40 Burst results for "Chief Medical Officer"

Fresh update on "chief medical officer" discussed on Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

00:36 min | 30 min ago

Fresh update on "chief medical officer" discussed on Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

"Americans at risk of losing their homes. Starting tomorrow, people will all the money they haven't paid in either rent or mortgage payments. Many of them are still out of work. Russia blames a software glitch and possible human error for throwing the international space station out of control. Cameron Fairchild reports thrusters on a Russian research module ignited a few hours after it docked, causing the entire station to spin out of position. Seven crew members are aboard. NASA says a flight director declared an emergency as engineers on the ground struggled to restore the position of the station, which pitched end over end for nearly an hour. I'm Cameron Fairchild. Hundreds of people gathering at the Texas Capitol in Austin today to push for the passage of a new federal voting rights bill. Civil rights leaders are calling on Congress to pass the four the People Act. I'm Brad Siegel and I'm Daddy's Pellegrini in the Bloomberg newsroom. Covid numbers in the tri state area are surging as the Delta Wave takes hold but hospitalizations relatively low. Meantime, another wave of covid concerns among the vaccinated this one to San Francisco hospitals. At least 233 staff members of the hospitals tested positive for Covid this month. Dr Luke John Day is the chief medical officer of San Francisco general in July, he says more than 50 staff members there tested positive for Covid 75 to 80% were fully vaccinated. So a small portion but how they got covid is interesting in close to over 99% of.

Brad Siegel Nasa Cameron Fairchild Congress Austin July Luke John Day Texas Capitol Today Tomorrow More Than 50 Staff Members Seven Crew Members Hundreds Of People 75 80% Bloomberg People Act Pellegrini Over 99% Russia
Ravages of COVID Surge Evident Inside Missouri Hospital

AP News Radio

01:04 min | 2 d ago

Ravages of COVID Surge Evident Inside Missouri Hospital

"I'm Missouri hospital that had no copay patients just two months ago is now dealing with the July surge the ravages of the fast spreading delta variant or becoming a parent in a state with one of the nation's lowest vaccination rates lake regional hospital in the heart of Missouri's lake of the Ozarks region has seen twenty two people die from the virus in the first twenty three days of July the lake of the Ozarks region averages five and a half million visitors annually local counties vaccination rates are less than forty percent doctor how much Sanga is lake regional's chief medical officer big time though the virus orange here lot of admissions lots of people who are very sick and I'm dying thirty one year old Darryl Barker was against the co the backseat and so were his relatives now he's in the ICU at lake regional transfer from Branson where the hospitals are maxing out six year old son and wife Billy Barker said outside his ICU room in lawn chairs looking in through the glass any side effects that you're going to have from the being vaccinated are are way better than having to do this I'm Jennifer king

Ozarks Missouri Darryl Barker Billy Barker ICU Branson Jennifer King
Fresh "Chief Medical Officer" from The Wendy and Ray Show

The Wendy and Ray Show

00:43 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "Chief Medical Officer" from The Wendy and Ray Show

"Todd Bork wls Amy 90 with another update in 30 Minutes from ABC News signed Chuck Stevenson. We're all dreams. So we're all out of about a little bit of a breaking point. Dr. Natasha Kathuria e R doctor in Austin, Texas Emergency Center Because of the surge of Covid patients, she sounds like an old recording from the crush of patients last year, but this is now and among her fellow hospital employees. Morale is a little bit low. We're very disheartened. It's becoming more and more difficult to, you know, keep our strength to major San Francisco Hospital. Zuckerberg San Francisco general and U. C S F reporting more than 230 staff members infected with Covid at San Francisco General Hospital, Dr Luke John Day is the chief medical officer. Staff are getting Coben that we saw before even it's mostly vaccinated staff, and that's just because of the easy enough restrictions US is reporting over 100,000 new covid cases in a single day, says data from the CDC, the highest in six months. Florida reporting over 21,000 positive test the past 24 hours as Florida's largest single day increase of covid cases since the start of the pandemic, New Orleans reimposing a mask mandate. Mayor LaToya Cantrell, You really need that mask on period. Whether you are vaccinated and of course, if you are unvaccinated, some Republicans call election security measures brought this on the steps of the Texas State Capitol calls for voting rights protections and reforms. The Reverend William Barber, along with former Texas Congressman Beto O'Rourke, joining forces with other voting rights advocates.

Chuck Stevenson San Francisco Hospital Beto O'rourke 30 Minutes Luke John Day CDC Amy 90 Todd Bork San Francisco General Hospital Six Months Last Year Republicans William Barber New Orleans Zuckerberg Mayor Abc News More Than 230 Staff Members Over 21,000 Positive Test Over 100,000 New Covid Cases
Biden Wants 70% of American Adults Vaccinated by July 4

WBZ Midday News

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

Biden Wants 70% of American Adults Vaccinated by July 4

"In the fight against covert 19, and the date is familiar. It's July 4th of this year, but now he wants 70% of American adults who have gotten at least one shot by Independence Day. There is resistance, especially in rural America. CBS's David Begnaud continues our coverage. The Biden administration is also planning to work with more local doctors, who they believe will be key to breaking through that vaccine distrust in local communities. Dr. Stephen Lakey is the chief medical officer at a hospital in Fort Collins, Colorado, in the northern part of the state. There aren't any demographic that are gonna be suspicious or or have not heard the message from either you know, national sources or from national news, And I think having that impact of having our local leaders in those rural environments is gonna be critical. Back in Maryland vaccine administrator Cornell candidate says some people have been able to overcome their vaccine hesitancy. In a game

David Begnaud Biden Administration Dr. Stephen Lakey CBS Fort Collins America Colorado Maryland
Fresh update on "chief medical officer" discussed on Handel on the Law

Handel on the Law

00:42 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief medical officer" discussed on Handel on the Law

"And it's becoming more and more difficult to, you know, keep our strength to major San Francisco Hospital. Zuckerberg San Francisco general and U. C S F reporting more than 230. Staff members infected with Covid at San Francisco General Hospital, Dr Luke John Day as the chief medical officer or staff are getting covid that we saw before even and it's mostly vaccinated staff and that's just because of the easiness restriction US is reporting over 100,000 new covid cases in a single day, says Data from the CDC, the highest in six months. Florida reporting over 21,000 positive test the past 24 hours as Florida's largest single day increase of covid cases since the start of the pandemic. New Orleans reimposing a mask mandate Mayor LaToya Cantrell. You really need that mask on period whether you are vaccinated and of course, if you are unvaccinated what some Republicans call election security measures brought this on on the steps of the Texas State Capitol calls for voting rights protections and reforms. The Reverend William Barber, along with former Texas congressman Beto O. Rourke, joining forces with other voting rights advocates to put the spotlight on the state's passing restrictive voting measures. Including Texas. Voter suppression isn't a partisan issue eight to the quality issue. Charlie Bonner's WITH Move Texas The rally today, marking the end of the four day 27 Mile Moral march for democracy that began in Georgetown, Texas, designed to echo the Selma and Montgomery march of 1965. ABC's Michelle Franzen on the Texas Rally. You're listening to ABC News. I can't wait. News radio time. 52, part of Boulder.

Michelle Franzen ABC Charlie Bonner San Francisco Hospital San Francisco General Hospital Beto O. Rourke CDC Boulder Luke John Day Selma Georgetown, Texas Abc News Over 100,000 New Covid Cases More Than 230 William Barber Today U. C S F Six Months New Orleans Montgomery
India Tops 200,000 Dead as Virus Surge Breaks Health System

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

India Tops 200,000 Dead as Virus Surge Breaks Health System

"An Indian song the repeaters Karan tells the AP this call would be alive today if the hospital who just admitted him instead of waiting for a piece of paper three days off to his corona viruses symptoms appear to question the Chiron struggled to believe instead of waiting for an ambulance his son drove him to a government hospital in Lucknow the couple of India's largest take it without Pradesh but the hospital wouldn't let him in without a registration slip the district's chief medical officer by the time the sun goes it his father had died in the car just outside the hospital's stories of death tangled in bureaucracy and system failures have become just really come on India where deaths have not officially surged past two hundred thousand but the figure is likely follower the new troop count I'm Charles through this month

Karan Chiron AP Lucknow India Charles
Fresh update on "chief medical officer" discussed on American Warrior Radio

American Warrior Radio

01:15 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief medical officer" discussed on American Warrior Radio

"30 and 18 are recommended alternates. A mother and her baby got ejected from a car during a recon torrents in which the infant died towards police officers responded to the call of a two vehicle wreck last night in 220th streets and Western Avenue, the mother and child to riding in the back seat of one of the cars hit when they were ejected and rushed to the hospital. The five month old died and her mother remains hospitalized in critical condition. The wreck is being investigated with no charges filed in the case. So far, that was a quick from ABC News on Chuck's Everton were all dreamed. So we're all had about a little bit of a breaking point. Dr Natasha Kip Theory. But this is now and among her fellow hospital employees. Morales a little bit low, We're very disheartened. It's becoming more and more difficult to keep our strength to major San Francisco Hospital. Zuckerberg San Francisco general and U. C S F reporting more than 230. Staff members infected with Covid at San Francisco General Hospital, Dr Luke John Day is the chief medical officer. Staff are getting covid that we saw before even and it's mostly vaccinated staff and that's Just because of the easiness restriction. US is reporting over 100,000 new covid cases in a single day, says data from the CDC, the highest in six months. Florida reporting over 21,000 positive test the past 24 hours. It's Florida's largest single day increase of covid cases since the start of the pandemic. New Orleans reimposing a mask mandate Mayor LaToya Cantrell. You really need that mask on period whether you are vaccinated and of course, if you are unvaccinated what some Republicans call election security measures brought this on on the steps of.

Chuck San Francisco Hospital Western Avenue Luke John Day Two Vehicle 18 220Th Streets 30 CDC Six Months Abc News New Orleans Over 100,000 New Covid Cases Zuckerberg More Than 230 San Francisco General Hospital Last Night Republicans Latoya Cantrell Five Month Old
Using AI to Improve Health Behaviors with Ravi Komatireddy, of Motiv Health Inc.

Outcomes Rocket

02:27 min | 3 months ago

Using AI to Improve Health Behaviors with Ravi Komatireddy, of Motiv Health Inc.

"Today i have the privilege of hosting dr ravi kamata ready. He's Digital health entrepreneur. Who is currently the founder and ceo of motive health inc a startup passionately focused on using human and ai. Coaches for health behavior change. He is an internal medicine physician. Who trained at dartmouth hitchcock medical center and the university of california san diego. Additionally he was the first and i h wireless digital health scholar at the scripps translational science institute and west health institute where he earned a masters in clinical translation investigation previously. He co founded and served. As the chief medical officer of two funded digital health startups numata inc. A big data. Ai healthcare company focused on creating the world's largest medical graph database which was eventually acquired by google and reflection health inc digital medicine avatar lead gamified virtual physical therapy solution using motion tracking cameras in the home. He also received i grant from nasa flight opportunities program to advance research in digital health and human spaceflight. That's pretty cool. And the work that he's doing is really cool at motive health so i'm excited to have him on the podcast. Welcome robert thanks. Thanks so much for having me you know when you list that stuff off it sounds like a lot and i think about it like wow. That is a lot. I don't have time for all that. Well you know a lot of people that do great things ravi are usually the ones that do the majority of them and i say if you want something done. Give it to the busiest person you now. That's that's definitely a lifestyle that have adopted. Well thank you very much for having me on. Be glad to talk about what everyone talk about absolutely so before we go there robbie. I definitely want to learn about health and listeners. Definitely learn about it. Talk to us a little bit about. What inspires your work and healthcare. Honestly i can tell you the line about you know we should make everyone feel better and not be sick and stuff like that but if i had to drill it down to what really inspires me about it because those things are true. The truth is it's about human performance. I'm just fascinated by what people can achieve when they work together on things and i'm talking in let's just if we zoom out for go to like everything from pyramids to highways vaccines landing on the moon. This is like no aliens didn't build that stuff right this is people so it's people coming together rallying around a common goals a pretty amazing thing and you can get some amazing things done without right. You can explore the universe. You can figure out how to solve really complicated problems. So that's only possible. Would you have people

Dr Ravi Kamata Motive Health Inc Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Ce Scripps Translational Science West Health Institute Numata Inc. Robert Thanks University Of California San Diego Nasa Ravi Google Robbie
Fresh update on "chief medical officer" discussed on Climate One

Climate One

02:43 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief medical officer" discussed on Climate One

"Move over G M o, But it's not just a technology she's critical of. I'm critical of the worldview of arrogance. The worldview that came to colonialism the mechanistic mindset of the conquering man being the creator of the earth and creator of the wealth that they basically stole. Montana Shiva and tapping biodiversity to counter the hubris of corporations manipulating nature up next on climate one Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Amy held senators are returning to the capital for a Saturday session as they forge ahead on a $1 trillion infrastructure plan. It contains billions for roads, rail and bridges as well as broadband access and clean energy. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is optimistic the bill will be completed in a matter of days, The Senate remains on track to reach our goal of passing both of bipartisan infrastructure bill and a buzz it resolution. With reconciliation instructions before the start of the August recess. Schumer says senators will vote on several amendments this weekend. A national eviction moratorium is set to expire tonight, putting millions of Americans at risk of eviction. Yesterday, the House tried and failed to extend to October the freeze the CDC imposed to slow the spread of Covid 19. The Justice Department is suing Texas over Governor Greg Abbott's order that state troopers impound vehicles suspected of transporting migrants as a way to curb covid. NPR's John Burnett Reports The Justice Department is asking a federal judge to block the Texas governor's sweeping executive order that would allow state police to pull over buses and vans lawfully transporting migrants have been processed and released by the Department of Homeland Security. DHS relies on humanitarian, non governmental organizations to help transport migrants from border patrol processing centers to bus stations. Attorney General Merrick Garland called Abbot's order dangerous and unlawful. Abbott, a Republican who is using immigration as a hot button issue in his reelection campaign, said On the contrary, he is trying to protect Texans for migrants who could be infected with coronavirus. John Burnett. NPR News at the Tokyo Olympics today, a male Kenyan sprinter tested positive for a banned substance, according to team Kenya. He's been suspended from today's qualifiers. American BMX racer and defending gold medalist Connor Fields is hospitalized in Tokyo after crashing at the Olympics. NPR's Leila Fadel reports he sustained a brain hemorrhage and broken rib at his semi finals Heat. Fields is out of the critical care unit but is still being treated in the hospital after slamming headfirst into the ground following a jump that was leading into his first turn during the semifinal runs. Medics rushed him off the course on a stretcher. The chief medical officer of the U. S Olympic team, along with the USA cycling medical team, and coaches have been evaluating him in a statement, The team says they found no additional bleeding or injuries. And no family. Members of athletes were allowed to travel to Tokyo because of the pandemic, so family members of fields have been getting UPDATES from team officials. Leila Fadel NPR NEWS Tokyo swimmers Caleb Dressel and Katie Ledecky got gold for the US Today, Dressel set a world record for the 100 M butterfly With a time of 49.45 seconds, Ledecky became the first female swimmer to win. Six individual golds with her 800 freestyle victory. You're listening to NPR news. Flash Flood watches are in effect across the West this weekend. Rain is providing some relief to the drought stricken region, but the National Weather Service says it could reach monsoon levels. Wildfire burn scars increased flood risk in parts of Arizona, California and Nevada. Third round of mass demonstrations is taking place across France today against New Health passed restrictions. Rebecca Rosman reports from Paris. France is one of the first countries to mandate proof of Covid 19 vaccination for certain activities. At least four demonstrations are expected in Paris alone with.

