35 Burst results for "Chief Meteorologist"

Climate Change Blamed for Havoc in Northeast US Floods

Here & Now

02:06 min | 3 months ago

Climate Change Blamed for Havoc in Northeast US Floods

"The northeast still cleaning up all of the destruction caused by the remnants of hurricane ida last week at least fifty people died and while residents in some public health officials were surprised by the severe weather. Storms like this or what. Scientists have long warned about jeff brady from npr's climate team reports in bridgeport pennsylvania about one in the morning thursday vernon perry says the nearby river was rising and the fire department. Woke him up. They just were saying evacuate. Now get out the only chance you to go. Now get out run. There wasn't even time to move his car. It's flooded like others on this street a front loader hauls them to waiting trucks at the end of the muddy blocked. Brenda night is sitting under front step next to the sidewalk. Where a pipe. Gushes water into the street. It's being pumped up from her basement. The water came up to the first floor here and first floor. My rug was soaking wet in. There has whether she expected such a severe storm because of climate change. Not at all. This is a complete surprise. We had no idea of the magnitude of the damage. That was going to be called even new york governor. Kathy hokuto who talks about climate change fueling. More severe storms was surprised. We did not know that between eight fifty nine fifty pm that the heavens literally open up and bring niagara falls level water to the streets of new york. It's one thing to talk about the effects of climate change. It's another to experience them. Says burnet. woods blackie chief meteorologist with climate centro even. If you said to her there was going to be over three inches of rain in one hour if she's never seen that what does that mean. What does that look like. What does that look like on the ground. Same for the rest of us but we're getting more examples. There was superstorm. Sandy new york and new jersey nine years ago. The pacific northwest now understands what days of one hundred plus degree weather is like and across the country more people are experiencing wildfires and hazardous smoke.

Hurricane Ida Jeff Brady Vernon Perry Nearby River Kathy Hokuto Bridgeport NPR Fire Department Pennsylvania Brenda Woods Blackie Climate Centro New York Burnet Niagara Sandy New York Pacific Northwest New Jersey
Infrastructure Bill Offers Once in a Generation Investment in Climate Resilience

Climate Cast

02:07 min | 3 months ago

Infrastructure Bill Offers Once in a Generation Investment in Climate Resilience

"To meet the moment to be responding to the needs of the people we have to be bold. And we can't tink worth the edges. I'm mpr chief meteorologist. Paul hutton here. And that was massachusetts democrat on presley. Talking about the bipartisan infrastructure. Bill that passed the senate this week. It now heads to the house where presley and her progressive colleagues say. It isn't bold enough on climate change especially on the heels of this week's dire warning in the un climate report but while some say it doesn't do enough to reduce emissions. It does offer billions to help the country prepare for the effects of climate change. Forbes tompkins manages efforts for flood prepared communities with the pew charitable trust and joins us now. Hi forbes welcome to climate cast i paul. Thanks for having me. So what do you see in this bill. That can help address. Climate change altogether. This bill really marks potentially a once in a generation investment in climate adaptation and resilience in particular. There's a focus on transportation and it's going to open up An abundance of resources for communities to develop new plans to implement new projects that can better prepare themselves for flooding and other types of disasters. So let's focus on the flooding aspect a little bit. I know you work a lot in that area. What are you seeing in there. That you think can have short term impact One of them is called the building resilient infrastructure and communities program and this bill would infuse a billion dollars into the program immediately and it would allow communities to support. You know any type of hazard mitigation projects That can help them reduce their risk that they face from disasters the second piece specific the flooding is also a second infusion for fema flood mitigation assistance program that provides financial and technical assistance to states localities for projects to reduce the risk of repetitive flood damage to properties and buildings insured by the national flood insurance

Paul Hutton Presley Forbes Tompkins Pew Charitable Trust Massachusetts Senate UN Bill Paul Fema
Refurbished Wind Turbine Powers Homes and Learning

Climate Cast

02:42 min | 6 months ago

Refurbished Wind Turbine Powers Homes and Learning

"I'm standing underneath a wind. Turbine in chaska minnesota on a windy spring day. I'm npr chief meteorologist. paul hutton. Her this is climate. Cast this wind turbines middle. School educates students about renewable energy and generates electricity for nearby homes. It's operated by the minnesota municipal power agency or m. pa matt quota. Har- sqi is the group's chaska chair or standing under a hundred and sixty kilowatt Wind turbine that was refurbish. Here from palm springs california and one of these resides in each of the twelve member communities. And what does mpa do. So mvp is twelve member counties that basically represent municipal electric Users that we basically get together both to generate our own electricity for all communities or to purchase it off the grid depending on the pricing of one. Electric has a give time. What are you trying to accomplish. So basically our goal is -ccomplish having a very reasonable electric creates our goal is to have power that's cheaper than xl energy As investor owned utility. How is it going deeper. Yep it's going very well. We're on a residential level. We ten in chaska to be about eight to nine percent lower than xl energy. These swishing blades above us help adults and their pocketbooks and offer a learning opportunity for students. Amy feet teaches. Fourth graders at saint. John's lutheran school in chaska. She leads her students on field trips to see renewables action. It's a great opportunity for students to think about how they use energy on a daily basis. We think about what are some ways that maybe we could cut some of our energy use and maybe not us quite as much energy. Our we may be wasting energy. We talk about how our use of energy affects the planet and all the people around us as well and then we also when we get to favorable energy park We they put us through. Maybe we'll ride a bike and we'll try to power entire home and how hard that is when we have lots of different things on in our home versus when we have maybe one thing on or two things on We'll go to a different station where we look at the solar panel. We'll go to a different station where we look at the wind turbine We'll talk about how we use non-renewable energy and also renewable energy the differences in those and how they actually affect us and how they actually affect the world around

Chaska Paul Hutton Minnesota Municipal Power Agen Matt Quota Amy Feet NPR John's Lutheran School Palm Springs Minnesota California
The Search for a Better EV Battery as Customer Demand Rises

Climate Cast

01:58 min | 7 months ago

The Search for a Better EV Battery as Customer Demand Rises

"More expensive models are going to have even longer ranges were go. What would be about the same as a small car. Get on a full tank of gas. That stand guerrino from inside climate news and he's been following new kind of space race in electric vehicle batteries. And i'm npr chief meteorologist. Paul hutton hutler today on climate cast. How quickly is ev battery tech evolving. Hi dan welcome back to climate cast and to be here. So you wrote about the quest for a solid state. Ev battery what are they. And how are they different from current ev. battery tech. so right now the battery. That is in just about ali's if not all either that i know of have a joe material a kind of a thick liquid material that is what the electrons pass through as they charge and discharge a solid state battery is designed in which those electrons are passing through a solid material. The reason that that's potentially a breakthrough is that it takes less space to have the same amount of energy passing through a solid than it does through a gel on so you can pack more batteries into the same space more power into the same space which leads to longer ranges. it also can lead to faster charging times as far as automakers. We know tesla has led the way in. Ev technology which other automakers are now going all in on ev technology. Just about every major automaker is at the very least talking a lot about their vm. Bishen volkswagen is the company that could probably make the strongest case right now that it is investing the most heavily and making kind of a a top to bottom transformation into an e company.

