have been a long time coming in and like many dramatic changes. They. They they come up on your very slowly. And then when they really start they happen. Suddenly that I think that's true the computing age, and now as we enter the the artificial intelligence age, I think it's going to it's going to continue to creep up on a slowly. And then happen very, suddenly and as a country, we need to be prepared. Is that something you're seeing a lot of discussion on in your work as as CEO the business roundtable, I am. And it's in most of the most of the leaders in in the business roundtable, which is two hundred of the two hundred CEOs of some of America's largest companies almost all of them face. The same challenge of finding a a well qualified workforce to. To do the jobs of the future. And I think would would this challenge along with many others business has a new role to play in our society as as people have lost faith in in some of the other big institutions in in government in, unfortunately, in churches, I think our business leaders need to step up and and lead on issues like skills training in this country in ways that they haven't in the past which makes my which makes my current job a terrific place to be in. At this point in the in the twilight of my career, Josh thank you so much for spending the time with us, really. Appreciate it. Holly. Thank you as well. Thanks. What is your? If you enjoy today's episode would like to help us spread the word about the strategic to please give us a five star review until your friends to subscribe for available on apple podcasts Spotify and all the major listening apps if you're tuning in on a smartphone tapper swipe over the cover art. You'll find episode notes with helpful information and details he may have missed the strategic was produced, but you Anna Pappas at the George W Bush institute in Dallas, Texas. Thank you for listening.

President President Bush president White House chief of staff deputy chief of staff Bush institute United States Josh George W Bush administration Holly coups George W Bush institute Andy card Mr President Washington Joshua bolten CEO America Andrew Kaufman Bush White House
Nigerian President Orders Reduction In Price Of Fertilizer

Newscast - Africa

01:27 min | 7 months ago

Nigerian President Orders Reduction In Price Of Fertilizer

"The Appellate podcast shares the stories of multifaceted Africans one episode at a time the podcast aims to uncover The Untold Stories of modern and Millennial Africans off base and various parts of the world. Each episode gives listeners an opportunity to learn and experience conversations that showcase who they are and they're Global perspectives in our own never change in World. Be sure to listen And subscribe to the absolute podcast on Spotify or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. You can also follow at Affiliates podcast on all social media platforms, you're listening to the news of this hour on Africa Business Radio president muhammadu buhari has ordered the reduction of the cost of fertilizer from $5,500 up to five thousand. Naira per bag reduction was announced by the Vice chairman of the national food Security Council and the governor of kebbi state and tick. Oh bugger do it is closed is on Tuesday. We've been Statehouse reporters in Abuja after I cancel met with the chief of staff to the president Professor Ibrahim gambari, but we do explain that the federal government's decision to reduce the price was to ensure food Security in the country. And that wasn't he's at this time on Africa Business Radio. You can continue to listen live online at w w w dot Africa business radio.com or our mobile home. I am Rachel children do thank you for listening.

president Africa Business Radio dot Africa national food Security Council Africa Professor Ibrahim gambari Vice chairman Abuja muhammadu buhari Spotify Rachel chief of staff $5,500
Witness testimony ties Mulvaney to quid pro quo; chief of staff was a no-show at deposition today, White House official concerned Giuliani's Ukraine work was illegal, Trump today: "I hardly know" Ambassador Sondland Trump last month: Sondland is "a really

Erin Burnett OutFront

45:59 min | 1 year ago

Witness testimony ties Mulvaney to quid pro quo; chief of staff was a no-show at deposition today, White House official concerned Giuliani's Ukraine work was illegal, Trump today: "I hardly know" Ambassador Sondland Trump last month: Sondland is "a really