Caleb Dressel Leila Fadel Katie Ledecky Rebecca Rosman Abbott $1 Trillion Ledecky Tokyo Dressel October John Burnett 49.45 Seconds DHS Nevada National Weather Service Olympics Washington Schumer AMY Tokyo Olympics
Surging Virus Has Michigan's Whitmer at Loggerheads With Biden

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:00 min | 3 months ago

Surging Virus Has Michigan's Whitmer at Loggerheads With Biden

"About two. Dozen hospitals in the great state of michigan are at ninety percent capacity or above as that state steel. That state deals with a huge surge in cova crisis at least one michigan hospital the mclaren port huron hospitals at one hundred percent capacity as of this morning chief medical officer. They're saying that when his hospital tried to transfer out some of its patients with the most acute needs. They couldn't do it They faced long delays trying to move patients out because so many hospitals are so crowded. There's nowhere to move them. To as michigan cova cases and hospitalizations continue to rise inexorably without any relief at all. The michigan health and hospital association said today they expect the number of hospitalizations in the state to beat last fall's peak to head up higher than they have ever been before during the crisis at all. This is the daily new reported coronavirus cases in michigan. Right now there are dozens of states that are having covid case numbers spike across the country but michigan is by far the worst. Still though even in light of that today. The white house confirmed again that they're not planning to send an extra allocation of vaccines to to michigan. That is what governor gretchen. Whitmer is asking for to try to get michigan's crisis under control. The white house says they will send other resources to michigan to try to help but not additional vaccine supplies when you have an acute situation Extraordinary number of cases like we have in michigan. The answer is not necessarily to give vaccine in fact. We know that the vaccine will have a delayed response. The answer to that is to really close things down to go back to basics to go back to where we were last spring Last summer to down to flatten occurred to decrease contact with one another to chaffetz to the extent that we have available to to contact tracers. Sometimes can't even do it at the capacity that you

Michigan Mclaren Port Huron Hospitals Michigan Health And Hospital A Cova Governor Gretchen White House Whitmer Chaffetz
"chief medical officer" Discussed on Blazing Trails

Blazing Trails

07:27 min | 4 months ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Blazing Trails

"And they have a task force and they're out there publicly communicating. I think people tend to trust what's happening and you're more likely to get buying into whatever it is you're trying to do. I mean this is simple. Change management one. Oh one transparent open. Communication is key to success in these types of initiatives. So i think that's really really important In these types of initiatives. And i think when you think about that building trust as really it is at the heart of this conversation to meredith when you're thinking about how companies are going to be using the product for with employees and with customers and building the trust to share that information to use that information in different ways. How are you thinking about this. And how is the product developed to address that so many of the points that dr ash talked about we have corresponding technology. That's native in our platform that we law so the communications aspect is really coming through with personalized journeys in campaign. This is an ongoing communication program and our platform. Does that every topic now for a very important one around vaccinations. We have let him mobile technology. So we've several customers that are using our platform to schedule nurses to go into the elderly home and deliver vaccinations. Right in the home again. bringing the vaccinations to people as opposed to expect Able to come so that is a big part of equity and we're looking at using our platform in the mobile assets our platform to expand that beyond the elderly to the underrepresented minorities and countries lovely. That are hesitant around the vaccination. I think that it's really important to think about emerging conversation. That's happening right now. Which is what am i going to do when it comes to mind fleas. How am i going to prepare do. I need to know their vaccination status or not and. I think it's really interesting to see. It's it's going to be an ongoing dialogue but we certainly see that for Acing employees if you're a company that has facing employees customers already asking that i want the people visiting my premise to be vaccinated. And so you're seeing that need that i think private sector is looking at a little hesitantly but realizing this is going to be the new normal. This is how they operate their businesses and they have a new type of customer engagement that they need to plan for and of course. That's the hard let salesforce does. And so we can put those tools and let them modify them to meet their titular. Customer needs and certainly a big context on her aspect is going to becoming with the digital passports. I need to be able to go to my state. And yet my validation credentials that i've been vaccinated so this is opening up a whole new type of interactions around the digital passport. The identities and one of the questions on the table is will. We be like what's happening in israel. Where when you're booking a restaurant in your shine up the restaurant you're pulling out your digital credential to show that you've been vaccinated or not and this is where the salesforce engagement layers be critical to put that into every business from travel transportation hospitality financial services and this gets to this growing reach of what that scene brown is emerging to deliver on beyond enabling vaccination distribution meredith. Can you give some examples of companies on the cutting edge of deploying this technology sure so in many cases is just augmenting their current platform usage and were delivering basically prepackaged automation component. So that they can hit the ground running and so one common use cases. I'm going to ask my employees to let me know if they've been vaccinated and so they'll upload a picture of their vaccination card to a portal and our einstein automation And will correlate that yes. It's meredith's picture and information on that card and then will flag me as an employee who's in vaccinated and then i'll be scheduled to go to that customer site. I'll be scheduled in a different way from an unvaccinated employees. That's happening today. I'm that's happening across many companies. That have a workforce that is going to customer premises. So you know a very easy but prepackaged it's it's really just using the automation that's needed in the salesforce platform in a way to run their business and inform a better scheduling of employees. So that's an easy and very common question. We have other customers that are asking us if an employee is sick even if they've been vaccinated what do we do. You know that's where the contact tracing would kick in and you need to be. We have the full suite of products. I think our contact tracing is protecting over six hundred million people right now collectively and so. This is where we have all those tools that would then not allow the employee to go into the office. You know they've tested. They're not feeling well. And then the contact tracing support you know what is the employer wants to do for that employee. Or what is the state going to do for that citizen to support them is. They're actually sick because people are still getting covered right now as well. I think it's something that people wanna forget about that. You have to correlate testing as well you know airlines will working with many airlines right now. in order to issue of pass you need to have roof of your testing status now in the future mainly the vaccination status that the systems will support that as just another field to validate before they issue that boarding us so you know when we have customers like like each publicly talk about how they're going to be having events where only vaccinated people will be able to come to that event. How do you manage that right. So it's this whole new normal of returning back to normal and doing it in the most seamless virtuous way but keeping people safe just to activate. Those are all such good points. I just wanna add and say to what man it said. Which i think is so important. There is gonna come a time. Where countries are going to mandate that people have to show proof of axa nation or negative testing or organizations like live nation etc will mandate that you need to be vaccinated come on premises but when it comes to employers i think there are going to be countries or places where they're going to leave it up to the employer to decide and You know some employers decide that you have to be backs news to come on site while others may not be able to do that for everybody. I mean there are people who will have allergies to vaccines that are unable to get it. There are people that don't want to get it for you know religious reasons etc we see with flu and other types of acids right. So you're going to have like some exclusion criteria for people who can't get a vaccine and so are you going to create an environment where they're not allowed and create a divide because of people who can and cannot get the vaccines right and it's not even people that are choosing not to their other reasons. Why people may not be able to get vaccines citing. What meredith I don't think we're gonna just vaccinate people and move on and move away from a testing and tracing testing tracing combined with.

israel Acing over six hundred million peopl today meredith one common use cases each one of the questions dr ash
"chief medical officer" Discussed on Blazing Trails

Blazing Trails

06:46 min | 4 months ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Blazing Trails

"Portfolios including service cloud in work dot com meredith was co founder and ceo of haywire of cloud based enterprise messaging platform which was acquired by salesforce in two thousand sixteen and is the first female. Ceo who's company is now part of salesforce. So welcome meredith. Thank happy to be here okay. Great what dr ash. Let's start with you like so. Many companies salesforce has jumped in to help during the pandemic what sales forces role been responding to covid nineteen since march twenty. Twenty can you give us an overview. Yes absolutely so you know. I have to say we jumped in very early on in the pandemic and going and we didn't start on the technology front we started hearing from many of the frontline workers that they didn't have enough Personal protective equipment masks gowns etc. So we internally mobilize effort to go out in procure. Ppe and broadened sixty million pieces of p. e. and distributed to frontline workers and that was very early. I want to say back in march of last year like he called out. Then we really a lot to play our part to help with the pandemic. initially we Release bait in may of last year technology capabilities. To help folks get back to work and that was around something called dot com and it had everything from a command center to emergency response management tools to contact tracing everything that was required as companies were looking to have their employees back in the workplace and asked that went on. You know we started adding more capabilities american out a lot more to this around vaccine capabilities but it became fairly obvious as vaccine. Rollout started that. We really needed to dedicate an entire cloud around this. Because you know we are able to like provide an end to end tool and hence came out. Vaccine crowd in january of this year really With like i said end to end peop- abilities with the logistics and scheduling patients callback of patients surveys and reporting tools etc and in january released seen cloud wonderful and. Just follow up on that as you know your history in the medical field and you're sort of relationships. What were people talking about plano. It's interesting because you would think that. Crm is unrelated really to what was needed in the pandemic. But for those of us. I come from a public health background. I was government during some previous natural disasters. And i can tell you you know. The first thing that many of us were talking about is how we lacked command center. How we lack the capability of really looking at all these different sources of data on a single pane and how we lack the ability to have all of these tools at our fingertips so we can make quick decisions right in collaborate with each other and for those of us companies like salesforce. It makes it so obvious to say. Of course we have the capabilities as not a technology problem. Let's get this out there let's help. We have really agile platform that we can really take and make it available to all different industries. And we've seen that throughout the last twenty plus years in this company so why not for helping with the pandemic and so. I think there was a lot of excitement for those of us who come from the healthcare world to see that these capabilities were so relevant. Everything from like. I said a command center to triaging tools using chat bots so much influx of volume into these call centers people asking questions and our line providers weren't used to taking all these calls. Do i have covid. Who do i go see right like we. Technology could triage all of these. Things provide the ability to reduce the load on the few workers that were on the front lines at that time so we saw a lot of capacity and capability where we could quickly come in and help provide technology. Help accelerate these types of changes. That's great and you know that led to work dot com and vaccine cloud meredith the product that you're leading as part of work dot com. Tell me a little bit about how that came about. We weren't even thinking about this product before the pandemic. Just give me a little bit of that history of that. And i was involved from the very beginning when our customers were reaching out in march early to say. We're seeing things i. It was some hospitals and healthcare providers that then it turned into basically many of our customers across all sectors. Were saying how do. I communicate to my employees. How do i communicate to my customers in so salesforce launched what we call salesforce here to free products. He's helped us. Context centers is dr ashes referencing filled with automation and bonds to handle the overload. Right in many cases context senators. Were shut down because the stock was no longer able to into the contact center in phone systems. Were shut down. So this is where the automation platform really kicked into high gear so A product team of folks that near you heard the word contact tracing just listen to what our customers were saying their needs were and literally developed that application in a matter of six weeks and so it's really the salesforce focus on customers and customer success that we've continued throughout the year michael so as the needs and the impact of covid has hit our customers. Across all of our sector's public sector healthcare in private sector. We're listening to their needs. And that's when vaccine cloud came into play because obviously it moved from just protecting my employees mom my citizens with contact tracing to. How do i get them back so needed and so today it's a robust fuck or that's really filled with these imposible modules because it is ultimately a solution that needs to be customized to customers. Need it allows you to do that. Campaign in Ability allows you to do the inventory management it allows you to do the actual appointment scheduling and the outcome monitoring. But it's really takes the pieces that you need and so we're continuing to see that evolve by the way vaccine. Cloud is now moving from enabling those vaccines in the arms to now. How do i engage with my customers in a world where some people are vaccinated. some people aren't vaccinated my office space and my business organization has been profoundly changed by kovin. How do i create an run. This new operating model. How do i interact with my employees because it is a world where the vaccination process is going to continue. This is unfortunately not going to go away. Were worried about our first and second vaccinations but this is going to be an ongoing basis. I am dr. Atkins certainly talked to the longevity and all of the services around the basic vaccinations and then overlay with.

six weeks first january of this year today meredith march Ceo march of last year january dr. michael two thousand Twenty sixty million pieces second vaccinations first thing march twenty american first female dot com
US sees lower death rates among children

Inside Outside Guys

01:27 min | 4 months ago

US sees lower death rates among children

"Rates for Children are down for about everything and for Corona virus, Except for the rare obese adolescents seem to be the patient that would pump the Children's hospital Michigan or another pediatric facility and have a bad outcome now bad outcome, meaning that they would need to go to the ICU and that they might need to be on a breathing machine. We're not usually talking about somebody passing away that that's a rare rare exception in pediatric doctor Rudy Valentini, chief medical Officer of Children's Hospital of Michigan, says the near disappearance of the flu corresponds with the small number of coronavirus cases and deaths among Children were being so few cases of viral infections in general, because I believe distancing and mask and sanitation of your hands. Nobody behaves like they used to call the small numbers of kids who have gotten Corona virus. Ah, higher percentage of cases are among minorities spread with people who live in close proximity. That's why we talk so much about distancing while we talk about masking, they think about if you have a household With four people in it for household is more densely populated in that tends to be less affluent communities to this could still spread the virus. So any one of us you, me or any child could have covert infection today not realized it we call it pre symptomatic and actually be infectious for one or two days before we become symptomatic. And if you're very infectious, early on, and so, yes, that's definitely been shown that Children can do that. But in a year marked by pandemic catastrophe, the lower childhood deaths from all causes is a welcome. Change. I'm decay thinner for WJR Health

Rudy Valentini Children's Hospital Of Michiga Viral Infections Michigan FLU
Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