Guerrino Paul Hutton NPR DAN ALI Bishen Volkswagen Tesla
The Natural Gas Boom Appears To Be Going Bust

Climate Cast

01:30 min | 8 months ago

The Natural Gas Boom Appears To Be Going Bust

"Son natural gas as the bridge fuel to a net zero energy future but the rapidly emerging climate solutions mean. That bridge is getting shorter fast. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. Her and today on climate cast is the natural gas boom going bust. Justin mccullough is an independent journalists covering the finances of the energy transition. Hi justin welcome to climate cast. I paul thank you very much. So big companies like shell bet big on natural gas what are emerging solutions to the economics of natural gas. There are two main challenges to show all the people who had bet big on the future of natural gas and specifically liquefied natural gas. Renewable energy now can produce electricity for lower costs than natural gas. Fired power straight up competition. The other issue is there's oversupply right now. What level of investment are we talking about to get into these projects you know when shell bet big on the future of natural gas they in two thousand sixteen. They bought a company for over fifty billion dollars in two thousand and nine exxon company for over forty billion dollars. Exxon has since written off the majority of that forty billion dollars as a loss and it now appears that shell is facing similar problems with its fifty billion dollar investment in natural

Paul Hutton Justin Mccullough NPR Justin Paul Exxon
Why There Is A Change Coming To Your Local Weather Forecast

Environment: NPR

02:06 min | 8 months ago

Why There Is A Change Coming To Your Local Weather Forecast

"There is a change coming to your local weather forecast next month. The data that it's based on will be updated that will make the warmer climate literally. The new normal here's npr's jennifer. Ludden weather forecasters work off a thirty year average and it gets updated every decade right now. What's normal for temperature and precipitation is based on nineteen eighty one to two thousand ten. That's why we've all gotten used to this. Well temperatures for your friday. We'll be running about ten degrees than normal seven degrees above average yesterday. Look into tomorrow above. Normal temperatures will the past decade. Was one of the hottest on record mike. Pilecki of the national oceanic and atmospheric administration says that will show up in the new averages called climate normals. They'll drop the eighties and wrap in the twenty tens. It was a very substantial upward trend in temperatures especially along the west coast of south and along the east coast. He says there were exceptions. Oh you can go to fargo north dakota. That would be a place where it's actually cooled a little bit if that's your interest especially in the springtime but the fastest warming places. We'll see a real bump up in their averages. Amber sellin is chief. Meteorologist at abc fifteen phoenix. Where she says last summer was incredibly hot. We set a record of fifty three days at one hundred. Ten degrees or hotter. The previous record was thirty three days so it wasn't even close what's more she says. In the entire past decade phoenix did not said a single record for low temperature now oddly after the update in may some really hot days or nights could become officially cooler than the new normal plans to take more time to explain all this. We're going to have to remind people especially this year. Hey if we're at one fifteen. That is five degrees above the average but remember this average has changed. This average is not what it used to

Ludden Pilecki NPR Amber Sellin National Oceanic And Atmospher Jennifer East Coast Mike North Dakota Phoenix ABC
Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

Climate Cast

01:30 min | 8 months ago

Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

"Little to no ice floating along marquette bay noah reported january's total ice coverage in the great lakes to be the lowest in the last forty eight years lake superior. Ice cover briefly grew to fifty percent during our february arctic outbreak but that fleeting is vanished just as quickly with our mild march. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. And today on climate cast. What are longer term lake superior ice trends telling us about climate change in the upper midwest professor j austin researchers all things lake superior with the large lakes observatory at the university of minnesota duluth high. Welcome back to climate cast. Thanks for having me on paul. Let's start with this past winter. What was notable with ice cover on lake superior It was a really unusual year very low ice covered starch and we had that remarkable cold air in february and we ended up with fleetingly above average ice levels superior and just as remarkably. They went away really quickly. And how does this fit with the longer term ice trends that you're seeing on lake superior and the great lakes. I expect that we're going to see Significantly lower than average ice cover this year and basically since about nineteen ninety eight. We've had a long string of relatively low ice cover on lake superior with some exceptions like like the polar vortex in twenty fourteen where we had nearly complete coverage for two months.

Marquette Bay Paul Hutton J Austin Large Lakes Observatory University Of Minnesota Duluth Great Lakes Arctic NPR Midwest Paul
Deadly tornadoes batter southern states

WTMJ Nights

00:40 sec | 8 months ago

Deadly tornadoes batter southern states

"We're following a story in Alabama tonight, deadly tornadoes ripping through there. Trees have been toppled. Power lines are down homes have been leveled. We go to NBC's chief meteorologist in Jersey, who was in Birmingham. It's not over. Not even close from southern Indiana all the way into Mississippi. We still have tornado watches up particularly dangerous situation. Tornado watches it that we're gonna move this east as we go through tonight, So even through the midnight hour in north Georgia or eastern Tennessee and Kentucky, you need to be on the lookout, damaging wind and hail also a threat on top of the tornadoes. The only good news. It starts to weaken as it gets into south and North Carolina by tomorrow, and so far, the death toll sits at five in Alabama, as well as several others with

Alabama NBC Birmingham Jersey Mississippi Indiana North Georgia Tennessee Kentucky North Carolina
Iceland Volcano Erupts For First Time in 800 Years

AP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 9 months ago

Iceland Volcano Erupts For First Time in 800 Years

"Has fled to life, sparking the area's first volcanic eruption in nearly 800 years. Initial aerial footage showed a relatively small eruption so far, with two streams of lover running in opposite directions in 2010 and eruption of a different Icelandic volcano sent clouds of ash and dust into the atmosphere. Grounding over 100,000 flights between Europe and North America because of concerns the material could damage jet engines. However, Chief meteorologist held up, Johnson says this eruption is not a threat to air travel's is mine. There's no ash coming from it. So there's no it traffic considerations that we have to worry about. This southwestern corner of Iceland is the most heavily populated part of the country. Nevertheless, the Department of Emergency Management says it doesn't anticipate evacuations unless levels of volcanic gasses rise significantly. I'm Karyn Shamas. Is

North America Europe Johnson Department Of Emergency Manage Iceland Karyn Shamas
Long dormant volcano comes to life in southwestern Iceland

AP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 9 months ago

Long dormant volcano comes to life in southwestern Iceland

"Dormant volcano in southwestern Iceland has fled to life, sparking the area's first volcanic eruption in nearly 800 years. Initial aerial footage showed a relatively small eruption so far, with two streams of lover running in opposite directions in 2010 and eruption of a different Icelandic volcano sent clouds of ash and dust into the atmosphere. Grounding over 100,000 flights between Europe and North America because of concerns the material could damage jet engines. However, Chief meteorologist held up, Johnson says this eruption is not a threat to air travels. It's minor. There's no ash coming from it. So there is no air traffic considerations that we have to worry about. This southwestern corner of Iceland is the most heavily populated part of the country. Nevertheless, the Department of Emergency Management says it doesn't anticipate evacuations unless levels of volcanic gasses rise significantly.