"Finding the right pros for home projects can be tough and spark a lot of questions. Like how do I find a pro who can help. Will they do a good job. Will I get a fair price. That's where homeadvisor can help from leaky. Faucets to major remodels. homeadvisor connects you to the right pro for the job in seconds and even helps you get a fair price. Read Reviews News check. Project Cost Guide and book appointments go to Homeadvisor DOT COM or download. The free homeadvisor APP to start your next project out front next breaking news. The president's chief of staff to Rutley linked trump's Ukraine quid pro quo as according to to White House officials who testified testified under oath. Is there any way mick. Mulvaney wasn't acting on behalf of the president. Plus John Bolton says he has information that's relevant to the impeachment pitchman probe according to his attorney. So win will he testify and does the Biden. Warren battle gets uglier warring is going after loyal Biden voter news. Can't you win them over. Let's go out front good evening. I'm Pamela Brown in for Erin Burnett on this Friday and tonight. The President Chief of staff orchestrated the quid pro quo. That's according to White House officials whose closed door positions were released today. Fiona Hill President Trump's former advisor on Russia. Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vin men the top Ukraine expert on the National Security Council both testified under oath in the impeachment inquiry inquiry and both said it all came back to Mick Mulvaney. The president's right hand man a man. You'd be hard pressed to imagine was acting on his own. According into both hill and then men who testified separately under oath again behind those closed doors they have been told that Mulvaney was directing the quid pro quo with Ukraine gene and coordination with trump's ambassador the of the EU Gordon's on land. According to the transcript then was asked. Do you understand how he someone came to believe that this deliverable was necessary them in response so I heard him say that this had been coordinated with White House Chief of staff Mr Mr Mick Mulvaney question. What did he say about that answer? He just said that he had had a conversation with Mr Mulvaney. And this is what was required in order to get a meeting. And here's how hill recounted that meeting in her testimony quote Ambassador Sunland in front of the Ukrainians as I came in was talking about how he had an agreement with chief of Staff Mulvaney for a meeting with the Ukrainians if they were going to go forward with investigations and my director for or Ukraine was looking completely alarmed. So if you create one in a meeting with the president they needed to investigate Biden a quid pro quo that the Ukrainians were made aware of according to the testimony. And then there's another pro quo. This woman relating to military aid to Ukraine according to Benjamin's testimony Shimoni the hold on the military aid came from the chief of staff office and he'll quote it actually came as direction from the chief of staff office downpours. Mulvaney has already admitted to the world that there was in fact a quid pro quo member. This you just described is a quid pro four. It is funding will not flow unless the investigation into the into the Democratic Server. Happened as well we we do we do that that all the time with foreign policy I have news for everybody get over it. There's going to be political influence in foreign policy so he later took that back doc as we know but this testimony from Hill then men indicates his initial statement was the truth. Monte Rajoub is now on Capitol Hill and mono you also have some new developments regarding another potential star witness in this impeachment inquiry John Bolton. Yeah that's right. John Bolton is an individual has been mentioned time and again by a number of witnesses Someone who is central to some of these discussions that were going on and who raised serious objections by the push of by Rudy Giuliani and others to pursue these investigations. That could help. The president politically pushing the Ukrainian government to do so even Fiona Hill testimony. Today show that she. She quoted John Bolton as saying that Rudy Giuliani's a hand handgrenade. That is going to blow everything up now. In a new letter sent today by by Bolton's attorney to Capitol Hill he reveals that John Bone has information information about events meetings in conversations about which you have already received testimony but about meetings and conversations that have not been discussed in the testimonies so far and this was revealed in a court case in which Democrats have essentially said that they weren't going to fight to get John to come and testify five because John Bones attorney has said that if he were subpoenaed they would fight this out in court about his client is about a separate client who also served under John. Bolton Democrats Democrats have no desire to go a- prolonged court fight so there signaling. They're not willing to go this route but John Bones attorney says that if you were to come hugh provide this information nation but I want to court the rule in decide whether or not he is required to come and testify but that equates big complication here Pamela because Democrats I wanNA wrap up this impeachment probe in the coming weeks potentially by the end of the year to actually impeach the president but if they will go to pursue John Bone who could have add this key evidence that could delay this proceedings for months at the moment. It sounds like Democrats. Don't want to go that route. All right thanks so much. Interesting that The lawyer is dangling out there his client John Bolton has all this information that has been out there but yet he wants the court to decide. So let's talk about all of this Alfran tonight. A member of the House Oversight Committee Committee who was inside the room for the women deposition democratic delegate. Eleanor Holmes Norton. Thank you so much for coming on. So let's start with. What Mani was talking about this fact? Act that according to John Bolton's attorney dumble and has all this knowledge of quote many relevant meetings and conversations that have not yet been discussed west and the testimonies thus far. Are you willing. Are the Democrats willing to put an impeachment. Vote on hold for another few weeks an order to possibly get John Bolton's testimony. I can say I think although we have not discussed this just came up with him if he wanted to come forward he should've come forward much earlier. Look where we are. We have got this done by the end of December outcome runneth. Over we've heard from the staff we've heard from people who are in the room I think you're dealing with and official who remember was fired by a trump is going to be part heart of what he is his come uppance to trump and then he wants to say well of course they made me do it so you you think we don't need them. You think you have everything the thing you already need say in in the last You've just gotTa kind of a first first reveals once you hear from Lieutenant Colonel Decorated and from his supervisor and the Lieutenant Colonel was in on the phone call. You're almost they are there there. But what the White House trump argue is. You still. Don't have the direct link to the president. Couldn't someone like a John. John Bolton the former national security advisor provide that direct link that the Democrats might need to make the case stronger. What more directly can you you have than being on the phone call where you heard the president himself so I do think we have the direct link to the president and I do think that the Bolton would be helpful but is he going to give us anything more than his staff who've already come forward and has given us we've got to ask? Why is he so anxious to to come forward? And if he's anxious to come forward why would he say take me to court and let them decide. It talked a lot about quid. Pro Quo investigations in exchange for military aid but both men and he'll topped about these investigations. Leaving to happen beat announced publicly in order for a meeting to happen with the president and even intesified minor standing is was all about getting the bilateral. Meeting doesn't matter to you. Excuse me if this was about eight or meeting. That's my question to you. You is. It all is quid. Pro Quo all the same whether it be about eight or the meeting. It's very important what you ask because up until now we have been focused on the money and and of course. They needed that most of all so wine. This this emphasis on the meeting with the president the president wants to look these people in the high and get as much directly from them on Joe Bind. He you want the money but the money he can't withhold but so long. We have already voted in a bipartisan way. For the money to go forward. The icing on the on the cake is the meeting and there he can have a direct conversation and perhaps we could overheard over here that conversation as we have the phone call and he can learn even more about Biden situation. Where there is you know? Mulvaney and Giuliani and Sullen are acting without the direction of the president. Impossible if so then he should have fired them. All these people have direct access access to the president. More rain is the chief of staff you mean to tell me never talks to the president again. You say that the Democrats have all you need but White House worse is. I've spoken with telling me that the basically the White House is banking on the public not fully grasping all these different threads coming out. These different names that it won't ultimately move the needle for them it. It is a tangled web with so many names and different meetings. All over the place when you go through the transcript. Do you really think that all this breaking through to the public outside of the beltway way outside of this bubble actually not now. I don't think they have been watching these these these reports but wait until they testify. So you think money's really going to be everything you're going to see who I saw. You're going to see Lieutenant Colonel Von and when they it on the list so far well he is there. Are there negotiations right now to happen publicly to avoid it when you see he. Witnesses willing to testify directly to what they heard the most important witnesses will be the witnesses on the call the witnesses who were closest to the evidence we need seems to me that we have enough of them. Now that unless we WANNA be here this time next year talking about this and remember twenty twenty is a every every member of the House has the run again. I think you've got to finish this up before Christmas. Okay Eleanor Holmes Norton thank you so much which member and now up next trump and Giuliani. The two men still speaking wreck early on the phone even as the impeachment probe is heating up according to sources I've spoken with plus trump ham picton even praised the job that he was doing Gordon. Sunlen thank you whereas you great Jeff but now he says he hardly knows the man who delivered damning testimony on Ukraine and Breaking News Michael Bloomberg just filed. Oh for a presidential primary. Does this mean he's really running. We'll be right back. Finding the right pros for home. Projects can be tough and spark a lot of questions. Like how do I find a pro who can help. Will they do a good job. Will I get a fair price. That's where home advisor can help from leaky. Faucets to major remodels. Dell's homeadvisor connects you to the right pro for the job in seconds and even helps you get a fair price. Read reviews check. Project Cost Guides and book. Appointments go to homeadvisor adviser dot com or download the free homeadvisor APP to start your next project. Remember to create an ad like this one visit pure winning dot com mm slash. CNN News just released transcripts from the house impeachment inquiry revealing even more officials testifying under oath that they had a great great concerns about president. Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani's work in Ukraine Fiona Hell of former Russia advisor to president trump. Testifying quote I was extremely family concerned. That whatever was that Mr Giuliani was doing might not be legal. Especially after you know people had raised with me these two gentlemen Parnis and and Fruman Ella E. Fruman of course to Giuliani associates. Who are arrested recently while trying to flee the United States and Lieutenant Colonel Alexander van the top Ukraine expert on the National Security Council saying this about the July phone call or president? Trump urged Ukraine's president to help Giuliani. Dig Up dirt on the bites. Let's frankly up until that call you know. In certain regards. He was acting as a private citizen advancing his own interest to a certain extent. It wasn't until that call all that it became that that it became that he was pulled into kind of an official role all right. Let's discuss all of this out front. Now Greg Brower who was an assistant the FBI director Kerry Cordeiro who was the council to the US Assistant Attorney General for national security also with US tonight former Nixon White House counsel John Dean and former Republican congressman. Charlie Dent it has been a very busy news day going through these transcripts from two top White House officials. Carry to start with you witnessed ernest after witnesses testify and they had these concerns about. Giuliani what do you make of this of all. These officials testified that they knew what Giuliani was up to. They had these concerns. They did because we had there was an individual Rudy Giuliani who was not in government. who was doing things that from their perspective? At the as as far as State Department officials are White House officials working on national security related to Ukraine that he was stepping into interfering with what they were trying to carry out as legitimate foreign policy so on one hand you have a person not in government at all who is interfering in national security interests but then the second thing that but it also tells me is that there were a lot of people in the White House who knew what was going on. And it took the whistle blower to actually report it through an official channel Hannele and start that we part of this. I mean you have about it. He'll testifying a lot of people. Knew about what was going on. But you're right. It was the whistle blower who went through those channels. But what's interesting too is just the view of these officials Juliani. You know they're trying to do their official Government Work Greg. Then you have someone going rogue Outsides doing their own thing. I mean it kind of painted this picture of pure chaos when it came to Ukraine Policy Fiona Hill testified that John Bolton Liken Giuliani to a hand grenade alive handgrenade Do you think that's proven to be true. In all of this as you learn more and more Giuliani's role becomes more apparent and and not surprisingly so and and there was also the description of John Bolton oath you know Rudy's drug deal as if to dismiss this. Yeah exactly we have more understand the context around Right that's right and it would be hard enough frankly to have the national security and diplomatic Bureaucracy dealing with some kind of rogue operation if that rogue operation was parallel but legal. But in this case it appears that perhaps it wasn't even a legal rogue operation that not only complicates it's things for the govern- officials who are supposed to be pursuing national security and diplomatic relations but it it creates a whole Potentially impeachable the situation. And that's how it's playing out. It is how it's playing out John because this is all part of this. The Democrats impeachment inquiry. I WANNA bring up. What lieutenant colonel them and testified to who about acting chief of staff and they won't be head Mick? Mulvaney Vin was asked. Do you understand how he saw. Inland came to believe that this deliverable was necessary. This area and then men responded so I heard him say that this had been coordinated with White House Chief of Staff Mr Mick Mulvaney question. What did he say about that answer? He just Said said that he had had a conversation with Mr Mulvaney. And this is what was required in order to get a meeting. How significant is it to you that he testified that the president's acting chief of staff directed this quid pro quo essentially certainly gets closer to the president and and You know whether whether they'll claim that the president had no lodge we don't know yet Feel a hill gave the same testimony. Which cooperates spend Edmund? So it's a pretty strong charge and it certainly puts Mulvaney in the loop No question about that and Pamela. I'd I would just point out at this whole thing is just one giant conspiracy to extort a bribe. And it's very conspicuous. It's just no question and now how deep the president is. That's what the House is going to establish and so do you think this is an impeachable offense then because as we know bribery. According to the constitution is impeachable impeachable. Act John They have managed in this in this instance to come right within the definition of impeachable offenses. Because you the high crimes but how. But if if no one has made that directly to the president then then how do you make that case that he should be impeached impeached. Well you know it's interesting with Nixon When he was impeached they stayed away from conspiracy? Charges There is a reference in in in the minority report of all places that he conspired but the majority the Democrats with Nixon did not charge him with a conspiracy. All of that was very conspicuous. Louis in the in the evidence I so I don't think by precedent. They'll try to draw trump in through conspiratorial actions. They'll look for him being directly involved or enough. They'll look for testimony and we're they're gonNA find that is in the Document the the readout on the call on July twenty fifth the called the president continues. This is perfect really quick. And I'm going to go do you carry a thought but congressman president trump has also had this to say about who the Democrats have called to testify so far they shouldn't be having public hearings is a hoax. This is just like the Russian which this is just continuation of. It's a disgraceful thing. He says none of these witnesses have hurt him. Do you see it that same way and do you. I think that. How do you think his supporters? Do you think that they are seeing this as a continuation of you know this being the quote hoax. Oh I think these witnesses Taylor. Inman few on a hill have done enormous damage to the president because those witnesses are quite credible and I think I heard the president and just say today he's been the most transparent guy President we've had in a long time. Well if he's so transparent and he has nothing to hide. What's so bad about having all this testimony particularly from his staff Mulvaney and Guiliani And others into answer something that was said earlier he did the John Dean. You know if you're the president of the United States you have you you look. It's assumed that you had knowledge of what your staff was doing. I was chairman of the House Ethics Committee and we used to have these situations all the time. A member would blame the staff but we said there is imputed imputed knowledge that the that that the boss should have known what the staff was doing. And you just can't simply dump all this on the staff and get away with it. We would sanction members regularly for actions of their stuff. That's interesting and what would it say if the president didn't know about what is chief of staff and other key officials WERE UP TO OUR I. Thank you all for. I sharing your insights and analysis. Much appreciate it. We're going to see you again very soon in the show out front next. The president's bid donor turned diplomat. Trump's own pick for a you ambassador there is suddenly a stranger after his damaging testimony. Living here say I. I hardly know the gentleman and breaking news Michael Bloomberg Bloomberg on track to make a run for the White House for would skip early contests and four state. So how does he win. That's the end of the morning. It's the dragon experiment. Are you gonNa say it first off. I always sleep at Queen's secondly yes brick and mortar five all new episodes premiering Sunday November ten only on adult swim can't get enough of the NBA sign up for Mba League pass to gain access to every game being played across the association every night with all new ways to watch through the NBA APP Visit Mba dot com wars NBA APP to get started today and tonight president trump claiming he hardly knows Gordon Sunland the US ambassador to the U.. Who changed his testimony this week? Suddenly remembering that there was a trump Ukraine rain. Quid pro quo. I hardly know the gentleman but this is the man who said there was no quid. Pro Blow still says that so someone was handpicked by President Trump to be ambassador and to lead his Ukraine policy. Someone donated a million dollars to trump's inauguration and and trump has has had glowing things to say about him in the past tweeting last month. I would love to send about Sunlen a really good man and great American to testify but unfortunately Cinelli he would be testifying before totally compromised kangaroo court and that's not all our ambassador to the European Union Union Gordon. Sunlen thank you great job. Clinton the text message that I saw from Ambassador Sutherland. The New Zealand respected was there's no quid pro quo. He said that he said by the way it's almost sounded like in general. He he said. By the way there's no quid pro quo and there. Is Everyone back with me. Now carry them getting to you. I I went to go back to you before. Isn't this new defense. Trump hardly knew sunlen and doesn't show a pattern to you of what the president does in situations where he feels like officials might be saying unflattering things about him right. Well I think we have seen this