26 Burst results for "Chief Innovation Officer"

Fresh update on "chief innovation officer" discussed on  Business Beware

Business Beware

04:29 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief innovation officer" discussed on Business Beware

"Of innovation Developments are not worth the money. They are not. So We've covered three the questions that you should ask consultants before you hire them. Now let's jump in to question number four. Russian number four is is Can you adapt and adopt the approach from the innovation consultant? Last question was focusing on what is unique about their approach. What is it that they're doing? That's attracting this following In this case, Can you adapt and adopt and you would not believe how hard this is? One is. This does their approach lend itself to be easily a death and adopted into You've been allowed to adapt it and to adopt it. So there's only two points I wanna make on this one is If you're gonna hire innovation consultant and they're bringing in approach to the table. Do you get granted the rights to use their approach with the organization or Are you paying simply for a training class? And when you get the 1st 10 train and you want the next 10 train to get a higher, bring them back again and you gotta bring them back again, right? So they get the hooks into you, and then you constantly have to bring them back. In order to get the rest of your organization. Where can you take their training materials and, yeah, you may have to pay some more for it. Can you take their training materials, customize it to you and then use it. Maybe you pay a little royalty. Some consultants will do that. But sometimes all those things you cannot adapt it adopted. This is a standard course. You want us to come in? We will teach this course multiple times across the organization. You gotta really think long and hard, because if you're trying to List the innovation skill within your team and within your organization. You really have to think about how Do you get that training? How do you get that for me here already across the entire organization. The other is is, Are they willing to adapt it to your organization? To your culture to your approach? Even your language right? Gave in the last segment. We talked a little bit about Kroger. Would Kroger did that I thought was just absolutely brilliant was is they took the language in the fire framework. Used program words. Kroger has its own approach to how is it manage projects and phases and testing cycles of They want to test something out. They used their language because the when the staff and leadership Heard about innovation project and the project was the described It was using Kroger terminology, Everybody, their position was. Oh, I know what that word means. Why know what that Days means over. I know what that budget I don't mean because it's using program language. So One. You didn't make sure that you're granted the rights to use the approach within your organization and then two is the consultant willing to adapt to your organization's culture. Approach in language. Absolutely. Critical. So again, Let's walk through here. The four questions you should ask before hiring a Michigan Sultan is this innovation consulted a proven innovator. Back to my analogy for today's show. You're not gonna hire someone to teach you how to drive Who's never driven a car? Do not hired innovation insulted who's never innovated. They can't point to. Award winning product A, You know. Ah, being a chief innovation officer, a major company like Procter and Gamble or Kroger, you know. Global health or male clinic or idea, right? You got that some credibility to Also they've been hired by Who else is hiring them, right? Are they The clients that have Found them to be valuable. That's a little bit of that credibility. Chuck three. What is it about their innovation consulted that's attracting this following? What's unique about that approach and then four? Can I dad to adopt that approach from that innovation consultant? Can I actually bring it in? Can I modify it? And can I adopt it? And by adopting it is is. Can I get my entire organization on board, right? For questions you.

Consultant Kroger Chief Innovation Officer Michigan Chuck Procter Gamble
Fresh update on "chief innovation officer" discussed on  Business Beware

Business Beware

03:59 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief innovation officer" discussed on Business Beware

"We're so glad you are back here again with us with another episode. This show is going to be a little controversial, particularly if you are a consultant that particularly innovation consultant because well, I'm going to talk about is my opinions are my opinions. My view of innovation consultants, so Let's not delay which just go ahead and jump right in. So let's define what a consulted Dios Consultant is somebody who gives a professional expert advice. It's somebody who's got some form of expertise that they are going to share their getting paid to share it with a client now. I started my career early on as a consultant. I was a consultant with a small company. But then got acquired by Computer Sciences Corporation. So the CIA see used to be one of the big six consulting houses a lot of I t outsourcing. It was the company that invented business process reengineering the whole concept behind it. I was working in the industry vertical specifically Telecom. My background at that time was heavily wireless, heavily mobile. So that was the work that I did. I was a consultant. I had expertise. People would pay CSC to get my time to come in and share that expertise with them. A lot of my expertise was in building out new mobile networks. So I did the very first to the Jie ISMs in Europe, which would be modest mon, which is now Vodafone. Um I did nt in South Africa did support in Malaysia. Led the effort at Omni Point, which is the first G Osem. Network in the United States in that, and how many point became T mobile here and United States so Um, So that was my expertise. People paid money to get expert access to me and access to The Ah to my team who also had similar background and similar kinds of experiences. But what about professional expert advice? What we mean by professional expert advice? In my case, I had very deep expertise in the mobile space. I had Done it many, many, many, many times the company that I was with prior to it being acquired by CSC. That company had actually done the 1984 field trial for 18 T in Chicago. Market one mobile network in the world, the very first sailor network and that was the test market for 18 T when they first tried, um doing cellular network. So this is you know the true Siler network, not wireless phones or radio phones as they used to be called back in the day True cellular Phones, multiple cell towers, automatic handoffs all of those kinds of things. So That's what professionals properties is all about now. The topic for today is not about our consultants. Good or bad. And look, we've We've all had our our our own experiences with consultants, right? We've hired them. Some of them worked out. So then they have not worked out. But you hire consultants one because you need the resource is or you lack and expertise. You lack, um, familiarity in the area. It's a new area. Your team. You don't have anybody in your team. That has experience that you're bringing the consultant in help kind of get you started and a new area. This effort is becoming extremely popular with innovation. There are you calls all the time for recommendations of consultants who can come in and help organizations around specifically their innovation efforts. And As I looked through it, and I looked at the consultants that are out there and I've talked with consultants. I have a pretty No pretty negative opinion. My belief is is that 80%? Of innovation consultants or not worth the money. My mother that's set there for a second. If you're in innovation consultant, you're probably jumping up out of your seat, throwing your phone. You're yelling at me. But Based on the consultants that I've seen out there. 80% of individual zones are not worth the might know. Why am I saying that? Well, I'm saying that is is It's about professional expertise. You don't get expertise from reading a book. And then now all the sudden you are an expert. You don't read how to drive a car and then you go out. You become a driving instructor. No, you have driven a vehicle, Then you teach others how to do it. The same applies to innovation. There are loads of innovation consultants that are out there that I've never done it. They never done it. So what I'm going to share with you or The four questions you should ask before hiring an innovation of sultans. You should ask all four of these questions. You should get into the details with each of these questions, so we're going to do one right out of the gate here. This is probably the big one that I focus in on whenever I'm talking to. Evaluating consultants for others. I get called all the time by corporations. They Hey, Can you recommend an innovation consultant? This is the first question. Is this innovation consulted a proven innovator. Justus. Yeah, you can't be. You can't teach someone else how to drive a car. If you have not actually driven a car, Same applies to innovation. So what does that I mean by this Has the consulted led an innovation for organizations known for innovation success. Have they been a chief innovation officer Someplace? Had they lead innovation teams that have actually delivered that just Set up processes but who's actually done it? Is this person credited for creating an innovation at major market success if they Done great products or new services of they. They've gotten some form of credit for the work they've done. Have they been? You know, uh They've done something that is market moving. That's what you want. That's the expertise. You know you want to boring And the third is rookie knows by industry for innovation leadership. They've been written about. Have they done credit in publications Have they been, um they received awards have the products or services that they lead. Have they received the wars? Do they have a technical and me to their credit? Do they have the best product of the year for industry? These are the three things for that. You need to ask your consultants. If they are not true Innovators don't stop. This is it? They hope clear this bar. Then you can stop the video now and One because they can't do this. I can't answer this that they haven't led an innovation offer. Not just innovation, after all on their own, whether innovated creating an innovation consulting for doesn't count. Have they led innovation at a major brought a company where they, you know, doing something really little leadership role it at Apple or at You know some new mobile app or autonomous vehicle company? Whatever it is. Recognized by industry for innovation. Leadership is an important one..