Iceland North America Europe Johnson Department Of Emergency Manage
Volcano Erupts In Southwestern Iceland

AP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 9 months ago

Volcano Erupts In Southwestern Iceland

"A long dormant volcano in southwestern Iceland has fled to life, sparking the area's first volcanic corruption in nearly 800 years. Initial aerial footage showed a relatively small eruption so far, with two streams of lover running in opposite directions in 2010 and eruption of a different Icelandic volcano sent clouds of ash and dust into the atmosphere. Grounding over 100,000 flights between Europe and North America because of concerns the material could damage jet engines. However, Chief meteorologist how dope Johnson says this eruption is not a threat to air travels. It's minor. There's no ash coming from it. So there's no it traffic considerations that we have to worry about. This southwestern corner of Iceland is the most heavily populated part of the country. Nevertheless, the Department of Emergency Management says it doesn't anticipate evacuations on less levels of volcanic gasses rise significantly.

Iceland Dope Johnson North America Europe Department Of Emergency Manage
Eruption of Iceland volcano easing, not affecting flights

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 9 months ago

Eruption of Iceland volcano easing, not affecting flights

"A long dormant volcano in southwestern Iceland has flat tonight sparking the area's first full kind of corruption in needy eight hundred years initial aerial footage showed a relatively small option so far with two streams of lava running in opposite directions in twenty ten and Robson of the different eyes landed volcanoes sent clouds of ash and dust into the atmosphere grounding over one hundred thousand flights between Europe and North America because the consensus Mysterio could damage just tensions however chief meteorologist how dope you Anson says disruption is not a threat to add troubles is minor a there's no ashes come from so there is no if traffic considerations as we have to worry about this south western corner of Iceland is the most heavily populated parts of the country never the less the department of emergency management says it doesn't anticipate evacuations unless levels of volcanic gases rise significantly I'm Karen Thomas

Iceland Robson Mysterio Anson North America Europe Department Of Emergency Manage Karen Thomas
MN leads Midwest, but falls short on electric vehicles

Climate Cast

04:09 min | 10 months ago

MN leads Midwest, but falls short on electric vehicles

"The purchasing power of the federal government to buy clean zero emission vehicles that are made in source right here in america. That's president joe biden. He wants to electrify the federal fleet to help reduce transportation greenhouse gas emissions but our consumers and states ready to follow. I'm npr chief meteorologist. Paul hutton are here with climate. Cast the american council for an energy efficient economy tracks eib progress their state policy director. Brian howard is here. Hi brian hey all great to be with you today. So this is some pretty big news on the ev front. I president biden's plan and then gm announces its goal to sell only electric vehicles by twenty thirty five. Are we approaching a tipping point here for these. I think so. We've continued to see a steady growth in the av market Even this year despite all the challenge of the covid so you with those activities that are coming from federal government and from a major auto manufacturers. I think we are reaching invasion point about what transportation electric vacations gonna look like in the united states and correct me if i'm wrong but these are only about two percent of the market right now. Why is this such a huge scale of opportunity for vs to reduce these transportation emissions to start with the transportation sector is responsible for about eight percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the united states which is the largest emitter based on kind of the sectors. That are out there So when we're to convert interro combustion engines and move that over to electric vehicles. There's a significant emissions reduction benefit which obviously helps with climate. But then also there's a number of other residual really important benefits as it relates to public health that you get from electrifying transportation. Well in one of those. I assume is jobs right because it's not just the vehicles you need the right infrastructure charging infrastructure. You need the right policies to move these things along which states are leading on this front of the hundred points that we looked at california scored. Ninety one next in line was new york at sixty three point. Sixty three point five which is obviously a pretty deep differentiation between the numbers. And how does minnesota rank minnesota is twelfth based on our evaluation which is a leader in the midwest but certainly is behind the national leaders in the top ten. What is minnesota doing. Well and where is there a need for faster. Progress with vs. So minnesota's done a number of things well Minnesota has done a really good job of articulating. How utilities could invested infrastructure. The state has also taken some initial steps to ratify california's zero emission vehicles regulations which would set that manufacturers need to sell a certain number of electric vehicles from passenger like vehicles in the state of which is being considered. Now you know there are some things that clearly need improvement They have identified that the absence of statewide incentives for electric vehicles is a challenge in something that they need to address. One thing. We should touch on right when we're charging an electric vehicle. It matters where that power came from right absolutely. And so what. Are you seeing with trends of different states. That have More renewable energy than other places when it comes to being able to charge navy with that we are seeing a an overall positive trend in terms of having states move towards outer percent clean energy for their for their grids. There's also a lot of states that are taking that activity very seriously and providing interim goals about how they're going to get to that low carbon future minnesota as an example is considering how to deal with that now in the legislature But other states have already shown us the way. Brian howard state policy director with the american council for an energy efficient economy. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective. Climate cast today. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for the time.

Brian Howard Paul Hutton America Minnesota Joe Biden American Council NPR Biden Federal Government GM Brian California Midwest New York Navy American Council For An Energy Legislature
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:39 min | 10 months ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"And done. How many jerseys First news 5 14 as we bring in our chief meteorologist, Dan zero. So, Dan, not much happening now. What happens is we go through the day today, Things were going to fire up later on. It's not surprising that we haven't seen very much from this winter storm yet because dry air just has this grip on New Jersey so There just hasn't been much falling from the sky. I think that changes around late this morning. Let's say around 10 o'clock is our turning point. As precipitation moves in, and this time it's gonna be pretty widespread here. To the north of about Mercer and Monmouth counties. We're going to start with at least some wintry mix, if not straight, snow, the farther north you go the colder it's gonna be obviously so road conditions may go downhill is we get into the early afternoon hours a little bit ice there. On down a little bit of snow accumulation south of that point, it's going to be mainly rain, but you might find some snowflakes and sleep pellets in involved there again. It's not a major winter storm, but just have to watch out for those changing weather conditions and changing road conditions as the day goes on. High temperatures today. 30 to 40. Things will start tapering off early this evening. But in North Jersey snow showers will probably continue through tomorrow morning. We might see some fog overnight lows fall into the lower to mid thirties. And then tomorrow partly sunny and relatively pleasant highs mid forties chance of a shower Thursday morning, then turning very cold and windy for the end of the week. New Jersey First news time is now 5 15. Around this date around the clock. This'll is New Jersey's first news. Good.

New Jersey Dan zero North Jersey chief meteorologist Mercer Monmouth
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:49 min | 11 months ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Chief meteorologist Jay Cardosi It's ground zero on NewsRadio. Wait, 40 w H. A S. Spinning complacently in the darkness covered and blinded by a blanket of little lives. False security has loved the madness of this world into a slumber. Wake up and isa pawn. You staring straight down and kingly through seeing all that you are And everything that you can never be. Yes, on eye is upon you and I ready to blink so face forward with arms, wide open and mind really? Your future has arrived. Are you ready to go allowed to be spoke up instead? Wait. See me? Alas, speakers spoke up and said Weighs a loudspeaker spoke up to speed up, Give up, Give up. Give up. Which way which way? Yeah, Yeah, I'm like glue is and this is ground.