pattern with him before where when someone is doing things that he likes then he's very laudatory towards them and then when they don't and when he thinks that might be not in his interest and all of a sudden there's a whole sea of Of distance between them the the difficulty with the president trying to do go with the testimony of Gorse online or any of these other witnesses is that all of these facts that come out from the witnesses. Don't change the essential essential original information that we have from the original July twenty fifth summary of the phone call that the president himself was on with presidents Kamensky. And that's the call where the president asks Celeski to do him a favor. He mentions investigations of the Biden's he mentioned investigations into this conspiracy about whether Ukraine was involved in the two thousand sixteen election and no matter how much distance he tries to put between him and witnesses. He's not gonna be able to get away with the content of that phone. What's so interesting about that? We were talking about this Greg is it was the White House. Put out that transcript and without that actual transcript of the call. It would be a harder case to make that lake. Could be but you know. It's like welcome to the twilight zone here because we have the call which clearly puts the president in the middle of this this for that exchange strange Ukrainian president and then we have the presence chief-of-staff do a press conference at which he concedes. Yes there was a quid pro quo. And we've had every other witness before the committee. Basically say the same thing they learned of the quid pro quo either from the call or from other people they were alarmed by. So it's everybody against the president at this point and as a former prosecutor carry would agree with this. You know when you have a kind of a lineup of witnesses like that one against many it's typically the many any your version of what happened and all a lot of this is politics strategy from the White House from GOP. Allies of the trump congressman dent. Were seen them. Throw throw the people around trump involved with Ukraine under the bus. They're arguing they each actor without trump's knowledge. Some of this has been on display this week anytime they direct conversations with the president there was no linkage so any linkage that has been alleged obviously is based on many times second or third hand information. Either Rudy Giuliani or people believing that they understood what Giuliani might have wanted. This almonds opinion we are we the these are all folks opinions instead. And he says he he says it was his the presumption so on on the fact that this presumption so you served with these those men congressman. What do you make of this apparent new strategy? Is it effective. No a trying to throw all these people on the bus is simply not going to fly. Nobody's GonNa believe for a second that Mick Mulvaney or rudy. Giuliani was acting on their own without any consultation with the president. I I think just like Michael Cohen. WHO believes that the you know? Michael Cohen paid off stormy Daniels didn't he. He paid off. He did that on his own. The president and direct them to do it. I mean same thing here. Of course these people were operating under the direction of the president. I there they may try to throw these guys under the bus and they'll do it in this order they'll throw sunland other bus then Mulvaney Zany and then Giuliani in that order. But I don't think it's going to be effective I think it's laughable. The facts are the facts are simply not on the president's side. The news is tightening. The quid pro pro quo has been established. All these people spoken up did so out of concern for national security and also because of interference election so these are more distractions not going to be effective live. And what's interesting here. John is that the president has repeatedly and publicly embrace Giuliani's work in Ukraine which included trying to dig up dirt on the Biden's breath. We've been investigating on a personal basis through rudy and others lawyers corruption in the in. Two Thousand Sixteen election is looking to also find out where the phony witch-hunts started how it started and I think he's got a very very strong right to do it. He's a good lawyer knows exactly what he's doing and it's very aboard. I stand behind. Rudy Giuliani absolutely and rudy has said that he was acting on on his client's behalf in regards to Ukraine based on these comments John if Republicans. Try to throw Giuliani under the bus. Isn't that effectively. Throw the president under the bus. It's too I I would think that could be very dangerous for the Republicans to do it and I would think trump would tell them to stay away from that strategy satiety Rudy at some point if he's sees himself being discarded by the White House Beedon discarded by the Republicans And on his way to the Bureau of prisons for a long stay He's somebody you can give up the president because there is a crime fraud exception in the attorney. Ernie client privilege. That trump can't block his testimony if that happened and crime. Fried Exception Carey is that there's an ongoing crime. I am right that that that means that the lawyer that the lawyers privy to involve with that doesn't make the lawyer immune. It remains to be seen if Giuliani will testify. The way things are going certainly doesn't seem so but what's interesting here is sources. Tell me that the president continues to talk to rudy that. As recently as late October he he was the one calling rudy up about once a day to talk to him. Despite all of these revelations coming out on this testimony about Ukraine he really seems undeterred. Undeterred by it what do you make of that. Well he is. I mean he's a close adviser he's been a close advisor of the president for a long time and the president has trusted him and so I think he's been a central homeadvisor. I think Giuliani has difficult claim of attorney client privilege to begin with because the things that he's doing if he's running around Ukraine trying to dig up political information for the president's political interest. That's not giving legal advice. The attorney client privilege has to do with a lawyer providing legal advice to client. This might be a silly question about like what makes something. An attorney client privilege rudy. said he's done it pro bono and like what what provides attorney client relationship and the communications in question have to be for the purpose of giving or receiving legal advice and there cannot be an exception like the crime fraud exception that applies to the situation. So that's basically it but look. I think it's clear clear. That Rudy knows everything about this Ukrainian deal and so to the extent the president continues to talk to them. I think the the common sense explanation is that that he wants to keep rudy close so as to be able to try to control rudy and what he says publicly and I wouldn't be surprised if he's doing that with Mick Mulvaney as well all right. Thank you all out up front up next breaking news. Michael Bloomberg takes a step closer tonight to running for president. Does he have a chance. and New Book Claims White House Officials Wade resigning on mass. What stop them? We're going to discuss up next Wednesday's on TNT. All the lead wrestling sling hits harder. Flies Higher and breaks off. Boundary is a wholly wrestling a new league Wednesdays at eight on TNT. On Saturday November Ninth Jon Moxley Frizz Kenny Omega Kobe versus Chris Jericho for the e W World Championship By now on the breaking news Michael Bloomberg taking a major step tonight toward running for president officially filing for Alabama's Democratic presidential primary Bloomberg is reportedly concerned about the current candidates and their ability to beat. President trump will Joe Biden responding tonight. Every single poll is run. I beat like a drum as I said. There's an states into the south and states in the Midwest states around the world so look I look If he wants to run his just get anyone taking personally. No no no no no out front now. Mad Pala Democratic strategist who met with Bloomberg about a potential twenty twenty Ron. He is also senior vice president for Cornerstone Stone Public Affairs. Also with Joan Walsh National Affairs correspondent for the nation. Thank you both for coming on Matt I. It does Bloomberg really think he has a chance of beating president in trump. Don't think he would have done this pam if he didn't believe that he had a shot. I when we talked in two thousand eighteen. It's been a while since we chatted but he he said look. I'm I'M GONNA consider this if I believe I can win so clearly. Something has happened from. Why do you think he does his I I think look why do I think he's? He's taking a look at this because he cares about the country he's interested It's no secret anybody that he's long expressed an interest in and running and being the president of the United States. I don't think there's any question about that but this is hard for him. We're eighty seven days away from Iowa. Ninety seven percent percent of Iowa precinct locations are locked in campaigns. have been on the ground there for over a year working hard to organize it so I think this is a challenge but listen. I don't think anybody should underestimate Mike Or the team that he will put around him and look at this a recent New York Times poll of head to head matchups in swing states by and was barely beating trump and the other candidates. Trailed him does Bloomberg have a point that the current field isn't strong enough. Look I think a lot of people. A lot of centrist Democrats are very concerned about Joe Biden. I saw the vice president's say in that clip. You know I'm not. I'm not taking this personally. He should take it very personally. It's personal You know this is. This is coming out of a real perception. That that he's a weak front runner But on the other hand you know first of all this lane. Centrist lane is so crowded already. I think the person that this helps the most. Frankly is Elizabeth Warren. The person that he's out to stop along with Bernie Sanders is Elizabeth. Warren and I think I think this this really elevates her and wounds Biden. It's interesting though because I was talking to a trump a source close to the trump campaign. Who said actually this could be good for trump trump because the Democrats will be focusing their fire more on on Bloomberg rather than on trump? It could take some pressure off by that Joan. No I don't buy that I. I think they have plenty of plenty of fire for trump. And and you know I think a lot of them are just going to ignore Bloomberg. I mean you know Pam you could. You can have a debate here between Michael Bloomberg and Michael Bloomberg because we we have so much tape of him explaining very candidly and clearly in my opinion why he can't win. Why there's no path so I agree with Matt? He's a smart man I I can't believe he's going to waste his money but yeah I mean let's talk about what this path could be. Because we're learning Bloomberg's adviser say he plans to skip the first. I four early. Contests Iowa New Hampshire Nevada South Carolina. No one has done this successfully. You Advise Hillary Clinton Twenty sixteen campaign in Iowa. Can he win without those states. Well it's not been done before. I do think it's important to point out. There's a lot of talk about Mike and he's certainly successful. He is a self made guy. I I think it's important to remember he's also been very involved and Dennis Politics I think wisely. He's been a strong supporter of climate Bernie attention to climate change and the need for policy there. He's done more on on supporting choice in women's it's healthcare He's done a ton on gun safety and the need for commonsense gun reform in the country so He does have strong chop suits more than than his money. But I think one thing he's he's going to have to figure out is. How does he thread this needle and move forward? especially if it's Mayor Pete. I think this is an important consideration. I think there's a big impact on Vice President Biden money which is already a challenge for the Biden campaign. I think it's also This path if it's not Elizabeth Warren as our nominee or coming out of Iowa which the two are closely related Then then this path has is tougher And I think it's tough. It's if it's mirror pete because he's built such a coalition Quickly and importantly in this selection and you talked about mats and things that could work in Bloomberg's favor in terms of his record but there are other parts that are no doubt that will no doubt no already coming under scrutiny. It just stop and Frisk how that could impact voters one one source. I spoke to close to the trump campaign said when it comes to trump first Bloomberg. If that ever happened said look the president has been battled tested over the last several years Michael Bloomberg hasn't obviously in the same way. The question is can he take a punch and the president today was asked about all this. He seems to relish a fight with Bloomberg. Here's what he said. Little Michael will fail. He'll spend a lot of money. Yeah he's got some really big issues. Got Some personal problems. He's got a lot of other problems. There's nobody I'd rather run against little by Kovacs. Yeah so what do you think about that. Joan what do you think of that potential match up. Well I think Michael has a lot more money than Donald Trump. He's a really truly successful businessman so he should think about that But to go back to something that Matt said Mayor Pete is very impressive right now but he is not pulled together a solid coalition. He doesn't have black voters in his coalition. And right now I have to say Michael Bloomberg starts as you just referred as he as he just talked about with the real I think in in the whole with a lot of black voters because he continued to defend. Stop and Frisk even after it was found unconstitutional. So you've got black voters who are going to be a tough sell. He's I don't see him being like Mr Rust Belt Guy. He's going to go back in and take Wisconsin and Michigan and Pennsylvania that. I'm not feeling that either. So again again. The the last person to try this was his predecessor Rudy Giuliani. He was GONNA go into Florida in two thousand eight and we know we never saw president. Giuliani all right. Well we shall see how this all plays out. Thanks so much Matt and Joan much appreciate well out front up. Next how far we're senior. Trump officials is willing to go to stop the president. Mass resignations were reportedly on the table. So why did they end up. Staying and Elizabeth. Warren is trying to win powerful Apple Latino votes with a pitch that may pay off. I am open to suspending deportations. -tations tonight a midnight. Self massacre the anonymous author behind the new book a warning claims teams that a group of senior trump administration officials considered resigning on Moss last year. To warn about the president's conduct but ultimately decided against it they fear it a mass mass-resignation would further be stabilized. The government it's just one of the many revelations from the person who wrote The New York Times at last year titled. I am part of the resistance inside the trump administration. Alfred now Jennifer's ally the New York Times Non Fiction Book Critic who reviewed this book. Thanks for coming on Jennifer now this author others claiming to be a senior trump administration official. They claim that there was this planned out. A bunch of officials quit at once. What more can you tell us about? What the author says about that incident right so the author doesn't say very much other other than to say that it was something that was considered at some point during the first two years of the trump presidency and then the idea was abandoned? And so you know that is one of the big revelations of this book but it's a revelation about a road. That actually wasn't take him so yeah and so that raises this question of what evidence. This author has to back up these damning accounts. I don't know the painting this picture of an incompetent president someone who is dangerous and disturbing. Who shouldn't be trusted with running the government? In one case the author describes what it's like dealing with the president's tweets writing. It's like showing up at the nursing home daybreak to find your elderly uncle running pantelis across the courtyard ardenne cursing loudly about the cafeteria. Food as worried attendance. Try to catch him. Only your uncle doesn't have to leave the. US government wants. He puts his pants on. Now you you know very vivid Balaji but what details does the author used to back that up. Well so I think that this is. This is sort of the big question. Would this book which news because anonymous is really committed at least for now to remain anonymous and to not revealing his or her identity. You know he or she says right at the beginning that there's not going to be too many specific details or too many even Details that wouldn't necessarily give away who this person is so ultimately you know it's it's like an Anon- anonymously source book where you just have to trust what the person it's saying and trust that it's true. I mean there is indication that this is a senior level official There are sort of things that are mentioned that other our people have said to this person so this person seems to be trusted by other people on staff from but you know at the same time. We just have to take this person's word for it which just sort of this is sort of the Nadi problem of this book. I think quickly. The White House responded calling this person a coward for remaining anonymous. How how do you think this author will be remembered? I think we'll have to see. I mean I wouldn't be surprised. I wouldn't be surprised if the identity of this person is revealed at some point. I mean the the person who did write this book also does say that he or she may choose to reveal his identity in case it would help further the cause as of the argument of this book. So I guess we'll we'll say they don't want to reveal their identity now because they don't want to become the centerpiece of the conversation they wanted to be about the revelations in the book Chelsea Jennifer. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for having me and out front next Latino voters could propel a Democrat into the White White House is Elizabeth Warren that candidate tonight and Elizabeth Warren Making a big pitch to Latino Voters Warren revealing she would consider suspending all deportations bargaining chip for Immigration Reform Leyla Santiago. Dago is out front. Her cry comes with her story. Her husband she says still detained by is the returns later at the Mahinda townhall. She asked Senator Elizabeth Warren. Were you pass a moratorium on the appropriations I am open to Suspending deportations particularly as a way to push congress for comprehensive immigration immigration reform. That's new for warned not included in her immigration plant after the town hall we asked. You're leaning toward one way or another a moratorium on deportations. Given that yesterday Senator Sanders Plan does include that. You were asked that today so the way the way I would describe a bit is I should not be spending its resources deporting people who pose no threat to us. So is that a yes. Well it's don't spend your resources on our neighbors and friends as foreign made her case. Three daughters of immigrants sat in the front row now eligible to vote and twenty twenty twenty. I'm looking for a candidate that will not only show their support for immigrants like me who have college degrees. Who are fluent in English? WHO HAVE UPWARD MOBILITY? I'm looking for a candidate who will support my parents. Who will fight for people like my parents? Barbara Stidham is part of a fast growing piece of the potential. Electorate Hispanics are projected to make up more than thirteen percent of eligible voters in two thousand twenty according to the Pew Research Center possibly exceeding the share of black voters for the first time and she says focusing on immigration is not enough to win her vote Kelkar and indication of their but now after a bustle we see letting sexually really worried about discrimination against Latinos and immigrants. Said you'll get yours is an expert. On Latino he know and government studies he argues Latinos will be critical in states like California Arizona. Florida Texas in twenty twenty. But they shouldn't all be quoted the same way rape candidates. Are you doing anything different. For the Latino voters themselves I think showing up is critical and I also think talking about what we're touch. Their lives is critical and part of that is got immigration but it's also about education. Aw as twenty twenty candidates figure out the best way to reach the Latino community plans town halls tweets so neither insists. Candidates must understand understand the diversity within the Latino community has been a lot of time talking to Latino voters today here in Raleigh North North Carolina voters. Tell me That they felt that the Democratic Party at times took their vote for granted and acknowledged their their past relationship with the last Democratic president. Really celebrating President Obama for what he did for dreamers but also saying they haven't forgotten that he was known as the deport or in chief chief All Right Leyla. Thank you so much for bringing us elitist there from North Carolina and coming up on Monday Erin. Jose Democratic presidential town hall with Joe Biden. That's at nine PM Eastern only on CNN thanks for joining us a C.. Three sixty starts now. Are you interested in learning how great companies grow download the Mar- tech podcast. The Mar- tech podcast tells the stories of real world marketers who use technology to generate growth and achieve business and career success from advertising to software as a service to data getting brands authentically integrated the