Consultant Chief Innovation Officer CSC CIA Computer Sciences Corporation Europe United States Siler Chicago G Osem Vodafone Apple South Africa Instructor Malaysia
Fresh update on "chief innovation officer" discussed on  Business Beware

Business Beware

02:56 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief innovation officer" discussed on Business Beware

"Innovation consultant Is what I'm going to talk about is my opinions are my opinions. My view of innovation consultants, so Let's not delay which just go ahead and jump right in. So let's define what I consulted Dios. Consultant is somebody who gives professional expert advice. It's somebody who's got some form of expertise that they are going to share their getting paid to share it with a client now. I started my career early on as a consultant. I was a consultant with a small company. But then got acquired by Computer Sciences Corporation. So the CDC used to be one of the big six consulting houses a lot of I t outsourcing. It was the company that invented business process reengineering the whole concept behind it. I was working in the industry vertical specifically Telecom. My background at that time was heavily wireless, heavily mobile. So that was the work that I did. I was a consultant. I had expertise people with pay CSC to get my time to come in and share that expertise with them. A lot of my expertise was in building out new mobile networks. So I did the very first to the Jie ISMs in Europe, which would be modest mon, which is now Vodafone. Um I did nt in South Africa did support in Malaysia. Led the effort at Omni Point, which was the first G Osem Network in the United States in that, and how many point became T mobile here and United States so Um, So that was my expertise. People paid money to get expert access to me and access to The Ah to my team who also had similar backgrounds and similar Kinds of experiences. But what about professional expert advice? What we mean by professional expert advice? In my case, I had very deep expertise in the mobile space. I had done it many, many, many, many times. The company that I was with prior to it being acquired by CSC. That company had actually done the 1984 field trial for 18 T in Chicago. Market one mobile network in the world, the very first sailor network and that was the test market for 18 T when they first tried, um doing cellular network. So this is you know the true sailor network, not wireless phones or radio phones as they used to be called back in the day True cellular Of those multiple cell towers on medic, handoffs all of those kinds of things. So That's what professionals parties is all about now. The topic for today is not about our consultants. Good or bad. And look, we've We've all had our our our own experiences with consultants, right? We've hired them, some of them for doubts, and they have not worked out. But you hire consultants one because you need the resource is or you lack and expertise. You lack Familiarity in the area. It's a new area. Your team. You don't have anybody in your team that has experienced that you're bringing the consultant in help. Kind of get you started in a new area. This effort is becoming extremely popular with innovation. There are you calls all the time the recommendations of consultants who can come in and help organizations around specifically their innovation efforts. And As I looked through it, and I looked at the consultants that are out there and I've talked with consultants. I have a pretty No pretty negative opinion. My belief is is that 80%? Of innovation consultants or not worth the money. My mother that's set there for a second. If you're in innovation consultant, you're probably jumping up out of your seat, throwing your phone. You're yelling at me. But Based on the consultants that I've seen out there. 80% of individual zones are not worth the might know. Why am I saying that? Well, I'm saying that is It's about professional expertise. You don't get expertise from reading a book. And then all of a sudden you are an expert. You don't read how to drive a car and then you go out. You become a driving instructor. No, you have driven a vehicle, Then you teach others how to do it. The same applies to innovation. There are loads of innovation consultants that are out there that I've never done it. They never done it. So what I'm going to share with you or The four questions you should ask before hiring an innovation consultants. You should ask all four of these questions. You should get into the details with each of these questions, so we're going to do one right out of the gate here. This is Bobby. The big one that I focus in on whenever I'm talking to or evaluating consultants for others. I get called all the time by corporations. They Hey, can you recommend an innovation consultant? This is the first question. Is this innovation consulted a proven innovator. Just as if you can't be. You can't teach someone else how to drive a car. If you have not actually driven a car, Same applies to innovation. So what does that I mean by this Has the consulted led an innovation for organizations known for innovation success. Have they been a chief innovation officer Someplace? Had they lead innovation teams that have actually delivered that just Set up processes but who actually done it? Is this person credited for creating an innovation at major market success if they John great products or new services of a They've gotten some form of credit for the work they've done. Have they been, You know, uh They've done something that that is market moving. That's what you want. That's the expertise. You know you want to boring The third is recognized by industry for innovation leadership. They've been written about..