FT Politics

08:50 min | 4 months ago

Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

"When johnson talks about the uk's world-beating response to covid nineteen vaccine pogrom passes muster. It's been an unqualified success or one of the reasons. His conservative party are so far ahead in the polls over twenty five million brits have received their job so fall but the government unexpectedly announced show fall in the number of vaccines delivered in april juice. Supply issues and the debate has a geopolitical angle. To given the you struggling with its own vaccine rollout slovan the line. The european commission president on the block might even consider export controls. All options are on the table. We are in the crisis of the century. And i'm not ruling out any anything for now because we have to make sure that europeans are vaccinated as soon as possible so sarah. Let's begin with the overall state of the uk's vaccine pogrom based on what was set out in december. It's pretty much all going to plan fairly high levels of takeover ninety four percent i believe and the government is insisting that all over fifty will have had their first job by the middle of april. So what's the problem. Well a week ago we would have said. This was indeed the most Astonishingly amyloid success and a sign of vessel. Buoyant moved around it. Was that the with some very clear briefing to a couple of the saturday newspapers suggesting that we were actually going to move to the over forty's much sooner than expected so it was a bit of a jolt to find out on wednesday that in fact. Nhs people involved in the program had been told that they must hold booking any new appointments throughout april because the been a sudden very significant reduction in the supplies available so that really has put the first serious dent in the narrative which right from december the eight. I think it was the day. That william shakespeare became one of the first two vaccine as now suddenly. The government is in the unaccustomed position of having to explain what's happening and explain why some of the public expectations that they'd raised so hard may not be met to be fair to the government. They still absolutely insisting they're on track with the two big dates that they've set for this program that all over fifty should be vaccinated by the middle of april. And all adult britons. Who wants a job will have had it at the end of july. But there's no question that it's been a difficult political management problem for them this week and very much not the position that they'd hoped to be in the club. Let's have a look at why this might be happening and seven. I spent a lot of this week speaking to people. Whitehall trying to figure out exactly what was going on behind the scenes with matt. Hancock gave us a of clarity in the house of commons and the government is pinning own production issues. The first one is this batch of one point seven million jobs that we sent back for testing and the second thing is the supply from the soham institute of india which again the governor's put down to supply issues but others are saying that actions being blocked by modi's government from shipping out to the uk. Exactly it is pretty opaque what's happening. There are two elements. Here that can hold up. Supplies one is the genuinely technical difficulties in producing a complex biological process. I mean it's not straightforward zanu vaccine and a lot of the manufacturing sites haven't made this sort of marin a vaccine before it scale factor. You could say none of them have because this is the first one. That's the fiso won. The astra zeneca at novartis vaccine is also level to a complicated process. So there are technical supply issues and then there at the political ones. You alluded to and i don't know whether the serum institute of india supply has been blocked for political reasons because india was having rather a good downturn in covert cases. But that's turning up again. Unfortunately and there are feelings. That indian government wanted to have it at home. This is so. I think if we look at the context of this a lot of it is actually not that much of a serious problem that we were crunching the numbers this week and april is a significant moment in the vaccine program for the uk. Because yes they were vaccinated all over fifty which according to people like christie chief medical officer of england which uses ninety nine percents of deaths on messages the pressure on the nhc s. But eneko you have to install the second jobs. Really the po- gum began to scale up towards the end of january and eleven week window. The nhl is set between the first and second doses. That really kicks in april and but hancock said this week that really still going to be delivering about fourteen million jobs throughout april which is low though. It's been in march but it's still a pretty high number so it's probably good to keep it in context with feels really what's gone wrong. Here is expectations that the rogue briefing about forty s really feels like delivers come off the bush tourism bush. Johnson's tried to restrain for much of twenty twenty. One yes and i think some. Nhs officials were less than delighted about that huge raising expectations last weekend. In a way. I think this was always going to be a difficult point for the program. It was absolutely predictable that at the point at which second doses to scale up there was going to be a deep in first doses. So it's perhaps unfortunate that there wasn't more subtle public preparation. You're absolutely right international standards even in april. We're still going to be doing more. Vaccinations than many of our counterparts. So it's particularly unfortunate wasn't better preparation. Because i think in the minds of a lot of britain's the will now be a sense of this program isn't doing well it's stumbled. It didn't have to be this way that it could have been very differently presented. And after all as i said the government is still on track to meet those two deadlines that it says now clive. We need to put this in the context of europe as well and we heard from s. the von d'alene at the top. That and you still really struggling with its vaccine vo loud but the most baffling things. She's seen this week. Is the story about the astra zeneca job and how effective or side effects. That may have in this concern. Over blood clots we heard from the ama from the nhra in the uk from the world health organization. All saying there are no concerns about blood. Clots and ashes annika vaccine yet at didn't stop lawson countries from halting giving out the doses. It's a very complicated picture on side effects. At least the spotlight turned away from efficacy. Before countries in continental europe were worrying that the astrazeneca vaccine wouldn't work well enough to older people. I think the efficacy questions have more or less be answered now. The spotlight is on whether they're adverse side effects and a few of those have been discovered there. These two different sorts of blood disorders do with abnormal clotting thrombosis that have been detected in people who just been vaccinated in norway in germany elsewhere on continental europe. The numbers are tiny. I would say fewer than twenty around the continent. Investigation is still continuing. There's no proven link with the vaccine. But a lot of vaccine knowledge ists the might be a link. But that is no reason to stop the vaccination program when it's saving tens of thousands of lives probably and people have said that just by halting for a few days the astrazeneca vaccination and continental europe. This week until the european medicines agency said it was okay that would have cost lives. It loves cost lives directly because people weren't getting vaccinated and it also probably unfortunately of cost lives indirectly because all the publicity about ad side effects will just undermined confidence in the vaccine

UK Government Soham Institute Of India Astra Zeneca Serum Institute Of India Eneko European Commission William Shakespeare Whitehall Johnson Modi House Of Commons Sarah Hancock Novartis NHC Bush Matt
Indiana health leaders concerned about COVID variants

Hammer and Nigel

00:26 sec | 4 months ago

Indiana health leaders concerned about COVID variants

"But the virus is still around. As of yesterday, Indiana has had 57 cases of the UK variant reported on the CDC. Zmapp and new cases continue to come in. Experience is much more transmissible and we need more people vaccinated so that we can win this race between the vaccine and the variants. They health Commissioner Dr Chris Box says Indiana should see a large shipment of the three available vaccines by the end of this month. White House chief Medical Officer Anthony

Indiana CDC Dr Chris Box UK White House Medical Officer Anthony
Vaccination Efforts Picking up Speed in Florida

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

04:24 min | 4 months ago

Vaccination Efforts Picking up Speed in Florida

"The age for the general population to be vaccinated in the state of Florida for Cove. It is now 60 that began this morning. 60 and up without pre existing conditions. It's just the age and the more that Fizer Johnson Johnson Moderna manufacture the continue to drop that age. Let's talk about our vaccination process how we're doing in the state of Florida. But Dr Joshua Lynch's chief medical officer for Our health Medical center and vice president of the Florida Medical Association. Come, Archie, Doctor Good to talk to you. Good morning to you, Jimmy. Thanks for having me on again. How we doing so far. I think we're doing pretty good. You know, If you look at the national numbers more than 100 million people have already been vaccinated of those good part population, 30 35 million or so and have been fully vaccinated. With the other 70 million, at least having one dose and we're making significant strides. Two thirds of the population over the age of 65 already had one dose. More locally. Here in Florida. We have about a little more than four million people have been vaccinated about. You know, the population of 22 million you have about 10% of our population has already been fully vaccinated. And I think we're well on our way. Definitely down here in the southeast Florida reaching way. We're told that private doctors officers may be getting doses for patients. How do we When would that happen? And how do we know how well that rule out? Yeah, I would imagine that, as we increase as the amount of Johnson Johnson is increased here is only about three million or so doses that Johnson Johnson has has supplied. About half of those have already been used in the United States. But that's really going to be. I think, the foundation of the vaccination effort for private private offices who don't have to maintain the cold storage that that we have to maintain, and the other pieces is that it's only one dose, which is which is great because You don't have to worry about booking that second dose that we do in the health systems for for Visor, Madonna Right, Um Aziz goes forward we're supposed to get. I think almost half million doses of Madonna and Fizer plus Johnson and Johnson this week in the state of Florida. Are they being distributed correctly? In your view across the across the state. I think that there's a lot of logistics that way go into the supply chain of that vaccine distribution. And certainly hindsight is Is 2020. I don't know that anybody had anticipated depend up demand that we still have not just here locally, but across the country and so minor things that you wouldn't even think of like. When you open a phone line, you know, phone line, as you guys know, in the radio phone lines can only take X number of incoming calls. And when you put a call out to tell people is vaccine 10,000 people try to flood the phone system. It could crash the system. So I think that they're doing probably as best as they can. Everything is sort of predicated on the domino before it. And even though the industry that pharmaceutical companies are continuing to pump out as much as they can to get it into the arms of people, because that's really where it needs to be right, and the rollout is faster than we've ever done. I mean, you know, the the messenger RNA has been around for 30 years, We put it into a vaccination vaccination. Now it seems that works beautifully. But, um, But the rollout is faster than what they normally do for this kind of a product correct, And that's real. They're learning as they go. I'm talking about the logistics experts that these pharmaceuticals Always out it out. Yeah, This is your absolutely during the last year. We've used the word unprecedented a lot of times, But this is really I don't even forgiven. Unprecedented. This is this is historic. I mean that Operation works. Speed was incredible. Because if you think about it within the span of one year, you know, we had already identified the genetic code for that protein that was embedded into that messenger. RNA developed a new vex to new vaccines based on that technology and had distributed it and vaccinated people, all within the span in 12 months. That zoo historic.

Florida Fizer Johnson Johnson Moderna Dr Joshua Lynch Our Health Medical Center Florida Medical Association Johnson Johnson Foundation Of The Vaccination Madonna Right Um Aziz Fizer Archie Jimmy Johnson Madonna United States
Alaska becomes first state to open COVID vaccines to almost all

AP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Alaska becomes first state to open COVID vaccines to almost all

"A reporting Alaska's becoming the first U. S Day to open vaccines to nearly all residents. Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy says his state is opening up Cove in 19 vaccinations to anyone 16 or older who lives or works in the state. Dunleavy himself had about with co bid 19 doctor and zinc, the state's chief medical officer said Tuesday After seeing open vaccine appointments, officials decided to allow anyone who wants a vaccine to get one According to the CDC. Alaska has been out front and vaccinations leading states in percentage of its population to have received two doses of a cove in 19 vaccine, I

Alaska Mike Dunleavy Dunleavy CDC
Alaska becoming 1st US state to open vaccines to nearly all

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Alaska becoming 1st US state to open vaccines to nearly all

"Hi Mike Rossi you're reporting Alaska is becoming the first U. S. state to open vaccines to nearly all residents Alaska governor Mike Dunleavy says his state is opening up cove in nineteen vaccinations to anyone sixteen or older who lives or works in the state Dunleavy himself had about with Kobe at nineteen doctor and seek the state's chief medical officer said Tuesday after seeing open vaccine appointments officials decided to allow anyone who wants a vaccine to get one according to the CDC Alaska has been out front in vaccinations leading states in percentage of its population to have received two doses of a coal bid nineteen vaccine hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Alaska Mike Dunleavy Dunleavy Kobe CDC Mike Rossio
Houston bar struggles with how to enforce mask wearing after state mandate was lifted

Morning Edition

03:33 min | 5 months ago

Houston bar struggles with how to enforce mask wearing after state mandate was lifted

"Greg Abbott lifted coronavirus restrictions. He made the announcement in a restaurant. The governor is ending a mask mandate and encouraging businesses to return to 100% capacity. How does that plan look to the staff at a restaurant? The governor did not visit. That's where Houston public Media's Katie Watkins begins her report. They're going around at Neil's Bar in Houston's East downtown neighborhood. A sign on the door reads. No shirt, no shoes, no mask, no service. But bartender Kristin Farmer worries the end of the statewide mask mandate may make that harder to enforce. Even prior to this, it was difficult sometimes to get customers to wear masks. So Going forward. I feel like it's gonna be More so under Governor Greg Abbott's new order businesses, Concil enact their own mask requirements and safety protocols, the bar farmer works that will still require masks and social distancing. But she fears the governor's message may further embolden anti masters and put people like herself who haven't been vaccinated at risk. We're obviously in a position where the vaccine isn't available Death but are trying to still work, so it would be cool if More people were vaccinated before we started opening up everything and Not taking just the basic steps. Currently, just 7% of people living in Texas are fully vaccinated. Still, some praise the governor's decision to allow businesses to operate at full capacity that is going to be tremendous and very, very necessary for our industry. That's Melissa Stewart with a Greater Houston restaurant association. She says. The statewide mask mandate was helpful when it was stay wide, and everybody had to do it. Was easier for staff members, frankly, to enforce it says it wasn't a question. That's why restaurant owner Alex Brennan Martin says he's making mass mandatory for employees but not for customers. Those strongly encouraged. It's become contentious and putting our employees are managers myself. In the position of enforcing those regulations, especially on an issue that seems to be just about 50 50 when you talk to folks and is highly emotionally charged It's a difficult thing to ask your employees and management to do. Houston has recorded all four Major Cove in 19 variants and medical professionals warn that loosening restrictions now will set back recovery efforts. Dr Joseph our own is the chief medical officer at United Memorial Medical Center. His main concern is another spike in hospitalizations. The moment I heard about these information of the governor was saying, I immediately called for a meeting here in the hospital on talking to the rest of the leaders of the hospital. We leave. From initial plans. So what we're going to do because we think we're going to have a large number of patients coming because of this, don't not wear a mask request by the governor, he says. These plans include stocking up on more PPE having more nursing personnel and even getting additional ventilators. Other frontline health care workers like ICU nurse Yvette Polo, Mackey share his concern. Colbert is nowhere near over. There's still people know ICUs like today that are dying that will die tomorrow that will die the next day. The next day, weeks and weeks to come still because of covert. She's worried about the extra physical and mental toll. This decision will take on her colleagues. Who have already been caring for a never ending stream of covert patients for nearly a year for NPR news. I'm Katie Watkins in Houston. The

Katie Watkins Houston Public Media Neil's Bar Kristin Farmer Governor Greg Abbott Concil Greg Abbott Melissa Stewart Greater Houston Restaurant Ass Alex Brennan Martin Houston Major Cove Dr Joseph United Memorial Medical Center Texas Yvette Polo Mackey ICU
COVID-19 Hospitalizations, Infections Trending Down In Houston

Houston Matters

02:02 min | 5 months ago

COVID-19 Hospitalizations, Infections Trending Down In Houston

"Corona virus cases and hospitalizations are lower in houston than they were in january and that light at the end of the tunnel seems to be a bit brighter. Now with a third co vaccine approved by the fda today the three fema sponsored vaccination sites texas are expecting a total of twenty four thousand doses of the johnson and johnson covid nineteen vaccine twelve thousand of. That's headed here to houston. The state is also expecting some two hundred thousand more doses from johnson and johnson. Over the next week. Dr david purses the chief medical officer for the city of houston. He joins us now. Dr purse good morning more great. Thanks for having me sure i. How is houston doing when it comes to the covert infection in hospitalization rates. What are we saying to. The news is good For the most part are hospitalizations are down in houston harris tiny but actually across the region. So that's good to be rates have been coming down it's been a little bit of fluctuation in the last week or so that may be related to winter storm and the number of folks going getting tested but at this point i'm looking to have full part of the glass and feel that the positivity rates are coming down so and as you pointed out we now are interested in delivery of a A third new copa vaccine so a lot of good news to to talk about. And i'm going to talk about the vaccine. But i'm curious if you have any concern about the the fact that houston appears to be the first major city to see essentially every major variant of covid nineteen. So let's talk about half empty part of lassen so you're absolutely right is that we are seeing Well i houston is the first major city to be reporting multiple various from around the globe Do you very clearly here in the community and spreading So you know it does raise concern about what's going to happen in the weeks and months ahead because we we've seen across the globe. Is that the uk very They really sort of taken off. And so we're to some degree in a bit of a race to see how much vaccine we can get into people before the uk variant takes over

Houston Johnson Dr David Fema FDA Texas Harris UK
The positivity rate for new COVID-19 cases remains below 6% in Miami-Dade

Todd Schnitt

00:24 sec | 5 months ago

The positivity rate for new COVID-19 cases remains below 6% in Miami-Dade

"South Florida mayor's commissioners and medical officials are not letting down their guards. But for the moment we are winning the fight against covert 19. Miami Dade chief medical officer Dr Peter Page says. The last two days the county's positivity rate was below 6% drop substantially over the past two weeks, which obviously is favorable are impatient. Positive, admitted Covert patients has actually dropped 20% in the

Miami Dade Dr Peter Page South Florida
Tiger Woods survives car crash in Los Angeles, 'recovering' after surgery

Ray Appleton

00:22 sec | 5 months ago

Tiger Woods survives car crash in Los Angeles, 'recovering' after surgery

"A County sheriff's investigators say Golf star Tiger Woods was seriously injured when his SUV crashed and rolled over several times in suburban L. A harbor U. C. L, A medical center's chief medical officer says would shattered bones in his right leg and suffered additional injuries and his ankle and foot Had to insert a rod in that leg for stability. A statement on Woods Twitter account says he remains awake and responsive and is now recovering.