president President Trump Rudy Giuliani trump Mick Mulvaney Joe Biden Ukraine White House Michael Bloomberg White House official chief of staff Senator Elizabeth Warren John Bolton President Chief attorney United States advisor John Bloomberg
The Family Business

Outside/In

59:03 min | 2 years ago

The Family Business

"Hey there outside in listeners. There is a single stray f-bomb in the story that we have left unbleached if you'd like trying to skip it. It comes at about eighteen and a half minutes when we're talking about the conclusion of a global climate negotiation. So good luck. As I said, I've had the privilege of knowing working with John and his son Michael over the last six years, I've learned much from that association. I'm confident that you'll feel the same after today. It's my distinct honor to introduce governor John Henry sununu. This is Joe Delia a meteorologist who doesn't believe human activity is driving global warming. Introducing John H sununu in two thousand thirteen sununu served as governor of New Hampshire for six years from nineteen Eighty-three to nine hundred eighty nine in political circles, he's famous for being a rhetorical knife fighter and attack dog and an expert Crafter of incendiary soundbites, and that's any row peak environment reporter in New Hampshire. Public radio's newsroom. Thank you very much. Joe? We've gathered to bring some reality and some sound science to the ongoing debate on climate change and global warming. John H sununu is famously whip smart. He reportedly scored near the top on a test that billed itself as a mega IQ test intended to distinguish who are the smartest among geniuses following his governorship. He was White House chief of staff, and is something of an elder statesman to the GOP, and I'm pleased to be amongst the this very distinguished gathering of experts who have come to make sure that the world knows that the debate on the science is not over as chief of staff John H took a special interest in the subject of global warming. But the anti-growth and antidevelopment crowd are a very hardy bunch. They won't give up John H gave the speech at a conference Hartland institute a think tank that has focused on trying to rebut mainstream climate. Science in this speech to new lays out his theory of the origins of global warming. My message today is to make sure we recognize that no matter how effectively we deal with exposing the errors and games behind that agenda. We need to know that the battle will never end because the issue is not really global warming. This. Global warming crisis is just the latest surrogate for an overarching agenda of anti-growth and antidevelopment that grew and gathered support in the years after World War Two global warming. John H argues is a Trojan horse carrying within its belly the real objective massive reformed capitalist system, socialism and the scaling back of economic growth. One of the first issues to be celebrated as a crisis by these reformers was overpopulation. That fad peaked in the sixties and seventies the bible of that coat. The population bomb argued that the battle to feed all of humanity is over and acclaimed. We had lost the battle predicting that in the nineteen seventies and nineteen eighties. Hundreds of millions of people would starve to death. That clearly phony crisis was followed by warnings about global climate change. Argues that the primary tool of these plotters is computer models in nineteen seventy two a group called the club of Rome used a computer model to argue the world would soon face resource, scarcity food shortages and economic collapse by the end of the nineteen ninety s all of which failed to materialize, John H sununu argues that similarly climate researchers have cooked the books use the models to achieve a predetermined outcome, but cast of characters involved in this has expanded a bit. But at the core there is an unbroken lineage back to those unbelievably wrong unscientific prognosticators. The speech were hearing is from twenty thirteen and maybe you've heard arguments like this, perhaps even recently be expensive. This would be absolutely tremendous. I mean, there's no way to even comprehend how much implementing this would cost. Well, first of all H L Mankin who was a democrat said it correctly, the urge to save you Mandy is almost always a false face for the urge to rule. This is really about socialism. This is nothing more than a socialist Trojan horse. That's why they've inserted all sorts of programs into the green new deal that have nothing to do with green energy. But John H sununu has been making this argument since the nineteen eighty s well before global warming became politicised at intractable back when there was twenty percent less carbon in the atmosphere. And when there was more time to transition to a lower emission society. What's interesting about sununu is that he developed. This whole skepticism and. All of these objections on his own and yet now they have become in various in various forms. The main talking points of of the right and climates in islets. But I think he came at them independently. So in some ways, he's kind of prime mover there. This is author Nathaniel rich in the nineteen eighties. There was a growing lamentable to address climate change momentum that ultimately fizzled out. This was the moment. We're history could have swerved in a very different direction. Rich, I wrote a detailed account of this period in article cold losing earth. But an expanded book version is due out next month. It's a tale. That prominently features John H sununu now if you look at it if you just came to them cold you'd say, oh, he's one of the rest of them. But now, I think actually strangely this sort of these these crank theory. Series have become the. Central tenants of republicanism. Today on outside in a family. That's been on the front lines of climate change politics since the very beginning. I'm same Evans Brown. The sununu are perhaps the most powerful family in the history of New Hampshire politics. They've been governors Senator congressman and even a White House chief of staff today, we're going to track this one political dynasty and with it. Mainstream Republican thought on climate change where it's been where it is now. And maybe where it's going. Clean air and clean water. The wise use of our land to protection of wildlife and natural beauty. These are part of the birthright of every American thing to keep in mind. A huge number of our foundational environmental laws. The creation of the EPA the clean water and clean air acts the toxic substances control act and many more were passed in the nineteen seventies. Under Richard Nixon to guarantee that birthright, we must act and act decisively. It is literally now or never at this point environmental issues had strong bipartisan support and Republicans wanted to be sure they didn't see this ground to the Democrats are I believe in a sound strong environmental policy that protects the health of our people and a wise stewardship of our nation's natural resources. That's enough about me. But less than a decade later under Ronald Reagan, the backlash to the environmental movement through he put administrators in charge of the and department of interior who worked to rollback Nixon era policies and to open up previously protected land, his EPA administrator and Gorsuch who also happens to be supreme court Justice. Neal Gorsuch mother cut the EPA budget by more than twenty percent. And when lawmakers accused her of mismanaging Superfund dollars, she wound up being held in contempt of congress Reagan's interior secretary, James watt increased the acreage of land the federal government leased for coal mining by around five times, the secretary of interior. Jim want is the prime target for those who claim that this administration is out to level the forest and cover the country with black tops someone in the press. The other day said of Jim discovered a cure for cancer. There are those who would attack him for being pro-life. These figures were not popular environmental groups fund raised and rallied against them. And they were pushed out and so in nineteen Eighty-eight when George H W Bush ran for president he positioned himself to regain the trust of the environmental community. We all know that human activities are changing the atmosphere in unexpected. And in unprecedented ways much remains to be done by this time. Global warming was already a high profile public issue. The first official government summary of climate science was finished in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine two more landed within a week of each other in one thousand nine hundred three and recovered by newspapers and TV news, James Hansen. A nasa. Scientists who wrote one of the first computer models of the greenhouse effect. I testified before congress on the issue back in nineteen eighty two articles about his research had already been front page news and the New York Times, so it should come. As no surprise that. This was an issue that Bush was talking about is. Residential candidate. What's particularly noteworthy to me that I remember was the one liner on climate change where Bush stated that those who are worried about the greenhouse effect are ignoring the White House affect he was making a very clear commitment on the issue. This is Rafe Pomerance and environmental activists who's worked for friends of the earth the world Resources Institute, the State Department and a hodgepodge of other campaigns and organizations in the early eighties. He spent years putting global warming on the national stage by personally arranging meetings between lawmakers and prominent government climate scientists by the time the nineties rolled around Rafe had already seen more than one climate change hype cycle, wax, and wane with no real action. So you're right that there were Republicans who were taking the issue seriously. Now, these were liberal Republicans, but I would say in the hall, the Republican party was much more moderate and open at that stage. So that's the political vibe of the nineteen eighty s. Some Republicans are prioritizing business over conservation. But you still had a Republican running for the Oval Office explicitly claiming he would be quote environmental president, unquote. It's here that we turn our attention to John H sununu at first he was an engineering professor at tufts, but he decided he wanted to put a smarts to work serving his community. He won a seat to the local planning board and later in New Hampshire's four hundred member house of representatives. He lost four elections twice for the state Senate and once for the governor's council and finally the Republican primary to be New Hampshire's U S Senator. But in one thousand nine hundred two he won the governor's office and like other Republicans of this era. He dabbled in environmental protection. In fact, Rafe Pomerance helped with an environmental campaign that caught John H is attention. I was involved with me leaders in New Hampshire and a major campaign around acid rain at the time acid rain looked feels and smells like any other rain, but the water in acid rain carries poisons, like sulfuric acid. An enormous now over one hundred towns at the annual town meeting approved resolutions calling for action on acid rain that campaign organized a conference in Manchester, New Hampshire and all of the democratic candidates vying to be the nominee to challenge Reagan attended. But curiously or importantly, John sununu, the governor came to the conference, and my recollection is is that sununu ultimately was a supporter of of acting on acid rain as governor John H sununu signed the nation's first acid rain legislation requiring a twenty five percent reduction on sulfur dioxide emissions in the state, so an environmental issues, it seemed that John H and President Bush would be on the same page in the nineteen eighty eight presidential primary sununu threw his weight behind Bush's candidacy, the bombastic governors rhetorical force and connections helped Bush win I in New Hampshire and then his party's nomination. We had a great candidate a candidate who got his message out candidate who. Engaged certainly with his nearest rival made it very clear what the difference was. And what I think of the most discriminating voters in the country did a little comparison shopping, but between the two of them and decided George Bush was head and shoulders above them in. Thanks after he won the White House. Bush appointed sununu his chief of staff, it was in that powerful role that John H personally shepherded a Bill through congress that said a gradually declining cap on pollution that causes acid rain and loud polluters to trade the right to emit. It was the model for the type of market based solutions to climate change that we're still debating today. All of this adds up to a situation in which it would seem that when it comes to global warming, George H W Bush who had promised to deal with the issue on the campaign trail, and John H sununu who had proven himself to be a pragmatic dealmaker on acid rain. We'd be simpatico ready to get to work crafting some kind of conservative solution. And in fact, when Bush came to office the table was set for them to do something big less than a year after Bush's inauguration world leaders planned meeting, the first ever international talks on a binding treaty to limit greenhouse gas emissions. The talks would be held in Nordvik in the Netherlands. This would be the ideal place for Bush to hold true to his promises of being an environmental president to lead the world in addressing climate change. But immediately it became clear that John H did not seek global warming is being like acid rain, and this teed up in internal battle within the Bush administration. This became an issue inside the Bush White House. And agencies some people really very enthusiastic about moving forward. Others like governor sununu chief-of-staff with not. What happened was during the crucial week when they were going to make a decision Hanson again shows up James Hansen. Is that NASA scientist the one who's models of the greenhouse effect? I got Congress's attention back in the early eighties. He had continued coming before lawmakers, including now famous bombshell testimony in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight when he declared that global warming was already being observed. Now, he was testifying again. But this time John H sununu intervened and Hansen's testimony was altered by the Bush administration and later as I have learned sununu claims he altered the testimony and diminished its conclusions. The new text said that climate change might be attributable to quote, natural processes, unquote, which Hanson did not believe this was leaked to the press and was splashed all over the front page of the New York Times. The Bush Whitehouse wound up with egg all over their faces. The Hanson alteration had a big political impact on the deliberations inside the Bush White House Rafe says that when you look back at newspapers of the time, you see editorial writers throwing Bush's own words. Back at him, the self-proclaimed environmental president had promises administration with tackle climate change. Instead they'd been caught doing just the opposite secretly trying to downplay the problem it put the White House on the defensive and for a moment in the roiling internal debate within the administration. It seemed like John H sununu had lost just before the historic first ever climate negotiations in the Netherlands began he wrote a telegram to the State Department's negotiators reversing his previous position and telling them to work toward a quote full international consensus here, again is Nathaniel rich, the author of losing earth through the strangest detail of all is that there's a series of talks on the eve of the trip in November at a Tonio. Allendc in front of international investors in the American stock exchange sununu. Although he's not there to speak about climate change necessarily. He's he's just there in his capacity as sort of powerful person within the Bush administration talk about the economy spends most of his talk on on Nordvik and on this idea of a treaty. And in fact, comes out fairly forcefully. It's a very strange thing to read in favor of a global agreement. And he's challenged at one point by an investor in the audience, he says, well, isn't this going to have some major short-term economic costs? And he says, yeah will be some up front costs. But that's nothing compared to the the back. The back end costs. If we don't do anything. And yet despite all of this despite having lost face by altering Hansen's testimony and having been pressured into supporting global greenhouse gas treaty somewhere between that speech to investors and the final negotiation Nordvik sununu flipped again, it meant Americans began the talks with a hard line stance. We won't sign anything that's binding in terms of emissions reductions, and you know, we won't we won't. We won't take part in anything that doesn't consider the economic implications in the short term, basically. And that's the end of the dream of a of a global binding treaty, essentially, that's the that's the closest we've ever come. This set the template for old climate talks that followed every subsequent attempt that of binding greenhouse gas reduction treaty has failed even the much lauded Paris agreement which the US also backed out of was completely non-binding is where we get this. Great, quote, which I think's the Swedish Environment Minister walking out of the room and saying your government is fucking this up. Yeah. Right. And they did. If that binding treaty had been signed in nineteen ninety and if the global community had lived up to it. There could have been fifteen percent less carbon in the atmosphere when the effort to scale back emissions began. There would have been a thirty year headstart on developing solutions and driving down their cost in short. The problem would have been a lot easier to solve sununu today would say, well, we were just being the only honest broker that all these other governments were full of it and had no intention of living up to any kind of treaty binding or not. This was not the end of John H sununu is legacy with regards to global warming. He resigned from the White House in one thousand nine hundred one after he was found to be using military planes for personal trips and taking a White House limousine to a stamp auction. But just a few months later, he got a job as one of the regular hosts of the TV show crossfire from Washington crossfire on the left might Kinsley on the right? John sununu for Jerry Taylor. It was an ideal situation. I left college in nineteen eighty six I didn't graduate. I wanted to get into politics. Jerry was a prominent climate change skeptic at the time that he was a regular guest on crossfire. He used to work for the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank that also traffic's minority viewpoints on climate science was one of the nation's leading gunslingers promoting climate skepticism Jerry has since left the church of climate skepticism. And is now the president of the disc. Cannon center, which works to promote conservative solutions to global warming. But back when he was on the other end of spectrum he was a frequent guest on crossfire. This was a political TV show that the New York Times described as quote, a week nightly half hour of aggressively expressed uncomplicated opinions delivered a spirit of absolute certitude in where I am daily sex. If you talk what what phrase? News talk about that. You can talk about adults. They generally have a script where you have a person on the right who argues very strongly for, you know, non action, and then you'd have a person from the environmental community on the left arguing very strongly four action. And producers were there to book, the the the most telegenic and glib and entertaining people they can take those two slots and back in those days. I was nothing if not glib and entertaining. Just like their guests the crossfire hosts, including John H sununu were not expected to be neutral. And this was the nineties it was the period during which oil companies were beginning to launch a media campaign designed at undermining the scientific underpinnings of global warming the media pounced on these new talking points. Suddenly the issue had two sides, and John H sununu was a perfect fit for the role of climate change skeptic. I mean, he had just left the White House chief of staff, so we still important political player in Washington. And so it's kind of a thrilled to get a chance to hobnob with somebody like that especially since John sununu was steeped in climate knowledge and climate skepticism, and he was no casual actor through the nineties think tanks began sprout up with their own self proclaimed experts like Jerry Taylor who you could book for your talk show, whereas previously global warming journalism had. Met writing about dry government reports and National Research Council summaries. Now, it could be covered as talking heads shouting at each other. It was the beginning of a time in which the media shifted from covering climate change as a scientific certainty to something that was up for debate. And as host of crossfire, John H was given a prominent voice in that debate. And so in these conversations oftentimes, I'd be an debate. And in the course of the back and forth. Sununu jump in and throw his own shots that were as capable as those that I was putting on the table. So he was not disengage, and he was not lightly informed. We couldn't find any old footage of sununu talking about global warming on crossfire, but other records show his main arguments in this period were simple. The climate system is complex climate models are too simplistic. And the jury is still out on global warming. These are all talking points that at the time Jerry Taylor was also using but unlike John age as Jerry dug deeper into climate science, he became disillusioned with the arguments of the. Skeptics when I was on these programmes and talking with governors know, what he was putting on the table was no more enlightened than the kind of crackpot ary that I was marketing on knowingly at the time. John H sununu would hold onto his platform on crossfire for six years all the way up through nineteen ninety eight misrepresented in California you. You. Whatsoever with and then he stepped out of the limelight. He began to take an interest in business investing in all kinds of companies. He was on the board of a company drilling for oil in south east Africa and even bought a ten percent stake in an honest to goodness gold mine in other budgen as John H eased into the private sector. Republicans began flirting with a new approach to the climate issue. Just as a new sununu with his own views was rising into political prominence. I thought it was more important to get something done to get a good bipartisan Bill that raise those fuel efficiency standards after a quick break. The next generation takes the reins. There are a lot of finis. Josh. News. Okay. There are a lot of soon news, John H sununu and his it is impossible to. Okay. There are a lot of sununu John H sununu and his wife Nancy had eight children most aren't public figures, or at least they keep a lower profile daughter. Kathy runs a museum, son. Pete works for a media company in Louisville and son James works in the family business, which it's worth noting spans a lot of areas that are kind of adjacent to energy and climate oil mining water infrastructure utilities, there's a lot going on. But some of the news have gone on to use the family name and political connections to their advantage in nineteen Ninety-six during the Clinton administration, John e sununu, that's the son not the father was elected to his first term in the US house of representatives for New Hampshire. If John H sununu was a prime mover in the shift of the Republican party's stance on global warming and early voice for the abandonment of mainstream climate science and favor of the fringes that questioned the very foundation of atmosphere physics. How would his son approach climb? Senator sununu with the energy Bill as you mentioned the energy Bill passed after very close fighting congress minder standing was universally opposed this Bill. No, not at all what I opposed was the tax package. John e served in the US house of representatives for three terms starting in nineteen ninety seven and was the youngest member of congress that whole time he was seen as a rising star a party darling who into two was recruited to a Republican incumbent from the Senate that had been giving the party heartburn. He won. So this is a case where you know, if you actually stand up for doing something that's bipartisan, then some partisan in this case from the far left is gonna come at you and say, oh you while he was in office. His voting record was consistently conservative the times that he broke with the rest of his party were usually because he viewed their proposals as not adhering to Republican principles. He joined a democratic filibuster of the Patriot Act because he believed it infringed on personal liberty. We had to filibuster the Bill we had to stop it in its track. Ax in order to get those changes made, but they were worth fighting for and fight for them again, and he helped block and energy Bill calling. It a grab bag for special interests that was too expensive. But toward the end of his time as Senator thanks in part to the unpopularity of the war in Iraq. Republicans had lost majorities in both the house and Senate and good morning to you. It is a new day in America. The people have spoken a seismic shift in the house of and this environment action on climate change, experienced brief moment of bipartisan support. Hi. I'm Nancy Pelosi. Lifelong democrat and speaker of the house Gingrich lifelong Republican, and I used to be speaker. We don't always the I I do know. But we do agree. Our country must take action to address climate change. We need cleaner forms of energy. And we need them. For years Republican Senator John McCain and democrat Joe Lieberman had been pushing different versions of something called the climate stewardship past these are facts that cannot be refuted by any scientist or any union or any special interest weighing in more heavily on this issue than any issue since we got into campaign finance reform, Mr President, that's the Arctic sea that's the Arctic sea and even look at the red line the boundary of it in nineteen seventy nine look at it. Now, you can believe me or your lying eyes. This was a cap and trade Bill a market based carbon reduction scheme that use the same model that John H sununu that's the father had helped to get through congress in order to deal with acid rain and Senator news case he actually had an interest in climate bills. This is grant Bosse I worked on energy and climate issues for Senator Johnny sununu from two thousand three to two thousand eight toward the end of Giannis time in office. Remember, that's the sun Republicans on their heels, and we're looking at an unfavorable election map in two thousand eight and he had a tough opponent, the state's first ever female governor. So despite being a rising conservative star despite the name recognition, his family enjoys Giannis. Reelection was a real question. So with Democrats holding the gavels there was