Consultant Chief Innovation Officer CSC Computer Sciences Corporation Europe Chicago CDC United States G Osem Network Vodafone John South Africa Instructor Bobby Malaysia
Foreign election interference is finding plenty of places online to spread

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:07 min | 2 months ago

Foreign election interference is finding plenty of places online to spread

"Them The Russian group accused of meddling in the two thousand, sixteen election was caught this month in another disinformation campaigns. Reuters reports that the group posed as a news outlet publishing articles that attacked. Vice. President Biden they targeted facebook and twitter. Yes. But also spread on Gab and parlor social media networks that attract right wing users Camille Francois is chief innovation officer at graphic, which helped research effort. She says, basically, disinformation is looking for a new home. It is the first time that we found for an actors use Palais Account and Gab accounts, and it was difficult because while as an industry, we've learned to work together to take action in between some of the social platforms. They are still social platforms that are that are not observing the same rules. I think that the main takeaway is if we want to be effective at tackling foreign interference, we have to tackle for interference on old platform. This is no longer just a facebook problem or just a twitter problem it is definitely a whole of the industry problem. You mentioned that they don't have the same rules. Is it a sign that perhaps some of the methods that facebook and twitter have employed against disinformation might be working a little better that something that platforms like Gavin Parlor, where anything goes might spread information a little better yet said that Cindy the, that's a sign of maturation from the firms. Some of that is also on the government to to. Sort of clarify rain. So in the specific context, we are talking about sanctioned entity in. So understanding what are the types of constraints that apply when platforms are notified by this type of activity is is also a government at question right? That creates an interesting conversation, which is whose job is it to make sure that we can tackle foreign interference together

Facebook Twitter Camille Francois Reuters Gavin Parlor Palais Account Chief Innovation Officer Biden President Trump Cindy The
Medical tech is the new gold rush for investors during the pandemic

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:11 min | 3 months ago

Medical tech is the new gold rush for investors during the pandemic

"More people are seeing their doctors added distance during the pandemic in this long awaited to telehealth has investors intrigued there was already a boom in biotech investing before covid nineteen hit. But now investors are rushing to put money into all kinds of ways to modernize medicine from Boston W.. G. B. H. Radios Aaron Schachter has more personal. Medical Technology isn't especially new push your fitness further with fitbit charge to a heart rate and fitness wristband that helps you make the most of all day workouts and beyond. And the wearables are just one facet of health tech. The pandemic has shown that much of health care can be delivered at a distance and there's been a boon in telehealth platforms, online fitness classes, and Internet connected devices that are vital signs. Harry LARRIKIN IS CO author of moneyball medicine thriving in the new data driven healthcare market before Cova. Did you really have to look at these things and figure out where the world was GONNA go how fast it was going to go there all of a sudden now you're giving people i. don't WanNa say no choice but now they. Need these things and tech investors want in venture capital entities have invested nearly five and a half billion dollars in medical tech from January through June that's according to rock health a company that helps digital health startups. But there are those urging caution about the direction. These investments take all too. Often the technology has attempted to reengineer the process of care rather than leverage. The most efficient process of Care Jed constance is a healthcare consultant. For example, he says, it took years for the developers of medical records technology to get it right because early versions made it difficult for doctors to Talk to patients and fill in the required computerized forms. Constant says there's a history of companies creating what's flashy instead of what's practical and so the venture capital investor backed efforts have found them to be largely ignorant. There are also concerns that new health technology could exacerbate disparities in healthcare between rich and poor communities doctor. My mom is the former chief innovation officer. At Medicare's innovation center she says that smartwatch are fun but the kinds of devices that help most people stay healthy are often more mundane. Can you develop a tool that will help them track their medications with things? That automatically dispense medication for them and or something that will give their physicians more real time data on which medications they're actually taking according to rock health much of the venture money handed out this year went to companies developing online platforms for more telemedicine, digital pharmacies, fitness classes, and more efficient ways to deliver mental health counseling at a distance that's w. g. b. h. Aaron, chapter, and Boston consulting firm McKinsey says the speed of telehealth adoption everything from video visits to digital records means up to two hundred and fifty billion dollars in healthcare spending could soon be going towards virtual care.

G. B. H. Radios Aaron Schachte Chief Innovation Officer Boston Jed Constance Harry Larrikin Consultant Mckinsey Cova W. G. B. H Medicare
Data privacy careers: A passion for learning

Cyber Work

03:00 min | 3 months ago

Data privacy careers: A passion for learning

"Lot of our listeners, the main slant of cyber cyber. Listener, working out what type of careers they want to enter? So I wanted to sort of. You. Know some of the career steps that you took to get to the position you're at now what types of positions experiences skills learning that you need to do to become a chief innovation officer? The sort of past signposts. Yeah. Well it certainly. Routes that is decided in wake up one morning any number of years ago. A vats where I want to be specific ob although you know it was it was in general arena if you would. Terms of getting to that place a large part of by. Three quarters of my my career path was very much on the practitioner side of the House. So let's say I was actively. Putting together the programs in medium security solutions to solve problems directly for the business. So in this capacity, it's it's. A lot of the skills learned from there kind of blow it out to do on a larger scale for for numerous organizations hundreds of. Thousands written that scale, and so some of the things that really helped me along the way was a very. Very, early understanding of technology and its interconnection point. So I. Don't know that everyone needs to necessarily you know the the different layers of the model, but it's helpful. Know that everyone needs to to know how to programs, but certainly advocate for it and so you know picking up those types of deep technology skill sets along the way along with the swerve just managerial skill sets. You know by the time you talk about you might position on is very helpful but. I still spend a lot of time learning a lot of time learning and I think not so much what? What the steps were to get here so much as the steps to to be good at what one does win they're they're not does require constant learning. So you programming for example. So I've been I've been getting my hands dirty in learning. Golan, for example. I'm actually really enjoying that Trying to think. Spent a Lotta time working with it. We've got a number of data scientists on the team in, and there are some new concepts in theories that spent the last two years really getting very deep into an understanding how how they operate you know how adversarial networks are created in those different types of emo models or building Sarah. I think the the easy easy. The short answer is regardless of where you want to end up I think it has to be A. Passion so much so that you have to enjoy getting really deep into the study of it as opposed to just the practice of it, but that does need to be be healthy balance of both studied MMG this. Yeah.