Tiger Woods Golf Twitter
Tiger Woods suffers multiple leg injuries in single-car accident in Los Angeles

News, Traffic and Weather

01:52 min | 5 months ago

Tiger Woods suffers multiple leg injuries in single-car accident in Los Angeles

"Woods, suffering serious injuries to his legs when he rolled his car in l. A this morning, Just in a statement on his Twitter page says, is awake, responsive and recovering Well tonight he underwent a long emergency surgery for serious injuries to his lower right leg and ankle, the first deputy on the scene, saying the wreck could have been so much worse. The nature of his vehicle. The fact that he was wearing a seat belt, I would say that greatly increased The likelihood that it saved his life. Rescuers had to use an ax and a pry bar to get Woods out of his SUV. The officer on scene said he was alert and talking at the time tonight. The chief medical officer U. C L, A medical center says Woods has leg fractures and injuries to bones on his right foot and ankle that were stabilized with screws and pens earlier today. Tonight. Come on, Who spoke to you? Dubs number one golfer Know Woolsey, who met Woods at a conference not long ago. Just praying that he get back and Oh, yeah, Everybody knows that Tiger Woods and, um so t hear about that is it's scary because you just don't know what the future is that with golf without him, investigators say there were no signs of impairment. There's still working to get answers about what led up to the crash. They're looking at speed. Is it possible factor? Crash happened on a notoriously dangerous road. Well, it is one of the all time greatest call first with 15 major victories, he second behind Jack Nicklaus, who holds the record with 18 major championships in 2019, He mounted a comeback, winning the Masters just two years after undergoing a spinal fusion. For today's crash. Woods was in the process of recovering from the fifth back surgery of his career. There has been an outpouring of concern and support on social media tonight. Golf legend Jack Nicklaus says he and his wife are deeply concerned and wish Tiger all the best for a full recovery. Pro golfer Justin Thomas tweeted quote sick to my stomach right now praying for Tiger Woods and hoping for an amazing recovery.

Woods U. C L Know Woolsey Dubs Twitter Jack Nicklaus Golf Justin Thomas
Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

Coronacast

09:50 min | 5 months ago

Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

"Today is the day that vaccination start to roll out across australia but we got a little preview of that yesterday with the with the prime minister and world war two survivor and a couple of other people getting the vaccine yesterday. Yes they go to i. Those of the pfizer vaccine which also followed a day on saturday of anti xers demonstrating and being talked to list in one city by pete evans. Some people criticizing the prime minister. Full so-called jumping the queue to get the vaccine before anyone else does but maybe leading by example. I just don't think you can criticize our leaders for having the it's not as if whole parliament skating it. It's really just showing their confidence in the vaccine. I think it's really important. Thing down the track. You'll see the health minister leader of the opposition getting the astra vaccine or the chief medical officer. Getting the astra vaccine to show that the our leaders are. You do have trust in this. And do you do believe in science. And i mean it's like laser immune to getting the virus either. Pay dutton got covid early. Jia by tribe and you you want your leadership cupboard and there's tens of thousands of accents that are gonna roll at in just the next couple of weeks. So i suppose people sort of is on the horizon going cool vaccine zahia. That's a really big comfort in a time of pandemic. When do we start to see things going back to normal. That's the critical question. And it depends what you call going back to normal because in most parts of australia. Things are pretty normal. We've got very little if any covid. Nineteen virus around in australia and new south wales is going weeks so has so have other jurisdictions so available around so we're back to normal internally back to normal means opening the borders having international travellers and tourists coming to australia us being able to go overseas listening. You'll becoming part of the world again. I think that's what we mean by becoming not becoming normal and covered that on tonight's Seven thirty program by talking to a mortar spoke to chris. Murray who heads the institute for health metrics and evaluation and he's of the he runs one of the world's leading modeling groups and covered on the health report back in november. He predicted the dr the global downturn in cases of covid nineteen that. We're seeing now he. He predicted almost to the week and his was. That was going to be nothing to do with. Thanks to nation and everything to do with season. -ality that really. It would have itself out in terms of the winter surge in covid nineteen. Because it's so seasonal. So i decided to go back to him. Seen other vaccinations going out. What what what's your modeling moving forward and it was quite sobering. He says he's not as bullish. Nah as he was back in november the variables that he's taking into consideration people's behavior. Now remember we're talking about the northern hemisphere not stralia new zealand but of almost no virus. And we've got close borders visit. If people's behavior goes back to normal before you get down to very low levels of virus transmission then you. He believes that you could. Well see a third wave evolving at the end of the northern summer. Pretty much like you saw in in twenty twenty and what could make that. Which is the second variable that he's worried about our vaccine resistant. Very variants of the virus escaped the vaccine and that they could really muddle the muddy the water considerably. How does that fit with other data that seeing coming out saying that the vaccines are reducing transmission in places like i and that's a place where the at least the uk variant is very prevalent on the uk very sensitive to the vaccine it's african variant and other variants than meyer is including the brazilian variant. We're not much is known. And you'll remember that. We spoke some days ago. About the brazilian city minnows. Seventy six percent of people had been infected with the virus. There were only five hundred admissions to hospital in the beginning of december beginning of january first nineteen days of january. Three thousand five hundred hospitalizations in so vaccine trials a very high percentage of people where had had covid nineteen when they were into the trial and in the placebo group they got reinfected with the south african variant so these vaccine escape variants are really worrying in terms of reinfection. Saw the vaccine does is turns covered one thousand nine hundred common core. Which is why. I'm gonna take the astra and we're five. We'll take whatever is given to me. Because i don't want to die of covid. Nineteen but if what we are looking for an opening of the borders and international normalization at least in australia. According to chris murray. We've made the wrong bet with the astro vaccine. He says you really do need to be immunizing with pfizer or madeira. Or perhaps even novak so that still to be proved in the real world. We're much higher. Degrees of efficacy and reduction in transmission and remember the other issue reduction in transmission is that these new variants emerge in countries. Where there's a lot of spread where the virus is multiplying and replicating all the time. And that's where these new variants are being thrown off. They won't be thrown off in austria. Where there's no virus around they'll be thrown off in low income countries like sight words middle income countries like south africa. They'll be thrown off in the united states in britain and other places if the virus keeps on circulating. So what we've got to do is get to very high levels of immunization very very quickly with highly effective vaccines and hope that that minimizes these of virus. Which is resistant to the vaccines. And then what we gotta do. And it's got to be done right now actually getting vaccines op through visor. Moderna novak's which are designed to cope with the resistant variants. That are around. Perhaps the brazilian one certainly the south african one and within a few months star boosting with them. This is really demoralizing. When with sort of on the cusp of vaccine. Roll out of here in australia woman. And if i'm just an average person sitting at home listening to corona 'cause what should i take away from these. Iud urging people from getting vaccine that they often no. Because i think it's really important that we all get covered so that shoots so first of all we're going to have a layer of protection. The international evidence is increasingly by the pfizer vaccine prevents transmission. So that means with hotel. Workers bar workers being immunized and hopefully their families to and that's a really important part of the story. We are creating a ring of confidence around the hotel borders. We've also got to institute with the pfizer vaccine. Not the astros vaccine ring vaccination around outbreaks so that we are controlling this any outbreaks there and everybody else immunized with the astra vaccine so that we are turns it into the common colds. We create a very safe situation. The problem is wayne. Do we open up to international travel and windy relax on hotel quarantine and with a country. That's largely covered with the extra astro vaccine. Which is not very effective somewhere doggy. Effective at all against the south african variant certainly in terms of transmission. Then it becomes a very nerve wracking decision to make. So that's why we've got to be planning in twenty twenty one for a booster. Does of vaccine resistant covid nineteen. That's actually a question that we had from john who's in australia who leaves in the us. And he's basically asking now. The australian vaccination program is rolling out. Do we expect. When do we expect the quarantine might be lifted. And what kind of factors go into that decision making so you could be quite cool about it if you think that we are all. We've turned effectively. Destroyed population susceptibility to covid nineteen into the common cold. And it does look as though the it's pretty effective at doing that with you're talking about african variant or indeed other variants. So we're pretty protected so you could say well maybe sooner rather than later but you know. It's just a very nerve wracking theme because we variants from all over the world and we are not donating vaccine to low-income countries. At the rate which will get van covered quickly enough and they will be throwing off variants and those variance will come to look at hiv hiv started around contrast saw in zaire and then you tens of millions of people have been infected with. Its an died. It doesn't matter where these variants arise from. They will spread to other parts of the world. So we've got to get the globe immunized as quickly as possible otherwise. It's very hard to relax just when you thought you had this thing pinned down at escapes again. Norman so so becomes really does become a bit like flu where the first vaccination does protect us to very significant extinct in terms of dying and serious disease. That's why i'm lining up. For whatever vaccine i get and i would urge other people to do the same. But it means that the government has got to not be complacent about this any shape or form and has to star ordering what's called multi vaillant vaccines are trying to ranging them now so that by spring summer of this year. We're getting boosting booster shots with multi valent vaccines that will covers against the current range of resistant. Variants around the world and that swing will open up borders.

Australia Astra Pete Evans Pfizer Institute For Health Metrics A Stralia JIA Dutton Moderna Novak New South Wales Chris Murray UK Murray Meyer Madeira Chris Novak New Zealand Austria
What makes Melbourne's outbreak hot or not?

Coronacast

03:18 min | 6 months ago

What makes Melbourne's outbreak hot or not?

"So melvin is still kind of grappling with a bit of a hotel quarantine outbreak. Hassan we've seen these holiday inn. Classic continued to grow some close contacts have tested positive to covid. There's been exposure sites are added added to the list. This rapidly growing list and while this is happening people in melbourne. Obviously watching it really closely but so people in other states. Because we've seen that. When an outbreak occurs in recent months people wanna act really quickly states when actually quickly cape the spread from spreading as much as possible and so perhaps bought is going to be throwing up again or they might be increased restrictions in melbourne. And sorry can we talk about what it takes for somewhere to be declared hotspot what goes into that decision. It's a really interesting question and clearly. It's something that we haven't clarified. Throughout the course of the pandemic in the last twelve months it's been very confusing and difficult for people to work out when we should declare hotspot if we go back to first principles the key issue here when we declare hotspot is that we're making the coal the visit an increased risk of someone being infected in a particular area. And that if they travel to another area they're going to put that area at risk so the interesting thing the maze of last twelve. It's been real indicated the people's understanding or willingness to tolerate uncertain t and the willingness to tolerate risk. And we've seen how that has been different between the states and we've also seen that evolve even within states where a state would have pulled the trigger on a particular intervention six months ago. But now they're being a little bit more nuanced in response to these the situation so we constantly learning and it's going to be an interesting thing to say what happens this time around the toll months into this pandemic in australia. It seems like the cases coming through now in sort of drips and drabs yesterday. The chief medical officer professor paul. Kelly said that he was absolutely confident. That the infection was a single event going back to the holiday inn hotel. They'll close context though are starting to test positive. Is that something you're expecting to happen or were you hoping that it could just be contained to the immediate staff and residents of the holiday inn. Look i think you always hope that it can be contains at that level but always you always have to have the expectation that it's going to spread beyond that initial chain of transmission and that is why we worked so hard to identify contexts and quarantine them and we identify context context. So we're we're working really hard to put a ring fence around the virus and to halt any chains of transmission so in some ways cases that have been identified. Today have its. Its positive that they were predicted. And that they were in quarantine and so really. It's going to be the next few days that are crucial for us to be able to identify whether we're ahead of the virus or we have to play a little bit more touch

Melbourne Melvin Hassan Holiday Inn Hotel Kelly Australia Paul
"chief medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

04:01 min | 8 months ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Their blood glucose information Their activity data to really make smarter decisions about how to manage those individuals in virtual care environment One of the other things that we've taken away but we've added a layer of comfort to a member of so we provide them access to coaches twenty four seven. You have a coach that will reach out to you when you trigger a low or a high reading on our platform and finally You know with the telugu. doc integration. Because it's information is flowing continuously instantaneously with high fidelity We can really Shorten cycle times For our members to get information about the things that they need to do relative to their care If there is a tele provider On the other end who constantly monitoring that information and can prescribe You know the exact treatment refills alab task and not wait the traditional six months Where somebody to wait could come back in and look at old data the vision also is how do you enable all of this was also a machine learning once again take some of that burden not only off the physician but also in a position to view To highlight the information. That's really important and provide those recommendations that Physician needs to provide the optimally care for that individual to drive improve dot com. So it's a little bit of boats. Removing a lot of the friction but also enhancing the experience that not only the the metric receives but also You know enhances the ability to make really smart. Clinical decisions for the providers so following off of matt's question a little bit and circling back around to the president of longo jennifer snyder. She was also quoted. As saying. And i think we all could agree with this that there's a lot of waste in healthcare and so because of your partnership. She believes that over the next five years you guys are going to be able to trim a lot of that. Waste out completely. Can you share with us a little bit about that map on how. You're gonna actually trim the fat. So i would say that again. It's what we're really looking to do. Is reduce the barriers to care. So i think there's been a lot of attention recently. A around the social determinants of health and so as we go forward as a joint company. We're really going to be looking at all different types of populations globally and we are identifying these populations. We're going to be looking very carefully at the barriers and seeing where we can go in terms of really making it as easy as possible for individuals to get the right care at the right time in the right setting as you might imagine because our merger has not yet. We are somewhat restricted in terms of really getting into a lot of the tactical details In terms of the companies coming together we are going to be embarking upon that work once the merger closes which we are looking forward to sometime in november at delude there once again back to the example that we both gave is You know how do you take Structures that are enabled by our Reimbursement of carradine's of requiring episodic care as opposed to care when it's needed how it's needed In the most efficient manner into a lot of that doesn't always be predicated on a face to face visit in person with the provider It can be a virtual visit..

longo jennifer snyder carradine matt president
"chief medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

05:41 min | 8 months ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"It also can be a harrowing right if you're not prepared for loot when you hear jennifer say consumers and patients aren't gonna hate healthcare anymore because they're they're access the can get what what comes to mind view especially in terms of telecom. Bunga sure so. I think that people often talk about. How virtual care makes access so much easier and they often frame this in terms of a conversation around what you might consider medical convenience And i'd like to just draw out the issue that it's not just a question of convenience. It's really around the quality of care so on telemedicine side we see many individuals who seek care and they end up having pretty serious medical problems like a recent case where the individual Actually had some big chest discomfort in our little shortness of breath and ended up having multiple blood clots in his lungs and he would have just probably waited it out at home with really a life threatening medical condition and on the longo side. You're really talking about individuals who for the first time in their lives are taking care of these problems around blood. Sugar control blood pressure control. So they're really getting the care that they need because we've made it easier for them and have lowered a number of these barriers which are traditionally put the place and may care most difficult and as you might imagine during the time of covid. All of these issues have been highlighted. So if you are at home trying to do your telecommuting also trying to teach your kids at the same time who might be doing their own remote learning. It may not be the easiest thing for you to decide that you need to take you know a bus to a train to train to bus in order to get to a medical appointment to have somebody review your blood sugars with you so to make that care possible particularly in this time just makes all the sense in the world. Yes it does. I mean the absolutely flows logically that the partnership you have and what you're going to be able to offer..

covid jennifer longo
"chief medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

