37 Burst results for "Chief Meteorologist"

Fresh "Chief Meteorologist" from Steve Trevelise

Steve Trevelise

00:49 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh "Chief Meteorologist" from Steve Trevelise

"Promote the importance of organ and tissue donation. Get the latest Jersey news on your schedule on demand Could and J one on 15 dot com slash podcasts. Well, we get a warm up it some point this week. The complete New Jersey One on 1.5 forecast is coming up. New Jersey Fast traffic in one minute, New Jersey One on 1.5 has weather information just for you and your part of the Garden State Online and on our app. You can check current conditions watch radar setup weather alerts to be sent to your phone and know what's coming up in our five day forecast. The latest technology combined with Chief meteorologist dance Arrows forecasts let you plan your day plan. You're weak and stay safe in j Wanna 15 dot com slash weather visit US All. Line or on our free app today. Me. Me, me, me, me, but also you the payroll fast forwards his favorite foreign film, but the powdered doughnut. Okay, What's my line? Uh, the only line I see here on the script is get options based on your budget with the name your price tool from progressive man. That's a time twister, huh? I'm sorry. I'm gonna need.

New Jersey Jersey One Minute This Week Today Five Day United States 15 Dot Com ONE NEW J One On 15 Dot Com 1.5 Garden State J Wan
The Natural Gas Boom Appears To Be Going Bust

Climate Cast

01:30 min | 4 d ago

The Natural Gas Boom Appears To Be Going Bust

"Son natural gas as the bridge fuel to a net zero energy future but the rapidly emerging climate solutions mean. That bridge is getting shorter fast. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. Her and today on climate cast is the natural gas boom going bust. Justin mccullough is an independent journalists covering the finances of the energy transition. Hi justin welcome to climate cast. I paul thank you very much. So big companies like shell bet big on natural gas what are emerging solutions to the economics of natural gas. There are two main challenges to show all the people who had bet big on the future of natural gas and specifically liquefied natural gas. Renewable energy now can produce electricity for lower costs than natural gas. Fired power straight up competition. The other issue is there's oversupply right now. What level of investment are we talking about to get into these projects you know when shell bet big on the future of natural gas they in two thousand sixteen. They bought a company for over fifty billion dollars in two thousand and nine exxon company for over forty billion dollars. Exxon has since written off the majority of that forty billion dollars as a loss and it now appears that shell is facing similar problems with its fifty billion dollar investment in natural

Paul Hutton Justin Mccullough NPR Justin Paul Exxon
Fresh "Chief Meteorologist" from Terry Meiners

Terry Meiners

00:38 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh "Chief Meteorologist" from Terry Meiners

"Running Van Winkle, the blanket Baker and Main Street, Middle 10 figure Bush Lane and Glaser Lane. Our next reporting 15 minutes and Bobby Ellis News radio 8 40 W H A s folks with the UPDATED forecast. I'm Wook. Why? Chief meteorologist Jay Cardosi. Nice weather as we roll through the evening mainly clear skies during the evening hours and then Klaus will increase after midnight. Low temperatures down around 52 way will have chances for a little bit of patchy light rain in a few Sprinkles, most notably Through early afternoon tomorrow. Then look for mostly cloudy skies afterwards. High temperatures around 64 on Wednesday cloudy in the morning a few hints of sunshine during the afternoon highs of 65. That's your forecast on Wook. Why Chief committed all this? J. Cardosi, Kentucky, and it's breaking news, Weather and traffic station. This is news radio. Wait. 40 w H. A s. Your news now Governor Bashir biz giving Kentucky and an incentive.

Jay Cardosi 15 Minutes Wednesday Glaser Lane Kentucky Baker J. Cardosi Main Bush Lane Around 64 Around 52 Way Governor Bashir 10 Afternoon Tomorrow 65 Klaus Winkle Bobby Ellis Wook News
Why There Is A Change Coming To Your Local Weather Forecast

Environment: NPR

02:06 min | Last week

Why There Is A Change Coming To Your Local Weather Forecast

"There is a change coming to your local weather forecast next month. The data that it's based on will be updated that will make the warmer climate literally. The new normal here's npr's jennifer. Ludden weather forecasters work off a thirty year average and it gets updated every decade right now. What's normal for temperature and precipitation is based on nineteen eighty one to two thousand ten. That's why we've all gotten used to this. Well temperatures for your friday. We'll be running about ten degrees than normal seven degrees above average yesterday. Look into tomorrow above. Normal temperatures will the past decade. Was one of the hottest on record mike. Pilecki of the national oceanic and atmospheric administration says that will show up in the new averages called climate normals. They'll drop the eighties and wrap in the twenty tens. It was a very substantial upward trend in temperatures especially along the west coast of south and along the east coast. He says there were exceptions. Oh you can go to fargo north dakota. That would be a place where it's actually cooled a little bit if that's your interest especially in the springtime but the fastest warming places. We'll see a real bump up in their averages. Amber sellin is chief. Meteorologist at abc fifteen phoenix. Where she says last summer was incredibly hot. We set a record of fifty three days at one hundred. Ten degrees or hotter. The previous record was thirty three days so it wasn't even close what's more she says. In the entire past decade phoenix did not said a single record for low temperature now oddly after the update in may some really hot days or nights could become officially cooler than the new normal plans to take more time to explain all this. We're going to have to remind people especially this year. Hey if we're at one fifteen. That is five degrees above the average but remember this average has changed. This average is not what it used to

Ludden Pilecki NPR Amber Sellin National Oceanic And Atmospher Jennifer East Coast Mike North Dakota Phoenix ABC
Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

Climate Cast

01:30 min | Last week

Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

"Little to no ice floating along marquette bay noah reported january's total ice coverage in the great lakes to be the lowest in the last forty eight years lake superior. Ice cover briefly grew to fifty percent during our february arctic outbreak but that fleeting is vanished just as quickly with our mild march. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. And today on climate cast. What are longer term lake superior ice trends telling us about climate change in the upper midwest professor j austin researchers all things lake superior with the large lakes observatory at the university of minnesota duluth high. Welcome back to climate cast. Thanks for having me on paul. Let's start with this past winter. What was notable with ice cover on lake superior It was a really unusual year very low ice covered starch and we had that remarkable cold air in february and we ended up with fleetingly above average ice levels superior and just as remarkably. They went away really quickly. And how does this fit with the longer term ice trends that you're seeing on lake superior and the great lakes. I expect that we're going to see Significantly lower than average ice cover this year and basically since about nineteen ninety eight. We've had a long string of relatively low ice cover on lake superior with some exceptions like like the polar vortex in twenty fourteen where we had nearly complete coverage for two months.