Chief Innovation Officer Golan Sarah
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Network Disrupted

Network Disrupted

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Network Disrupted

"We need to run it and measure it differently to support being able to do these things. It's not just about hiring scrum Masters and and creating teams know it's it's it's really a home. It's it's the locus of your transformation of your whole business. Yes. So so so now now you're the chief Innovation officer and net impact strategies, which which gives you the ability to work across its net impact is is mostly government focused or merciful federal government. So a federal government some commercial but but our our focus is the federal government clients dead. Uh, we've got a pretty heavy investment in the Health Community Federal Health, uh Community. We've also got a heavy investment in financial oversight agencies and I think will be continue to Branch out there. But yeah, it's you know, our job is to to take what has been like the whole essence of the company was started with a lady who had worked in some of the larger Federal systems integrators or product areas and the dissatisfaction with the ability to focus on Mission and focus on the customer value package. So I'm very happy in that our our DNA is about focusing on the needs of our customers which goes back to my vision package of focusing not just on the business of it, but on the mission delivery and what technology brings so I feel like we have an opportunity here to change. Through our customers what they can do to drive their mission value, right and must be it must be it's a different perspective. I mean, I might created my first startup. I was working for several years at at Motorola or company that Motorola bought and doing something trying to make success doing all this engineering manufacturing supply-chain stuff and software and wage. And and when I left Grim, I started up I start I funded the start up by creating a management consulting company. And so the original product was just doing what I knew had to do at one company and trying to do it across many companies off and then that turned into eventually our product ID and we built something but the point being it was, you know, I had talked to other companies all the time when I was working in Industry trying to do these things, but the amount I learned in the perspective I had now actually working as a partner to these other companies and learning the the you know, yep. Broad brush. Yeah, they're high-tech electronics companies one makes cable box is the one makes laptops things aren't going to be that different..

Health Community Federal Healt Motorola chief Innovation officer Industry partner
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Network Disrupted

Network Disrupted

05:49 min | 7 months ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Network Disrupted

"Maybe it's part that but it's also part, you know, those data centers have been managed for quite a long time and the contracts that exists are either cost-plus contracts or like they may have made sense when they were six years ago, but now they're they're the contracts themselves almost limit the ability to really work out of services funded and I write there's only way for me to get better is generally by getting more the amount of investment to innovate and become and give out better Services. It's not nearly a dog. And frankly I look at their business model is more people go to cloud services how their costs not going to go through the roof. It's just the cycle time for improvement and change. There's not a value proposition there. Whereas commercial Cloud providers weather there in the Gulf Cloud space the the I else. The the the icy space or or commercial Cloud space them is an incentive to innovate cried to constantly provide new Services is enough customers there that are demanding new capabilities that you know, your Innovation Cycles am moving, you know at a order of magnitude or more faster than what you can do. If you're working your own data set, right? Yes, somebody somebody maybe somebody's innovating somebody's innovating underneath you and found in there for over time. You'll naturally have more services you can use as those services are available and and you may decide to use the services or build your own on the cloud. But you know if want to get started with a dog Data warehousing then don't spend any time. There's a data warehouse. There's a database specifically for that and and there's something you can at least experiment with it's available in their their allows us to get into the right space of affects vs. Capex, right? I mean part of the part of the the technical debt that's held people back is the need to throw big chunks of money a technical refresh right Hardware technical refresh in lieu of hey if I can topics that that gives me a better value proposition. I have more control over that way and it it keeps me from doing a penny wise and pound foolish decision of trying to extend the service life of something that really should have been refreshed of years ago. Yeah, no for sure and from a security standpoint from a quality reliability standpoint there. There's wins all over the place where we're in our customer base off. That there's lots of cloud adoption and hybrid Cloud adoption in our large Financial customers. There's there's still a lot of they're building their own cloud like services, but they're able to hire those people to build those services. And so for them, you know, they're not necessarily adopting Cloud at the same public Cloud providers at the same speed but are creating that same underlying infrastructure-as-a-service in platform services. So that those that are building deploying applications Services can do it rapidly and I think it's obviously critical part if you're going to do any sort of c i d ROM you need infrastructure that you can wield with software..

Gulf Cloud
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

08:00 min | 8 months ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"There's a part of me. Sometimes which kind of irks at the term patient centric like? Oh we're very patient. Centric will what is all of this for any not you know. I feel that way about value based carrots like no kidding goods. Oh okay value. You're a you WANNA provide value with your care. That would be nice. Let's focus on that. I'm with you. I'm with you. So every company always has setbacks. I love to hear about one of the setbacks you guys have had and how it's contributed to helping you deliver a better experience to healthcare company. I'd say from from a corporate perspective. Be a setback was probably early on like. I said I've been doing this since since two thousand and in two thousand one we had to you know as a crisis in and we had to let a bunch of people go and it was really early you know relatively early on and maybe another point in our in our journey where we've had a contraction we need to let people go and I think those moments that's the worst as a business owner and as a leader to have to sit down with someone and say you know because of either circumstances out of my control and things that we have or haven't done to tell them that they don't have a not gonna be able to continue their employment. It's it's it's really hard and those moments very soul searching and I would say that the lesson coming out of that is to be good steward of your people however whatever that means like you might not have responsibility. You might but either way that as a leader or even just as as a teammate that the sense of being a protector and a steward of your people is important. And the second being having empathy in connecting with people and that the way to have those difficult conversations is to do it from a place of humility and respect and openness and allow yourself to go there and Decca manifest and a lot of different ways. But I think that's those are a couple of lessons. Yeah you know and I think we we all go through that and Jay appreciate you bringing that up you know because when times get tough everything gets tough and Those contractions can happen as a leader and as teammate. You've got think about how to most. I guess how to do it in the most. I don't know if nicest word but maybe human empathetic way right. Yeah we're doing right now and we have been doing great and I don't WanNa pay picture that we're contracting want to make clear but it's also keep it keep in mind those those lessons in the good times right and like always always always bring that that intention of of being real and being human in realizing you know when we're in business we're in conference rooms with these corporate environments and you're playing a certain role that there's a tendency to to see like okay. I need to be that role and speak those things and kind of stay within those boundaries. And there's truth to that you're there to serve a purpose but there's also just remembering that like everybody's a human being all in the room with all the all the rules in making for those looking for those those ways to connect on a genuine level and that's critical. What are you must excited about today? I'm most excited about the potential for digital in healthcare. I think we're just beginning. I think we're there's frustration with how slow things move in the industry and you know there's reasons for that. I don't think we should focus on that. I think we should focus on the fact that we're probably not even in the bottom of the first inning and there's just tremendous potential to both to solve the huge problems in our healthcare using digital. It's not a silver bullet right and there's a lot of things that need to work together but just to transform the way that we do healing in the way that we do medicine in this country that has gonna lead to better outcomes less of a burden financially on society and better experiences and we're empathetic experiences. So that's what I'm excited about. The potential for for digital do move those balls forward significantly. Yeah and you look at the landscape of what's happening. Every day you see digital health company getting fifteen million dollars. One hundred million dollars like there's so much investment going on in this space. Yeah it just it's incredibly. You're gonNA say something I mean I have unlike what is the term cautiously optimistic in in that round. Like I think there's there's a I have mixed feelings about that. I think there's a lot of a lot of money. And this is part of what we were. Our mission node. Health is to kind of help bridge the gap between digital innovation. That's happening outside in Silicon Valley in places like that that is very BC driven in that kind of raising a lot of money and bridging the gap between that and actually deployed scaled technology. In health systems are in hell in actual operational environments. Because most of those companies are gonNA fail some of they're gonNA fail spectacularly and maybe raise a billion dollars. I won't name names so I think there's a big we need to really optimize those dollars and also bring more evidence based thinking and practices to those dollars. I think that's not. That's just growing pains. I think in part but yes I agree. It's exciting now that we're investing in it. But sometimes I think I'd rather give fifteen million dollars. Should a bunch of nurses to do a bunch of design thinking prototyping them a bunch of folks sitting in an office who don't really understand how it all works Genn? That's a great call out day at appreciate you mentioning that and we're talking about two different things right we're that digital innovation and that's being outsourced versus homegrown and the stuff that you guys are doing to help. The existing operational things being done within the hospital and some great gains to be had there some greater efficiencies and better experiences. So it's so great that you guys are working in this area. You need both. You need both to be clear and I. We do work. We work across both. And there's there's definitely startups that we work with an often. That's to your point. They have clinicians in the room or on. The staffer in the board are bringing that perspective in that can. That's helpful. Yeah well this has been great Jay. The importance of being human centric and design thinking. It's the tip of the spear and so I love if you could leave us with the closing thought but also where can we continue to learn more so you can go to our website which is motive stash made dot com or you can look at the node health websites which is which node an od dot health? And as part of that is working with leading group to develop a set of measures for a user experiences in in healthcare and in medicine specifically. And that's a tool that's available there now and can be downloaded in you can score any digital experience and baseline measured over. Time would love your feedback. It's a tool. That's startups have already started using an shipping product with features. That are more human centric so that's available and I appreciate it in terms of a closing thought I would just say let's all remember. We're all on the same team and to be widely collaborative to be bold and make fearless choices and to remember. This is all about the patient at the end. That's a great message. Jay and I appreciate you sharing that with us and and the work that you guys do. Listeners check them out. There's an opportunity for you to do more with with your existing way of doing things and I think Jay and team are doing outstanding job of helping improve the way that we offer our patients a better experience and better outcomes so j a really really grateful that you stop by and and some time with us. Thanks for having me solve really enjoyed it. Thanks for listening to the outcomes rocket podcast be shooter visit us on the web at. Www DOT outcomes rocket dot com for the show notes resources inspiration and so much more..