a lot more momentum to pass some kind of carbon Bill, and when it looked like Khan. Grice was gonna pass something then you wanna jump in? You wanna make that Bill as productive as you can't which is how it came to be that John e sununu son of the man who would go onto co climate science. Unbelievably wrong prominently signed onto a carbon cap and trade Bill a collaboration with Delaware Democrat, Tom Carper, the Carper in new plant there were all sorts of bills that varied in scope in varied in their approach. Some were more top down. Bernie Sanders had a Bill that was pretty much the federal government taking over the energy sector. Cain Lieberman was cap and trade Bill Carper sununu was actually multi pollutant. So it had as much to their quality sulfur nitrogen mercury. So because Senator sununu cared about it. I cared about it. So what did sununu Bill look like it was a so called cap and trade Bill cap as in it's set a cap on economy-wide carbon emissions and try. Raid as in it allowed companies to buy and sell allowances to emit carbon up to that cap. So you've got a financial incentive to free up as much of that those emissions as possible. So you can sell the right to admit to somebody else. This is the same scheme as John H sununu the father designed to deal with acid rain. It's a market driven solution. And grant says John e sununu wanted to carry that idea forward on climate change in congress. But more to the point when you listen to John e sununu at the time, he supported a wide range of initiatives to deal with climate change. Here. He is on New Hampshire public radio in two thousand eight. We got the Bill done. It's been signed into law, and we can in should come back and look at that tax package because there are a lot of pieces in it. That are very good that I support tax credits for for for wind renewable energy for solar for biomass. All of those are provision. I've supported in the past and will. Continue to support. So just to make it. Crystal clear, Senator sununu the energy Bill let some this up. John sununu, the father arguably was the most important single political actor opposing binding global treaty to limit climate change. But nearly twenty years later, John e sununu the sun facing a tough reelection and a political landscape in which the most prominent Republican was championing a domestic carbon reduction Bill is putting forward his own climate Bill and talking up tax credits for renewable energy. And so you saw a number of Republicans offering these ideas, mainstream Republicans, even consider Republicans. This is Jerry Taylor. Again, climate action is coming best that we do it in a rational market based fashion than suffice them scattershot regulatory jihad. So so Senator sununu was not an outlier in the GOP by any means, even though there were conservatives on the GOP oppose these ideas back at that time, you can take this position without risking your political career with the Republican base. But the bipartisan efforts to pass an economy wide cap and trade Bill fizzled when McCain launched a bid for president and abandoned the idea. For a lot of critics of the GOP this all prompts. A question were those mainstream Republicans like John e sununu sincere and more broadly are they ever sincere when it comes to action on climate change. Or is this all posturing, what climate activists call predatory delay? You know, I think with regard to climate. There was a certain amount of avoidance another former staffer for John ISA new Sheridan Brown. There were things that he did that he could tout. Cap and trade Bill towards the end when he was up for a tough reelection. But there didn't seem to be a lot of interest. Unlike grant Bossie who while he says, he's very discouraged by the state of today's politics has stuck with the Republican party Sheridan has become disillusioned with the right and become a loud critic of this new family. He's now on the team that believes John e was never serious about acting on climate. If you were truly believing that climate change existed and was caused by by man manmade emissions of carbon. You wouldn't be at the same time pushing for more drilling in places like the Alaska national wildlife refuge. You know? That's. The two are just not. Not in agreement grant Bosse doesn't buy this. You had a bunch of people Republicans and Democrats that agreed that. Yeah. The the earth is warming human activity almost certainly has something to do with that. And it would probably be a good idea. If we could do something about it and lower our carbon emissions in a way that didn't cripple the economy. Always a great emphasis on on. The fact that you were dealing with an engineer, but he wasn't climatologist. He was a chemical engineer yet. Great weight was placed on. Here's a bright guy. Here's an engineer who can think this through is really funny that you say that because. That feels like a sununu family TRAN. Yeah. I'm an environmental engineer. I studied in worked in the environmental engineering field for ten years. So this is something that I know a lot about combined that with running ski resort where we're completely whether bending. Johnnie lost his campaign for reelection to the Senate in two thousand eight washed out of office and the democratic wave triggered by Barack Obama's election. But New Hampshire would go along without a sin new in the halls of power the earth has been sold it warming since the mid eighteen hundreds this. There's no doubt about that. Is it manmade or not one thing? I do know. Nobody knows for sure. Back in New Hampshire. Another sununu was making moves in the business world. Chris new the second youngest of the eight children was put in charge of a very big family project. The snooze worked with a group of investors to purchase Waterville valley. A scary in the heart of New Hampshire's White Mountains a move, which if you're concerned about climate change might seem like a risky one. New Hampshire's winters are already getting warmer and research says that's bad news for the ski industry, but so far Waterville valley has soldiered on after the sale Chris was made CEO of the resort, but the whole family got into lending their half to promote it. Hey, there's this pizza new with the Waterville valley resort. It's been very gratifying for the wholesome of family. Over. But even as he was managing the ski area which included overseeing a major expansion of the trail network. Adding new lifts Chris new was dipping his toes into politics in two thousand ten he won a seat on the executive council, which is an office very specific to New Hampshire. It's a panel of five that share executive branch power with the governor. What was interesting is that Chris new was always opposed to the solar projects? This is another Chris now congressman Chris Pappas he served with Chris new on the executive council at a time when the five-member body was split three two with Republicans in the majority. You know, we would have a discussion and sometimes get to an agreement on some of the other alternative sources of energy. But whenever it was a solar project. He was leading the charge against it. A main job of the executive council is to approve state contracts public money. That's already been set aside and just needs to be actually spent one kind of contract that often comes before the. Anel is for renewable energy projects hoping to receive grants from the states of renewable energy fund when efforts to pass federal climate legislation faltered and fell apart in Obama's first term climate advocates shifted their attention to state level policies and trying to get local renewable energy projects off the ground. Still today. That's where most of the policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas. Emissions are advancing back. Then I was New Hampshire public radio's environment reporter, and when Chris news on the executive council getting one Republican counselor to flip and vote for them became the only way that a solar project could move forward. You're remembering that very correctly. And oftentimes that's how we tip the balance was just local folks weighing in in support of particular project getting to their counselor or other members of the council and just saying what's the hold up here. You know, we're waiting on these dollars to do something pretty important for our community in his six years on the executive council. Chris Newt never voted to give a state. To a single commercial scale solar array, I take away is that he's skeptical of solar and the promise that it holds more than wind more than you know, any other type of renewable generation. That's been my experience. So from the beginning from his investments in the ski industry to his Taghizadeh toward the solar industry. Chris new hasn't seemed very concerned about global warming. But his rhetoric on the subject has shifted in two thousand sixteen after three terms on the executive council. Chris the new one the governor's office. This is how talked about climate change when he was running in a competitive Republican primary. Nobody knows absolutely one way or the other. Whether it's man-made or not we have to be smart and with myself in the governor's office. We have the opportunity to have a governor that understands these issues now here he is two years later when he was running for re election and had to worry less about turning out the Republican base. Let's be very clear humans have contributed to climate change that that is not a question, contrary to what my opponent may say, I'm the only candidate on this stage that has fought to lower electric rates and here he is live on New Hampshire public radio late last year to quickies on this. So do you now agree with the consensus? Manmade emissions are indeed responsible for the temperature rises. Manmade emissions have a part to play in climate change. Yes. Fact done. Let's move on. Right. What are we go to your original question? What are we going to do about right here? What are we going to do about? And that's where my focus is in terms of what is an appropriate. Not just roll. But position to be in terms of making sure that we're being responsible, we're helping the environment. We're looking at the social impacts, and again, we're just in a tougher place. A lot of other states when it comes to the economic impact already so burdened with these incredibly high electric rates. So what's going on here? If John H sununu was a prime mover publican began to question climate science before that was a safe obvious political bet for publicans to make and of John e sununu was an office at a time where Republicans felt it was necessary to at least put forth some sort of proposal for how to mitigate climate change. What does Chris new represent you might be able to tell it's hard to pin him down. He's not the only Republican who has had to hedge on climate change these days. It's just not a winning issue with their base. Even as the pro business crowds. He's economic opportunity in finding solutions. No matter what Chris new believes personally about global warming. He's working within Republican party at war with itself. It's no longer his older brothers GOP which could get away with taking climate change seriously talking about policy solutions. It's the GOP of twenty nineteen. You can see a very clear dividing line in the party between. Prateep party in postie party. Again, Jerry Taylor of the Niskanen center pre-t party. You could be a Republican even staunch conservative like Senator sununu and argue that we have to do something about climate change. And you were not jeopardizing your career in a primary challenge or anything of the kind nor were you, you know, symbolically speaking putting on a trade over t-shirt by making that argument. Nobody's going to question your conservative bona fees may disagree with you about the issue. But after all atmospheric physics is not ideological and there's room for disagreement about this within the Republican party. But after two thousand ten that changed or excuse me after two thousand eight and that election taking a realistic position on climate became an absolute kiss of death. When asked about climate, Chris new doesn't have much to say he rarely acknowledges the effect that rising seas will have on parts of New Hampshire's small, but economically important coast or that warming winters will have on the just as important ski industry, which his family still has ties to when climate change comes up. He tends to pivot to energy and business. He says New Hampshire's electric rates, which are some of the highest in the country are too high and he's been in favor of bills that lower those rates and has veto bills that he says would raise them in one case vetoed pro-seoul or legislation that passed on a bipartisan vote in a Republican dominated legislature. Now that the Democrats have the majority this same Bill is getting even more support. But sununu is still threatening. Another veto his budget proposal for the next two years. Also, pull money from the state's renewable energy fund, the one that supports those solar projects he used to vote against in other words, even as his language shifts his policy priorities dome. But while Chris new in his role as governor has thus far been cagey on climate change. There is one Morrison new you should know about one who has been much more spoken. So it's pretty easy to sort of Google your name and find headlines that call you a climate denier. So, but it sounds like you're not questioning the idea that carbon dioxide warms the atmosphere. Let's let's talk about what that means a climate denier. Do I is the world warming up? Absolutely. I don't think there's any question in for most part, most of the pieces, I publish one of the first things I acknowledged the world has been warming since mid eighteen hundred this is Chris older brother, Michelson new he's not a climate scientist, and he's never been governor Senator, but he has made himself something of a public figure largely by writing editorials about climate science, by the way, we reached out multiple times via phone messages and emails to all of this new news who've taken a public stance in the climate change debate, John H John e Chris Michael was the only one who agreed to sit down and be interviewed. Remember how Chris has used rhetorical contortions to never quite say exactly what he thinks about climate change. That's what an ambitious elected Republican New Hampshire needs to do to satisfy both the conservative base and the general voting public. Well, the numbers have ticked up slightly in the last year only twenty five to thirty. Percent of conservative Republicans say they're worried about climate change. That's compared to more than fifty percent of Republicans, more broadly and nearly seventy percent of independence. That's a wide Gulf and a real conundrum for purple state Republicans, but Michael can speak his mind his views on global warming are well outside the scientific mainstream. He's sure that observed increases in carbon dioxide are driven by human activities versus natural processes. He isn't sure that CO two increases drive warming versus the other way around and even questions the fundamental principle of the greenhouse effect the degree to which CO two molecules effectively absorbed heat compared to the role of water vapor in the atmosphere. So I think you know, I'm not a climate scientists, obviously, I'm a norm. I yeah. But I do know that I could call you know, after again, very cursory googling any number of dozens of time scientists who would tell me that you're wrong about just about everything that you just said. And I'm curious how you respond to that the fact that it would be very easy to to produce climate scientists who would who would reject a lot of your surgeons. I think what you have to ask is is really what are they basing that rejection on are they basing it on a model form of our climate which most of those rejections will that's their foundation, which I would say that that's models are not science. Here. The connection back to his father's views is quite clear like John H sununu Michael says that the assumptions and simplifications made by climate models make their conclusions on reliable, this is despite the fact that historic climate models have to date done a pretty good job forecasting. Today's measure temperatures, but if John H sununu was personally digging into the assumptions made by climate models and picking them apart and John e and Chris choose their talking points on global warming based on the political calculations of their individual moment. Michelson news views are somewhat different. He hasn't had to create them whole cloth. When you ask him about his influences, he points to a few his name is Joe delay. Oh, he was actually one of the founders you mentioned Richard lindzen. Pobably Yogi toward I think voice Spencer a Judas curry eminent climate scientists. There are voices out there that I think in good voices that talk about the science these figures that Michael sites are a who's who of prominent climate change skeptics, they are scientists and some like Judith curry are actually cited by the United Nations body that evaluates climate science the IPC. They're still mainstream though, their studies are the outliers forecasting much less dire climate change than the rest of the scientific community when you read climate sceptic, blogs, these are some of the maybe two dozen names that come up over and over again in attempts to discredit the IPC their names that are very familiar to Jerry Taylor. The former gunslinger we've been hearing from throughout this story in two thousand sixteen Jerry was invited to New Hampshire to give a presentation at the university of New Hampshire while he was in town. He was. Asked to brief the president of a local right wing think tank on climate change over coffee and we arrive for coffee and to our surprise. There was Michelson. Anyway, we didn't expect to see Michael there. We didn't always going to be part of the meeting, but that's fine. He's an aboard guy. The president of the institute had asked Michael sununu to come along. In Jerry's words as a kind of climate council Yari. And so we had some coffee and started this conversation. It became clear that Michelson new had downloaded just about everything out of the right wing thing- tank world or that showed up on Fox News. The Wall Street Journal or Breitbart or Rush Limbaugh, and he was prime for bear. Just like his father was back in the day. I don't believe that Michelson new had any doubts that the the case for climate action was a as he would put it kind of a cooked up a bunch of nonsense that can't withstand even a casual examination and he was going to demonstrate that to me. So he was off to the races. And I finally stopped him. I said, Michael, I don't know if you know this, but I wrote all that crap twenty years ago. I mean, I I know what you're I know. I know this story, I know this evidence. I know these studies you're offering I know these arguments intimately I was paid to promote them twenty four seven. Let me tell you. What's wrong with them? Or at least why it was that I began to doubt them, but he would have none of it. Michael says he does consulting work for telecommunications. Clients and says he's worked on water development projects in the Caribbean and southeast Africa and helps manage Waterville valley the ski area his family owns and runs. He was briefly involved with an aborted plan to develop a coal fired fertilizer plant in the mid west as he says, he's not a climate scientist. But when many prominent New Hampshire Republicans have questions about climate science. It's Michelson new not Jerry Taylor who they turn to he presents on climate some regularly at the New Hampshire business and industry association's annual conference. Do you think that since you've taken on his mantle of talking about this that your views have gotten traction here in New Hampshire? No. I don't. And it's unfortunate. Because as I said, I think is there is a overwhelming public perception that sometimes I feel like syfy rolling boulder up the hill. So even even with things like getting invited to the BI to present to the BI, a, which is you know, it's a form of fairly powerful. Folks. I mean, it's not there's lawmakers in that room. You don't think you don't think your message just landed? I'm not sure I mean, it's it's it's always hard to tell. But I I mean to some extent, I guess, I'll know the message has landed when I see somebody here in New Hampshire get up and say, you know, I was on the other side of the climate debate. But these questions really that he raises actually has some village validity to change minds. I want them to ask the questions. But even though he's invited to address lawmakers and business leaders, even though he advocates for and against energy bills at the New Hampshire state house leveraging his last name, even though he's in visor to an energy group that has close ties to the governor. Even though the governor is his brother Michael doesn't believe his opinions on climate change matter more than any other Joe citizens. So you don't feel for instance, that I mean, do you get FaceTime with your brother? He's known listening to you know, none at all. I'm sure there are a lot of listeners in the general public out there who think that, you know, the sununu family gets together at dinner every week and figures out what we're doing all ten of you know, it is not and and I I avoid. Talking to my brother about these policy issues one for his sake because I don't think he really cares to hear me complain about what he's doing. Or you need certainly doesn't need me to support. I think the good things that he's doing it. It certainly for his, but for my sake as well. I think the issue is not is not, you know, my family. The truth is Michael sue might not need any special access in order for his ideas. Hold sway. He might just need to be. They're putting out these ideas. So that other Republicans can take them in run with them. Certainly he doesn't have to try hard convince a lot of Republicans. They don't need to put forth any sort of plan for taking action on climate change one thing to climate skeptics in denial of done. Very well is they have made skepticism and denial ISM about climate science, a core part of Republican identity, and that means a lot more to people than being quote right about an issue times have changed. But this noon family is still very much tapped into climate change and energy, politics and New Hampshire Michael testifies against carbon taxes at the state house. Chris veto any law that increases electric rates and their father, John H the former crossfire knife fighter has been known to poke his head back into the issue too. Question. That's the elder sununu late last year in a ritzy Bank would hall with views of New Hampshire's Atlantic coast. He was at a conference that sparked controversy locally because it had a lot of speakers who've become synonymous with climate change denial and not so many on the other end of the spectrum. But the speakers who are skeptical that we should be worried about climate change had a fan in John H sununu. So where does this leave us? Of course, it's anyone's guess if you'd asked Rafe Pomerance, the climate activists who watched John sununu torpedo the first climate talks Nordvik in nineteen Eighty-nine. He wouldn't have guessed that we'd see the questioning of climate science that we've weathered over the past three decades. These e part was a science you put more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere the earth warms up, very straightforward. Who can who can who can argue with this. I was totally wrong. Right. So I thought the science was straightforward. The stakes were enormous that that there would be a response. I didn't predict divisions or think that the divisions. We now experience what happen? But if anyone's got an idea, it's going to be someone who spends a lot of time talking to Republicans someone like Jerry Taylor of Niskanen center, right now, most elected, I would say most elected Republicans are not the sort of blind denials that seem to inhabit the White House. Now that doesn't mean that they're ready to Embiid Asli act, but their minds are open one of the the only common denominator to the Republican party from the time of Lincoln to the time of Trump. And there is only one common denominator is that. It's always been the party business always and as climate change becomes more and more of a problem. It's going to cause more and more losses to businesses to ski resorts to fishermen to the egg industry. To various different other resource industries at to the recreation industry to to a number of them. What do you think the chances are that they will just quietly accept those losses versus perhaps launching legal action against the fossil fuel contra companies that manufactured the products that gave them these losses. We're already starting to see those kind of losses. We seem the from the municipal level. But we we just recently saw them from the fishing industry in the Pacific northwest. And we're gonna start seeing them more frequently I think from the ski industry and others. So that's one thing that could change the way Republicans think about climate change. What if they're favored industrial allies are the ones we're increasingly animated about recovering the damages that are being done to them. It does feel like level warming is having something of political moment right now, we have to deal with this. It's a top issue for Democrats on the twenty twenty presidential campaign trail or planet is in peril. Moderate Republican governors like Larry HOGAN, Charlie Baker or acting on climate at the state level. We have tougher tougher clean air standards. Progressive Democrats have put their weight behind at least the framework of the green new deal. Challenges are one of the biggest existential response group of Republicans, including Mitt Romney, Lindsey Graham and Lamar Alexander have counterproposal. They're calling a new Manhattan project for clean up our air, raise family, incomes this fall after a year of fires floods and devastating hurricanes. All potentially linked to the warming trend opinion polls registered the first real uptaking concern about climate change for the first time in more than a decade. But we've been in these moments before and if history is any judge there will be sununu in the room who decide where we go from here. Talk. Forty seven. This episode about side in was produced by me Sam Brown, any row peak in Taylor Quimby with helping Daniel Barrick for prince L, Josh Rogers, Nick kep Ajay, Jimmy, Gutierrez and just in paradise. Erica Janik is our executive producer. Maureen McMurray is director of dynastic succession, planning if you're interested in hearing more about this story, we're trying something new you can find full unedited versions of several. The interviews. We used to put the story together including the one with Jerry Taylor Michelson. New shared a Brown and grant Bosse on our website outside in radio dot org. If you wanna weigh in find us on Facebook search for outside slush in after Jordan are moderated group or just shouted us on Twitter, we're at outside in radio. I'm at a row peek and Sam is at Sam be an HP music in this episode came from blue dot sessions. Our theme music is by brake master cylinder outside in the production of New Hampshire public radio.