Chief meteorologist Jay Cardosi
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:34 min | 11 months ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

"Warning. Chief meteorologist Marshall My Peak on your severe weather station news radio 6 10 w tvn. He's here. No broadcasting from the underground command post deep in the bowels of a hidden bunker somewhere under the brick in steel of a nondescript building. We have once again made contact with our leader, find love, then.

Chief meteorologist Marshall
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:18 min | 11 months ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

"Getting hungry. I may have to do something like that tonight. Tragedy. Hill's been there. What? I'm sure he has traffic and weather together from temp start heating cooling process, the aforementioned Johnny Hill. Been where again? I'm sorry, Jeff. I bet you've been to Thurman Burger Thurman Cafe down in the village. Well, it's been a while. It's been a long time has never been there. And that's too bad. Max enormous in German village Close. That's even a bigger shame. Yeah, I think there's one over in Hilliard. Otherwise, I'm not sure how many others are still left. Might be one of cemetery road, but I don't know how many left. Traffic's not too bad through downtown. We have an accident scene still too clear on the 2 70 south before West Broad, it's off to the rights. Another one coming in on post road just off of 33 1 61 in Dublin and Wagon Road near Havens Corners Traffic sponsored by the exigent Temporal Scanner Fever is the leading sign of covert 19 use an accurate thermometer for twice daily checks. Protect your loved one for the exits in temporal scanner. It takes an accurate reading in seconds and is the only home thermometer recommended by hospitals, positions and clinics. Stay safe with exigent traffic and weather together, powered by temp star and Classic air on Johnny Hill. NewsRadio 16 w TV in your ABC six first Warning, whether from Chief meteorologist Marshall McPeak Excuse me tonight It's gonna be cold. Partly cloudy. 29 Tomorrow we get rain changes. We have rain. The afternoon evening. It's coming mild, at least windy 48. Then on Thursday that rain changed over the wintry mix and snow. Not a lot of accumulate. I don't think we're gonna get really thing the stick. Just you know that wintry mix stuff highs will be in the thirties, whether powered by the basement Doctor 31 Right now. Just severe weather station NewsRadio. 6 10. W TDM Hour I Heart Radio Music Festival brought the biggest artists and music back together for two nights of live performances. You'll never forget. They plugged in and played loud superstar collaboration. Powerful performances, iconic covered state of the art Virtual technology. Well, I heard radio listeners experienced it all live as it happened from First ever video fan wall. See for yourself. What? I must be I Heart Radio Music Festival Thursday at eight on the CW, Columbus Is the season to be married and be bright as a proud partner in a longtime customer of Matthew's for Newark and on behalf of the dealership. We want to wish you a wonderful holiday season and a happy new year. And remember when it comes to Ford. You're one place to go is Matthew's to work dot com. Listen to Kelvin. What he's about to say could change your life six to and I was about to 90 lost weight fast, actually down down about 2 35 and probably had about nine. Maybe 10% body fat. That's great. I lost probably At least £60 in probably green, half former color. My hair's coming back. It looks better, obviously gave him muscle by muscle. Last came back. Thank you for providing an awesome product. Somebody who actually has and does what they say they will. That's awesome. That's great. Calvin. Losing that belly fat in less than four months is outstanding. Since 2004 andro 400 has been changing men's lives like Kelvin and can help you lose belly fat, gain energy and improve your lifestyle week. Guarantee it go to andro 400 dot com For more.

Johnny Hill Kelvin Thurman Burger Thurman Cafe Matthew West Broad Hilliard NewsRadio Jeff Dublin Calvin Chief meteorologist Ford Columbus Marshall McPeak ABC Newark partner
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Also a fallen tree Mnla Been south by Taylor's Mills Road traffic every 15 minutes. Next report at 9 48 on New Jersey one on 1.5. New Jersey one a 1.5 instant weather over six inches of snow on the ground in spots, and it's still snowing and sleeting and raining depending on where you are this nor'easter spitting out a little bit of everything here. Let's not forget the wind to top Gus so far have been over 50 miles an hour, and that wind is doing a few things. First. It severely Reduces the visibility alongside the wintry precipitation. Second, it raises the risk of power outages overnight. Third, it'll spawn around of moderate coastal flooding at high tide tomorrow. Forced it's making it really cold. The wind chill in northern New Jersey has been hovering in the single digits. Definitely wintry out there. Most of the state will probably flip back toe light snow early tomorrow morning with an influx of colder air on the back side of this winter storm. Them will dry out and clear out around mid morning tomorrow And then the shoveling really begins from the weather Center on Chief meteorologist and Zero way are looking right now. 27 degrees in Trenton 24. Degrees East Orange 34. Degrees taking falls fast traffic instant whether every 15 minutes on New Jersey one a 1.5, New Jersey weather made possible by four jewelers. 1971 very Berman afforded. Ulises often custom is one of the largest quality Julie watching gift collections in the area all under one roof, but they haven't seen the story. You should More information, visit Ford's jewelers dot com. Happy holidays every holiday season. New Jersey water 145 collects teddy bears where the New Jersey.

New Jersey Chief meteorologist Taylor Ford Trenton Gus Berman Julie
A record year for wind turbine shipments through Duluth

Climate Cast

03:53 min | 1 year ago

A record year for wind turbine shipments through Duluth

"Record year for wind. Turbine shipments in duluth. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul kutner with climate cavs. Here's a story about climate change solutions and economic prosperity. Twenty twenty was a record year. for winter. shipments through duluth harbor ships carried more than half a million tons of wind blades and towers into the harbor this year that means jobs for port workers in duluth for truckers who drive the giant blades across minnesota and for wind energy technicians building the giant swirling turbans on the prairie pater mavis is the western regional policy manager for the clean grid alliance. Hi peter welcome to climate cast. Paul what are the big wind. Power projects underway now. And what's coming in the next few years so The last couple of years have been very good for development. Economics is the driver here and utilities. Want the stuff commercial industrial customers. Want this stuff. And saint received very robust construction in north dakota south dakota minnesota in iowa currently there's about thirty seven hundred megawatts of projects under construction in these four states. And that's you know you're you're looking at over a thousand turbans just to fulfill that full of projects talked to us about jobs. What are the trend. Lines for employment in clean energy in the upper midwest. Well as we see more projects come online. There's a lot more for operation and maintenance. Jobs is actually somewhat of a deficit. And it's very difficult to find people affiliates positions and so a lot of universities other tech schools in the companies are doing things they can to try and get more people into this field and these are good well paying middle class jobs and i think the most important piece in that all set for rural jobs. And it's oftentimes. It's very difficult to find jobs in the rural parts of our state since so. This is an excellent addition to the row community. I know there are now some days where minnesota has enough generating capacity from win to produce a hundred percent of electricity from wind and solar. What are the trends like there. Well if you look at the region as a whole Minnesota and the upper midwest as part of the independent system operator which fifteen state organization that manages the ball transmission system and it creates efficiencies. So that you can move power across the entire central part of Country and you know because of the wind resources. So good in. North dakota south dakota iowa we could use just a ton of wind and move that you know states and to other states in the region that don't have as much visibility of when peter. What's the state of battery storage technology for wind and solar. How quickly as that technology advancing on its advancing quite rapidly. Great river energy just announced as part of their portfolio changed very large battery storage system in minnesota. There's gonna be some time before we can really scale up battery storage. In addition to the price point that can make it attractive for utilities. How fast has clean energy progressed in minnesota in the upper midwest. And what's the future. Look like well. If you think about a decade ago wind energy was just really kind of getting off the ground and states. Were starting to take initiatives to move that direction if you look now. I mean state of iowa. Forty percent of all their generation comes from win minnesota's at about nineteen percent self dakota's at twenty four four percent. North dakota generates about twenty seven percent. So we've seen very robust growth. We expect that to continue.