Jay business owner Decca Silicon Valley BC
R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

Outcomes Rocket

06:44 min | 8 months ago

R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

"Just got back from Argentina year over there Yeah that's right. We have an office down there and I was doing some work down there and Yet we just moved back last week. Interesting time to move back of course to be traveling around but love Argentina. Wow well welcome back to the States. And you are also very focused on the digital aspects within healthcare so tell us what inspires your work in the healthcare vertical In the core of my inspiration is a very personal so seven years ago. I was diagnosed with advanced metastatic to sicker cancer. I spent about a year and treatment at Sloan. Kettering forty five days in patient. Three months of Chemo for big surgery. So I was sort of a professional patient for a year and I learned law things. I'm six years. No evidence of disease now so I feel very much. Thank you thank you and as you can imagine I learned a lot of things and a lot of different levels but one thing I I learned in observed in that role was just in my opinion. How poorly a digital was being deployed in space for patients and for clinicians and this is not a knock on Sloan. They're amazing they saved my life. But it's something that's across the industry. As as soon as I came back and so before that I was the chief operating officer is really just focusing on running the business and when I came back I said this is something I really want to dive back into. Working more directly with clients focusing on as a problem to be solved doing what I can to put my shoulder to the wheel of making better more effective experiences for patients and for clinician. So that's my My touchstone of the passion that I bring to it. Well I think it's A powerful story Jay and I appreciate sharing that and congratulate you for for beating cancer and so great that you have taken this upon yourself. Having been there done that as a patient better and more efficient are two things that we could definitely get from from digital technologies. Tell us a little bit more about how you guys are. Adding value to the ecosystem through digital so our focus is really on creating experiences that are engaging in effective and this mostly for patients but also for clinicians and sometimes caregivers and bringing best practices to the industry that hasn't really been woven into the to the way that the digital products have been built outside. The industry and healthcare has has been data centric and rightfully so right. The legislation was passed. You know twenty plus years ago saying you need to get everything into the data and and that's been journey and now that we have all the data in we're starting to figure out ways to unlock the data and share the data and do more with the data. We need to stop being so data centric and start being more human centric and understanding that people are complex and their situations are often very unique and we need to build experiences that meet them where they are and make things easy for them and drives towards the outcomes that we want for them. So that's a long answer and I can be unpacked. Non Thought of different ways but how we sort of more tactically are coming into his kind of doing really running more design thinking processes That haven't been lacking so picking up on sort of clinical insight or a market research research site in farm industry for instance and building on that doing ethnographic research actually talking to patients in really understanding their sort of holistic view. Their Longitudinal journey that might touch a bunch of different things. A bunch of different providers a bunch of different mediums a bunch of different co morbidity or products understanding those longitudinal journeys doing rapid prototyping and. Co Design and collaboration ways. And then putting those back for early prototype validation before anything gets actually develop so that process of design thinking is something that has been lacking in the industry and has led to a lot of digital experiences that are either painful or hard to navigate or create unnecessary cognitive. Load especially in the case of clinicians. It's interesting you know. And I'm glad you mentioned clinicians as well because bad experience exists on on the patient side and on the clinician side. As well and to your point there's a lot that's going on that's great but there's an opportunity to do so much better and saw I'd love to hear from. Uja On on what your team has done. That's made either outcomes better or business models better within healthcare. Yeah so I think it's. It's applying that process that I described by lake. You know it's all in. The end is about outcomes right so you really are trying to make better Clinton experiences. They can spend more time to medicine less time on data entry or so. They're less burnt out. Say let's make less mistakes and in the patient case you're trying to keep them engaged. You're trying to get data to flow and to have the outcome of their experience in their disease journey or or or health journey. Have a better outcome. So it's not just about great experiences to create great experiences. I WanNa make that clear to but specifically applying those cases. I mean. We've done everything from working with. Pharmaceutical companies to develop a digital prototypes around using stress managed using behavioral change techniques around social support for stress management or behavioral scientists at pharmaceutical companies or working with healthcare providers to provide better pathways for patients to navigate their journeys. So it's a lot of simple stuff and it can be starting with schedule. An appointment and navigating to the in helping with with with transport access to the site of care. Just that doesn't require blockchain or a I or anything fancy but doing that in a way that is easy in as easy as Uber or another experience that we're used to in our normal life bringing that level of ease and utility to those experience that's table stakes right and then it's going from. They're moving more into actual medicine side of things and we do a lot of stuff around adherence and getting people know we know that that forty percent of outcomes is driven by behavior. And there's really nothing better at a scalable in evaluating level to help with behavior change them and digital devices mean there's a there's a shadow side to that too also right. Mike. We're all addicted to these things. But that same power can be used to drive behavior change whether it's adherence to medication or physical therapy or just a care plan so creating experiences for patients that help them with that. So that's we start to get into the closer to the medical side of things so that's some of the ways that we are bringing our skills that we've owned also in other industries like you've working in hospitality and retail and e commerce and all these other industries that have more are more mature digitally especially from human centric perspective bringing all those practices and tools to the space