New Hampshire John Henry sununu Republican party John H president Jerry Taylor Senator sununu sununu scientist Senator John e White House congress Chris new chief of staff New York Times Chris Michael George H W Bush
John Kelly Just Undermined the White House's Story on Family Separations

The Point with Chris Cillizza

02:31 min | 2 years ago

John Kelly Just Undermined the White House's Story on Family Separations

"Tired of spending hundreds of dollars for prescription glasses. Xeni offers thousands of affordable. Eyewear styles starting at just six ninety five. No ridiculous markups. No hassles. Just quality affordable. I wear delivered right to you visits. Any today at Xeni dot com slash CNN. Welcome to the point four Thursday, March the seventh. I'm Chris cillizza cutting through the political spin and bringing the news, you need to know, John Kelly. You remember him former White House chief of staff gave a speech at Duke University on Wednesday. And he was asked about the Trump administration's policy is related to family separations and more broadly immigration said a couple interesting things, but I want to draw you to one specific thing when he was asked about the family separation policy essentially enforcing a zero tolerance policy when people attempted to bring their children illegally to this country. Kelly used an interesting word he said, it was quote, unquote, the decision of the attorney general to make and he made that decision how the Terni journal at the time was Jeff Sessions. But what's interesting about it is that Donald Trump and his administration have gone way out of their way to suggest that they made no decision that all they were doing was enforcing policy on the books. And John Kelly suggests that that isn't true what he is saying is what facts have borne out which is a policy existed on the books and the Trump administration decided to enforce these zero tolerance end of that policy, which affectively led to significant increases in the number of families separated young children separated from their parents, this shed some light on a major controversy and a major problem for Trump's first two years in office in which he got very hung up on insisting that he had in fact affected no change when we knew he had. And now, you don't have to believe me. You can believe is former White House chief of staff John Kelly, also probably explains at least in part, why John Kelly is no longer the white husky of staff. That's the news you need to know for this March the seven four much more. Please check out my daily Email newsletter. You can subscribe to that easily by going the CNN dot com slash the point. You can also subscribe to this podcast on Stitcher. Spotify apple podcast. Forever. You get your podcast. You can call it up on your Amazon echo or your Google home device.

John Kelly Donald Trump Trump administration Xeni Xeni dot CNN chief of staff Chris cillizza White House Spotify White House Jeff Sessions Duke University Terni journal Amazon Google attorney two years
Don't Even Talk to Donald Trump about Russian Election Interference

The Point with Chris Cillizza

03:17 min | 2 years ago

Don't Even Talk to Donald Trump about Russian Election Interference

"It ways. Carpool is not a bus. It's not a taxi, and it's not a slug line ways. Carpool is an app that lets neighbors co workers and commuters save time and ride together to work and home drivers may get express lane access and cashback for gas riders getting affordable commute and help the planet and carpoolers get to know their neighbors and co workers a little better. Download the app and see how easy it is to catch a ride forgive ride to work for home ride together with ways carpool this Jimmy Butler, see himself as a belief that saquon Barkley thing he can be the greatest running back of all time. Well on my new show, take it there with Taylor rooks. I'll get all those answers from your favorite athletes. Tune in on the app for new episodes every week. Welcome to the point Wednesday, April the twenty fourth. I'm Chris cillizza cutting through the political spin and bring you the news you need to know. We're putting it in the New York Times on Wednesday morning said that Mick Mulvaney. The White House chief of staff had warned department of homeland security secretary to Nielsen not to bring up the issue of Russia election interference with President Trump because he President Trump was not capable of differentiating between the Russians actively interfering in our elections and people questioning the legitimacy of his victory, which in one way, what else is new Donald Trump has repeatedly been able publicly and privately to show that he cannot separate the two that he views any discussion of investigation into how Russia sought to meddle in our elections. As a way to undermine the credibility of his victory. Which of course, it is not you can't accept the fact. That Russia actively interfered in the two thousand sixteen election to help Donald Trump and hurt Hillary Clinton and accept the fact that Donald Trump won fair and square everybody, but Donald Trump can do that. But because he's the president United States that poses a big problem. If you cannot go in the department of homeland security secretary, which Nielsen used to be before she was removed by Trump and tell Trump the plans to keep foreign powers from getting into our election systems from trying to interfere online and offline that's a problem priorities, matter and administration's channel, eight presidents priorities. This is not only not a priority for Donald Trump. It's in fact, his chief of staff keeping him from even being in the loop on what the nation is doing as it relates to keeping our election safe and secure that's bad news. And it's a welcoming invite if you're Russia, China or another foreign power seeking to create chaos within the US election system. Unfortunately, Donald Trump doesn't seem to see it that way, that's news. You need to know for this. April the twenty four th four much more. Please check out my daily Email newsletter. Six times a week now still preserving Saturday for myself, but we get one Monday through Friday and Sunday, you can go to it by subscribing at CNN dot com slash the point. You also subscribe to this podcast at Stitcher. Spotify apple podcasts for wherever you choose to. Give us can also call it up on your Amazon, echo or your Google home device.

President Trump Russia chief of staff Chris cillizza secretary New York Times Nielsen Hillary Clinton Mick Mulvaney United States Taylor rooks Jimmy Butler Spotify Amazon CNN Google White House saquon Barkley China
Hungary Bans Travel From Africa, Most Of Asia

Newscast - Africa

01:13 min | 9 months ago

Hungary Bans Travel From Africa, Most Of Asia

"You're listening to the news at this on Africa. Business Aradio. Hungary's government and Sundays said it was barring travel from Africa most of Asia apart from China and Japan and restricting entry from several European countries after worldwide spikes in coronavirus cases. Prime Minister Viktor Bonds Chief of staff. Jelly Julius said Hungarian health officials have placed one hundred fifty four countries into three risk categories based on numbers of virus infections. He told reporters in the past that they need to protect the security. Security so that the virus is not introduced from abroad as the level of active infections, cases at home is falling, and most be kept like that entry into Hungary will be for citizens from countries assessed as read from Tuesday midnight, including all African countries in Asian countries, apart from China and Japan, and that was the news at this time when Africa Business Radio. You can continue to listen live online at www dot, Africa, business, radio, DOT COM or via a mobile APP. I. Am Rachel She Junior? Thank you for listening.

Africa Hungary Prime Minister Viktor Bonds Japan China Julius Chief of staff Asia
Sam Stone on the Phoenix response to the riots plus Gov. Ducey placing a curfew for one week and the impact that choice will have.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris

07:06 min | 11 months ago

Sam Stone on the Phoenix response to the riots plus Gov. Ducey placing a curfew for one week and the impact that choice will have.

"Governor. ducey put out a curfew last night, saying that after eight o'clock a united basically allowed to be on the streets and given what happened in some of the communities are a lot of people. They kind of agree with that but alas. The protesters did not agree with it because they shirked the. The the curfew they're out and about they bag downtown downtown Phoenix last night. Reading little bit of problems in center ring, other conservative circus. We have SAM stone. He is the chief of staff for City Councilman Sal to Cisco and Sam. Last night we heard that if started out fairly peaceful, and then it kind of turned in the end. Is that true? Absolutely a mess. The history of these things James at least the last few days we've had you know hours very peaceful. Protesting which I certainly had a ton of respect for, and then it's gone to hell and. Thank goodness for the Phoenix Police Department and the effort they did especially last night they stepped up in a big way. We had over two hundred and fifty. I think arrests the last two nights in downtown. They are taking these folks off the streets, and if you were out there. If you were saw any, you here uber driver someone still out last night. What you saw was the entire three thousand persons Phoenix police department on the streets in every single neighborhood, every commercial center and you wake up today to a city. That's still looks normal because of our police department contract. That's what's going on around this country. This is the right way to do. Things Jerry Williams police chief in Phoenix. Deserve a ton ton of credit. You don't stone. Stone I agree with you. She does deserve a ton of credit and she needs to hear from the community. Because strangely, I haven't heard too much for mayor Gago on on this whole issue, and this is a liberal round city, but for some reason we were blessed to have achieved Williams. Who really doesn't play and they're so professional in the pushback it it's it's it is gratifying to see my question is what will these people who are in jail be charged with will be. Will they be held responsible for the chaos? They've caused. That's the big question that still yet to be answered James Because the first night of these protests. We arrested just two people. And on some pretty significant charges, one of those in fact had a bunch of wars, and they got down to the jail, and the administrator just turned around and let him right out. and. A chance that we rearrested those same. People are pretty darn high. so we're waiting to see one of the things about the governor's order and I I have my questions about a week on lockdown, but one of the things about it is that it ups potential penalty you can face a fine of up to twenty five hundred dollars and six months in jail. You know we need to be parents simple if you're out there, looting rioting, if your lighting fires and causing damage and doing the things we've been seeing. We need to throw the book at. You need to go to jail. Can they stay there for a long time might question is how could it be? Why were they just released? Allow to sign out I mean what good does it do? If you go into arrest, two hundred people for looting for for violence, and then they're not going to be punished. You're not going to hold them accountable. That's that's that's crazy. I'm not putting that on. Chief Williams or do I need to WHO's responsible. Who made that call? No chance you definitely don't need to be putting. Matt Chief Williams. Putting out on the politicians at City Hall and the majority, the liberal majority, and it's what we've seen across this entire country for over a decade. Now they look on the. There's a liberal brand that looks on and TEPA, and cheer them on and has been doing it for a decade, and now's the real truth. The real face of MT is out in front of every American. They're trying to deflect the blame. What they have done for years is treat this group, which is a domestic terrorist group like they are legitimate protest group, and it is not. It needs to be treated differently there. There are people out there who are very legitimately protesting George Floyd and issues around policing in minority communities, and Tika is here to commit violence and throw this little boy, revolution of all these little white boys sitting in their basement, dreaming on the radical revolutionary. It really is a frightening thing to see, and you see how they tried to coop the movement and we're GONNA. Talk about that later on today's show, but but stamps. Are we talking to Sam Stone? He is the chief of staff for city councilman. There are at least two members of the city council who have been particularly unhelpful and our egging on as you just said are supporting and cheering the actions of these radicals and our streets. Well I, you know I wanna be clear we do. They are in and what they're not doing is differentiating between legitimate protesters and the troublemakers. The ones who are out there to do mischief and criminal damage destroy property threaten live. They're not defining the difference between those two and until they do that. Their protest is legitimate and the end of the story. It's just amazing to me that we elect people like this who are on the inside of the government now and they're helping. Create the chaos, Samson? What kind of effect is this having on the on police officers and also WANNA. Know what impacted this having on small businesses downtown? who were trying to reopen after the covert? The orders were lifted. Well. This is absolutely destroying all these small businesses James I mean they're struggling for all their work to to find a way to survive this thing. And now they're getting hit with these damages, and they can't have their businesses open it absolutely devastating, but the bigger point here that you just hit on, you know we had a from what I understand I'm hearing report that one of the Tucson City Council. Members was actually. With the the the people damaging property in downtown Tucson was actually out with them and we've. We've had council members here in Phoenix who have set out on their office letterhead statement saying Oh Phoenix police. Really reasonable measures are brutality and violence, and this is racism, but knox not done with this garbage, James we're done with it. It is time to take control of our country back. If there is a real problem and there is with policing in this country. Then let's address it meaningfully. You do not do that by lighting fire and causing damage and burning down at hurting people. That is ridiculous.