Marquette Bay Paul Hutton J Austin Large Lakes Observatory University Of Minnesota Duluth Great Lakes Arctic NPR Midwest Paul
Deadly tornadoes batter southern states

WTMJ Nights

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

Deadly tornadoes batter southern states

"We're following a story in Alabama tonight, deadly tornadoes ripping through there. Trees have been toppled. Power lines are down homes have been leveled. We go to NBC's chief meteorologist in Jersey, who was in Birmingham. It's not over. Not even close from southern Indiana all the way into Mississippi. We still have tornado watches up particularly dangerous situation. Tornado watches it that we're gonna move this east as we go through tonight, So even through the midnight hour in north Georgia or eastern Tennessee and Kentucky, you need to be on the lookout, damaging wind and hail also a threat on top of the tornadoes. The only good news. It starts to weaken as it gets into south and North Carolina by tomorrow, and so far, the death toll sits at five in Alabama, as well as several others with

Alabama NBC Birmingham Jersey Mississippi Indiana North Georgia Tennessee Kentucky North Carolina
Iceland Volcano Erupts For First Time in 800 Years

AP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Iceland Volcano Erupts For First Time in 800 Years

"Has fled to life, sparking the area's first volcanic eruption in nearly 800 years. Initial aerial footage showed a relatively small eruption so far, with two streams of lover running in opposite directions in 2010 and eruption of a different Icelandic volcano sent clouds of ash and dust into the atmosphere. Grounding over 100,000 flights between Europe and North America because of concerns the material could damage jet engines. However, Chief meteorologist held up, Johnson says this eruption is not a threat to air travel's is mine. There's no ash coming from it. So there's no it traffic considerations that we have to worry about. This southwestern corner of Iceland is the most heavily populated part of the country. Nevertheless, the Department of Emergency Management says it doesn't anticipate evacuations unless levels of volcanic gasses rise significantly. I'm Karyn Shamas. Is

North America Europe Johnson Department Of Emergency Manage Iceland Karyn Shamas
Long dormant volcano comes to life in southwestern Iceland

AP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Long dormant volcano comes to life in southwestern Iceland

"Dormant volcano in southwestern Iceland has fled to life, sparking the area's first volcanic eruption in nearly 800 years. Initial aerial footage showed a relatively small eruption so far, with two streams of lover running in opposite directions in 2010 and eruption of a different Icelandic volcano sent clouds of ash and dust into the atmosphere. Grounding over 100,000 flights between Europe and North America because of concerns the material could damage jet engines. However, Chief meteorologist held up, Johnson says this eruption is not a threat to air travels. It's minor. There's no ash coming from it. So there is no air traffic considerations that we have to worry about. This southwestern corner of Iceland is the most heavily populated part of the country. Nevertheless, the Department of Emergency Management says it doesn't anticipate evacuations unless levels of volcanic gasses rise significantly.

Iceland North America Europe Johnson Department Of Emergency Manage
Volcano Erupts In Southwestern Iceland

AP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Volcano Erupts In Southwestern Iceland

"A long dormant volcano in southwestern Iceland has fled to life, sparking the area's first volcanic corruption in nearly 800 years. Initial aerial footage showed a relatively small eruption so far, with two streams of lover running in opposite directions in 2010 and eruption of a different Icelandic volcano sent clouds of ash and dust into the atmosphere. Grounding over 100,000 flights between Europe and North America because of concerns the material could damage jet engines. However, Chief meteorologist how dope Johnson says this eruption is not a threat to air travels. It's minor. There's no ash coming from it. So there's no it traffic considerations that we have to worry about. This southwestern corner of Iceland is the most heavily populated part of the country. Nevertheless, the Department of Emergency Management says it doesn't anticipate evacuations on less levels of volcanic gasses rise significantly.

Iceland Dope Johnson North America Europe Department Of Emergency Manage
Eruption of Iceland volcano easing, not affecting flights

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 3 weeks ago

Eruption of Iceland volcano easing, not affecting flights

"A long dormant volcano in southwestern Iceland has flat tonight sparking the area's first full kind of corruption in needy eight hundred years initial aerial footage showed a relatively small option so far with two streams of lava running in opposite directions in twenty ten and Robson of the different eyes landed volcanoes sent clouds of ash and dust into the atmosphere grounding over one hundred thousand flights between Europe and North America because the consensus Mysterio could damage just tensions however chief meteorologist how dope you Anson says disruption is not a threat to add troubles is minor a there's no ashes come from so there is no if traffic considerations as we have to worry about this south western corner of Iceland is the most heavily populated parts of the country never the less the department of emergency management says it doesn't anticipate evacuations unless levels of volcanic gases rise significantly I'm Karen Thomas

Iceland Robson Mysterio Anson North America Europe Department Of Emergency Manage Karen Thomas
MN leads Midwest, but falls short on electric vehicles

Climate Cast

04:09 min | 2 months ago

MN leads Midwest, but falls short on electric vehicles

"The purchasing power of the federal government to buy clean zero emission vehicles that are made in source right here in america. That's president joe biden. He wants to electrify the federal fleet to help reduce transportation greenhouse gas emissions but our consumers and states ready to follow. I'm npr chief meteorologist. Paul hutton are here with climate. Cast the american council for an energy efficient economy tracks eib progress their state policy director. Brian howard is here. Hi brian hey all great to be with you today. So this is some pretty big news on the ev front. I president biden's plan and then gm announces its goal to sell only electric vehicles by twenty thirty five. Are we approaching a tipping point here for these. I think so. We've continued to see a steady growth in the av market Even this year despite all the challenge of the covid so you with those activities that are coming from federal government and from a major auto manufacturers. I think we are reaching invasion point about what transportation electric vacations gonna look like in the united states and correct me if i'm wrong but these are only about two percent of the market right now. Why is this such a huge scale of opportunity for vs to reduce these transportation emissions to start with the transportation sector is responsible for about eight percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the united states which is the largest emitter based on kind of the sectors. That are out there So when we're to convert interro combustion engines and move that over to electric vehicles. There's a significant emissions reduction benefit which obviously helps with climate. But then also there's a number of other residual really important benefits as it relates to public health that you get from electrifying transportation. Well in one of those. I assume is jobs right because it's not just the vehicles you need the right infrastructure charging infrastructure. You need the right policies to move these things along which states are leading on this front of the hundred points that we looked at california scored. Ninety one next in line was new york at sixty three point. Sixty three point five which is obviously a pretty deep differentiation between the numbers. And how does minnesota rank minnesota is twelfth based on our evaluation which is a leader in the midwest but certainly is behind the national leaders in the top ten. What is minnesota doing. Well and where is there a need for faster. Progress with vs. So minnesota's done a number of things well Minnesota has done a really good job of articulating. How utilities could invested infrastructure. The state has also taken some initial steps to ratify california's zero emission vehicles regulations which would set that manufacturers need to sell a certain number of electric vehicles from passenger like vehicles in the state of which is being considered. Now you know there are some things that clearly need improvement They have identified that the absence of statewide incentives for electric vehicles is a challenge in something that they need to address. One thing. We should touch on right when we're charging an electric vehicle. It matters where that power came from right absolutely. And so what. Are you seeing with trends of different states. That have More renewable energy than other places when it comes to being able to charge navy with that we are seeing a an overall positive trend in terms of having states move towards outer percent clean energy for their for their grids. There's also a lot of states that are taking that activity very seriously and providing interim goals about how they're going to get to that low carbon future minnesota as an example is considering how to deal with that now in the legislature But other states have already shown us the way. Brian howard state policy director with the american council for an energy efficient economy. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective. Climate cast today. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for the time.