04:53 min | 8 months ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Well the country in the world's talking about it. I want to start with one year colleagues <unk>. Shop and i want you to listen to so much. Answer this question to <hes>. Jennifer schneider <hes>. She's quoted as saying the following things. Virtual healthcare is growing. It's getting to the point now. You're not going to hate it. What does it mean to you when you hear. A clinician say to a group of patients were consumer class. That you're not gonna hate this anymore. What comes to mind. And how does this relationship solve that problem of disliking the care you were getting going to the big parking lot paying the seven dollars and a park having to walk through the labyrinth dodging david bowie on the way to your clinic and finally getting there to see who you needed to see what comes to mind there when you hear jennifer say that it. It's a great summation of. What would i have felt that has been broken. Healthcare for past fifteen years. As i think we also s consumers in this marketplace obscene seen how content has been reorganized by the internet how communities have been reorganize how entertainment commerce more recently even <hes> banking. When was the last time that you actually stepped foot in a bank. And so this this notion of you're gonna drive twenty to thirty minutes to this obstacle or building <hes>. and then ended up waiting an hour at least <hes>. I think comes an hours like a a gift to see physician. Pretend to fifteen minutes us. We'll give you a whole bunch of information that you're not gonna process <hes>. And send you on your way driving back down twenty or thirty minutes in some cases i haven't come back again. You know in two or three days or a week is you've got to get lab tests. Imaging tasks don seem so <hes>. You know sort of disconnected from how we live our lives today in terms of the immediacy of the things that were able to get it all at our fingertips and so <hes>. I think this is what jennifer was talking about it. I think you alluded to just so nicely is the experience of inter connectivity through now wearable sensors software that personalizes methodist to you <hes>. And always on connectivity <hes>. Through the cloud <hes> <hes>. Starting to make its way into healthcare and covid nineteen is only accelerated people's view in notion of what's possible in healthcare that today was just a method or a vision it is absolutely accelerating ed <hes>. From everyone we've been speaking to <hes>. And of course you are walking this walk on the acceleration happening before we're ready <hes>. So it's really an exciting time. It also can be a harrowing right if you're not prepared for loot when you hear jennifer say consumers and patients aren't gonna hate healthcare anymore because they're they're access the can get what what comes to mind view especially in terms of telecom. Bunga sure so. I think that people often talk about. How virtual care makes access so much easier and they often frame this in terms of a conversation around what you might consider medical convenience <hes>. And i'd like to just draw out the issue that it's not just a question of convenience. It's really around the quality of care so on telemedicine side we see many individuals who seek care and they end up having pretty serious medical problems like a recent case where the individual <hes>. Actually had some big chest discomfort in our little shortness of breath and ended up having multiple blood clots in his lungs and he would have just probably waited it out at home with really a life threatening medical condition and on the longo side. You're really talking about individuals who for the first time in their lives are taking care of these problems around blood. Sugar control blood pressure control. So they're really getting the care that they need because we've made it easier for them and have lowered a number of these barriers which are traditionally put the place and may care most difficult and as you might imagine during the time of covid. All of these issues have been highlighted. So if you are at home trying to do your telecommuting also trying to teach your kids at the same time who might be doing their own remote learning. It may not be the easiest thing for you to decide that you need to take you know a bus to a train to train to bus in order to get to a medical appointment to have somebody review your blood sugars with you so to make that care possible particularly in this time just makes all the sense in the world.

lou levy brigham women medical officer longo lou harvard medical school lavar congo harvard david bowie clinical assistant professor boston Jennifer schneider la bongo matt stanford Shop
"chief medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

04:24 min | 8 months ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Thanks so much and it's really a pleasure to be on today. I'm lou levy. I'm the chief medical officer for health. My own clinical background is practicing general medicine in the boston area for the past thirty two years and teaching over at harvard medical school as well as in the internal medicine program at the brigham women's hospital. I've been in digital health for the past twelve years and as you alluded to in super excited about the budding relationship that we have with the upcoming merger between our company. Telehealth with though. We're glad to have you once again. A lou you've been Someone we've cultivated relationship with over time from the conference at harvard. Medical to other interactions and our previous podcasts. Thanks for joining us. phones again. And then our other guests from lavar congo. Yeah thanks so much matt in read to be here. I'm the i'm the lou. Levy of la bongo. I'm the medical officer at longo. I'm a practicing carla gist. Still see patients Here in my battery practice where. I'm a clinical assistant professor at duke My medical training do my Residency training at stanford and came back to do propeller ship was on faculty for a number of years before About seven or eight years ago going into the private sectors have been longo now for three years as lou said. We're really excited about the the next iteration of our two companies Coming together in this space well the country in the world's talking about it. I want to start with one year colleagues Shop and i want you to listen to so much. Answer this question to Jennifer schneider She's quoted as saying the following things. Virtual healthcare is growing. It's getting to the point now. You're not going to hate it. What does it mean to you when you hear. A clinician say to a group of patients were consumer class. That you're not gonna hate this anymore. What comes to mind. And how does this relationship solve that problem of disliking the care you were getting going to the big parking lot paying the seven dollars and a park having to walk through the labyrinth dodging david bowie on the way to your clinic and finally getting there to see who you needed to see what comes to mind there when you hear.

lou levy brigham women medical officer longo lou harvard medical school lavar congo harvard david bowie clinical assistant professor boston Jennifer schneider la bongo matt stanford Shop
"chief medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

02:40 min | 8 months ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on The Voice of Healthcare

"Hi and welcome to the thirty first episode of the voice of healthcare podcast. I'm your host matt sibierski. On october thirtieth tell it like health completed. Its merger with lavoro with the merger complete dr lou levy now serves as telemark house chief medical officer medical policy in quality and dr gamal. Shaw serves as telesales chief. Medical officer product and.

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

05:33 min | 9 months ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Pro Rata

"How do you answer people who are concerned that if this vaccine is available to them in january or february just by virtue of the fact that covid nineteen so new. There won't be long term safety data on these vaccines. I think that is true. But i think what also is true. Is that when you launch a vaccine or medicine. What's important is the benefit risk. What is the benefit. And what is the risk. Now in the risk there always is. What don't i know i don't know. And that's the bucket of well. What what are the unknown risks. That we don't know yet that we may see years from now but those could be serious. When you're talking about vaccinating. An entire population could be neurological cardiovascular. Just don't know correct so that is true but we do have a scientific basis to predict two things one if it is serious it will be very rare because we've had a very large trial and there is a scientific basis of understanding will. What does this vaccine do and this vaccine. This technology really focuses the attention of the immune system only on this one protein right and so it's a very precise vaccine and the effect that it has and i believe personally that that precision should translate into a good safety and tolerability profile. Now it will take time to demonstrate that i think. What is salient in the coming months is we are all living in an era of very high transmission rates. We know what the consequences are. We're we're learning. What the severe of infection with covid nineteen are and. I think the benefit is becoming quite clear you guys obviously part of the development of this and we talked about this at the beginning came from the us government particularly relationship with barreda. What strings if any does the bardem. Money mean for madeira. No when it comes to distribution you guys for example talked about twenty million doses by the end of the year. How much of that goes to folks in the us or is allocated to people in the us and how much of that is tied to the us tax payer money so all of this is going to the us all of this should cost the individual vaccinated at the end of the day. Nothing has per what the. Us government has committed And this is the distribution here will be handled by the us so I think the real work of distribution will begin once we have regulatory approval and we can start Distributing this per the us government and to cdc and then two states does that complicate. Because you guys are part of kovacs or this vaccine is part of the kovacs project which is for emerging countries. How do those two things square that all of this initial vaccine goes to folks in the us but that you are part of this other consortium. There is a dialogue ongoing with kovacs. A i don't think we have quite aligned with them. On how many doses and win those doses would be available for the co collaboration. A political question for you when pfizer came out with its data last week The president those tied to the president seemed fairly upset about the timing..

us kovacs pfizer president
"chief medical officer" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

04:27 min | 9 months ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Far. It's only seen mild side effects like headaches and injection site. Soreness that resolved Now this builds on last week's quote more than ninety percent efficacy news from pfizer and is objectively awesome news. Remember the fda originally set a vaccine efficacy floor at just fifty percent. So what we're seeing. Now is not only the fastest vaccine development in history but also results that far exceeded initial expectations. A few things to know. First maderna's vaccine doesn't require the same ultra cold storage conditions as does the pfizer one instead. It could be kept in standard freezer conditions for six months and in regular refrigerator conditions for thirty days. That's a big boost for ease of distribution to both vaccines are focused on the same so-called spike protein which is likely a big reason why the efficacy results were so similar and why each vaccine requires two doses per patient. Three moderna expects to file for emergency use authorization from the fda within the next couple of weeks it could have around twenty million doses available by year end and in a different announcement this morning. Tony added that vaccine distribution for the general population could begin by this coming april for a little bit of a dark cloud to the silver lining. Here is that medina like visor before it managed to obtain reportable results so quickly because there's so many new covid nineteen cases and even limited. Vaccinations begin five or six weeks. There's a lot of death and a lot of pain from here to there if seconds will go deeper with tall zacks chief medical officer at medina. Ba i this from bottling plants to grocery stores america's beverage companies employees along with those in food and retail are working tirelessly americans have with essential during challenging times. More at here for you. Us we're joined now by tall sacks chief medical officer at moderna therapeutics so tall. Your company had been working on corona virus vaccines before covid nineteen was known about you. You've been doing some so-called war gaming on pandemics viral pandemics with nih. How much did those activities help give you. Maybe even a head start on the covid nineteen vaccine development. Yes i believe. The answer is yes. And i think There are two elements here that underscore our ability to get to today one in science and the other. Is collaboration people working together. In terms of the science. We had always envisioned that one of the core capabilities of this platform would be to react quickly to a pandemic and it's no. It's not by chance that are first. Two vaccine started back in two thousand fifteen were against pandemic strains of influenza so we always saw this as a potential now fast forward to the end of last year we were down at the nih fund. Myself talking to tony fauci. And his team. They had been worried for many years. That a pandemic could come. We've seen stars. We've seen emerge and we had been collaborating with them in preclinical models to demonstrate the utility of this platform to prevent such a pandemic in fact one of the discussions. We had back at the end of last year was do we need to take a model. A vaccine say virus that most of us never heard of like nipah virus That is a threat but use it as a drill kind of artificially. Start the clock and see how fast we can go and as we were talking about what could be a demonstration project. We started to here in december about this Pneumonia out of china and in the beginning of january. We started talking to them and we said okay..

pfizer medical officer medina nih tony fauci Pneumonia fda maderna china
"chief medical officer" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

Daily Coronavirus Update

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

"Grade School questions, and a million dollars to give away. Are you smarter than a fifth grader? Let's go. Get Ready. One of the most popular game shows of all time is coming to audio up as a podcast. Are you smarter than a fifth grader, listen on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts? It's Wednesday August twelfth. I'm Ramirez from the daily dive podcast in Los Angeles, and this is reopening America. As companies to resume operations while the pandemic continues to endure, many are hiring new executives as chief medical officers in industries, where they normally would not be Tyson Foods and Royal Caribbean cruises recently made the appointments because they need expert medical advice on how to keep employees and consumers safe Patrick Thomas reporter at the wall. Street Journal joins US for more. Thanks for joining US Patrick. Thank you for having me. As companies return back to sort of normal operations, I guess that I know a lot of big companies are still doing work from home, but there's transitioning over other places like meat packing plants that have continued to work throughout the pandemic. Is kind of changing the need to keep your workers safe and healthy is so important right now, a lot of companies are elevating a new type of executive, even more the chief medical officer. They're creating this position in places where they normally wouldn't be. So Patrick us a little bit about the chief medical officer and how they're playing a large role in a lot of companies right now. For context chief medical officer in past years is very common with hospitals, healthcare companies, pharmaceutical companies. It's not so much a term that you would find at a food processor or other non healthcare companies. It just wasn't that type of career, but lately, we've started to see company like Tyson Royal. Caribbean cruise lines, food processors, like you said that have a central workers back in the workplace in more confined quarters, Beth band, the factory floor if you remember. Remember back to March. Some of the early outbreaks where in food processing plants in rural areas, there are some outbreaks in early March and the cruise ships. So these are places where they felt like they needed a chief medical officer to bring medical advice. How can we bring back our worker safely on the factory floor? How can we keep our cruise ship employees? Say, Tyson also said that CMO is going to oversee some of their testing protocols they pointed. Pointed tests, workers at all their facilities. In the case of Caribbean, they want their CMO to work with one of the rival cruise lines on a panel to develop policies of what's it. GonNa look like to have consumers back on their ships and keep the crews workers safe. So there's a variety of different reasons why these kind of companies, WanNa, bring in a CMO and it's so important and you just nailed it. Why was you know taking the cruise? Cruise lines. As an example, they took a big hit with consumer confidence. In this last round, they've always had random problems with norovirus people getting sick. But when the pandemic started, we're hearing stories about people being trapped on cruise ships getting sick, and then workers were stranded on cruise ships months on end, and they really need to build that reputation back. So the role of the CMO in this I mean it's going to be hugely important for them. Yeah, absolutely, and like I said, they're gonNA. have their CMO on a panel with one of their rivals. Norwegian cruise line and Companies WanNa, bring in a chief medical officer, not only to bring in a medical expert, but it does give the public perception that they are taking a step. You know not suggesting that it's just a PR shut, but also it does in sometimes crisis like as we say, the story in twenty seventeen, the NFL added a chief medical officer. We've seen sports, teams, achy medical officers before for this reason whenever concerns come up at chief medical officers, kind of their voice. So they're expert they kind of. Of Give to the public to say, here's what we're doing and health policy in a way, Royal Caribbeans, kind of taken the same step in terms of having that figure to show consumers, we are doing something about it and it's not just for this for coronavirus. Specifically, you know some of the CMO's traditional roles are taking on new dimensions, mental health issues, I, think he profiled salesforce and their CMO, their how to help people's mental health situation when they're working from home and all that. So even the traditional role of it and the traditional things that they would tasks, they would be doing are kind of changing as well. That was one of the more interesting things I thought about. This was that a company like salesforce, and maybe some more like Silicon Valley type companies that make a variety of tech product. salesforce makes a bunch of different types of software products and they use the chief medical officer to develop certain kind of products. Know CMO is a medical expert who can bring expertise on dealing with regulations, the variety of legal hoops to jump through when you're. You're making something that organizers patient data you need to have someone developing that that knows what's legal and what doctors one, what they wanna see what's helpful to them, kind of their adviser on certain projects. Right. And in this case now that we're going to pandemic their CMO IS GONNA, she described it as doing double pack, right? She's got two roles. Now, it's not only the traditional role, but now you're also counseling your company in terms of. The experts that can bring in how can we bring people back workplace safely? Are there products that we've been developing that we can use to help our own employees or working from home? That sort of thing? Yeah. It's going to be interesting to see as things continue to develop and we work through the health crisis right now. If there's an outbreak in another meat processing plant Tyson, let's say for example, we're going to be hearing from the CMO on things that they did and didn't do and how the readjusting to it. So these are the people that you're going to be hearing from as well as we continue to go through. So just a more important role for more than ever right now, Patrick Thomas. Reporter for the wall. Street, Journal thank you very much for joining us. Thanks for having. I'm Oscar Ramirez, and this has been reopening America. Don't forget. Big New stories, you can check me out on the daily dive podcast, every Monday through Friday. So follow us on Iheartradio or wherever you get your lock you. I'm John Horn host to the podcast Hollywood the sequel. On every episode, we're challenging producers, actors and directors to tell us what's broken in. Hollywood and how they'd fix it. Here's producer Eva. d'Hiver. Name on ending systemic racism. Not Enough statement is. Not Enough. One black executive of not enough to not enough. You accompanying must look like the real world and we're tackling other problems like keeping everybody, safe onset and fixing Hollywood's broken GIG economy. Here's Mulan Producer Jason Read, The financial pressured to. Do with more in terms of days. Running, crew twelve or fourteen hours, six days. A week wasn't a sustainable model before, and it's definitely not a sustainable model. Now listen to Hollywood the sequel on the iheartradio, APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast..

medical officer Patrick Thomas Hollywood Oscar Ramirez salesforce apple executive Companies WanNa Tyson Royal producer Tyson Foods Iheartradio Los Angeles Tyson America WanNa Street Journal Royal Caribbeans Royal Caribbean
"chief medical officer" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on ExtraTime

"Youtube endless facebook or twitter. You can watch it anywhere and we will go live on Youtube immediately. Following that draw Charlie Davies will swap out of the drawing comes straight back into extra-time. Thou albus breakdown. These groups six of them with two thousand sixteen distributed. File thoughts anything that you didn't say that you wanted to say anything. Just kind of jumped out to you as we add this discussion or do we go to our our daily lives. To say I mean I I was kind of on vacation in the last two weeks, and it was really weird. Time to to be on vacation Refresh Twitter Fifty Thousand Times that I went to marches and everything. Been Weird time but it's also been weirdly hopeful time, and it's been really great to see our players. You guys and so many people standing up and speaking out and it did this old man's heart some good, so it's been. It's been really strange, but it's been Hopefully we're on the verge of something bigger and better, and the grinches heart and. Also if Atlanta. UNITED FANS want to go out. And get together socially distance hit me up to steer me. 'cause. I've connected with some more out there. already, so yeah, let me know and if you've got an united hat to exchange with Kaelin his rival hats. Miami as you got. Older rivalry yet, we CAN'T MANUFACTURE MIAMI. Dream I would never ever even think to. Family associated to geographically not even that. Into a manufactured rivalry. It doesn't even occur to me. This time tomorrow we'll be doing a live show and we will be inventing Orlando. Tournament rivalries that have he's already created. Did you that Portland and San Jose stay on the same floor and that's why rivalry week July twenty first exactly it's endless. Real World I saw somebody there's is Minnesota United said this MLS real world, everybody the same hotel. Everybody like hanging out. We'll see how it all plays out..