Phoenix Matt Chief Williams Phoenix Police Department James chief of staff Tucson City Council Sam Stone Governor. ducey City Hall Cisco Jerry Williams Sal Gago George Floyd Tucson administrator MT knox Samson
Women in Politics - The Traits You Need to Succeed!

Women Worldwide

32:42 min | 1 year ago

Women in Politics - The Traits You Need to Succeed!

"You're listening to episode two hundred forty seven of women worldwide. What does it take to be a woman in government and politics today? Are there certain characteristics. Ristic you need not just to survive. But also thrive. I've got a guest today. WHO has a lot to share on this topic? So stay tuned to to learn more. Hi I'm Deirdre Breckenridge. I've spent entire career helping women to share stories. Nurture relationships were of their brands but most of all to find their voices so they can make a difference. Do you feel stuck. Do you want to power up your own voice. Women worldwide features stories of passionate women who have navigated big career challenges and some of the toughest changes these professionals nationals. Offer deep insights and advice to inspire you and to help you cover. What's holding you back? Let women worldwide. Ignite your passion sooner. You can excel in life. I everyone welcome to another episode of women worldwide wide. Thank you so much for showing up for tuning into the show and we hear you every week. We're hearing from you about challenging stories topics things that you WANNA learn about and that really helps us to line up our guests now. You know that every every week is a new guest someone who is a highly talented and accomplished professional and they make it look easy but you know it's not always easy and they're here to share the ups and downs of their journeys and what they've experienced all to help new overcome your challenges to help you feel your passion and power up your own voice so please keep the comments coming you know. I'm on twitter. At breckenridge. You can post on. facebook subscribe on our Youtube Channel. Leave a comment there or just email me and that's Deirdre at pure performance com with two M'S DOT COM okay. Let's get to today's topic and special guests the topic Vic is women in Hala Ticks. Yes wasn't exciting. Time to be hitting this particular topic. What are the characteristics risk? Fix what do you need if you're a woman in politics or if you're in a tough workplace environment not just to to survive but actually really to thrive what does it take. Were some of the challenges. I've got the perfect guest today. Joining me on the show is Joni Wickham Now Joni is a seasoned leader in government and politics. She has spent time directing public public policy communication strategies and political campaigns. Now she spent a Lotta time about eight years or so in the office of the city of Kansas City Missouri. The mayor's office sly James. She was chief of staff and today she is the CO founder under of Wickham James Strategies and solutions. Joni here to share her journey with you. Joni it's great to have you on my show show welcome. Hi thank you so much for having me. It's really an honor to be with you. I appreciate the opportunity. Well thank you so much and being a woman in politics there is a lot not that you can certainly share through your journey and as a leader and I think that's where let's start with the journey so Joni did. Did you always want to be in government in politics for you. A child to certain New Year Direction. or how did this all kind of come about A little bit. Yes a little bit no. I always enjoyed Watching the news with my grandparents I grew up in rural North Carolina and My family was a very modest means so we didn't really have the resources to go to museums or Go to movies in that sort of thank thank for entertainment so I did a lot of reading the newspaper to them I did a lot of out watching. TV with them and in the evenings we would watch the nightly news. David Brinkley was was a fixture in our living room. Right in so I was kind of Almost obsessed with The news because that's basically all that I had going on around me so for the longest time I thought I wanted to be a political journalist and when I was a freshman in college I was lucky enough to get a internship in my hometown. Newspaper taper teeny tiny hometown population than of all. I don't know maybe Fifty sixty thousand And I honestly The editor percent to cover a city council meeting and while as their their Seven older white gentleman who made up the city council and they had an eight hundred thousand dollar budget which was a huge amount of money for city of that size At that time and so they decided to close that budget gap by cutting what they call the Weiss Program and was very clear from the discussion at the table. That no one they are knew. What the Weiss program was Come to find out it was w WNYC women infant children. And I had been recipients of that program when my mother and I We're finding our way through do Poverty and Generational poverty under education. That sort of thing. When I was growing up I knew percent with that program minutes Or four families in our in our community and so I was just shocked. and appalled that A decision like that can be made with really little all fought given to the impact it was gonna have and I went back to my editor and told him about it. He was like yeah. That really sucks. Go right about it so I thought for a minute. Oh my gosh in this system. My my only role is to write about a decision after he'd been made so I decided in there that actually wanted to figure out a way to get a seat at that decision making table And and maybe they wouldn't listen to every single thing I said but I was GonNa make sure that in a situation like that they knew what the women infant children for room was in the impact that it had. I mean that's so personal A way to get started at really hits your life what you've been through so as you sort. Do you started with the reporting and the city council meeting and you grew into a role a big role as a chief of staff the mayor and that's quite a role. What was that like just being a woman in politics? Can you maybe share how you fell. Did you feel alone. You feel empowered. I felt all of that Sometimes I there were times that I felt along. There were times is that I had Imposter Syndrome that. A lot of women leaders feel You know Imposter Syndrome is win. If you don't feel like you know every single thing about about a topic you feel like you don't deserve a place at the table. I certainly felt that from time to time. there is also times that I felt very grateful to have the network of strong women leaders around me. Who would number one tell me what I was doing wrong and sometimes tell me things that I did one a year which is powerful writing But they would either for you Joanie on him just curious when you were receiving feedback from other women. was that difficult at first or was that something that you embraced right away It's something that I embraced in. I had to because As I mentioned I had a very modest in in make upbringing and I really didn't have professional role role models much less women professional role models too late so I always knew that I had to soak up whatever knowledge in feedback. I can get because there had always been on experience experience and knowledge gap there because of Where came from So I think I've always been open to feedback because that was how I learned thanks to do when things not to do. Now that's really important. I mean it's always hard to receive feedback. Some people feel it's easier to give of it but it's a gift no matter lately and I think sometimes when you receive feedback even if it is horsh or critical. It's realizing that those people are coming coming from a place of in most cases help and to help you grow so good that you had women leaders around you. What do you think are some of the importance and skills that helped you mentioned the whole not just survive but actually thrive? What are some skills that you relied on or or felt like you had to develop more as you went along? Good question I've always had to be very thick skinned If I were particularly sensitive I don't think I would have been able to survive. I've always had to be resilient in try and build resilient teams around me in politics in government. You can wake up one day thinking that your your schedule is GonNa look a certain manner and then a pothole breaks or God forbid. There's another homicide in your city. You know and it changes ever a a so resilient cities key Work Ethic and determination. I mean it seems so obvious but sometimes I think we forget about it One one of the things that helped me overcome impostor syndrome was that I tried to make sure I was the most prepared person in a room. I did a lot of Meetings in negotiations with economic development attorneys real estate attorneys. That sort of thing. I am not an attorney. I didn't have a different attitude on our property tax abatement when I took gophers chief of staff in the mayor's office but I had to learn very quickly because my job dependent on the momentum of the mayor's administration dependent on and so I would do things like going Amazon and purchase real estate development law books bet a student would read in their classes acid and I would read it on the treadmill at night. Yeah just just preparation In hard work. Sure Yeah I mean a I. I think it's really good. That's great advice because you are going steps beyond would somebody in that role might do and do you feel who You know as you were learning more that the impostor syndrome was less. Did you ever feel at some point that allow now I get this yeah Competence Begins Competence and success. Begets success in so I would find myself When I walked into a room and I knew that I had prepared? I knew that I knew what I was talking about on that I knew what I was. the principles that I was standing bore four That type of situation and Success made me feel more confident in ready to take on the next challenge. And I think also I had to prove myself to a lot of different stakeholders I moved to Kansas City from the state capital's a lot of people didn't didn't didn't know me as an individual much less as a professional I am a petite young ish gonNA go youngest I male with a southern accident that you may detect and so a lot of those things creates biases for sure. And I'm sure other women experience those things to So when you walk into a room and you immediately know that people are Kinda Trying to figure out measuring you up off on what you're what you're shortcomings. Are you figure out ways very quickly to walk into a room With some confidence and make sure you're prepared in in no What you need to do to take care of business now? That's really good. I just remember looking on the youngest side earlier earlier in my career walking into the Board Room when we were I owned an agency and we were catching a law firm for services and and my partners in myself we walked in. We'll young ish and the partners at the table actually said to us we're the executives with this so what we did luckily thankfully we were author so we put our books down on the table to away crew showed Oh that we were the experts. So it's really interesting but yes. Competence does get confidence. What was the reason for the Transition Shen to move into your own business? Yes so the city of Kansas City has term limits on the mayor is allowed two four year terms He was re elected in Twenty fifteen with eighty six percent of the vote. That was a great for us in art. Ministration ration- in We were term limited. Last eight office was July thirty first of this year so I would say probably a year and a half two years before we were term limited We knew do that We had an expiration date. If you will on our term in we started kind of figuring out I Each of us individually what we wanted to do the more we thought about our own individual visions and hopes and dreams for life Both personally and professionally. We really discovered that We number one still liked each other. which doesn't always between the chief of staff and elected so whenever together for the right? We still liked. It's each other and appreciated The difference skills that we each brought to the table We have complementary personalities and skill sets which is very important We have the same values And so we decided that we would open up our own consulting firm Wickham Jane Strategies and Solutions Solutions and have greater control over a life. The mayor of a city is largest. Kansas City. Doesn't have much control over his or her life which also means the chief of staff doesn't have much control over his relied. Actually I knew that a so. When we decided to start her own firm we had to a guiding pieces of of criteria? That we want to operate this firm. All in the first is that we would never compromise all values when it came Axa our business and the second that we didn't work with eight holes anymore politics. There are few of those my Oh goodness yes criteria everything else we can kinda talk about Johnson. Glad that you said that. Congratulations on launching. I think that's fantastic and upholding your values and knowing who you WanNa work with and now you don't WanNa work with So challenges in our mentioned it at the beginning of the show. If I were to ask you if this was a a speed question just I challenge off the top of your ahead. What do you think your biggest challenge was or is as a woman in politics man there are so many it's hard to pick just one Tom Honestly I would go back to that imposter syndrome. Yeah because it is so indicative of the Internal Psychology -nology and confidence that women leaders have but it's also indicative. I mean not. All of that stuff comes from within some of that stuff You're dealing dealing with because other people projected on you. I know when I walk into a room and people have low expectations of me. I know you can kind of Women tend to have more emotional intelligence agence and so That's kind of a blessing and a curse when you can use it to your advantage and a negotiation or something but when you walk into a room and you're using components of emotional national intelligence that you can tell that people are rolling their eyes when you talk or what happens to me a lot even to this day. Is that Line I will be in a conversation. I'll ask a similar question. And they'll turn Hanan answer it so just like that Imposter Syndrome Is Probably one of the biggest challenges that I've experienced. I know a lot of other women do to absolutely so so do I and Joanie I'm GonNa ask you to hold your thoughts just for a moment. We're going to shift our focus over to the sponsor of today's episode which is the empowered women event. That's taking place on December fifth in San Francisco and this is an event in Joanie. You know it you're speaking added. I'm speaking at it. Where women are sharing their authentic stories about their experiences experiences in business in an hell equity really matters and on that note Joni we've been talking about being a woman women in politics and now you're a woman in business? I just want to ask you a quick question on because it is all about empowering women how can women support one another another good question I think a key to women empowering each other is making king sure that we get outside of our bubble and outside of our comfort zone and talked to women who may be have different backgrounds. I was at a Women's leadership conference put on by our regional. Better Business Bureau and it was so insightful for me to be in that room because as we've mentioned I've been in politics and government for over twenty years into being a room surrounded by women who had worked in business nonprofit I never would have interacted with many of them if I hadn't taken that step to get out of my comfort zone in meet women of different perspectives backgrounds in an expertise I think that's helpful. Because has there are so many lessons to be learned insights to be conveyed between women who have different experiences And particularly these days I think it's is important to make sure that we have a diverse network network of women I love Being able to learn Some of the things that my sisters who are women of Color Experience and how I can support them. that sort of thing I think diversity -versity of Background expertise on just building. A network of women from all walks of life is really important. I agree and thank you so much for answering that question and just a little bit more about the empowered women event of the speakers are absolutely absolutely amazing. So we have Dr Deborah Tannin. Who wrote the book? You're the only one I can tell with a best selling book. We also have Pat Gillette. WHO's taking sage? She is a motivational keynote speaker. Who deals with diversity and women's issues and business he's joining? What's your topic? What are you going to be talking about? So my topic is near and dear to my heart and it's Based in a lot of personal experience served in politics and government. And it's called the thin line between cupcake in bitch familiar to you until you while I I the Try to increase my own network and have more diverse women that I can lean on. There's so many women who experienced this you know you go into a meeting in your your viewed as being too much of a cupcake by one person. Too much of a bitch by somebody else at the same meeting. Oh I think we've all had that experience so that's going to be the name of my talk I'm excited about it fantastic. I can't wait to listen. I'll be there also. I'm so honored to be taking the stage. I'm going to talk about a new communication. The Model Colt Steel based on a year's journey of research with millennials. I'm excited about that. And for all of you who want to join us APP December fifth empowered women events. They're still tickets left although I am told by the conference coordinator that they are going quickly. So if you are interested in attending and we save you or L. and then of course you can find it in the show notes. You can find it on the my youtube channel L. But it's H. T. T. P. Colon Ford slash four slash bitterly that's be it dot l. y. forward slash and. I WANNA make sure I get this right. Empowered D. E. C. Five. So look for that you are l.. Go find out more information. Sign up and hope to see you there. Joni thank you so much for answering the questions about how women can support one another and a big thank you to the organizers of the empowered word women event for being sponsor of winter worldwide. Okay Tony Let's dive back into our discussion. We left off talking about out imposter syndrome. We mentioned emotional intelligence. That is something that women have. It's gift it's it's sometimes could the occurs and I think I wanted to key into your thought around millennials and kind of you know I'm doing a lot of research around millennials noticing that they are really wanting more emotional intelligence from the leaders around them. So were you finding this. In your experience with millennials in this generation in government for sure Yeah and this is something Honestly I think I tried to grow into it was interesting to me. Working with millennials in the mayor's office they are so creative Much more creative than Some of the peers. I have my own agent and a little bit older when it comes to innovation and strategy that sort of thing And it was interesting marrying that Creativity with things like resiliency Yeah so I think it's going to be interesting in the decades to come to see how millennials both grow as individuals and and grow as cohorts In how they married those strengths and weaknesses in the workforce with other generations. As well right now I think that's really interesting and allot comes down to trust in the environment and I'm just curious so I'm sure you had millennials. I think you mentioned that. There were millennials in your office. What were some of the ways that maybe you were building? Trust just helping some of the listeners. Out there who also have millennials around them might be on their teams. They might be supervising. Lenny's what does it take to build trust. I really tried to focus on building them as individuals and professionals We did a lot of professional development and training and We have staff meetings where we would try to at least have a portion of their staff meetings be introspective In focus on How we as individuals could contribute more to the group's mission We did a lot lot of leadership. Training we did a lot of focusing on articles in invest practices and talking can about how we can incorporate that into our daily lives and so I felt like As a leader it was incumbent upon me to make sure that I wasn't just focusing on the day today the mayor's office but also seeing growing our staff. On particularly the millennials. We several staffers who that was their very first job was working in. The mayor's office I I can remember working for us. Senator when I was nineteen and how scary that exactly. That can be really scary. You just feel like if you mess up when you're GonNa read about it in the newspaper the next day safe. Yeah which which can be traumatic for some people or An can lead to the Imposter Syndrome that. We've we've talk so much about as well so I just felt like as a leader. It was important to make sure that I was helping develop Our staff MILLENNIALS millennials included in helping them see what their leadership strengths are perhaps where some areas where where they could grow. I think that's really good. Did you notice as you were doing this. Their behavior change at all. was there anything that I mean whether they were saying. I feel great about this this environment and verbally saying or even the non verbal cues. Did you notice any changes. Within the way that they were acting. Yeah I think the more we focused on growing each others leadership potential. The more they saw themselves as individuals. I can remember willing young lady. There was something some big crisis hit. The mayor's office and I was supposed to go in. Speak on behalf of the mayor at a conference in this crisis happened and I had to stay back at the office in help him through strategy so I had this young lady who I asked to go speaking on my behalf and she was so scared to do it but we had just been focused and the staff eating before Thankfully sometimes timing on taking risks risks in overwhelming fear. She was scared at the public speaking in. So we KINDA had admitted resent my office In reflected on that discussion about fear in and Dan taking risks and how we can gain so much alerts much from that she knocked out of the park. She was great now. Yeah so I hope over the time that we were in the mayor's office not only did we help The city in a Lotta different ways but I hope we kinda planets in seeds in some of our staff that they can take leadership positions as well. That's wonderful that is a great story and I'm so glad she knocked it out of the power grade you know. Take a risk. It could be scary. It's such an opportunity just to see how you can succeed so I also wanted to talk a little bit about communication in in general because I mentioned communication strategy political campaigns. How are you feeling about social media? He's days is it helpful. Pulled to what you're doing is horrible meaningful if you could share a little bit there bill like everything in life or most things in life. I think It's a blessing and a curse sometimes When I first started out in political communication the only way to get your message out was by walking out of the the state capital in Raleigh in walking down to the Raleigh News and observers office in having a face to face conversation with reporter on changed? Yeah Yeah and then within a few years you could fax someone s release. I reverend so now I mean it's just a whole new world In so I find social media really help comes to spreading the word about events You know when we wanted to make sure people knew when and where the Mayor State in the city address was absolutely social. Media was wonderful wonderful. I have not found social media to be that helpful when you WANNA have Some robust conversations in public discourse about public policy Elsie Issues I think he can be destructive in toxic from time to Time I. I can remember several circumstances in the mayor's office where someone would tweet something with no facts or data to back it up Whatever they felt like was the reason that we we had a pothole on in the city? absolutely no truth to it and then we would have spent four or five hours dealing with it because of how the viral nature of social media so I think it can be a blessing and a curse. Sure I mean you can hide behind your Avatar on social media. I just is fine. I mean we're seeing things play out clearly on a national level election coming up but it's more of finding what is being said this level of toxic discourse wouldn't happen necessarily in if you were face to face with somebody sometimes when you're in the room when you're having those one on one or even a small group you might be able to get to some kind of resolution. Social Media tends to fuel sometimes the worst. Why what's being said? I mean there is good. There's no doubt about it and I won't blame social media for everything but there is this level of you kind of step back and say is this a waste of my time or can we really help here. It's Har- right difficult to determine right a lot of what my work was In the mayor's office dealt with navigating conflict of different varieties in my fear ear about social media. Is that to your point. People can hide behind an Avatar right. And there's very little Media consequences for bad behavior on social social media. Also it changes the way you navigate conflict when you can respond to tweet without any ramifications of it in any the personal contact or interaction so I hope that it doesn't negatively impact society's ability to navigate conflict right. That's a really good point tornadoes. Kidding believe it were at the question where I ask you advise so that you can share some advice with all of our listeners. In we're going to wrap up this segment. So what would you say to those business professionals out there who whether they're in politics or they're just in a really tough landscape landscape. What what's your advice so I think my biggest piece of advice is to remember to take care of yourself This is there's been a weakness of mine for a long time And I know when I'm not taking care of myself. I'm not firing on all cylinders and my work in my decision making isn't the best There were times in the mayor's office that like I couldn't even remember what I did in the week because I was so exhausted by the end of the week. And so I think it's important to take a step back act whether you're in business nonprofit philanthropy politics whatever it is when you're going through times of crisis conflict. It's tough times to make sure you're taking care of yourself so that you can be sharked in make sure you're navigating whatever issue it is to the fullest extent that you can't ah be sharp. Be Present your it'll show. Yep absolutely making absolutely Joni last question super easy. We're can people find out more about you. And Wickham James. Our website is www dot wickham james dot com and you'll also find links to in each of our dreaded social media channels. You've got to have them around him. And there is a blessing curse. Everything said did it while I hope everybody goes in and looks you up and checks you out. Thank you so much for coming on the show for sharing your journey for talking about a tough landscape landscape and forgiving really great advice and just for sharing your insights openly. So thank you thank you so much for having me your welcome and thank you to so all of you for tuning into women worldwide. Please keep the feedback coming. Keep sharing the stories of amazing guest like Joni who come on the show. We are changing changing. Lives one story at a time. You know you can always reach out to me at D. Breckenridge twitter leave a comment on Youtube Channel. And please subscribe subscribe there. You could also go to the women worldwide show DOT COM website and sign up for updates. Okay friends till our next episode. Stay focus energized. Feeling empowered thank you.