Paul Kutner Duluth Harbor Duluth Minnesota Clean Grid Alliance Midwest South Dakota NPR Iowa Peter North Dakota Paul Jobs Great River
There Were 30 Hurricanes And Tropical Storms That Hit The Atlantic In 2020

Climate Cast

03:42 min | 1 year ago

There Were 30 Hurricanes And Tropical Storms That Hit The Atlantic In 2020

"Twenty hurricane season goes off the charts. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul here. with climate. the two thousand twenty atlantic hurricane season broke several records. And it's not just the record. Thirty named storms or twelve. Us landfalls the way storms behaved. That's got climate change experts talking a record. Ten storms rapidly intensified this season hurricane ada flared from tropical depression two major category four hurricane in just thirty six hours hurricane expert jeff. Master's tracks hurricane transfer yale climate connections. Hi jeff welcome to climate cast. Hi paul what stands out to you. The most from this record atlantic hurricane season you know it was the late season activity. We had two major hurricanes november. Ada and i oughta both reached category four hurricane status. In fact i was a five. The latest category five we've ever seen in the atlantic the fact that we're able to have in november a time when the hurricane seasons normally over catastrophic hurricanes that really speaks to the unusual level of activity that the twenty twenty atlantic hurricane season had put the overall season into context for us. How does this layout compared to previous atlantic hurricane seasons. This was more than double regular season so it was like. We're seeing twenty twenty and twenty twenty one altogether in one year jeff as we watch these hurricanes rapidly intensify so quickly. Now i'm wondering what are the measurable links to climate change there. In his ernie way to quantify the climate change component to this rapid intensification. There was a paper published last year that looked at rapid intensification during the period One thousand nine hundred eighty two two thousand nine and they used a climate model to study that and they found that using the climate model could not account for the rapid intensification without using human caused climate change and that makes a lot of sense because he does energy and when you've got a lot more heat energy available to a hurricane you're gonna see more rapid intensification. You mentioned the november storms. We saw those back to back. Category four and five hurricanes hit. How can that level of human and economic destruction be a driver of climate migration the main gdp driver for the hunters economy which is the patriots hula valley with about two million people that generates sixty percent of their gdp and they basically had their economic activity destroyed their so without any economy. And with a lot of your crops by the hurricane people don't have anywhere to go. Nothing they can do to generate an income and defeat themselves so we saw the back in nineteen ninety eight. When mitch hit we had hundreds of thousands of hondurans leave and seek future elsewhere. We seem like we're in this era of climate change enhanced super hurricanes and seasons. How do these impact those of us. Who don't live on the coast. I made way all pay higher insurance rates to fund the people who do live on the coast who are subject to these flooding events. In fact the national flood insurance program is more than twenty billion dollars in debt. Thanks to all the storms. We've seen in recent years and you know here in michigan where i live.

Hurricane Hurricane Ada Jeff Paul Hurricane Season Depression Atlantic United States Mitch Michigan
The art of science communication

Climate Cast

03:48 min | 1 year ago

The art of science communication

"Communication and art within science i'm npr. Chief meteorologist paul here with climate cats. It's a challenge to explain a complex science in a way. That's relevant to people's lives. That's why one of the world's biggest science organizations. The american geophysical union gives the climate communications prize as a top award every year. This year's winner is jennifer francis with the would well climate research center in massachusetts. She was nominated by minnesota climate scientists. John abraham with the university of saint thomas jennifer welcome to climate cast. Hi there thanks for having me jennifer. What does this award mean to you in the context of the importance of climate communication. Well it's of course. A huge huge honored to be recognized by my peers. My colleagues and i'm especially proud of the american physical union for creating this prize in the first place. Because i think the public really really wants to hear about the science now especially in these days of covert and climate change and all kinds of changes that are happening in the society to hear directly from the scientists themselves so i think it is even more important for us scientists to be able to explain the work that we're doing and that the public is paying for when you think about your fellow communicators. What skills do excellent climate communicators share. I think the best science communicators are able to take a very complicated but interesting topic and boil it down not dumb it down but boil it down so that they're talking to an audience and that audience is gonna come away with the most important information that whatever that science is saying And i think good communicators also are exciting. The people are want to hear them. And some of the best ones i think are able to impart that excitement to the audience about our audience. What communication tips do you have that. Maybe could help our listeners as they talk about climate change right so the listeners. I think are are really interested. Now we're finally getting traction with the public and with decision makers particularly when it comes to climate change and so my hope is that those listeners will will pay attention and maybe do some reading on their own and maybe cross reference and also. I think it's really important for the listeners. When they hear something that doesn't seem to make much sense to dig down a little bit and see where that information is coming from. Jennifer one of your areas of expertise is the arctic. And we've seen some dramatic sea ice and temperature shifts in the arctic this year. What specific trends are you watching in the arctic. And why are they important to all of us well. The arctic is changing just so fast and this year was an exclamation point on the trends that we've been watching as you say. The sea ice reached almost a new record this year. We're watching the arctic unfold in ways. We didn't expect to happen so quickly. There are many reasons why it matters to everyone for one thing. The rapid warming in the arctic is accelerating the melt of the greenland ice sheet which is raising sea levels. It's accelerating the faa of permafrost which is releasing more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and it's also disrupting weather patterns all down around the northern hemisphere so it affects all of us in many different ways woodward climate research center senior scientists jennifer francis. Thanks so much for your perspective on climate. Cast today my pleasure anytime.