Youtube Miami Minnesota United Kaelin twitter Charlie Davies facebook Portland Atlanta Orlando San Jose
"chief medical officer" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on ExtraTime

"Two finishers in each group advanced. Then you have the floor third place. Finishers also advanced, and then it's single nation all the way, no extra time to added time it's DJ's at the end of those knockout round games. We'll go all the way to the final. I believe on August eleventh and one point one million dollars in prize. Money is no joke. But kind of share. The sentiment that you guys are not there I love this league. I love soccer. It is passionate it is it is. You know what has really kind of light guided my life for the last fifteen years, or so it set a schedule. Armies established a group of friends. I would not have any of you without it and I consider that a blessing but I'm not there yet I'm not like. I had to write a column about this and I basically said I want I in normal times. I would be the right Rah. RAH MLS is back and I use the phrase woo girl because I would have been ruined. Jacked up, but right now. I, sort of feel like the place it occupies in my mind is a place to recharge. is a place to sort of say, oh, Cav two hours to let my brain rests before turning back to the things that. I think on this show. We've done a good job, but only in recent history of pounding home, and we hope that you need to do so and and focusing on our society at large, and I'm excited to see how our players use this opportunity. The pre-game meeting Jalen when I thought you made a great point. our players have proven. They don't necessarily need the games to be. The impactful intelligent group that they are that they have tools at their disposal to do that I hope that the this gives them an extra a boost, a stage on national TV and we don't yet know what the sort of games schedule or the TV schedule is, but I hope this gives them an opportunity to say the things that they think need to be said on a platform that reaches out wider than. Just, their own social media or MLS SOCCER DOT COM or whatever it is, it's been spread on now I hope they get that opportunity out there to do what they love to, and I can't imagine what it would.

soccer Jalen
"chief medical officer" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

Beyond The Baseline

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

"You know in Tennessee. I guess the one thing we can say that the spore is a pretty used to a day before tournament start injury withdrawals or retirement through illness or things like that so at least it's something that tennis is accustomed to in a way in. We'll have those hopefully have those lucky losers lined up but who knows if how are go down the line in terms of Quarantining lucky losers are testing. All healers. Yeah that'd be no and it's If I'm in the locker room in the even in the players lounge and I hear a player pulled out because she had a sore hamstring. It's one thing if I find out. A colleague pulled out because of a positive cova test. It's affects me in a different way but no I mean I. I think there's this is sort of a there's A. There's a think piece if not a book to be written here but I think the role of sports in this whole pandemic is is really interesting to me and we usually think of sports as having like duck handling said I mean it. Has this real ability to bind us. It's this source diversion. It's it's unification there's life lessons I mean all of these kind of mushy ideas about why we love sports in all of those in a Lotta ways are under attack. I mean somebody saying somebody said. There's there's a pandemic ripping through the world. Hey here's what we're GONNA do. We're going to get seven hundred thousand fans in a confined area. We're going to have athletes come in from all over the world and share one locker room you could. You could scarcely script less conducive scenario than the Olympics the US Open or the Super Bowl. His sports are not only not being able to be played. They are almost singularly ill suited for this pandemic. So I I think we're all sort of rethinking how we're GONNA stage sports but also what sports mean in the social fabric and how we can keep that when obviously like you say Jamie I mean the the idea of seven hundred thousand people going to one site that just so happens to be ground zero for this whole global pandemic in Queens New York but how hundreds of thousands of fans going to one site to watch. Athletes who've flown in from all over. The world are now sharing a locker room. How are we going to be? I mean that's that's clearly going to be precluded for years. But how are we going to be able to enjoy sports? And how are we going to be able to alter sports and reassess sports and sort of keep the goodness while recognizing that? There's a lot about sports that are really inconsistent with the best practices in the age of cove in terms of coming back. I mean the you have C. announced that they would hold this fight I guess a pretty long time ago they did give the players the opportunity to obviously train and get ready And they knew that they were on deck for this past weekend. How long do you think the US Open will give players to notify? How soon are we going to see a decision? I mean there's there's an early June gate that's been circulated of look. We're GONNA make the call by then. I mean I do think. A lot of these players I don't think players are sitting at home Guzzling beer in on twitch. I mean I just saw video nick. Cheerios without practicing and Canberra Nick curious practicing looking reasonably fit. You can be sure that You know dominant team and it's very as well If anything you have seen one of the harder sports where you've got to actually got in the you really have to be in literally in fighting shape. I think a turn the switch today. I mean right now at noon. We're GonNa have a tournament tomorrow. I think the majority of players would would be ready at least is IT I. I think we're and one thing we. I was glad Dr Hoenlein address us. I think one area. That's been a little short changed as just the mental health component to all of this and you're an elite athlete and you're competing is what you do. I mean that is a form of self assessment. It's a form of self identity all of a sudden. You're no longer competing. I mean niddle has been very outspoken about this essentially in so many words saying I'm just not and this isn't a doll of people saying I'm not necessarily in the state of mind to be competing but from a physical standpoint. These plan and I thought you know the level of play that exhibition. I referenced in Florida the four-man Exhibition with Appel Cop. Paul and I to me was indistinguishable from the level of play at this review. Told me this was the first round of Australia would have said Yeah. That's about right so I think the one thing I I think players muscle memory. I think the players will come back without too much of a perceptible difference but emotionally whether or not all these players are ready to resume like you say spent two weeks in quarantine before major is not a drill. Any of them have done before. That's a really interesting point about about a dollar. You know it gets me thinking in previous tournaments in previous grand slams. Think a lot of what we always talk about is that that one it factor that one thing that is going to separate you know player from player be especially in the finals in a lot of times especially when we talk about the big three is is their mentality is how they approach the game and it's that that mindset that somehow you just see them all the sudden turn it on or just take it to another level that you you didn't think was there That's a really interesting perspective. You know is someone like dollar federal in mind said to compete in that way you know. I think it's one thing to say. Yeah we can. Have you know this this match tournament? That looks like a the first Australia. But once he gets to the later rounds. How how strong is that competition going to be going to be good tennis? Is that or do? Do we care And how much does that affect the the winner of that year? You know to say well. You are people going to say well. You didn't compete against the best or you didn't compete against you know everyone that could have been there because maybe some people couldn't or decided not to not to come so. I was talking to one player who said I was talking to a player The days all run together by the way but it must have been last week. Who Essentially said they. They wanted to just to get back in the swing of competition and that people don't realize that that's a muscle to and it wasn't about whether I can make a few thousand bucks playing in some exhibition. It's about sort of getting back in the swing of competing and testing myself and being in a situation where it's it's four thirty all and it's something that You know we. We don't necessarily have statistics for it. It's something that doesn't isn't necessarily manifest when we watch tennis on TV but getting in this competition mindset is really part of the job in players haven't had a chance to do that since February and if playing backyard tournament there was event Tracy Austin mentioned in southern California. Sam Query is going to be on by believes Taylor. Fritz or son for some Brandon Savita. I'm blogging but it's you know a six man competition backyard but you're still going to be playing world-class practitioners you're still going to be facing Sam. Queries serve at four all and for a tennis player. There's there's something to be said for that so strange times all around but I think this is You know honestly Jamie this. This to me is the equivalent of the restaurant. That's now doing you know. We're we're all improvising and it would be great if that restaurant were doing full business and had table service and we were all having leisurely meals. But it's better than nothing so that's I sort of see tennis and very much. The same place better than nothing. Open House that slogan all right that will usually usually we are podcast. Because you know grant grant wall is is giving US looks or The NFL guys are coming in now. We are running out of zoom time so That will do it for this week. Thanks always a pleasure chatting. Jamie always a pleasure. I hope we get some some news soon. Some good news in the tennis world on what's coming from from your mouth to the USDA and of course governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasios. Aren't this this is the better than nothing? Tata's five guests. That will do it for this week. Thanks everyone thanks Jamie Yet this podcast wherever you get your podcast Lieber Review. Free to continue sending guest suggestions and suiting initially boop BOOP BOOP boop..

tennis Jamie US Tennessee Sam Query Tata Australia Nick Dr Hoenlein C. Open House Paul Queens New York Appel Cop Tracy Austin Florida
"chief medical officer" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

Beyond The Baseline

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Beyond The Baseline

"Tennis podcast. Hope everyone is new. And Okay wherever you are yesterday Dr. Brian. Hey Line he is the chief medical officer for the Ncaa College Sports for our international audience. He's also the chief medical officer for the US Open and the USDA and has been since the early nineties. He is also a former college tennis player. So today's discussion is a lot about what it will take for sports to come back what we make of this closed-door scenario and then we talk specifically tennis. What are the unique challenges tennis bases and whether the twenty twenty? Us Open can happen. If so under what circumstances so Thought after a lot of speculation from lay people who was time we consulted someone who had real expertise so here does a great job is Dr Brian Halen. I I've seen you quoted a number of times and I feel like everyone has become an instant expert on sports science and And Virology these days. But I figured we've talked to a real expert and let's let's just start. Generally I mean what? What are you seeing out there? And what's going to be the biggest challenge for sports to restart I think the Two biggest challenges are really having surveillance. That's firmly in place and and really really good testing. So you can imagine and you know resocialised and you can't imagine re socializing in sport if you don't have both of those you know once we start opening up where no longer saying. We're just trying to flatten the curb or or were trying to really make certain. Our healthcare systems are not overwhelmed him so New York City which is a great example of that. The healthcare system were ninety percent of the hospital were devoted to taking care of patients who had colds and were in respiratory failure. We're now opening up. Doing procedures elective procedures. Insult going forward. If this is GonNa work you have to be able to test large segments of society and especially in sport and you have to do contact tracing and do what's right when there's a positive so it really does fundamentally rest on those two principles and you're just to be clear. You're talking about testing testing. And not just the temperature checks that's correct. And and it's two types of testing the indoor being you know even good advances and even in the last week so The rapid diagnostic testing shifting to what we may call point of care testing where you can even have on your your own kit in. And that's two of. That's going to be evolving in two ways. One is on looking for the virus particles so the PC artas to to see if you really are wait on infectious and even the serology testing if there wolves out properly and we really get good out. There's two ways to look at serology. One is to see if you have immunity but also when you first are infected with a virus your immune system kicks in right away. What's it's called? Gm and that may even evolve as as a screening tool for for seeing someone has accused effect infection so I think bolts are going to really advance in the next month and then were GonNa be strategies for how to work with teams without and you think testing is available and sufficient. I mean I don't know if you saw the UFC card that they held Saturday night and Florida. They went through. I think was twelve hundred tests for one. Sporting event and people eyebrows raised over that you think we have enough test to pull the saw. I think we're going to get there so so we had a a meeting. We meaning the chief medical officers of sport on so I was representing amateurs or Z. A. And then you had the chief medical officers of the NFL NBA Major League Baseball. H Own. We're all meeting with Dr Birch's office in the White House and we emphasize we said. We can't do this if we don't have adequate tests so you know the White House response is the usual response. Were were increasing them substantially but. I think what's happening in ups obscene. This happened as a least at university levels. They're either working with a hospital or university lab so they can take care of their whole campus but the private companies have have really been rubbing up as well and you know that's challenging and on on the one hand you WanNa make certain Dutch. You aren't testing for one segment of society while the rest of the state is still prioritizing test and they only have enough so but I I think the way the private companies and and and even with you know I just saw another. Fda approval reverse serology. Tusk come in our yesterday. So it is starting to substantially increase where. I think we're going to be moving into a different APP testing on we. We keep talking about the possibility of sports returning but I wonder how granular you get to what extent UC distinctions between sports and the benchmark for football is GONNA be much different than the benchmark for golf no absolutely so So so you know aside from the event Florida this past weekend so the PGA tour will be hosting event and in Texas the first week of June and on and they happen. You know a really cool without getting into too much detail but you know you. Essentially we have to create what's called an inner bubble and then you have outer bubbles out in the inner bubble was who would be really going to be around the athletes. So it's the athletes the core of athletics. Sam personnel the coaches. And you have to make sure that they're sort of walled off and really well-protected. I mean in these first early events like that you know when we look at the NCAA and the false or so ranges from cross country to And Soccer and field hockey and then of course. There's there is football insults. It's a little easier to imagine pulling off cross country than than it is onto to pull off off on but even across country meet the logistics of it are not straightforward and on. You know when you're starting off across country event. You're pretty close to a lot of people at the end. You're pretty close when you're trying to pay someone you know it's a The elbows are flying. And so you have to make sure that done might too and so we are actually getting a very granular levels. Were at the NCAA. We we have these committees that are our staff and members of committees working in conjunction with other. And we're developing basically all of the what if scenarios that we can think of and the other thing is we're building off of the core principles of resocialization document that we put together and were beginning very granular in terms of general guidance. For what needs to happen in a lock of what needs to happen in in the gym. What needs to happen. You know for showers and and you know the whole old idea of just kinda show up in the training room was actually sort of a choice for athletes to hang out. I mean it's going to be by appointment so it's really going to be staggered and I think it'll be easy in the first couple of phases but the tricky part is going to be when you start having contact what what does need. I'm thinking about tennis. What were you've got you know? A hundred and twenty eight singles draw from fifty countries. What what does need to happen in the locker room was hope you think of China's to be thinking of something like the US opened on you. Would you help to really make certain that when people are in the Locker Room? You have a staged presence in other words. You can't just come into the locker room when you want so it really all has to be orchestrated and hold out. You know if you if you've ever been in the US Open Locker Room. You know their their lockers right next to each other. Right above each other and The the training tables are are one after the other. The athletic trainer is going from one person to the next you know doing infectious disease control. But that would be much different Would you would you would have to control the timing. The inflow the outflow and and the standardisation procedures have to be exceptional. What else are you looking at sport to sport? It seems like indoor outdoor would be an obvious distinction and contacts sport. Even yeah we just had you have see so you don't get much more contact than that. But what else are you looking for when you're determining sport by sport so you're thinking about safe football If you're going to be rolling that out. So there's there's going to be protocols I think one protocol for the inner circle and you have to find the inner circle at the level to you know. They're they're really a code of honor and you can take the compliance even beyond that And where everyone's GonNa have sort of a symptom checklist if you will and a temperature and if you have anything. That's positive on that checklist where you have a temperature. You just don't show up so that's a general screen. It's certainly not foolproof especially in college age students. You know as we advance in any of the sports the ball works or even basketball for their baptist in the summer is that can define when people you want to test them and they should all be tested and that those are the protocols that even schools are working abroad or students and then you WANNA have a protocol regular testing that still being worked out in the modeling. How often do you need to test so as a minimum? When we're looking at all of the sports as you're going from phase one to phase two you task before you move to phase two and then the question is when you have a positive test. What do you do? And that has to be worked out with the local on health officials as well and this is where they have to have the capacity contact tracing and I'm sure are GONNA be imaginable. Apps in the next couple of months that are going to help without to on but then the question is do quarantine everyone for two weeks. It was in close contact. Or is there another paradigm where you can do testing on days? One three and five and you just a five day quarantine. Those are the models that are still being worked out didn't football. Let's take the the the you know the most contact collision sport in the fall. There is on you. Imagine a protocol of something like at least once weekly testing but then before a game the only player is a play in the game and the only people who are really in close contact test negative. So it's ends up being resource dependent as a lot of test. Yeah and You know you can. You can do the math and you end up. You know did it. Depends on how how much you could easily be a thousand dollars a player when you when you when you do. The math could be more now about the cost of an old LEICA. Salman and I don't think we need to have four or five helmets per player on but but it it's a cost in and the question is who who who is going to take care of that cost because it's you know you can think about a society where you believe sports important schools important will out to that sort of a federal expensive about doesn't happen in our country and I don't think the states have the money for that but you know a lot of schools don't either and the NCAA as you know. Took a a a a a big hit budget too so on? It's it's problematic at heart. I mean when you make these assessments. How do you divorce the finances or or do you divorced to finance of the minute? You know you're right. College sports are GONNA look radically different. If there's football this fall or not the USDA's budget is gonNA look radically different if there's a US Open or not. How do you sort of consider the finances? It's it's a big part of it so you have to. I make the court a Susan and say well. What's the one thing that can't be sacrificed? And they'll tell them safety on. And then you and then you build out from there you know you've seen you know even the PAC twelve their announcement that they may just be playing conference only games this year and I think a lot of schools are looking very closely at travel. We haven't come out with travel guidelines yet. I think it's still too early because you know you look at what's happening around the world so I mean I got kind of a firsthand. Look at this so Mike. My Wife's father Died suddenly last week so she flew to France and it was Really Eerie to be Kennedy Airport. I wasn't allowed him but it was like a ghost town but when she came back when she arrived on Sunday night they weren't allowed off the jeopardize unless they had a screening which included temperature chuck and for those screen. You know positive. They were directed to a different part of the airport and You know you look at Emirates airline. They actually do a A point of care tests before you're allowed to fly so you think of that and then you think about an event like us open where you have a you know a lot of international players you know. Do we work with one airline that we know they're going to be actually doing the screening? It's it's valid screen and and on the people on that flight of just tested negative. So you know that's the thing we're testing you know. At the moment that you're negative you could be positive the next day but So I think it's going through scenarios like that but certainly in this country we're not at that level of sophistication for travel and I think a lot of schools are going to be looking more local travel. What we're talking about athletes. What do you think of this this no fan scenario that.