Brian Howard Paul Hutton America Minnesota Joe Biden American Council NPR Biden Federal Government GM Brian California Midwest New York Navy American Council For An Energy Legislature
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:39 min | 2 months ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"And done. How many jerseys First news 5 14 as we bring in our chief meteorologist, Dan zero. So, Dan, not much happening now. What happens is we go through the day today, Things were going to fire up later on. It's not surprising that we haven't seen very much from this winter storm yet because dry air just has this grip on New Jersey so There just hasn't been much falling from the sky. I think that changes around late this morning. Let's say around 10 o'clock is our turning point. As precipitation moves in, and this time it's gonna be pretty widespread here. To the north of about Mercer and Monmouth counties. We're going to start with at least some wintry mix, if not straight, snow, the farther north you go the colder it's gonna be obviously so road conditions may go downhill is we get into the early afternoon hours a little bit ice there. On down a little bit of snow accumulation south of that point, it's going to be mainly rain, but you might find some snowflakes and sleep pellets in involved there again. It's not a major winter storm, but just have to watch out for those changing weather conditions and changing road conditions as the day goes on. High temperatures today. 30 to 40. Things will start tapering off early this evening. But in North Jersey snow showers will probably continue through tomorrow morning. We might see some fog overnight lows fall into the lower to mid thirties. And then tomorrow partly sunny and relatively pleasant highs mid forties chance of a shower Thursday morning, then turning very cold and windy for the end of the week. New Jersey First news time is now 5 15. Around this date around the clock. This'll is New Jersey's first news. Good.

New Jersey Dan zero North Jersey chief meteorologist Mercer Monmouth
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:49 min | 3 months ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Chief meteorologist Jay Cardosi It's ground zero on NewsRadio. Wait, 40 w H. A S. Spinning complacently in the darkness covered and blinded by a blanket of little lives. False security has loved the madness of this world into a slumber. Wake up and isa pawn. You staring straight down and kingly through seeing all that you are And everything that you can never be. Yes, on eye is upon you and I ready to blink so face forward with arms, wide open and mind really? Your future has arrived. Are you ready to go allowed to be spoke up instead? Wait. See me? Alas, speakers spoke up and said Weighs a loudspeaker spoke up to speed up, Give up, Give up. Give up. Which way which way? Yeah, Yeah, I'm like glue is and this is ground.

Chief meteorologist Jay Cardosi
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

"Warning. Chief meteorologist Marshall My Peak on your severe weather station news radio 6 10 w tvn. He's here. No broadcasting from the underground command post deep in the bowels of a hidden bunker somewhere under the brick in steel of a nondescript building. We have once again made contact with our leader, find love, then.

Chief meteorologist Marshall
A record year for wind turbine shipments through Duluth

Climate Cast

03:53 min | 4 months ago

A record year for wind turbine shipments through Duluth

"Record year for wind. Turbine shipments in duluth. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul kutner with climate cavs. Here's a story about climate change solutions and economic prosperity. Twenty twenty was a record year. for winter. shipments through duluth harbor ships carried more than half a million tons of wind blades and towers into the harbor this year that means jobs for port workers in duluth for truckers who drive the giant blades across minnesota and for wind energy technicians building the giant swirling turbans on the prairie pater mavis is the western regional policy manager for the clean grid alliance. Hi peter welcome to climate cast. Paul what are the big wind. Power projects underway now. And what's coming in the next few years so The last couple of years have been very good for development. Economics is the driver here and utilities. Want the stuff commercial industrial customers. Want this stuff. And saint received very robust construction in north dakota south dakota minnesota in iowa currently there's about thirty seven hundred megawatts of projects under construction in these four states. And that's you know you're you're looking at over a thousand turbans just to fulfill that full of projects talked to us about jobs. What are the trend. Lines for employment in clean energy in the upper midwest. Well as we see more projects come online. There's a lot more for operation and maintenance. Jobs is actually somewhat of a deficit. And it's very difficult to find people affiliates positions and so a lot of universities other tech schools in the companies are doing things they can to try and get more people into this field and these are good well paying middle class jobs and i think the most important piece in that all set for rural jobs. And it's oftentimes. It's very difficult to find jobs in the rural parts of our state since so. This is an excellent addition to the row community. I know there are now some days where minnesota has enough generating capacity from win to produce a hundred percent of electricity from wind and solar. What are the trends like there. Well if you look at the region as a whole Minnesota and the upper midwest as part of the independent system operator which fifteen state organization that manages the ball transmission system and it creates efficiencies. So that you can move power across the entire central part of Country and you know because of the wind resources. So good in. North dakota south dakota iowa we could use just a ton of wind and move that you know states and to other states in the region that don't have as much visibility of when peter. What's the state of battery storage technology for wind and solar. How quickly as that technology advancing on its advancing quite rapidly. Great river energy just announced as part of their portfolio changed very large battery storage system in minnesota. There's gonna be some time before we can really scale up battery storage. In addition to the price point that can make it attractive for utilities. How fast has clean energy progressed in minnesota in the upper midwest. And what's the future. Look like well. If you think about a decade ago wind energy was just really kind of getting off the ground and states. Were starting to take initiatives to move that direction if you look now. I mean state of iowa. Forty percent of all their generation comes from win minnesota's at about nineteen percent self dakota's at twenty four four percent. North dakota generates about twenty seven percent. So we've seen very robust growth. We expect that to continue.

Paul Kutner Duluth Harbor Duluth Minnesota Clean Grid Alliance Midwest South Dakota NPR Iowa Peter North Dakota Paul Jobs Great River
There Were 30 Hurricanes And Tropical Storms That Hit The Atlantic In 2020

Climate Cast

03:42 min | 4 months ago

There Were 30 Hurricanes And Tropical Storms That Hit The Atlantic In 2020

"Twenty hurricane season goes off the charts. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul here. with climate. the two thousand twenty atlantic hurricane season broke several records. And it's not just the record. Thirty named storms or twelve. Us landfalls the way storms behaved. That's got climate change experts talking a record. Ten storms rapidly intensified this season hurricane ada flared from tropical depression two major category four hurricane in just thirty six hours hurricane expert jeff. Master's tracks hurricane transfer yale climate connections. Hi jeff welcome to climate cast. Hi paul what stands out to you. The most from this record atlantic hurricane season you know it was the late season activity. We had two major hurricanes november. Ada and i oughta both reached category four hurricane status. In fact i was a five. The latest category five we've ever seen in the atlantic the fact that we're able to have in november a time when the hurricane seasons normally over catastrophic hurricanes that really speaks to the unusual level of activity that the twenty twenty atlantic hurricane season had put the overall season into context for us. How does this layout compared to previous atlantic hurricane seasons. This was more than double regular season so it was like. We're seeing twenty twenty and twenty twenty one altogether in one year jeff as we watch these hurricanes rapidly intensify so quickly. Now i'm wondering what are the measurable links to climate change there. In his ernie way to quantify the climate change component to this rapid intensification. There was a paper published last year that looked at rapid intensification during the period One thousand nine hundred eighty two two thousand nine and they used a climate model to study that and they found that using the climate model could not account for the rapid intensification without using human caused climate change and that makes a lot of sense because he does energy and when you've got a lot more heat energy available to a hurricane you're gonna see more rapid intensification. You mentioned the november storms. We saw those back to back. Category four and five hurricanes hit. How can that level of human and economic destruction be a driver of climate migration the main gdp driver for the hunters economy which is the patriots hula valley with about two million people that generates sixty percent of their gdp and they basically had their economic activity destroyed their so without any economy. And with a lot of your crops by the hurricane people don't have anywhere to go. Nothing they can do to generate an income and defeat themselves so we saw the back in nineteen ninety eight. When mitch hit we had hundreds of thousands of hondurans leave and seek future elsewhere. We seem like we're in this era of climate change enhanced super hurricanes and seasons. How do these impact those of us. Who don't live on the coast. I made way all pay higher insurance rates to fund the people who do live on the coast who are subject to these flooding events. In fact the national flood insurance program is more than twenty billion dollars in debt. Thanks to all the storms. We've seen in recent years and you know here in michigan where i live.