Jennifer Francis Would Well Climate Research Ce University Of Saint Thomas Jennifer American Geophysical Union Arctic John Abraham Massachusetts Minnesota Jennifer Greenland FAA Woodward Climate Research Cent
Climate change puts hundreds of Superfund sites at risk

Climate Cast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Climate change puts hundreds of Superfund sites at risk

"Hundreds of toxic superfund sites are vulnerable to extreme weather. I'M NPR chief meteorologist Paul Kutner here with climate cast. Hurricane, Harvey Dump Forty five to sixty inches of rain on the Houston area in two thousand seventeen the extreme floodwaters inundated more than one hundred and fifty thousand homes. They also breached toxic superfund site washing deadly chemicals down. In concentrations more than two thousand times. The EPA required cleanup level according to inside climate news. Just. How many of these superfund sites are risk and exposed to these extreme weather events? Frank Coal Ash is the climate director at the Minnesota Pollution? Control Agency. Frank Welcome to climate cast. Hi, Paul Thank you for having me on today the Government Accountability Office reported last year that nine hundred, forty, five superfund sites across the US are vulnerable to hurricanes flooding, sea level rise increased precipitation or wildfires. I see fourteen of those are in Minnesota. What is it about the location of these toxic sites that makes them does too extreme weather events. What we know with a changing climate in Minnesota is that we are seeing heavier rainfall which presents a risk for flooding at some of these sites and the impacts to both surface waters near the sites and potentially groundwater near these sites which we are. Managing and controlling for the toxic chemicals that have been found there. So it's really within Minnesota and the way that our climate is changing is looking at how that precipitation regime is changing, and we've seen that in the mid West here in Nebraska in twenty eighteen, there was a superfund site there that was impacted by the massive flooding. It didn't leach any toxins, but I'm wondering has Minnesota seen any close calls like that? I'm not aware of any close calls that we've seen regarding specific flooding events in Minnesota but certainly, that risk exists anytime that we are seeing a changing climate like we have in that, we're trying to manage sites that have these toxic chemicals on them from past pollution events that we're trying to maintain keep people protected from especially our most vulnerable populations, and we know that one of the biggest climate changes were observing recording in Minnesota are these mega rainfall events these six to eight plus in Sch- rainfall events how is that being incorporated into your? Planning for these sites yes, and that is the kind of work that we're just really getting started with looking at our ability to understand what's going to happen with a rainfall like that and and is the water going to go and where are we at risk for a significant floods? How will that rainfall interact with any of the protective coverings or protections that have been built around the superfund sites and how that may impact the contaminants as they they are moving on the site, and hopefully we're able to keep them from moving away from her saying. Frank superfund sites were talking about clean up. After the fact, I'm curious how climate change can be taken into account before potentially hazardous developments break ground. Yes, and that is an area that we're particularly looking at right now we are providing funding to cities to be able to do climate resiliency and adaptation plans to be able to identify how the rainfall and precipitation flooding events are going to impact not just contamination contaminated sites but the infrastructure that we rely upon many people are concerned about potential pollution from mining projects in northern. MINNESOTA, in sensitive areas like the boundary waters, how can we be sure future extreme rainfall events won't breach containment of those proposed sites. We we continue to look at the best science and the best research about how we can we predict what these large rainfall events are going to look like, and then build that into the planning processes our permitting processes, frank coal, ash climate director for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. Thanks so much. Thank you.

Minnesota Frank Superfund Minnesota Pollution Control Ag Sch- Rainfall Paul Kutner Frank Coal Ash Hurricane Director NPR Frank Chief Meteorologist EPA Houston Harvey Dump Control Agency United States
Climate change is affecting flower pigments

Climate Cast

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Climate change is affecting flower pigments

"Our flowers reacting to climate change. I'm NPR chief meteorologist. Paul. Hutler here with climate cast. A new study in the journal current biology finds flower pigments are reacting to temperature and ozone changes. What does that mean for our flower colors, Clemson? University. Biology Professor Matthew. Kaczynski is an author of this study. Hi Matthew. Welcome to climate cast hype. All I want to get into the details but I what's your sort of elevator speech headline on climate change and flower colors. Yes. So flowers while one of their functions is to dry in pollinators. Another is actually protect the pollen in the abuse that hold the reproductive structures of the plant. And Pigments can protect Holland inaugurals from abiotic damage like from temperature or UV radiation. So climate change has the strong potential in we showed that it did contribute to changes in flower pigmentation. So for a non biologists like me, how would you explain the physical process increased pigmentation can lead to more absorption of solar radiation in any structure in so win a flower absorbs more light. It has the potential to increase in temperature. and. We found that flowers that have their pollen tucked within the pedals day actually declined in pigmentation when they experienced larger increases in temperature, and that could be a thermal regulatory response where flowers are actually decreasing pigmentation to reduce the chances that they're going to increase in temperature baked their pollen in species that have their pollen exposed to ambient light like a buttercup those when the pedals are open, you can see all of the panthers in those are the structures in the flower that hold the pollen So increasing UV pigmentation in the flowers might protect that pollen from ambient UV, light and so. Some species increased some species decline in pigmentation in some showed no change at all. How were you able to observe that in is a something we could see as visible to our is humans are Tri chromatic that means we see blue green and red, and that's our three photo receptors. Many insect pollinators are also try chromatic, but they see you the blue and green, and so what we measured is these UV absorbing pigments using ultraviolet photography if pollinators see these plans differently, how are these pigment changes impacting them? I've done some studies basically smearing sunscreens over the flowers so they become completely uv absorbing. That often reduces pollinator visitation. In, that might be because the UV reflection on pedals might help the flowers to kind of pop against a green vegetative background. So if it's declining, that could have potentially negative impacts for plant reproduction. So a lot of people like to plant flowers that attract pollinators, what does this mean for the average gardner who might be thinking about flowers for next year as a rule of thumb? It appears that more yellow flowered, plant, sleigh, comment asters, daisies those often are pretty UV reflective. In in terms of some of the common crop species that have UV, reflection on them, canola or ravenous, which is a mustard that is one that has these UV reflective traits on the flowers and then come in sunflower dozen while. Clemson University Biology Professor Matthew Kaczynski. It's a great conversation. Thanks so much for sharing on climate cast today. Thanks for having me.

Matthew Kaczynski Panthers Professor Chief Meteorologist Clemson University Clemson NPR Paul Holland Gardner
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"I'm certified chief meteorologist Todd Terry little bit of rain between Longwood in lake merry and Sanford most of that is on a high for the rest of the rain south of the for a weight just outside of downtown Orlando then extending all the way along the four seventeen through lake Nona through the airport into Kissimmee harmony hunter's creek area all seeing a rain but again it is slowly but surely moving east and we have a regular traffic problems five four eastbound near four thirty four Jackie what's going on yeah lots of a lots of emergency vehicles here I. four eastbound looks like it's before four thirty four two right lanes are closed at least one now you have a large area there but traffic is slowing up to Maitland so now is the time you might want to consider hopping off you could take Maitland seventy ninety two were over to four thirty four to get around that to get you off to the exit and pass the crash if you're sticking with it just make sure you stay to the left on the westbound side you've got some onlooker delays between four thirty forty four thirty six still that slowdown will drive past the four twenty nine and signal out on silver star John Young right down the road make sure you treat that as a four way stop this report is sponsored by tax chat by E. why get your taxes prepared and filed fast tax check by E. why does your taxes involves them for one price no paper documents and no hidden fees get a free no obligation quote right now go to tax dot chat download the free tax check out or call one eight three three tax chat with traffic alerts every six minutes in the morning we're helping you get to work on time I'm Jacki o'brien news ninety six point five W. DBS where ever you go direct auto insurance will be there for you whether it's early morning on your.