Joni Wickham chief of staff Kansas City Youtube Wickham James Joanie I editor Deirdre Breckenridge breckenridge Weiss Program twitter Hala Ticks David Brinkley North Carolina Vic Axa Hanan
AP One Minute Headlines Jan 28 2019 06:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

03:45 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Jan 28 2019 06:00 (EST)

"Hi, it's Jamie, progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the. Hi, jamie. It's me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool. So when it's like tell us what you want to pay. Hey, and the trombone goes, blah, blah, blah, and you say, we'll help you find coverage options to fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while a choir goes, savings coming at ya. Savings coming at ya. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway, see you practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap break. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. After years have been rolled up within an inch of life. I'm free receipts of a mind of their own go, paperless and manage your travel expenses online with my taxi business, make the smarter choice of might Tuksy dot com. I'm Rita Foley with AP news minute. Those furloughed federal government workers returning to work. Now. We'll soon get those paychecks. They missed during the shutdown, but what's next acting White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, says he hopes all federal workers will receive paychecks this week we hope that by the end of this week. All of the backpay will be we'll be made up moving spoke on CBS's face the nation. Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer says he's supporting legislation that would prevent the federal government from ever shutting down. Again, it will mean above all that federal workers will not be hurt again Schumer wants President Trump to make arrangements to have federal workers paid as quickly as possible and to make sure federal contractors paid Mike Kemp. In Washington, but the deal President Trump signed only funds the government until February fifteenth and the president says he thinks it's unlikely that negotiators will come up with a deal to end the border wall standoff with congress. I'm Rita Foley. Hi, it's Jamie, progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the. Hi, jamie. It's me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool. So when it's like, tell us what you want to pay, and the trombone goes, blah, blah, blah. And you say we'll help you find coverage options that fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while a choir goes, savings coming at ya. Savings coming at ya. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway, see you practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap break. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. No an ad from dad. All right. Save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive guy. Take these off what is this? Wow. Where did you get this? I'm talking to you with the hair. Yeah. Where did you get this? Good stuff. Solid. That's not veneer that solid stuff. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents, but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company, billiards and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations.

Jamie Chuck Schumer Rita Foley Trump president Mick Mulvaney CBS billiards Washington AP congress White House Mike Kemp chief of staff two months
Burial Practices For Covid-19 Practice

Lagos Covid-19 Updates

04:00 min | 1 year ago

Burial Practices For Covid-19 Practice

"If you haven't heard about anchor it's the easiest way to make a point caused. Let me explain it free. There's creation tools that allow you to record an editor podcast. Right from your phone. Or Computer Anka would distribute your podcast for you so it can be heard on spotify apple podcast and many more. You can make money from you. Podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast in one place. These very strange times in which we live so practice needs to change accordingly so very practicies needs to be just that while living right now with the virus that is ravaging the world. My name is not on this caused by Africa. I will be talking about how did but is handled. When a person dies of ninety I believe is right here and right now kept business radio to it profitable Africa so it is no longer news that the former chief of staff to the President of the Republic of nine Mama Carey died or the coronavirus seventeenth of April. Twenty twenty now. He's rather unfortunate incidents where they just went to highlight the fact that that's what we do respect of persons in kills the old and the young and it affects people who are highly pleased on people who have nothing so the more we followed these trucks. John's all the guidance at the end. Cdc This dancing for avoid touching is news and mouth frequent washing then the less likely we to contract the corona virus not being saint. Mary's burial was fraught with a lot of controversy in that the body was probably not handled as well as it should. Have to shout distancing issues because people who attended the bureau more than stipulated and the wick crammed unpracticed to one another so. The barrier practices. Need to change. What happens right now if it dies of ninety body needs to be hounded in very specific guidelines by being. Cdc body needs to be carried by people who are wearing protective equipment. The religious cannot touch the piece. The body to keep that in distance not inflicted. This is all for the protection of the relatives. Now the burials to be as dignified as possible giving that this other human being who had you in life and had done things in life and you deserve that dignity of a burial worthy of a person but it has to be done in a controlled manner infected if the person dies at home however is a different matter is at home and for one or the other religious suspect they might have been good with nineteen the really ought to call the. Cdc's busy can come and take action on the body and evacuee body in control. We saw that people are not affected. Imagine just evacuate the body. It's actually commercial vehicle. That can be quite devastating. The body has been nineteen nineteen by Ross on. It's also what we were. Printing diseases like asthma diabetes. Hypertension people are dying from causes other than with nineteen and that is very unfortunate. So if you have any in terms of your disease that you'd be managing for a long time. It is necessary to call. Your husband will let them know that you like to come in four and appoints main and then moved on because right now people might be worried dealers and somebody might end up dying for for reasons other than nineteen. So let's protect ourselves. Steve and I will see you next time on this past. This has been a public health collaboration between Africa Business Radio Films and Uncle Paddy Dot Com.

Cdc Mama Carey Africa Twenty twenty spotify editor Uncle Paddy Dot Com Africa Mary Steve John Hypertension asthma Ross chief of staff President
AP One Minute Headlines Apr 08 2019 06:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

03:30 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Apr 08 2019 06:00 (EDT)

"Hi, it's Jamie, progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the. Hi, jamie. It's me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool. So when it's like tell us what you want to pay. Hey, and the trombone goes, blah, blah, blah, and you say, we'll help you find coverage options to fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while a choir goes, savings coming at ya. Savings coming at ya. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway, see you practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap break. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. The masters is back Streep all four days from Gusta and get every second of big swinging glorious setting career besting water splashing record-breaking tiger taming Rory winning maybe ego making green jacket engulfed lower. You could ask. Robin not skysports week poss-. I'm watch all four days of the Mosser's for just fifteen euro search no TV today content during the internet, full, terms and not dot com. I'm Rita Foley within AP news minute, Kim, and to cut the California woman kidnapped in Uganda is free and in good shape. Say officials there after what they call a rescue operation kidnappers demanded five hundred thousand dollars for her return. But it's not clear if any ransom was paid homeland security secretary Kirstin Nielsen reportedly went to the White House to meet with the president yesterday, not knowing if she was going to be fired we're told she was not, but she did resign AP Washington. Correspondent soccer megani? Was the president's most high profile female department, head her exit means both the homeland security department and the Pentagon now have acting heads. As does the White House staff itself now to the president's tax returns acting White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, says congress will never. Get them. They know they're not going to get this. They just want the attention on the issue because they don't wanna talk to us about policies. Mick mulvaney. The acting White House chief of staff on Fox News Sunday. I'm Rita Foley. Stream all four days from Costa and get every second of big swinging glorious setting career besting water splashing record-breaking tiger taming Rory winning maybe ego making green jacket engulfed lower. You could ask Robin not V skysports week poss-. I'm what's all four days of the Mosser's for just fifteen euro search not today conferencing, by the internet, full terms, not dot com. Hi, it's Jamie, progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the hi, Jamie. It's me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool. So when it's like tell us what you want to pay. Hey trombone goes, blah, blah, blah. And you say we'll help you find coverage options to fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while a choir goes, savings coming at ya. Savings coming at you. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway, see you practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap break. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. The style light lounge presents an evening with the progressive box. Let's you go tickling the ivories. He just saved. By bundling home and auto progressive gonna finally that gal of yours, Hugo dolences. This nice. There's. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Discounts on available in all states or situations.

Jamie White House Rita Foley Mick Mulvaney president Robin Rory chief of staff White House Kirstin Nielsen Pentagon soccer Hugo dolences Uganda Costa AP Streep California