Hurricane Hurricane Ada Jeff Paul Hurricane Season Depression Atlantic United States Mitch Michigan
The art of science communication

Climate Cast

03:48 min | 5 months ago

The art of science communication

"Communication and art within science i'm npr. Chief meteorologist paul here with climate cats. It's a challenge to explain a complex science in a way. That's relevant to people's lives. That's why one of the world's biggest science organizations. The american geophysical union gives the climate communications prize as a top award every year. This year's winner is jennifer francis with the would well climate research center in massachusetts. She was nominated by minnesota climate scientists. John abraham with the university of saint thomas jennifer welcome to climate cast. Hi there thanks for having me jennifer. What does this award mean to you in the context of the importance of climate communication. Well it's of course. A huge huge honored to be recognized by my peers. My colleagues and i'm especially proud of the american physical union for creating this prize in the first place. Because i think the public really really wants to hear about the science now especially in these days of covert and climate change and all kinds of changes that are happening in the society to hear directly from the scientists themselves so i think it is even more important for us scientists to be able to explain the work that we're doing and that the public is paying for when you think about your fellow communicators. What skills do excellent climate communicators share. I think the best science communicators are able to take a very complicated but interesting topic and boil it down not dumb it down but boil it down so that they're talking to an audience and that audience is gonna come away with the most important information that whatever that science is saying And i think good communicators also are exciting. The people are want to hear them. And some of the best ones i think are able to impart that excitement to the audience about our audience. What communication tips do you have that. Maybe could help our listeners as they talk about climate change right so the listeners. I think are are really interested. Now we're finally getting traction with the public and with decision makers particularly when it comes to climate change and so my hope is that those listeners will will pay attention and maybe do some reading on their own and maybe cross reference and also. I think it's really important for the listeners. When they hear something that doesn't seem to make much sense to dig down a little bit and see where that information is coming from. Jennifer one of your areas of expertise is the arctic. And we've seen some dramatic sea ice and temperature shifts in the arctic this year. What specific trends are you watching in the arctic. And why are they important to all of us well. The arctic is changing just so fast and this year was an exclamation point on the trends that we've been watching as you say. The sea ice reached almost a new record this year. We're watching the arctic unfold in ways. We didn't expect to happen so quickly. There are many reasons why it matters to everyone for one thing. The rapid warming in the arctic is accelerating the melt of the greenland ice sheet which is raising sea levels. It's accelerating the faa of permafrost which is releasing more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and it's also disrupting weather patterns all down around the northern hemisphere so it affects all of us in many different ways woodward climate research center senior scientists jennifer francis. Thanks so much for your perspective on climate. Cast today my pleasure anytime.

Jennifer Francis Would Well Climate Research Ce University Of Saint Thomas Jennifer American Geophysical Union Arctic John Abraham Massachusetts Minnesota Jennifer Greenland FAA Woodward Climate Research Cent
Climate change puts hundreds of Superfund sites at risk

Climate Cast

04:09 min | 5 months ago

Climate change puts hundreds of Superfund sites at risk

"Hundreds of toxic superfund sites are vulnerable to extreme weather. I'M NPR chief meteorologist Paul Kutner here with climate cast. Hurricane, Harvey Dump Forty five to sixty inches of rain on the Houston area in two thousand seventeen the extreme floodwaters inundated more than one hundred and fifty thousand homes. They also breached toxic superfund site washing deadly chemicals down. In concentrations more than two thousand times. The EPA required cleanup level according to inside climate news. Just. How many of these superfund sites are risk and exposed to these extreme weather events? Frank Coal Ash is the climate director at the Minnesota Pollution? Control Agency. Frank Welcome to climate cast. Hi, Paul Thank you for having me on today the Government Accountability Office reported last year that nine hundred, forty, five superfund sites across the US are vulnerable to hurricanes flooding, sea level rise increased precipitation or wildfires. I see fourteen of those are in Minnesota. What is it about the location of these toxic sites that makes them does too extreme weather events. What we know with a changing climate in Minnesota is that we are seeing heavier rainfall which presents a risk for flooding at some of these sites and the impacts to both surface waters near the sites and potentially groundwater near these sites which we are. Managing and controlling for the toxic chemicals that have been found there. So it's really within Minnesota and the way that our climate is changing is looking at how that precipitation regime is changing, and we've seen that in the mid West here in Nebraska in twenty eighteen, there was a superfund site there that was impacted by the massive flooding. It didn't leach any toxins, but I'm wondering has Minnesota seen any close calls like that? I'm not aware of any close calls that we've seen regarding specific flooding events in Minnesota but certainly, that risk exists anytime that we are seeing a changing climate like we have in that, we're trying to manage sites that have these toxic chemicals on them from past pollution events that we're trying to maintain keep people protected from especially our most vulnerable populations, and we know that one of the biggest climate changes were observing recording in Minnesota are these mega rainfall events these six to eight plus in Sch- rainfall events how is that being incorporated into your? Planning for these sites yes, and that is the kind of work that we're just really getting started with looking at our ability to understand what's going to happen with a rainfall like that and and is the water going to go and where are we at risk for a significant floods? How will that rainfall interact with any of the protective coverings or protections that have been built around the superfund sites and how that may impact the contaminants as they they are moving on the site, and hopefully we're able to keep them from moving away from her saying. Frank superfund sites were talking about clean up. After the fact, I'm curious how climate change can be taken into account before potentially hazardous developments break ground. Yes, and that is an area that we're particularly looking at right now we are providing funding to cities to be able to do climate resiliency and adaptation plans to be able to identify how the rainfall and precipitation flooding events are going to impact not just contamination contaminated sites but the infrastructure that we rely upon many people are concerned about potential pollution from mining projects in northern. MINNESOTA, in sensitive areas like the boundary waters, how can we be sure future extreme rainfall events won't breach containment of those proposed sites. We we continue to look at the best science and the best research about how we can we predict what these large rainfall events are going to look like, and then build that into the planning processes our permitting processes, frank coal, ash climate director for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. Thanks so much. Thank you.

Minnesota Frank Superfund Minnesota Pollution Control Ag Sch- Rainfall Paul Kutner Frank Coal Ash Hurricane Director NPR Frank Chief Meteorologist EPA Houston Harvey Dump Control Agency United States
Climate change is affecting flower pigments