Sloan Argentina Chemo Chief Operating Officer Kettering JAY Co Design Mike Clinton
Camille Francois on Disinformation Campaigns

Good Code

09:14 min | 9 months ago

Camille Francois on Disinformation Campaigns

"How do foreign actors spread this information online and engage with us to sow chaos or simply spread their message? What have we learned from the campaign of Russian meddling into the two thousand sixteen presidential elections in the US and all we ready for? What's coming in two thousand twenty? Welcome to good code. A weekly podcast on ethics in our digital lives may mean is chain than the. I'm visiting journalist at Cornell Text Digital Life Initiative and I'm your host this week we talk with Kemi Hosoi. She's the chief innovation officer at Graphic and Network Analysis company that studies the spread and patterns of Information Online. She specializes in disinformation campaigns and media manipulation before joining graphic. She was the principal researcher. Google Jigsaw working on electro integrity and this information too. She's been in that space for very long time long before it was in the headlines. Every day I sat down with chemicals wave week ago minutes before her firm released a report called. Red Card which details a recent inoffensive campaign led by an Indian. Pr Firm on several issues including sucker after the two thousand sixteen elections the US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. Gave graphic out all the data they had on the Russian disinformation efforts targeting the elections millions of posts linked in large part to the Internet research agency the air a patrol farm based instant fetish perk spent seven months studying these posts looking for what she calls the. Abc's of this information actors behavior and content. So I began by asking her to walk us through what that campaign looked like concretely. Just to be clear on something. I don't think we got older data. We had all the data that the Senate could obtain at that time. And I think it's really interesting that nobody to the state had the entire data of everything that happened. The really means that we still have blind spots on this campaign and how you know how it functioned in how targeted users Certainly take a step back. The Russian attempt to target. Us audiences doesn't start in two thousand sixteen. It starts two years earlier with a project called project. Lakhta those two I years between two thousand fourteen in two thousand sixteen really interesting to study because they show a lot of like bizarre experiments that the Russians doing to understand the Americans and to try to see like what are going to be hot button issues. A how can you create panic? How can you go through local media to do that? How can you manipulate local executives to create panic you see in those first two years? Two thousand fourteen in two thousand fifteen a series of again bizarre experiments cullman chemical is one that people tend to be familiar with where the Russian campaign traits to create a local panic saying that chemical plant has exploded of course none of that is true but they send SMS to elected officials? They go on youtube and create fake explosion videos and you know pretty quickly get dismissed as a hoax a year. After that around Thanksgiving they try to create a panic around Thanksgiving. Turkeys being poisoned with Manila. And so you know for two years is sort of like poke around and try different things in two thousand sixteen. Of course it's election year. That is campaign that I think we're all familiar with in so here at that stage. They have fairly developed fake personas rights fake accounts fake individuals fake news organizations and advocacy groups. And those are going to engage in social media to divide the country as much as possible. Sometimes they even tried to use social media to get people to take action. Off-line right so there's a famous case where in Texas. They try to organize to groups of protesters on opposing issues. And they try to sort of like have them be face to face protesting in the streets from one another on the same day at the same time in two thousand seventeen is interesting moment to where the platforms are catching up with security and are starting to take down but at their own different pace facebook as the first to move the identify that some of these groups are not real organizations but are actually run from Saint Petersburg and they start taking it down one by one and that creates a note bizarre situation where these trolls start using the platforms against one another. So in the case of a group that attract many closely that was called black matters. Us was a fake group. It got kicked out from facebook. I in the they sort of moved to twitter to complain about being taken down from facebook and then they starting buying Google ads. In order to redirect traffic from their new websites. Right to two thousand seventeen is very much a cat and mouse chase between the trolls into different platforms and in two thousand eighteen. We see yet a different face of that activity with the midterms. Where here? It's a lot of sort of method. Trolling writes a lot of like telling people that they're going to do something. That's really big in the large campaign when it isn't really exactly the case. Finally we've seen them again at play in two thousand nineteen with a campaign with really good operational security rights of so much harder to look at the accounts and to say. Oh those are the accounts of the IRA but remarkably similar in terms of divisive content. That we have come to know a same communities being targeted of course because they're focused on twenty twenty this time. They're talking about the candidates that they were not talking about in two thousand sixteen Remarkable remarkably consistent strategy in that set. That was taken down in October. Two Thousand Nineteen where so the actors were mostly coming from. Russia on troll farms their behavior. Basically the main trait was what these Very elaborate pursue Nazar. How would you describe their tactics at the time? Yeah it's a great question because I think in reality. They were much more than one actor right. So if you take an actor like for instance it really wasn't in a lot of people's radar and we tend to think like. Oh Iran can learn from Russia and followed along. That's not true. Iran's started using information operations to target American audiences as soon as two thousand nine. They were already a lot of actress. President Two Thousand Sixteen. We were honesty also just not looking for them within the Russian actor is you of course had the I- Rachel Farm. Which is what I just discussed but you also had Russian military intelligence also being active in the election an honesty pursuing very different strategies for the IRA. We saw these very sophisticated fake personas. Some of them were quite popular on lines of my my own favourite troll is Jenna Abrahams. She was presenting as a woman in her mid thirties and her big thing was to do like very funny and engaging jokes online a lot of pop culture commentary and sometimes some really bizarre sort of political and racist commentary. She had built a huge audience to the point that she had often been cited in mainstream media. So that's for the IRA side the story right. So you create very sophisticated personas. Some of them are going to be very successful. And then you sort of used them to divide Americans to sort of like increase chaos in society. That's a bit of different strategy than we've seen from actors like the GRU Russia military intelligence seemed to have been more involved in the hacking and leaking operations right so hiking politicians obtaining material and in creating these campaigns about the release of the material of emails for instance so now fast forward to today. So you brought us through a little bit. What happened in the year before the year? Afterwards and since men in terms of volume has online deception. Faded has it grown. Is it just same? Same Old. Tim will offer Said's very hard to track. But I think it's fair to say that it's changed a lot. Sophisticated actors are getting better in many ways at hiding traces but in many ways investigators in platforms and reporters also getting better at finding these deceptive campaigns. So all the foreign actress side is an interesting cat and mouse game with. I think it's more type of government actors being involved being a little bit better at it every time and growing community of people who are here to expose them in who are sort of like catching up with these techniques. The thing that's also interesting is the growth of a Disney vacation for higher market marketing firms. That are now sort of selling fake profiles in creating fake organizations on behalf of their customers.