lake merry Sanford Orlando lake Nona Jackie Maitland John Young chief meteorologist Todd Terry Kissimmee Jacki o'brien
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

"Lisa thanks man for for sharing that with us I appreciate it we're gonna we're gonna run thank you very much for letting us in on that it's it's an interesting situation your ABC said first warning weather chief meteorologist Marshall McLean joining us now and Marshall are you glad that you get to just talk about the weather nothing controversial you know I'll tell you though controversial lately because a lot of us planted too early and people you are right we're in that boat so me me and the wife we're going to have to cover some stuff up you're right and tonight is your night to make sure that you get some stuff covered what we're looking at is lows in Columbus getting down to thirty six and basically anything from thirty six down is a good chance for frost thirty two and down of course is a good chance for a freeze so we're looking at thirty six in town and then outside of the outer belt you're likely to get into the low thirties you might even get into a fight but the eastern and let's see the how do I describe this north of Columbus east of Columbus and southeast of Columbus there is a frost advisory in effect already even though it doesn't cover Columbus itself you're still probably going to keep those plants are under under cover thirty six overnight tonight partly cloudy tomorrow a breezy day to high up to sixty three Friday Friday some rain and wintry mix with highs in the along with that your life is only sold Marshall you very much well actually why am I saying thank you I guess.

Lisa ABC Marshall McLean Columbus chief meteorologist
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"To a fine overnight construction will be taking place along I. seventy five southbound before and after Sun City Boulevard two right lanes we close in that section of the road also for highway tolls issued a travel advisory about high winds across the sunshine skyway bridge tonight Carl Z. newsradio WFLA but more unsettled this week warm conditions will continue and mostly humid eighty three degrees this evening a southwesterly breeze in place a slight possibility still of seeing a shower seventy seven degrees are forecast low for Tuesday morning very warm for this time of year eighty eight degrees for a high warm and humid partly cloudy skies twenty percent rain chance for Wednesday a cold front hanging just around the area eighty five for a high rain chance thirty percent on Thursday with a lot of clouds slightly cooler eighty two for a high voter south winds ten not sees two to three ally choppy waters I'm originally chief meteorologist Steve German news radio WFLA streaming on your Amazon echo and over two thousand devices via the I heart radio at you're hearing coast to coast AM with George Noory live from somewhere deep below the earth on works welcome back to coast to coast as we of course are doing in our special art bell tribute program art passed away at the age of seventy two two years ago of a prescription overdose it was an amazing story we couldn't believe it when we were getting news of it that night in though we couldn't verify it we haven't been able to talk to the sheriff's department.

sunshine skyway bridge Carl Z. newsradio WFLA chief meteorologist George Noory Steve German Amazon
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Chief meteorologist or warming up yeah kick off the first in other words these guys on Saturday every night over the Knox later on sunrise on a Sunday but we'll do that with a mix in a few showers twenty sixteen to twenty four cancer celebrate the event only hereinafter your choice ninety nine one thousand dollars on the card Mexico five Tempur Pedic but the robot was malfunctioning that day in a word the slow down it was creating on the line Robert Williams went to grab the parts himself while Williams was reaching into a bin the one ton robotic arm swung into that same day the robot didn't have any alarms to warn Williams it was nearby I didn't have any sensors to tell a human was in its path it only have the intelligence to execute its commands to retrieve in place auto parts the robots struck Williams head with such force that it killed him instantly it was thirty minutes before anyone came to look for Robert Williams during that time the robot continue to slowly do its work well Williams lay dead on the park's room for the death of Robert Williams happened during a weird time for a the public at large still felt unsure about the machines that they were increasingly living and working among Hollywood could still rely on the truth of our machines running amok and ruining the future for humanity.

Chief meteorologist Knox Tempur Pedic Robert Williams Hollywood Mexico
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Okay why chief meteorologist Jay card OC over having a great day Hey more beautiful January weather out there on this Tuesday afternoon those temperatures will climb into the upper fifties a good dose sunshine for tonight we'll see partly cloudy skies this evening and then the clouds thickening up after midnight a mild night though with lows in the mid to upper forties tomorrow we bounce into the middle sixties with mostly cloudy skies the chance for a little bit of patchy drizzle that's your forecast some W. okay why chief meteorologist Jay cargo see it's fifty eight newsradio eight forty WHAS our top story Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is slamming house speaker Nancy Pelosi for withholding articles of impeachment for a month four weeks demonstrating through our actions that impeachment is actually not that Arjun and they do not actually have much confidence in their cage opening the Senate McConnell called the case against president trump half baked o'connell's counterpart minority leader Chuck Schumer call for witnesses and documents that have been withheld by the White House to decide whether the president merits acquittal removal from office the Senate must conduct a fair trial the house is expected to vote tomorrow to formally send two articles of impeachment to the Senate voters are going to the polls today in a special election to fill a Kentucky Senate seat Paul miles has details this special election is to fill the vacated district thirty eight Senate seat it's been open since long time senator Dan sign retired last fall sign is a Republican who supported Democrat in the but sheer in the governor's race district thirty eight includes ball at county and a portion of southern Jefferson County the two candidates are Republican and former state representative Mike demi's and Democrat Andrew Bailey a public school teacher Paul miles news radio eight forty WHAS the city of locals partnering with.

Jefferson County school teacher state representative Kentucky Chuck Schumer president Jay card chief meteorologist Andrew Bailey Mike demi OC senator Dan sign Paul miles Senate White House o'connell Arjun Nancy Pelosi Majority Leader Mitch McConnel
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Issues at this time the veterans expressways clear all the way up through citrus county if you are getting Boulevard right now just river there are some different traffic patterns as construction continues ROZ newsradio WFLA still on the breezy side this evening with mostly cloudy skies temperatures milder sixty seven degrees down to sixty three for a low ten degrees above the normal low with a slight chance of rain in the forecast for Saturday with a mix of clouds and some sunshine seventy seven for a warm high the rain focus with this area of low pressure shifted mostly the Sunday seventy percent chance a shower maybe a storm seventy for a high and a lingering shower thirty percent Monday with a high of sixty nine east winds fifteen **** two to three a moderate choppy waters I'm just totally chief meteorologist Steve jury news radio WFLA streaming on your Amazon echo and over two thousand devices by in the I heart radio at we to talk to me cigar call the wildcard line at eight one eight five zero one four one zero nine the first time caller line is eight one eight five zero one four seven two one to talk to Lisa from east of the Rockies call eight hundred eight two five five zero three three from west of the Rockies toll free call eight hundred six one eight eight two five five this is coast to coast AM with.