Climate Cast

04:03 min | 6 months ago

Climate change is affecting flower pigments

"Our flowers reacting to climate change. I'm NPR chief meteorologist. Paul. Hutler here with climate cast. A new study in the journal current biology finds flower pigments are reacting to temperature and ozone changes. What does that mean for our flower colors, Clemson? University. Biology Professor Matthew. Kaczynski is an author of this study. Hi Matthew. Welcome to climate cast hype. All I want to get into the details but I what's your sort of elevator speech headline on climate change and flower colors. Yes. So flowers while one of their functions is to dry in pollinators. Another is actually protect the pollen in the abuse that hold the reproductive structures of the plant. And Pigments can protect Holland inaugurals from abiotic damage like from temperature or UV radiation. So climate change has the strong potential in we showed that it did contribute to changes in flower pigmentation. So for a non biologists like me, how would you explain the physical process increased pigmentation can lead to more absorption of solar radiation in any structure in so win a flower absorbs more light. It has the potential to increase in temperature. and. We found that flowers that have their pollen tucked within the pedals day actually declined in pigmentation when they experienced larger increases in temperature, and that could be a thermal regulatory response where flowers are actually decreasing pigmentation to reduce the chances that they're going to increase in temperature baked their pollen in species that have their pollen exposed to ambient light like a buttercup those when the pedals are open, you can see all of the panthers in those are the structures in the flower that hold the pollen So increasing UV pigmentation in the flowers might protect that pollen from ambient UV, light and so. Some species increased some species decline in pigmentation in some showed no change at all. How were you able to observe that in is a something we could see as visible to our is humans are Tri chromatic that means we see blue green and red, and that's our three photo receptors. Many insect pollinators are also try chromatic, but they see you the blue and green, and so what we measured is these UV absorbing pigments using ultraviolet photography if pollinators see these plans differently, how are these pigment changes impacting them? I've done some studies basically smearing sunscreens over the flowers so they become completely uv absorbing. That often reduces pollinator visitation. In, that might be because the UV reflection on pedals might help the flowers to kind of pop against a green vegetative background. So if it's declining, that could have potentially negative impacts for plant reproduction. So a lot of people like to plant flowers that attract pollinators, what does this mean for the average gardner who might be thinking about flowers for next year as a rule of thumb? It appears that more yellow flowered, plant, sleigh, comment asters, daisies those often are pretty UV reflective. In in terms of some of the common crop species that have UV, reflection on them, canola or ravenous, which is a mustard that is one that has these UV reflective traits on the flowers and then come in sunflower dozen while. Clemson University Biology Professor Matthew Kaczynski. It's a great conversation. Thanks so much for sharing on climate cast today. Thanks for having me.

Matthew Kaczynski Panthers Professor Chief Meteorologist Clemson University Clemson NPR Paul Holland Gardner
Ocean stratification and what it means for weather

Climate Cast

04:06 min | 6 months ago

Ocean stratification and what it means for weather

"New, evidence, our oceans are changing faster than climate models predicted. I'M NPR chief meteorologist Paul Kutner here with climate cast. A new study out this week in the journal Nature Climate. Change finds. Oceans are becoming more stratified warmer surface waters from climate change mean less mixing from deep in the ocean, and that produces a range of impacts from stronger hurricanes to changing fisheries. So how does it all Work University of Saint Thomas? Professor John. Abraham is one of the studies co-authors John Welcome to climate cast. It's a pleasure to be on Pau. Your study finds the oceans are becoming more stratified. What does that mean? Well, Paul we're having this conversation in fall in Minnesota, and I know that there's a lot of hearty listeners out there that still like to swim in Minnesota. Lakes and they know what stratification is when you jump into a lake, this water near the surface is warmer. And the water near the bottom of lake is colder and what's happening is the lake forms layers of water that tend not to move. They tend not to rise and fall in the lake they tend to be stationary in that process stratification and that same process occurs in a major way in the oceans. Okay. That's a great analogy, and we know that those lakes and Minnesota turnover in spring and fall when the temperatures become more equal and that brings oxygen rich water down to the depths. Is that the same in the ocean wise that deep ocean mixing? So important? Deep Ocean. Mixing is important for two reasons I thinking about the water near the surface of the ocean. It's been heated up by sunlight month after month. In that tribes storms. So one of the reasons stratification is important, is it fuel storms? The other reason it's important when the water near the surface falls down to the bottom of the ocean that pushes bottom waters up and the bottom waters are cold and filled with nutrients. So when upward and downward motion happens, it's bringing nutrients to the surface so that see life can thrive. So it's important for. Weather and for life what impacts can we already see today from the climate change that's already occurring when the surface waters get warmer become more buoyant in so as we're warming, the oceans were heating up the surface waters even more than normal and that's keeping the near the surface they don't want to mix. So how do the warmer oceans affect larger ocean circulation patterns like the currents in the Atlantic Ocean? And the current and the Atlantic Ocean are so key for our weather and in fact, if you've ever wondered why is England, which is at about our latitude, why are they so much warmer in the winter than we are and it's all due to the ocean. What happens is warm waters off our East Coast in the tropics flow up to Europe and they keep their heat and that really makes the weather in Europe very very mild and as we warm the planet, we are putting at risk this natural ocean current. In. If we go too far, we could shut off that current and that would end up changing weather all across the planet especially in Europe what does your study say would likely happen to these ocean circulation patterns in the next fifty to one hundred years at this pace. We do not know right now whether the ocean currents will totally shut down however. Our results are telling us. We need to watch this carefully and take action very quickly to reduce global warming because it's global warming that is increasing the stratification of ocean waters and making our weather more while University of Saint Thomas Professor John. Abraham. Thanks so much for your perspective today. Pleasure. Thanks for having a Nice Day.

Atlantic Ocean Paul Kutner Professor John Minnesota Abraham Chief Meteorologist Europe Work University Of Saint Thoma NPR University Of Saint Thomas East Coast England
5 tropical cyclones are in the Atlantic at the same time for only the second time in history

Nightline

02:07 min | 7 months ago

5 tropical cyclones are in the Atlantic at the same time for only the second time in history

"Tonight for the first time in nearly fifty years. They've ocean is home to five rapidly growing named tropical cyclones with one hurricane sally set to slam into the southern coast tomorrow for the very latest I'm joined by ABC News. Chief meteorologist Ginger Zee now Ginger Hurricane Sally is clearly strengthening as it approaches your location in Alabama? Where do you see the storm heading? Juju I'm in the heart of mobile and you've got things like that building with sandbags in front of it, and that is for good reason from here back through coastal Mississippi that's where the brunt of the storm is going to impact. So let's look at on the satellite got lot better organized as we went through today, and that's going to keep going as it moves really painfully slow to the West northwest it will finally start to make that northern tick tomorrow afternoon and evening, and we expect landfall sometime around midnight or thereafter early Wednesday morning. So this is a slow. Storm that means that rain is going to be a big time issue and part of the slowdown is that stationary front making it almost defense you see we stopped the clock at about midnight. It looks like it should make landfall somewhere close to Pascagoula Mississippi if it does by the way, make landfall in Mississippi as a cat to that's the strongest we've seen in. Mississippi. Since Katrina in two thousand five that looks like wrong place wrong time. Now, there are always multiple threats as a storm approaches. There are already dire storm surge projections. What worries you the most about Sally. Storm surges what loses most life and property and storms. So six to nine feet in some places others up to eleven. Let me break it all down for you get warnings all the way from eastern Louisiana through the Florida panhandle. Now, it breaks down and closer to the center of the storm. In the northeast quadrant, we call it the dirty side of the storm. That's where you'll pick up some of the hefty so. From Mobile Bay. Back through deloise pass Christiane that's where we're most concerned. Now we also have rainfall and I don't want anyone if they're inland to say, Oh, this is just a coastal storm. By no means, you get fifteen to twenty inches on top of that storm surge right at the coast. That's not good especially here in mobile but go up to Gumri or even Atlanta and you could see a half a foot arrange.