IRA Facebook United States Google Russia Us Senate Select Committee On Cornell Text Digital Life Init Chief Innovation Officer Principal Researcher Senate Iran Kemi Hosoi ABC Youtube Network Analysis
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

The No Limits Selling Podcast

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

"Today I have the privilege of sitting down with Julie Lancer here at What do you call this place? It's called the startup you. MD At the diamondback garage which is a mouthful and the chief innovation officer. That's right at the University of Maryland. College College Park. Welcome to the program. So the reason I wanted to reach out was just A less than a month ago. They had ted conference upstairs. Right that's right and one thing that struck me was the amount of powerful amazing capable women that came on the stage and it wasn't that they were women that were just amazing amazing human beings and it was just kind of Nice that they actually had a concentration them that. That's great to hear because I share that same thing one of my goals. When I used to run a nonprofit fit for women for empowering women was to make put myself out of business because we might find you a job? Yep We don't need to anymore. Highlight that somebody's a woman. They're just a person in there at the same level as everyone else kind of pissed me off the other day. I don't get pissed off often. It was they did a space walk with the all female thing is like. Get the Frick Outta here. We need to start easing. Women did that. It's not like it was reallowed. Little women to go do that is what the underlying this is that they're still i. Yes Sir Women and you know other other you know Ethnicities and things like that not just based based on gender but other groups where we need to stop like Sean challenged. This is the first time I call it emotional constipation so you get to work with a lot of folks in this joint. Some of them would be professors. That have brilliant idea. But maybe don't have the expertise not really start a business right and then you have other people that just are here that want to start a business tell me about the different food groups and then we'll kind of dive into each one sure sure So yeah we have Brilliant researchers who've made a fantastic discovery that WANNA see that discovery out into the world and oftentimes a startup. Is the the best mechanism for doing that. So we have a faculty member WHO's cured. Ms In mice and yeah so whether or not that will work in a human. I don't know but it deserves a chance to be We have another faculty WHO's Figured out how to detect Salmonella produce in not forty eight hours as per the current. The way it's done four hours and that's a huge difference in can save lives without or saved Medical bills and so got a lot of really cool things so there's faculty members at supposed to curing. Ms In my think of how many amazing life changing world altering inventions never got made because that step from idea to letting the world know about it never happened effectively. That's what drives me to be here honestly sleep. It's if the cure for cancer is sitting in someone's head or in someone's lab and it doesn't have the chance to realize whether or not it is truly you know that it truly works. That's just not acceptable to me. Every good idea deserves a chance to be successful and I even say every idea whether or not it's good who am I to judge right right And so that's what we do here. We activate fearless ideas with the idea that they can drive transformational impact on that. I don't want on my watch for us to miss something that you know didn't get a chance to to see the light of day. Yeah or somebody comes out three years later you know. I have this idea at thirty years ago and that happens all the time. The the differences in execution. I mean you know I had an idea for an ear reader back when I was traveling internationally and carried five books because I read so fast and Michael. It'd be really nice to have this on a tablet. I didn't create kindle are INCRI readers but so execution has all of it. So that's what we focus on here is. How do we activate good ideas? Because you've got this sign on the wall I it's the get shit done. That's right that is our mantra. It's like you can sit around talk about it and think about it but nothing happens until you actually execute on it and you can execute badly which is still a blessing. Then you learn and you kind of move fail fast fail fast. Learn Pivot repeat excellent so the first spruyt group were faculty from the university. The other one. We've also got students so oftentimes for students. It's more of a learning experience so it's part of their curriculum more. It's just part of their whole college experience Many students who start companies in college won't actually continue continuing with the same company when they get out but you you're creating a mindset and that's what's really important is you're you're teaching them to possibility thinkers and to be able to realize that they can affect change in the world. And that's really what that's about what the students and some of them do go on continue their companies and build into successful companies. I'm squarespace is a great example of one that came out of the University of Maryland Student Company And so yeah so we try to kind of foster that and and we want the cross pollination within alumni who have started built successful companies or folks from the community that have been successful entrepreneurs. We WanNA bring them in. Get them in touch with these. You know kind of emerging urging entrepreneurs and see how we can help cross pollinate and affect each other. Yeah because The AD that comes to mind is Reese's peanut butter cups got got your chocolate in my peanut butter and peanut butter because it's amazing. They are that different. Some excites me is when you take someone comes from one discipline chemistry and they go into management and they go well when you have a catalyst. This happens in chemistry. Why don't we do that with human beings? We Cross Paul all the news and you extend that sometimes stagnant industry much further. True innovation requires diversity of thought and perspective You can't can't saw I think it's one of my favorite Einstein. Coach can't solve the problem from the context in which it was created. Yes so you need people and so we do a lot of And some of our innovation Shen catalysts whom you met earlier students that we pay as interns to be here and they help us with some administrative work but they're working on projects they're actually involved in our ecosystem and so so But but we know that just them seeing some of that is really crucial absolutely so the two groups students and Faculty Faculty Primary Yep. Those are our primary customers one of the things that gets in the way of US becoming awesome is ourselves. Oh always Julie as you get professors coming in here. Sometimes they really have an idea locked into their head. which is you know this is my baby is beautiful? This'll we're going to do with your experience. Sometimes you know that's not the right path to go what techniques do you use to get them to see. The light released be open to the possibility so a lot of times like anyone you have to let them fail a little bit before they realize and so they have to struggle kind of like raising children. Right you gotta let them do it on their own. You GotTa Lotta Struggle and then you you can come in and say well so let me explain to you how you can fix this or how you can do this differently. So we've had A faculty member WHO Had One of his investors wanted to come on on board and be a team member wanted. You know a significant portion of equity and it didn't turn out well and then He realized that he doesn't know. Know How all this business stuff works. we had another one who's Brilliant researcher was able to you know was having trouble raising money Because he needed a CEO but then finally he was able to raise because of the technology a large chunk of money but part of the caveat was that he had to find a CEO And so the way. Hey I explain it is that You know it's not starting a business isn't rocket science but a rocket scientist doesn't know how to do it which is perfectly true to hear something that it happens quite often that you've got a venture capitalist that's investing in a company and they say you need a CEO to come in which is absolutely true right but here's how it can go go sideways that Co that comes in has a team. They've worked in the past -solutely they take a culture that's already exists. That may be good or bad or in the middle within the force another culture upon it absolutely and so that can go sideways to guard against that. Or how do we can't I mean it's We can educate indicate our faculty On how to you know you know what their role is. But they're you know they've never done business before they're really the scientists And so we try to protect him in our licenses. Such that If the company gets a license that that and the company goes in one direction that there's maybe a way that the intellectual property can come back or they can carve out another piece or another Field of use for the intellectual property. So they can create another company around the technology but in a different field so we look for ways to try and protect them. But but it doesn't always work. I mean I think one of the companies was in the news. Recently Was One of our companies that the The founding I P the researcher was forced out and then the company went bankrupt and So he lost all of his equity in the company. Okay and did you lose the IP as well so the university is No because the university owned okay so we that's our job is to try and sometimes it's protect them from themselves. Nice we were you when my hero Yeah just love was giving the rights to his invention invention to Westinghouse to save them those wondering. Why don't you ask? The stock. Wouldn't cost them anything new. They don't always know. Yeah yeah they don't always know so one of the things that it was kind of interesting about Tesla if you believe it is of course. He was buddies with Mark Twain and he used his coil to also generate xrays. Sue took an X-ray of Mark Twain. which is to be one of the first xrays ever taken interesting? Well you know an interesting thing about intellectual property if you read the history the One of my favorite books is Peter. Drucker innovation and Entrepreneurship Mariel Book. We talked about Thomas. Edison Thomas Edison created a light bulb. But he didn't create the commercial lightbulb. Hold that went to market. He actually license someone else's patent what he did is he created the system of delivery electricity. Yes and then he license somebody else's patent which was a better technology so It's one of the things that you also have to educate These professors honest that. It's not always the best technology that wins just because your widget may be better than the next one doesn't gene at. That's going to be a commercial business success before we went on air. You were chatting about your daughter. How many children do you have two daughters as they move into the world? What three pieces of of advice would you give them to allow them to be happy? And successful So one is the you can't you can't always control what happens to you but you can control how you you react to it and how you respond to it and so maintaining that Sense of agency Self Agency knowing that you you can control you you and that's about the only thing in the world that you can actually control And so so use that power. Don't ever give away your power of controlling your life and and I used to speak on this actually quite a bit before I came to the university about How we give away our power all the time to other people And so that would be one is You know maintain your agency maintain your sense of patrol. Choose how you respond to the things that happened to you The second thing would be Follow the thread. You know When opportunities -tunities come to you sometimes unexpectedly or when somebody says? Oh you really should talk to this person. Follow that it might not lead where you know. They think it was gonNA lead when they made the introduction. It might not lead anywhere but you might learn something and Tend you ten years down the road they might remember you and opportunity comes up. And that's exactly how he ended up working in the Obama Administration. Is that someone that I had met. Ten years ago. That was following a grant that I a program that I was on that I had you know. She was following my career when the secretary of Commerce called.