ROZ newsradio Lisa Rockies chief meteorologist Steve jury Amazon
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Okay why chief meteorologist Jay Kerr no see quite weather has returned to the region as we roll through tonight will have clear skies the first part of the night then some clouds will increase after midnight temperatures back in the middle and upper twenties the outlook now for your Wednesday a lot of clouds around in the morning they will slowly decrease through the afternoon but it's going to be a cold day just low and middle thirties across the region very cold on your Wednesday night the good news sunshine and forties return on Thursday that's your forecast on W. okay why chief meteorologist Jay card OC this report is sponsored by Louisville winter Beerfest evil winter beer fest presented by west six brewing more than three hundred twenty five craft beers and had me cocktails live music food trucks and more stay warm inside the king white international convention center February fourteenth and fifty tickets only forty dollars to Christmas day visit Louisville beer fest dot com this holiday season make sure the batteries are include tickets with his kooky can depend on us to include whether with traffic on the morning news radio eight forty WHAS for what it is this is the Christmas it's a standard is not a state ever break Crosby everybody's got their but the old one a lot of it rob the one with the singing this song Brian what wondering what he's I've got a good version of the home yeah I know what yeah I know it's the rob Halford go not Christmas is very good known as good stuff right there brand stuff brand new stuff up rob Halford's.

Jay Kerr OC Brian rob Halford chief meteorologist Jay card Louisville Crosby
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Okay why chief meteorologist Jay Kerr no see beautiful weather continues out there tonight it's going to be chilly clear skies thirty for our low that'll lead us into a great day for your Thursday lots of sunshine lighter wind with temperatures in the low to middle fifties clouds will thicken up Thursday late night and then by Friday morning a chance for a little bit of light rain around the area that's your forecast on W. okay why chief meteorologist Jay cardo sea coast to coast AM is on news radio eight forty WHAS and in one man this is and when the so many to be you from somewhere out there this is coast to coast AM with George Noory deities witchcraft the beloved dead in a moment first time guess Phoenix love Fay joins us or work what is remembered lives stand by on coast to coast AM lots of strange things in the world one of the strangest and something that you.

Jay Kerr Fay chief meteorologist Jay cardo George Noory
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

"We have a real chief meteorologist with us right now my body to show but starting most of you know who he is he wrote a great book the climate chronicles now Joe I know you're really really busy what do you make of what's going on at this hour the eight PM eastern time our with this hurricane well I'll tell you what it's degrading rapidly started turn to the west and you know if you've been following our ideas it was good I'm not deep in real fast in the northwest that but as it turns to the west that if the Korea situation for the storm to intensify and that's what we're seeing now it's going to continue to get stronger here over the next twenty four to thirty six hours and go to the category for our passes takes it into the nor the Bahamas and then when it gets off the Florida coast the steering currents break down and look we have an opportunity on the southeast coast of the Florida coast to miss the brunt of this folks folks up understand I tell people all the time is like a Cork in the screen and it's as big as it looks is powerful sort it's pushed around by everything around so what happens is this quarter's bobbing along and the situation to the north to the east to the west and to the south of it determine where it's going to go and we know it's going to get all the way to grand Bahama we know it's going to get the word fifty sixty miles the Florida coast as of this morning and I don't change forecasts around other national hurricane center and my company we had the same land fall area but there is a chance that it does what Matthew did now you folks in Florida and the southeast coast remember back a few tries to come up and it stays off shore mark unless this goes in south of the bend of Florida west Palm Beach in that area it's not going to go into Florida because what happens is when this with powerful storms are trying to move up to the Florida coast because of the effects of wind they tend to stay off shore.

chief meteorologist Joe Bahamas Cork Matthew Florida Palm Beach Korea grand Bahama thirty six hours
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Nine I'm chief meteorologist, Tom Terry. Thank you, Tom. Now does player it's really lovely sixty one at our Landau severe weather station. Safetouch Security triple team traffic. But by the grace of God, this is an outbound shutdown on an inbound rush. Let's go to our helicopter air wanna Tarik Brown. Crashed overturned eastbound just past Maitland. Lord, just to give you some of the behind the scenes what I'm seeing going on. I four bound at cut down of mainland. They're trying to get people at Maitland boulevard westbound stuck between this and I poured rebound here. Going to be forced on at the boulevard. You're already on the interstate. So don't do that kid on his Lee Road and make your way. Seventeen ninety two Riva quite more. You can still get on. I forty at Maitland boulevard on the westbound side. You're backed up to four three four lookers a little bit of Lake Mary bound, usual delays twenty seven to five thirty two. I'm Eric Brown. In starting to see traffic building on the turnpike northbound after state road four seventeen this traffic report brought to you by AllState with an AllState agent. You get a local expert and help finding the best coverage for you. Plus when you bundle home and auto you can save so call your local AllState agent today, are you in good hands. With traffic alerts every six minutes in the morning, we're helping you get to work on time. I'm Ed Torrence, news ninety six point five WDBO. There's nothing like meeting e pass gets you to the people and places you care about faster with nonstop.

AllState Tom Terry chief meteorologist Tarik Brown Landau Ed Torrence Eric Brown Riva Lake Mary Lord six minutes
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Dot com. Now, here's the forecast from the American standard heating weather center. Mostly cloudy and chilly tonight. Temperatures will fall to the mid thirties in the overnight hours spring officially arrives tomorrow. Expect on and off showers with temperatures in the upper forties. Fifties I'm some track chief meteorologist Ashley Brown on Ninety-three WIBC. Gene. Seems to spoil the Bank. You marry music. The Mazda c. Dancing names. Now. Dance. Jesus. Three. Knows..

chief meteorologist Ashley Brown
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Kyi chief meteorologist j cargo quiet out there for the rest of the overnight with some passing clouds, a low of thirty six we climbed to forty six on Friday afternoon, but have the umbrellas ready to go with periods of light rain developing. This is a quick moving system though. So that by Saturday and Sunday, we dry it out some sunshine returns, along with warmer weather. That's your w k y forecast, I'm chief meteorologist j Cardo. See this is a Bloomberg market minute. Data from Washington could help set the tone for the Friday session on Wall Street. Stocks took a pounding yesterday after apple trimmed at sales outlook. The Dow Jones industrials fell six hundred sixty points or two point eight percent. The Labor Department's December employment report is on the way this morning and economists surveyed by Bloomberg think we'll hear that about one hundred eighty thousand jobs were created last month. Forecasters expect the unemployment rate to hold three point seven percent. ADP reported yesterday that private firms added two hundred seventy one thousand workers to their payrolls. In december. Sean crews of TD Ameritrade tells Bloomberg radio the economic indicators are important. He's also keeping tabs on the trade war markets. Got a little bit of encouragement with the tweet over the weekend. Also news that there is going to be a delegation heading out to Beijing to try and keep negotiations going through says trade uncertainty may be starting to hit the Chinese economy. Jeff Bellinger, Bloomberg radio. Message and data rates may apply. Earning your degree from one of the top business schools in the country might sound impossible to fit into your workload..

Bloomberg chief meteorologist Kyi Jeff Bellinger Sean crews TD Ameritrade j Cardo apple ADP Washington Beijing Labor Department eight percent seven percent