Mississippi Sally Chief Meteorologist Ginger Zee Abc News West Northwest Christiane Katrina Alabama Gumri Florida Atlanta Louisiana
Slow-moving Hurricane Sally takes aim at Gulf Coast

Here & Now

03:31 min | 7 months ago

Slow-moving Hurricane Sally takes aim at Gulf Coast

"The Gulf Coast is bracing for another hurricane. The National Hurricane Center says Sally, which was a tropical storm has strengthened into a Category one Hurricane Kelly has already been dumping rain on Florida and is likely to strengthen as it heads towards the Louisiana coast. And New Orleans. Joining us now is Jeff Hoffman, director and chief meteorologist at the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network. Jeff Where is Sally now? And what's its track and timing for land landfall? Good afternoon. Jeremy Sally is of course, as you mentioned now Hurricane it's about due south of Pensacola, and it's moving slowly to the West West Northwest and expected to continue strengthening it underwent a rapid intensification cycle this morning. Winds are now gusting well into Hurricane force is expected to potentially come close to a Category two before landfall. On that landfall track has shifted slightly to the East. Because this morning, Gerry the center reformed a bit to the east as well which that tends to happen sometimes when storms undergo rapid intensification landfalls now projected to be somewhere along the southeast coast of Louisiana, southern coast of Mississippi and Alabama sometime Tuesday afternoon to Tuesday night. Emphasis on the word slow. It's a very slow moving system, of course, which will enhance the potential for flooding. That's going to be the big story. I think with now Hurricane Sally well, and Louisiana's governor John Bell. Edwards has already declared a state of emergency for Louisiana, which is still dealing with the damage from Hurricane Laura that made landfall there just three weeks ago with 150 mile per hour winds. Some people still don't have power. Sounds like Sally is not going to be as bad as Laura. In terms of the widespread wind damage likely not that remember every hurricane or every tropical system, not just hurricanes are very unique, imposed their own hazards. This one is a slow moving system. It's goingto produce a prolonged period of life threatening storm surge. For pretty much from the mouth of the Mississippi River all the way over to maybe Pensacola and then because the storm is going to be in the vicinity of the northern Gulf Coast states for two, maybe three days, we're talking. Maybe Wednesday or Thursday before it pulls up into the southern appellations. Very heavy rain inland. Flooding freshwater flooding flash flooding. We're talking about a 2 to 3 Day event here that could produce rain totals in the order of 10 to 20 inches nearer and east of where the center tracks. I'm looking at the National Hurricane Center website right now, and there are 1234567 Systems out there. Not all of them have become even tropical storms yet, but this is a pretty busy season. Yeah. When it comes to records, Where do you begin? I mean, right now we have five tropical cyclones or named storms that is tied for the record a same time on were now only one name away from having to move into the Greek alphabet. Eyes to certainly what they call a hyperactive season and we have broken. I think I'm losing count, but somewhere over 13 or 14 records in terms of the earliest, a particular name storm forms The numbers keep falling that we've had a fairly weak systems Other than Laura and Sally is, of course, a significant threat to the northern Gulf Coast states. But for example, in Florida they've we've missed most of the storms in Florida on DH. There's still a potential we still several more weeks of the peak of hurricane season to go. It is Jeff Hoffman, director and chief meteorologist at the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network. As we keep an eye on Sally, which, as we said, is now a hurricane heading toward the Louisiana Coast, Jeff Thanks as always. All right. Thank you.

Hurricane Hurricane Sally National Hurricane Center Louisiana Gulf Coast Hurricane Kelly Hurricane Laura Hurricane Force Jeff Hoffman Florida Public Radio Emergency Chief Meteorologist Pensacola Sally Florida New Orleans Director Mississippi River Mississippi Gerry Edwards
Boston - Massachusetts Just Had Its Hottest Summer On Record, Climate Report Says

WBZ Afternoon News

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

Boston - Massachusetts Just Had Its Hottest Summer On Record, Climate Report Says

"Time whether to hot summertime weather. In fact, it was the hottest meteorological summer on record in Massachusetts, also in Connecticut, Rhode Island and Arizona. The average temperature in Massachusetts between June and August was 71.4 degrees. Noah reports that the contiguous US experienced its fourth hottest summer between June and August. And the third warmest month off August. BBC TV chief meteorologist Eric Fisher notes that Providence are its hottest summer on record, Hartford tied its record and Worcester and its second hottest, hot out

Massachusetts United States Chief Meteorologist Eric Fisher Rhode Island Worcester Noah BBC Hartford Arizona Connecticut
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"To a fine overnight construction will be taking place along I. seventy five southbound before and after Sun City Boulevard two right lanes we close in that section of the road also for highway tolls issued a travel advisory about high winds across the sunshine skyway bridge tonight Carl Z. newsradio WFLA but more unsettled this week warm conditions will continue and mostly humid eighty three degrees this evening a southwesterly breeze in place a slight possibility still of seeing a shower seventy seven degrees are forecast low for Tuesday morning very warm for this time of year eighty eight degrees for a high warm and humid partly cloudy skies twenty percent rain chance for Wednesday a cold front hanging just around the area eighty five for a high rain chance thirty percent on Thursday with a lot of clouds slightly cooler eighty two for a high voter south winds ten not sees two to three ally choppy waters I'm originally chief meteorologist Steve German news radio WFLA streaming on your Amazon echo and over two thousand devices via the I heart radio at you're hearing coast to coast AM with George Noory live from somewhere deep below the earth on works welcome back to coast to coast as we of course are doing in our special art bell tribute program art passed away at the age of seventy two two years ago of a prescription overdose it was an amazing story we couldn't believe it when we were getting news of it that night in though we couldn't verify it we haven't been able to talk to the sheriff's department.

sunshine skyway bridge Carl Z. newsradio WFLA chief meteorologist George Noory Steve German Amazon
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Chief meteorologist or warming up yeah kick off the first in other words these guys on Saturday every night over the Knox later on sunrise on a Sunday but we'll do that with a mix in a few showers twenty sixteen to twenty four cancer celebrate the event only hereinafter your choice ninety nine one thousand dollars on the card Mexico five Tempur Pedic but the robot was malfunctioning that day in a word the slow down it was creating on the line Robert Williams went to grab the parts himself while Williams was reaching into a bin the one ton robotic arm swung into that same day the robot didn't have any alarms to warn Williams it was nearby I didn't have any sensors to tell a human was in its path it only have the intelligence to execute its commands to retrieve in place auto parts the robots struck Williams head with such force that it killed him instantly it was thirty minutes before anyone came to look for Robert Williams during that time the robot continue to slowly do its work well Williams lay dead on the park's room for the death of Robert Williams happened during a weird time for a the public at large still felt unsure about the machines that they were increasingly living and working among Hollywood could still rely on the truth of our machines running amok and ruining the future for humanity.

Chief meteorologist Knox Tempur Pedic Robert Williams Hollywood Mexico
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Okay why chief meteorologist Jay Kerr no see quite weather has returned to the region as we roll through tonight will have clear skies the first part of the night then some clouds will increase after midnight temperatures back in the middle and upper twenties the outlook now for your Wednesday a lot of clouds around in the morning they will slowly decrease through the afternoon but it's going to be a cold day just low and middle thirties across the region very cold on your Wednesday night the good news sunshine and forties return on Thursday that's your forecast on W. okay why chief meteorologist Jay card OC this report is sponsored by Louisville winter Beerfest evil winter beer fest presented by west six brewing more than three hundred twenty five craft beers and had me cocktails live music food trucks and more stay warm inside the king white international convention center February fourteenth and fifty tickets only forty dollars to Christmas day visit Louisville beer fest dot com this holiday season make sure the batteries are include tickets with his kooky can depend on us to include whether with traffic on the morning news radio eight forty WHAS for what it is this is the Christmas it's a standard is not a state ever break Crosby everybody's got their but the old one a lot of it rob the one with the singing this song Brian what wondering what he's I've got a good version of the home yeah I know what yeah I know it's the rob Halford go not Christmas is very good known as good stuff right there brand stuff brand new stuff up rob Halford's.