NCAA football US tennis medical officer And Virology USDA Dr Brian Halen Florida Emirates airline UFC New York City Fda PAC France Kennedy Airport China Gm
"chief medical officer" Discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Coronacast

"This is an ABC podcast. Hello this is corona cost a podcast all about the corona virus. I'm health reported taken Tyler opposition journalists to Norman Swan. It's Wednesday the twenty second of April so as promised we have with us today. Deputy Chief Medical Officer Paul Kelly. We've been asking questions that you want us to put to him. Am I gonNA try to get through as many as we can today? Thanks for joining us. Poll Oh you're welcome. Sorry tiny's asking about mosques. He's wondering why the federal government is still not recommending mosques for everyone who goes out in public and also he's asking why the federal government isn't supporting the states actions on school clashes firstly unmasks We look at the evidence As well and and as quickly as we can emerge in relation to masks and people would know nothing. Norman's mentioned it on this program in recent days in the US The Centers for Disease Control have recommended mask us in public certainly in the US situation and their epidemiology with way more cases in the general community perhaps make sense but for us firstly very few cases secondly masks not great protection. If you don't know how to wear them masks that are not made in the prescribe way will not be effective in Avenue in relation to stopping the spread of the virus or indeed protecting. How the so so. That's the reason we we haven't recommended masks at the moment in previous times. There was a shortage. Of course we wanting master remain for our frontline. Health Workers That's been relieved in in recent times with an increase in supply. So that's That's no longer a raisin so just on master moment. I mean people recognize that it this is about. Acm dramatic spreads. If you've got and you don't know what you might reduce the spread. How how bad with the epidemic to get an Australia for the small benefit to be worth it. You think in masks if you had the resources if there were enough masks around a lot worse than what it is now Norman I think would be the short answer and as as an epidemiologist of course I would always say depends but certainly if there was widespread community transmission could at that point be reviewed sped at the moment. We don't believe it's the right way. And what about twenty second question one on school closures in the State sections here? Yeah so the school closures is an interesting one Certainly the Strang Health Protection Committee has been very clear from the beginning In our advice to the national cabinet but the national cabinet is made up of nine. Different states in different states have to make their own decisions to the elected governments. And they're the ones that run the school system so So some have gone further than others. So the N. T. For example. They haven't closed schools in South Australia. In other places they've directly and specifically asked kids to stay at home in New South Wales Somewhere in between the suggesting that children should start coming back one day a week. I think there's a couple of issues here firstly in our current situation. Not Not a lot of Transmission in society and so that would be the same in schools. We know that transmission amongst children is not strong and children themselves. Do not get severe illness. We know that pretty strongly now including in Australia indictor Australian investigations of of our brakes. There is the question of course in a very valid question about teachers and their safety and all of the brakes. We've looked at has tended to start with a teacher or appearance and spread amongst teachers so the staffroom is actually the most dangerous place rather than the schoolroom room or the school yard in terms of of teachers. So Carrie asks on schools. Why are we reopening schools when social distance is so important and supposed to add onto? Kelly's question I'd ask as well. How'd you socially distance when you've got fourteen year olds in the playground very difficult and I understand that my my my sister effective of my sisters a teachers one of them currently working as the school's Comeback in New South Wales? So of course these things are challenging. And I think the the point is you can do as best you can. In terms of social distancing is certainly a lot you can do about hygiene around the school. Kids go to school. But they're not allowed to play on public playgrounds. Yeah well that's that's a challenge. Some of these things. I can certainly say how it's it's difficult to maintain those two conflicting pieces of advice. I'd I'd say this so at least in schools we do know who's on the school playground and and there is some ability within the school environment to increase those hygiene messages and cleaning for example public playgrounds a bit less of a controlled environment. More open to others coming in so I think that's part of it but look I think as as we go forward it's been we've been so successful in dampening down the curve flattening the curve and so few cases that in the next month. We'll be saying the relaxation of many of those things that have been introduced. So we've got some questions on strategy and a radical roll up the three questions and just tell you what they are because the overlap Margaret ask Kuby covered nineteen from our shores. And she says if so. Why aren't we apparently not doing so? Henry asks wise the federal government not moving towards a covered nineteen limitation strategy. Luciana asks why would we even consider stopping the current measures diminishing the spread of the virus before complete eradication so three questions on the theme yes so the theme of strategy so that was made much more explicit last week by the Prime Minister and the chief medical officer Brennan Murphy was just outlines what we have indeed been doing all along but making it more explicit and that's about a suppression strategy. So that's in between the let it rip or herd immunity strategy that some countries are going along. Which if you do that you end up with a lot of lot of infections. And some of those will be severe about twenty percent of them And people die and so that is not a strategy. That we're looking for brought at the other end is of course. Lock everything down and look for ratification. that's New Zealand Strategy Now. New Zealand quite interestingly has announced they're starting to pull back from that That lockdown phase. And they'll be much closer to where we are in terms of handling this forest more Into the future we've ended up in the same place. Interestingly and we've had more cases than New Zealand but not a lot more in recent the recent weak very few cases and virtually non yesterday outside of Tasmania and New South while so So I think we're getting to a similar place of through that suppression strategy. I think is it possible to actually eradicate this forest altogether from Australia? It might be certainly eliminating it as a public. Health problem. Appears to be where we're heading at the moment with `sufficient strategy. So just how long would you wait before? You're fairly sure. In other words you talk starting at Tenneco the reproductive cycles of the vars. So let's say new. South Wales is the challenge here because they've had more cases than any other state. They are working hard at doing. A Lotta tasting so. This is not a criticism New South Wales but it is the challenge. But let's assume we get down to zero in all states. How many days in a row before you think? We're actually in a pretty good shape here and we can let the break off albeit slowly but we can let the break off this. Call a Chris Crystal Ball Question Norman. And that's always a difficult one but no not a biological question. Isn't it because you reproductive cycles of the virus and once she washed through for a couple of weeks surely you can be pretty sure? Yeah you would be short but it depends on a house it and now you the people are coming to get the testing the so called passive surveillance strategy which is what we've had at the moment. And most countries that have been far worse affected than us in in Europe and North America and and so many other countries. Now that passive surveillance depends on people. Coming recognizing that they're sick with the virus and getting this right test and that that is proving positive and flowing on their to public health but our challenge now is okay. That's seems to be drying up but will there may be other people in the communities to slowly brewing small outbreaks. We've seen that exactly playing out in North Western. Tasmania where Tasmania pull up the drawbridge and they went on that strategy of isolation but then several weeks later at some point there was someone that had the virus which led to other people having the virus and now they have eighty so can can change rather quickly and brings us to our border controls to at the moment the borders are essentially shadow there trillions continuing to come home we will continue to get a trickle of cases only needs a few of those two to get out into the community so so. I think declaring this over is going to be a very difficult thing to do but I think the other side is is balancing up the the other effects of locking down we've done and digressing business social interactions and all of the other things made for Iran wellbeing as well as that of the economy. So I'm going to take the privilege of being coarseness my own question here Paul. Kelly given that it's possible that as you say you get a few cases trickling through and as a Cuban saying there was one point of the end of November. There was just one person in the whole wide world with what would come to be known as covered nineteen and look where we are now with well over two million cases and over one hundred thousand deaths and we could get a second wave so this question is relevant because we could come to a second wave necessarily which might be worse than the first looking back and it's only four and a half months. What if anything would you do differently? If you again and I'm not talking about the second wave I'm talking about. Let's go back in time. And what would you do differently? I remember very clearly the first time I heard about this forest so there was It's as you say. Probably sometime in November. There was something happening in Hubei Province. We weren't absolutely clear about that. In fact there was no sort of external reports about that until the first of January was actually the time when we were first notified through World Health Organization contexts Aww forty-three cases of an unusual happening in Wuhan. We look very closely at that and and and decided that this was something we should keep a close eye on so we immediately had had a meeting about that To decide what we should do. And we put some information out to the states and territories and through them A carnival a alert. Not Alarmed message to our emergency department. So we were onto this very quickly by mid January. We decided that things hadn't really changed much in China at least officially and then all hell broke loose as we know from From reports that came out of Wuhan and then rapidly other parts of China. Just interrupt so you give yourself ten ten here or I think if we'd known a bit more more quickly about what was happening in China than That might have might have changed Something's but by by on the twenty first of January. We'd already relies that. This actually had some was a disease pandemic potential and we moved to a higher Higher level at that point so the the question is whether whether we could or should have done things more quickly I think after that on the first February we got modeling that demonstrated that China was possibly. The rest of John was was heading towards being the Siamese Wuhan And on that same day was when we put in the restrictions about people coming from China or other than Australian Citizens and residents so and things escalated quickly like that and through much in particular Things moved very rapidly. Could we have gone a bit more quickly? Perhaps but in the end of the day you were in such a good situation now It's hard to see where we could have could have done other things but you know we learn from these things. These these are the best exercises we can do to test our preparedness and our reaction to these things and so we will be more prepared for a second wife if it comes because we've gone through a first wife Freshman Kelly. Thank you very much for joining us on current cast. You will come no one. That's over Coronas today if you've got a comment or question sending in go to ABC dot net slash corona virus and feeling the form and make sure you use the word. Khurana cost so that we can find it. If you like the show give us a rating and review at Apple. Podcast helps others to find us and we really like reading. We'll see you tomorrow bye. You've been listening to an ABC podcast. Discover more great. Abc. Podcasts live radio and exclusives on the IB. Say Listen APP..