Jay Kerr OC Brian rob Halford chief meteorologist Jay card Louisville Crosby
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Okay why chief meteorologist Jay Kerr no see beautiful weather continues out there tonight it's going to be chilly clear skies thirty for our low that'll lead us into a great day for your Thursday lots of sunshine lighter wind with temperatures in the low to middle fifties clouds will thicken up Thursday late night and then by Friday morning a chance for a little bit of light rain around the area that's your forecast on W. okay why chief meteorologist Jay cardo sea coast to coast AM is on news radio eight forty WHAS and in one man this is and when the so many to be you from somewhere out there this is coast to coast AM with George Noory deities witchcraft the beloved dead in a moment first time guess Phoenix love Fay joins us or work what is remembered lives stand by on coast to coast AM lots of strange things in the world one of the strangest and something that you.

Jay Kerr Fay chief meteorologist Jay cardo George Noory
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on WTVN

"We have a real chief meteorologist with us right now my body to show but starting most of you know who he is he wrote a great book the climate chronicles now Joe I know you're really really busy what do you make of what's going on at this hour the eight PM eastern time our with this hurricane well I'll tell you what it's degrading rapidly started turn to the west and you know if you've been following our ideas it was good I'm not deep in real fast in the northwest that but as it turns to the west that if the Korea situation for the storm to intensify and that's what we're seeing now it's going to continue to get stronger here over the next twenty four to thirty six hours and go to the category for our passes takes it into the nor the Bahamas and then when it gets off the Florida coast the steering currents break down and look we have an opportunity on the southeast coast of the Florida coast to miss the brunt of this folks folks up understand I tell people all the time is like a Cork in the screen and it's as big as it looks is powerful sort it's pushed around by everything around so what happens is this quarter's bobbing along and the situation to the north to the east to the west and to the south of it determine where it's going to go and we know it's going to get all the way to grand Bahama we know it's going to get the word fifty sixty miles the Florida coast as of this morning and I don't change forecasts around other national hurricane center and my company we had the same land fall area but there is a chance that it does what Matthew did now you folks in Florida and the southeast coast remember back a few tries to come up and it stays off shore mark unless this goes in south of the bend of Florida west Palm Beach in that area it's not going to go into Florida because what happens is when this with powerful storms are trying to move up to the Florida coast because of the effects of wind they tend to stay off shore.

chief meteorologist Joe Bahamas Cork Matthew Florida Palm Beach Korea grand Bahama thirty six hours
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on The Tim McKernan Show

The Tim McKernan Show

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on The Tim McKernan Show

"That he didn't that i am what happened he it you'll hear it mike's be he be volunteer the information about his relationship with the jax snow he gets into that uh talks about the state of st louis which he was very candid on uh and i think something that for people who uh would remember this from the mid 1990s the death of bob richards who was uh not only the chief meteorologist it cast he k but really mike bush in bob richards because of what was really or genius promotion on the part of the people at cast decay became known as a tandem from these promotions therein uh bob and mike they would host labor day telethon together they had this report on the air where they will give each other trouble and then bob richards uh crashed his plane uh following a newscast um and i've never heard mike talk about i don't know why mike would have talked about it anywhere but uh we got into that and i didn't know if you'd want to get into that i don't know if he necessarily wanted to but we talked about it uh and and all that he is experienced in his career uh because he's truly seen it all heard it all and told many of you about it all over the last thirty plus years so to be able to sit down with mike bush uh and hear his stories with something i really was looking forward to doing it did not disappoint once again i always go to my uh jury the seamaster and nick for their reaction and they love it and i and i am glad because i didn't know if it.

bob richards chief meteorologist mike bush
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Said they never dreamed of turning it into a business jessica says that building fronin has not only been a turningpoint in her life but has also taught her about the importance of doing what you love like many college seniors jessica felt uncertain about her future career path she says she always had an entrepreneurial spirit but never knew how to pursue those passions until she became a part of the startup community at eu chicago her game changing decision was to give up her fulltime job offer and work on fronin i bet that was a hard call jessica i wonder what your parents said she says her motivation to make the choice was seeing how happy fronin makes customers if she could give herself some advice at the start she would tell herself to listen to the advice of others but always remember to trust her instincts if something doesn't feel right it probably isn't and to have confidence in her decisions what i love about jessica story is that she went for it she had an idea she found a local competition to enter and that gave her a foot in the door to make her company a reality and what better way to do that than when you're in college to test it out that's a great place to test out ideas if you're listening in college start testing start experimenting some food for thought brought to you by fronin some frozen food for thought in windy chicago jessica garten steam i wish you continued success i look forward to try and you're frozen and congratulations on being are no limits entrepreneur of the week remember if you or someone you know should be featured year on no limits as an entrepreneur send me your nomination to no limits with rj podcast gmailcom that is no limits with rj podcast gmailcom i love hearing from you i read every email that comes into that address thank you for those who have shared them thank you to those who have made nominations again you're welcome to send me a note you're also welcome to send me a note there if you have questions and you want to be featured in our arjang answer said.

jessica eu chicago rj
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Uh but yes but but do something where you're writing it earlier living it every day i think it's a great idea and fingerprint your face now yeah exactly a fine when you back the back when you were doing that there just weren't even breaches so everything was fine ginger zee thank you so much for coming on no limits was great chatting with you as grade to tell the too i hope everybody enjoys it natural disaster i cover them i am one by ginger zee my friend and abc news chief meteorologist thank you so much and now it's time for our no limits entrepreneur of the week where we feature one of our listeners who's building something of her own and are no limits entrepreneur this week is jessica garten steam she is the ceo and cofounder of fronin jessica just graduated from the university of chicago congratulations jessica that's awesome of see my alma mater throughout her college career jessica had internships and finance and marketing but this past mae she and a friend one first place at a startup competition at the booth school of business that is the university of chicago business school for their banana based non dairy nice cream called fronin one month after winning they officially launched in hyde park produce and are now featured in nine stores across chicago her biggest turning point she says that winning the competition at the booth school completely changed her career path she and her cofounder would make banana nice cream for fun while at college but they say.

ceo hyde park chicago chief meteorologist jessica garten university of chicago booth school of business one month
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"I can't believe it's been a long of course it means the world who knows how long we have our parents who knows how long we have each other so fit something for family and something that so really at this point kind of monumental i was telling my husband this and he's like no way you haven't seen your dad for thanksgiving in twenty years wing know between my mom always being and with my mom's or working most of the last twenty years for every holiday if i had time to go somewhere it was with my stepfather's family in chicago i haven't i haven't spent in it that is so sad and it needs to change while it's art of the tradeoffs that's i think that yet to be honest about what our businesses it is one of the tradeoffs especially in the early years when you're when you're building the career yeah and you have to do the sacrifices you you have to be open to that i think that just knowing your limit i am knowing when you don't have a limit knowing when you can get to that point but it will mean something a year from now to me and that's how one of those things that i ask myself when i when i go to say no is it going to be worth saying now the trade off with if you were in a meteorologist if you weren't on good morning america every morning what would you wanna do with your life so i didn't know whether it all i can't even like oh work for new i had district than what i mean is is working for an airline oh you would you would look at meteorology like half ef oh interesting have meteorologist you know something but i think it's fair to get away from meteorology if you're asking that question and then my answer gets really fun because i would love to bartender guess.