Chief Medical Officer Paul Kel Norman Swan Australia ABC China New South Wales federal government Wuhan Tasmania US South Wales tiny New Zealand Strang Health Protection Commi Tyler South Australia Disease Control Carrie Hubei Province
"chief medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

09:51 min | 1 year ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Can achieve certain metrics and along the way you get badges. There's social sharing within the platform so as a user of it pretty cool and now to put together the Science Rajiv is really fascinating fascinating to see how you guys put this together. Yeah we're very excited about it. And the best part is that we have demonstrable results Over years we've been at this for about fifteen years now and we've been able to show some pretty compelling in sustainable behavior change over five six seven years with participant so it really does work well this year. I went to the dentist one more time. Because you guys there you go Rajiv what would you say a time within the last fifteen years at the organization that you guys had a setback and what you learn from it as you may know an entrepreneurship There are setbacks every single day. And it's it's a crazy roller coaster. You know I I started this company. Precursor cursor this company which was called shape up when I was in medical school a twenty three years old and I got very passionate about behavior. Change how to prevent obesity or how to reverse diabetes and I actually dropped out of medical school for three years to build. The company eventually finished my degree but I decided that I wanted to focus on health. Promotion and using technology to scale interventions across crossed arch populations so after medical school instead of going do residency actually went back to the company and continued to invest and grow it and then two years ago we were acquired by Bertram Virgin Pulse in that stayed on as chief medical officer so as you can imagine as a twenty three year old starting a company I knew nothing about how to build an organization and you know about how to build a technology platform learned through the School of hard knocks along the way and made a Lotta mistakes. I think when I look back Rather than sort of picking on one MM particular event. I think one of the big mistakes that we made in our company was. We started to drink our own kool aid. We started the company on the idea that social support is is critical to behavior. Change that nobody will be truly successful at changing their behavior and sustaining that over time unless they modify their social networks that the people around them are supportive in encouraging. Them catching them. When they fall and sort of could've been conducive to their healthy lifestyle Because so often we go into the workplace in our co workers or having muffin often Monday and Bagel Tuesday and Friday. You know we are sabotage each other in that way in. That happens at home as well right so we need that kind of social support. That sort of where a lot of motivation comes in we saw other companies including our competitor virgin pulse focusing quite a bit on extrinsic motivation really kind of financial financial reward so paying people to change their behavior and I think we were very purist about our intrinsic motivation the social social incentives versus financial incentives. There's an we weren't really hard at that for many years in in it it does work and it does create sustainable eight affordable behavior change. But I think because we were so fixated on our own. What idea we fail to see that? The market was evolving and people's ideas were evolving and in fact the research was evolving to say. You know what the answer is not so cut and dry. It's not really one or the the other and in fact if you blend the two intrinsic plus extrinsic motivation you can actually have an even greater impact on people in on their behavior. And so you know. It's funny that we ended up joining forces with virgin pulse and I think we both sort of moved to the center of that spectrum. You know they came from the extrinsic side. We came from the entrance aside and we met in the middle and now our approach is to do both and I think it was a mistake we made and and really kind of just believing that we were right and we were sort of ideological about it and we failed to realize that maybe is. There are other people out there that we're doing things that were valuable as well. We learned that and we really started to thrive we embrace that sort of broader thinking. That's a great message Rajiv and one of the other. Thanks to that that just comes to mind is when you're in that spell because it does become a spell right you get into your head and what is it that you you do Rajiv to get out of it because so many of us do by our own ideas we we do. Eat our own cooking. How do we break out of it and see a fresh perspective perspective? What would you recommend the listeners? I think we have to actually seek out contrarian points of view and so people who we disagree with we have spent time listening to them on understanding. What what they're working on what their research says you know where they're coming from so we spent a lot of time shape listening to learning from our competitors? We go to a lot of conferences and we go to things that we might not otherwise go to because they might not confirm our beliefs they might challenge our beliefs. And that's what we thrive and so I think we've just kind of had to remind ourselves consistently that. Maybe there's a different way. Let's not get stuck in our conventional way of thinking and I think it's that constant challenging ourselves and putting ourselves feels uncomfortable positions that drives us to kind of keep an open mind. Wow fascinating a really great tip there for the listeners. Whether you be an entrepreneur more in in medicine listening or if you're an established executive provider leader in an industry Facet you really have to think and surround yourself with contrarian view sometimes even though it's not the comfort zone it may be what helps you see that blind spot that could potentially be fatal to your business and so really great call out the Reggie. Thank you for sharing that. What would you say one of your proudest medical leadership? Experience to date is so for years. I've been working with populations both an employer groups as well as in the community sort of running these kind of behavior change campaigns fitness challenges and competitions grassroots efforts to help people improve their life and my proudest moments were really when people would come up to me and you know. Even though I wasn't their primary care physician I still think of them as patients but people come up to me and they would say things like you save my life. You know not really you but this program saved my life. You know. I've gone off my medication. I was diabetic. And I've reversed my diabetes season. I'm off my medication. Lost so much weight that my knees no longer hurt and I can walk again. You know I took my grandkids Disneyland for the first time and I was actually able to keep up with them. So it's really those moments and I. There are hundreds of them in my head. The people that I've met that we've actually had an impact on and using technology people we have never met before but using zinc technology and using the science and figuring out a way to sort of engage that we were able to help them and empower them to make small changes led to huge results. And I think those are the proudest just moments you know. I don't know if the call that leadership or not but that's certainly where we get our excitement from working out of bed every morning. Yeah for sure. That's definitely leadership. Reggie even behind behind the motivations that you do this every day. Is there any story that you wanNA share that really got you into this because you have such passion United Behind Passion. There's a story. There are a ton of stories raise for me. When I was the first medical student I was shadowing physicians and working in their clinics and seeing a lot of patients and it just struck me that there were so many patients the majority of them struggling with? How do I lose weight? How do I eat healthy? How do I be physically active? And how do I if I have a condition like hypertension. Ah By blood pressure. How do I lower my cholesterol? We had no tools to help them. We really didn't other than just some sort of empty advice right going to join a gym though. Checkout outweight watchers. We were sort of resigned to the fact that they probably weren't gonNA change their behavior and ultimately we will put them on medication and that would be sort of the end game and that was frustrating to me. Because I knew that people had potential a change and we simply weren't giving them tools and understanding. What would work then? So I really thought how can we prescribe health and wellbeing and is there a resource that we can send people to program that we can give them. That would be truly successful. I couldn't find one and so I created it in that was originally called shape up Rhode Island which was the precursor to our company shape up and now virgin pulse. So that's sort of what my motivation was was. It just didn't feel resigned to the fact that we would have to prescribe medication for everybody. Everybody felt like we should really be focusing on prevention and when I talked to people who did change once in a while we get a patient that would say you know I lost twenty pounds or we the come in and their blood pressure will be down and say what did you do and they always said the same thing. I had an exercise buddy. I formed a group of friends and we motivated each other. My family did this together. It was always. That's social thread. And that was my sort of inspiration to say you know. Let's figure out a way to connect people and this was at the dawn of social media around two thousand four hundred thousand five and I thought maybe we can sort of take a facebook like approach to bring people together online to support each other offline. And that's what we did. That's so awesome and listeners dare to be the change you wish to see in the world and Rajiv found himself in the situation where he just didn't accept the fact that empty promises we're going to be he would he gave patients and he thought bigger he saw a couple of things at work in Iran with it. So I think Rajiv embodies that quote is he was the change that he he wished to see in the health world and with that has been an amazing ripple effect of better outcomes for patients stories that continue to come in to his inbox of people's lives that he's changing so the question is what can you do. What do you today find unacceptable and health? And what are you GonNa do about about it. Because it's doable. You just gotTa move it little by little. And it'll eventually get their Rajiv. What would you say an exciting project or focus that you guys are working on today? We're spending a lot of time. Around artificial intelligence we believe that one of the keys to motivating people will be giving them personalized highly relevant recommendations nations things that they can do and so we're trying to use artificial intelligence to learn about people over time and also to learn what makes people successful over time. So we've got millions of people on our are software. They use our mobile application on average three times a day. We're collecting seven billion data points every single month everything from biometric results to health risk assessment results..

Rajiv obesity Bertram Virgin Pulse diabetes Rhode Island School of hard Reggie facebook Iran
"chief medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

14:48 min | 1 year ago

"chief medical officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Office. Doctor Levin has founded several healthcare. It he startups and served as an advisor to many more. He's a nationally recognized speaker and has appeared in academic industry and consumer media. He currently serves on multiple industry in Private Equity Advisory Boards and nonprofit governance boards he received his medical degree and Bachelor's from Brown University and with bat has created an enormous amount of value in healthcare through the many companies he's created and rolls that he's served and so without further ado I just want to welcome welcome you to the podcast Dave. Thanks for joining while thank you. That was a incredibly generous introduction there. Maybe a little bit over the top salt. So what got you into healthcare. Well a you know. Your introductions was really kind to be honest. I think of myself as an often often say I am the forrest gump of healthcare. I feel like a lot of my career his simply bed wandering around and into the frame where other are really cool smart people were doing things and I was fortunate enough to be there when it happened and my entry into my medical career kind of reflects that Sol as a very young man I had a first career in. It really came of age in the dawn of the personal computer era and had believed from from early on that there was going to be a great opportunity to combine the power of computers and information technology with healthcare where it's taken a long time for us to get from that young man's little vision to a place where we're actually doing it. The forest gump part of the the story is I was applying to college and they're literally was a check box on the application. Check here. If you WANNA go to medical school and as I said said I thought at the time yeah that maybe someday I'll combine these things and what's the harm check in the box. That's literally how I launched. My medical career. It ended up. Fortunately Brown was a place that was a good fit for an hour or oh my gosh what a story. Dave and hey you know forrest gump. There's one of my favorite all time favorite movies I I love it and and I just kind of envisioned you there with your application medical school. Okay Hey exit. You're in and now here. You are all things work for him. Somehow and they've worked for you so as you've taken a tour of of health care through your various roles and companies what do you think today's a hot topic that needs to be on health leaders agenda and how are you and San sorrow approaching legend well. There's many of them. I'm going to focus on healthcare information technology today and what's going on is we're in the midst of the next grade transition and health. It I always say health. It onepointoh got us to put down our heads and start using keyboards. Awards was the basic digitalization of healthcare. We definitely need to do that particularly on the clinical side and it sounds Kinda silly when you say it that way but it actually actually was a giant step forward. It's positioned us for what I think of as health. It two point oh which is going to look more alike the experience as we have pretty much in the rest of our lives so it's it's GonNa be more about mobile more about cutting edge technologies about the ability ability to really leverage data in new ways and to connect and collaborate in ways that we haven't before and most of us know this. I mean if you compare are your experience of the typical healthcare encounter with what you experience when you go shopping or do banking or whatever it's as I like to say every day I work work in healthcare and then I go home and live in the twenty first century so there's a real opportunity here I think it's true and at the core of this and where my company is focused is on the infrastructure for creating this new ecosystem this APP economy if you will and a lot of that is about interoperability and increasingly it's about moving to the cloud so our focus has been on really powerful cutting edge solutions that let applications applications connect on exchange data and collaborate just like they do outside of healthcare this is all based on API technology and that's. That's really what we've been focused on for. The last five years is bringing this very powerful proven approach for creating that kind of capability to health care care and we don't do specific applications. What we're focused on is enabling others to take their great ideas and implementing a into a more powerful ways? We can go deeper on that if you'd like not it's absolutely would like to and maybe we could touch on that here as an opportunity for you to talk to us about an example of how San Siro you in the team over there have created results by doing things differently sure well. I think our he and site was over five years ago when we looked at how application programming interfaces or API's have changed the rest of the digital economy this is how companies like facebook and Google and Amazon have really thrive and it's also how they collaborate so that's how Amazon and ups collaborate elaborate so to deliver a package to your front door and allow you to track it the whole way so at its core. This is technology as I said let's applications connect exchange change data and collaborate and we saw that power we recognize this is a major gap in health care and sore focus has been on building a really powerful full. API for data exchange and healthcare and okay well. That's so you know so what what does that really mean. Why is it different and it really radically alters the way you develop all up the ploy and scale applications it delivers much more robust data. Does it in real time and these are all attributes that allow you to bill much more powerful and much more user friendly applications. I like to say we were doing this before. People in healthcare could spell API and in five the years. We've gone from this kind of the newest thing to We're about to see the federal government mandate as part of the new office of National Coordinator rules. Excuse Dave. There's there's no doubt you guys are ahead of the game on this one. I do WANNA. Take a moment to recognize your work. Folks Dave also so is the host of a podcast. It's called four by four health. If you go to Sam Sora Health Dot com you'll see a little tab there on the top four by four for health. PODCAST is an incredible resource for anybody looking to get educated on on health tech API is I mean he's got some great eight episodes on Api One oh one where he had John Orosco the CTO there at San Siro Incredible Work Bay than in. I mean incredible content that you're putting out here. We'll a appreciate you highlighting that in and we do see ourselves as evangelist for this technology may obviously we're trying to to build a successful company to but we're very mission driven we have something on our website called the API learning center and a really recommend it to anyone at any level. We've actually structured up for someone who's brand new to this but we've also provide resources for very advanced users as well. It's a great starting point right We've bought together not just what San Seora thinks about this but a contributor from health level seven we've actually got content and interviews from a government officials about some of the new rags and how this all plays out so very much appreciate you highlighting that I also just want to take a moment to talk about so what why does any of this matter and I'll give you a really concrete example we partner with a company that does real time clinical surveillance and decision decision support essentially their software sits in the background in a hospital setting and is looking for clues about patients that are either getting into trouble or have had an important change in condition or lab results or something like that and in real time looks for this and can alert the appropriate Rick Clinician and also provide guidance about what to do a classic application of this to the problem of Sepsis of widespread infection action. This is a major effort underway nice states to improve our recognition and treatment and this tool basically considered in the background and look for signs of impending Sepsis us and draw the clinicians attention to it so obviously really powerful it starts to bring together the elements of clinical decision support and and even into some degree augmented intelligence the challenges you got it takes a lot of data. You need the stated in real time you don't WanNa find out three days from now that the patients developing substance and you need to be able to inject yourself back into the clinical workflow so the clinicians can get to this easily from a business this perspective this means you are going to integrate to the electronic health record and perhaps other systems and so you also eat away to deploy rapidly the and scale to enterprise. That's still going to deliver the data you need legacy technologies just don't do that and this is really where the API shine so this partner partner firm of ours has gone from a model that required hundreds of hours of interface bill and really only worked with one or two of the EHR's to a model that allows awesome to deploy an hour's can scale essentially infinitely and because our API's designed to be universal it also has allowed them to now enter markets and service other EHR's. They couldn't access before well that's certainly powerful right in with the growing number of devices that patient monitoring devices and monitors and information flowing out of the patient's room how do you connect to it all and so-. API's API's make it Easier Day oh absolutely and and likewise you know as we've seen over the last few years there these emerging niches if you will population health applications unified communications were starting to see some really practical applications of robotic process automation artificial national intelligence what all of these applications have in common is. They need rich clinical data. They work better real time and from go to market company perspective. They need a solution that they can deploy and scale rapidly love that and so is how does the cloud fit into all of this right right. I mean and what are you guys doing to leverage the cloud or help your clients leverage the cloud well so that's a really perceptive question and the whole world has basically clete moved to the cloud and is often the case healthcare is just lagging a few years. We're starting to see this as well and what my engineering Dan Product colleagues have taught me is you just can't do these modern applications and provide the kind of data and the user experience experience that people expect unless it's based in the cloud so I kind of look at it as as sort of simple you need a secure place to put your applications nations and your data and you need a really robust way to pipe data in and out and so it's very what we do is very complimentary and our our solution can be cloud hosted in a number of of our customers. Take that approach got it so if current infrastructure is using the cloud. Give give it a go if it's not give it a go. You guys could apply to both scenarios. That's exactly right and and again we've we've tried to build flexibility into our approach because we recognize recognized people are different places on that journey and they have different needs and different thresholds around security and privacy but the bottom line is healthcare is moving into the cloud. It's GonNa Happen and and fortunately there are some really terrific solutions out there to help people do that in an effective and secure way fascinating so not everything works and so I I like to hear from you. Dave something that didn't work and and how you've learned from it and how it's made you end team Esera better. Will I love this question. We devote a whole podcast or probably several episodes install of my failures in just in general Saul what I've come to appreciate is mistakes and failures are a good thing you know. Hopefully there's a little thought it went into what you're doing but they're really opportunities to learn and so I I've certainly embraced failure. I think our corporate culture does we. We basically see everything as an iteration it kind of flows naturally from our our sprinting scrum approach to software development. You try you learn you. ITERATIVE failures not a bad thing. It's a good thing I'm actually gonNA. This probably surprise you. I'm GonNa talk about one of the biggest failures in my career that it was also the most helpful was when I had a three sixty leadership evaluation done and when the results came I'm back much to my surprise and it was a very humbling experience. Dave thought he was doing an amazing job of being a coach to his various teams teams when their perception was that I was actually pacesetting which is a very different thing and it was a real important moment in my professional development development both because it it allowed me to see what I aspire to do was not what I was actually doing and the process is that I went through the executive coaching and other things that I went through in order to Kinda understand that and learn and practice other leadership ship styles has been a lifelong journey since then. I feel like it's it has been one of the most important failures if you will in my career among a career that's filled with all kinds of interesting film. I love it. It's a great thing to call out. You know if you stop trying to improve yourself. If you live in a vacuum you're really just not helping yourself or.

Dave Doctor Levin advisor Brown University Private Equity Advisory Boards edge technologies partner Sam Sora Health Dot forrest gump federal government San Siro Bachelor Brown San Siro Incredible Work Bay EHR Saul