chicago america thanksgiving twenty years
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"With that with that kind of reporting in his foreseeing foreshadowing wants to come there's a huge responsibility to get it right yeah how much do you go back and look and say what did i say versus what actually happened at oh my gosh that's all we do do breakdown down the national weather service this year got great accolades as they should have uh especially for our at surrounding hurricane season if you look at the paths they've they've gotten better and better and better and on a personal level when i used to be in chicago for example i would regularly go back and say how many days before did i get people a heads up that they'd have a hailstorm because even if it's going to be hailed it's ruining your car in your your roof and it's not going to be killing unisys airlie i just felt a lot of responsibility especially in a local market to do that um i take it very seriously almost two seriously i'm a little overly ambitious with and with my team and i thought that this last hurricane season what is a great example because our job beyond just showing who's going to be affected if the impacts and so that's what i have now settled on this is my biggest job it's not just who's in the cone but who's going to feel what when and if i can make that clear in one minute that i have on television i feel like i've really done something because if i can get to that you know thirty people that live in this part of the you know florida on this side of florida and then realized that they're more in the storm surge area and if these people over here and then if they tell people hey i watch this person that i find credible in the new or they follow me on social media and i can get that information out correctly feels pretty good feels pretty exciting again on the locals to just going back to chicago though i used to have people tweeting me from their basement and they'd be like hortaosorio you told us to take cover when can we get out of my head he so get very personal i like that too i left the ability to juggle up you can come out now come on now.

chicago florida social media one minute
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"And so it'd be watching these storms in the power and the beauty of nature having that energy it grabbed me and there's something i fell in love with it there's a real it's it developed a passion for it and then i realized as i was in school science math just made more sense to me you know you sit me down dramatically i'm not strong i didn't take any communications glasses i don't know how i got here to be the oie you'd never know of abbvie as a first of all also in the book you talk about when you're nineteen years old and you went to this it was your first tv job yet like an internship labor on television all my gosh my pbs taste you ever look back on those but i don't have the tape or you don't have is hey y'all i'm so upset so i didn't save anything i think i it was all vhs or beta and so i taped over everything 'cause you know that's another thing about life don't tape over yourself at some very good point um i there are some videos that guy taped over in my youth and i would love to go back and see those between a nice to have nice in the way that i was so her horrible on tv v like every jedi usually as un with start that's i actually tell people that because i think young people who starred in this business they think that there's there's like somebody who's going to start on day one and be fantastic and be like i'm great in this just happened that doesn't happen i sounded more like many miles than i do now i was so so green and it will but at the same time the repetition of being able to go to a studio learn how to make graphics even if we were stealing weather channel graphics photo shopping off of them which is totally illegal uh that experience in coming from that very bottom you can't get less that a pbs station in northwest indiana really.

indiana nineteen years
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Antle health challenge you don't even have to depends on how you you know what you have everybody's is different and you can still succeed i did i was going through some of the worst at my most successful times and so i had this two two sides of me thing that i've always had and so now saying it out loud riding in a book for everybody to read and then publicly talking about it i think that's the next level of healing and those were the moments the more wrote the more reason i go back to the wedding that i that i had to call off and i'm proud you know i'm proud of that moment which own so strange it was heartbreaking in the time and i love the what a lovely person he is but now he's got his family and we have our own lives and i think all of us grow and we can see perspective when we have time so those stories were almost easy to tell me drunk under a bridge in chicago easy to tell maybe hasn't been drunk under a bridge in chicago ice italy hazard though come he added a blizzard note ted have a meteorologist george later later under a bridge having a homeless woman hand her her hat that's that's while jaansen high rail that story yeah that's a moment will i think i also think that there is strength in vulnerability and i think in our job it easy public facing job i didn't know frankly a lot of these things about you in the book that i that i read about but i also think that if you live today in a public racing job and you're trying to conceal things they're trying to hold them back from being exposed that has to be a very exhausting existence it does and i think i see especially after i did dancing with the stars that changed a lot for me much did changed my demo that sounds so strange but the people who use to like watching me on television were probably my biggest fan base were mostly men love you guys awesome but kind of like has dancing changed it to young women and i suddenly had this huge group of women in general but mostly young women reaching out to me telling me you're my inspiration.

chicago george italy ted
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"You're in the right place on today's episode abc's very own chief meteorologist ginger zee for unexpected and unfiltered story of struggle and resilience the selfproclaimed natural disaster details her story for perfomance she fell in love with the weather to her battle with depression to fighting her inner strength and gratitude ginger zee welcome to deliver it thank you i am so happy to be across the steve will from you i'm thrilled to have you here ginger is a friend she's a colleague she is our chief meteorologist at abc news the first female chief meteorologist for a major network which is a huge accomplishment it is it's pretty exciting and really there hasn't been a lot of meteorologist so they just to be one of the few of those is pretty special because you actually studied meteorology that's how long become a meteorologist not just because you play went on television her head but you are a good morning america every single morning covering all the weather headlines you're on world news tonight almost every night as well you have your abc news original digital series food more cast and now you are also an author your book out today natural disaster i cover them i am one and i love it ginger in easily this is first of all i would encourage everyone whose listening to read the book because i think for anybody who thinks about getting into this business it's very useful to understand what really does happen behind the scenes and you let people in on a lot of real authentic experiences and it gets raw oh yeah no this is not a this is not a book where you say oh it's very nice and i'm a nice sweater and i looked really am going to give you the kind story no while i mean the only giving a real mole thing begins with you cancelling your wedding yeah i mean and that's the thing i went in what took to write this book i really wanted to write a board book for children like a had a baby at thought i'll start with like fouryearolds that's a that's a really easy you know write a couple of where us pictures let some weather together but i had a very simple concept in mind and we went in and i.

ginger zee chief meteorologist america abc
"chief meteorologist" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"chief meteorologist" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"On the phone and joe is the the chief meteorologist or the chief i anyway what are you what what is exactly you're title i'm a chief meteorologist have a degree of meteorology would an degree it's hard to get it was for me ripe math and phyo i make sure i'm just people known as the forecaster and he is so i play one on radio a he is who have who a whether bell dot com and joe's a friend of the program and been around forever and is probably one of the most accurate voices when it comes to calling hurricanes for sure in the world and were thrilled to have him on the joe eat we weren't even seeing harvey come on shore yet when you started telling us wait wait wait there's another one coming that might even be more dangerous can you tell the latest is on erma well all right over the north east through the virgin islands right now and it's going to pass north of puerto rico would probably spare puerto rico a devastating hurricane in fact i'm sure it's close ferrets duggleby like you go in eighty nine uh so they're going to have a hurricane on the north coast of puerto rico's no question about that probably eighty two hundred mile an hour wind gust but they're not getting into that inner core that just uh yes we had to be uh just absolutely horrific over those islands last night by buddha saint martin uh where this thing hit directly uh the devastation it's going to come out of there is probably something that uh a few people have ever seen uh in the western hemisphere guilin now i don't fade out lightly if you're getting blasted by.

joe chief meteorologist forecaster harvey puerto rico fade out