Julie Lancer Edison Thomas Edison University of Maryland College College Park ted MD Salmonella cancer US squarespace Mark Twain Sean Westinghouse kindle Self Agency Michael
Rhinos and Their Gamekeepers Benefit From A.I.

60-Second Science

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Rhinos and Their Gamekeepers Benefit From A.I.

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky so what is the connection between A._I.. And Renat Sarai surprisingly direct Bernard May Orson chief innovation officer at I._B._M.. A._M. he spoke recently at the Cooper Union here New York City as part of a panel discussing the intersection of artificial intelligence A._I.. Ethics and healthcare so where two rhinos come in as you know poaching rhinos is a huge problem. The ranas were sworn represents about thirty years of revenue thirty years of income to an individual in sub Saharan Africa and that is why basically if you manage to kill a rhino and get a horn the represent essentially it's like winning the lottery. Unfortunately it's not so good for the Rhino not to mention you deplete a precious species yet again and poaching as a huge issue what people don't know about a thousand Gamekeepers U._N.. Kept numbers life in two thousand fourteen have been murdered by poachers. In order to get at the animals being protected this is about humans well. How do you basically protect rhinos with a I know it's a good question? Somebody said you know being a kid who grew up in the Bronx Smyth. Oh as well you know you put a collar on the Rhino on analyze is where they are their travel patterns and the guy who ran the reserve in South Africa sort of laugh said this does not help. That's the WILGA Vanden Game Reserve back to Meyerson I said why is this well. You know with a rhino stops moving. You'll know it was dead. That's certainly not helpful. Obviously you have a better idea says yeah what you do is get a bunch of animals that are easily spooked like gazelles antelope that sort of thing and what you do is you collar them and you look at that and we thought about it so you know that's brilliant because they become sentinels else because you see when a poacher enters area that it will encounter these creatures. It's not going to encounter rhinos there by far more rare when in encounters the creatures like any other animal they spook and run where does they. I come in well. It turns out when you have these collars on them. They're really a bunch of reasons. These animals run they migrate some Leopard is trying to make lunch out of it and yes. They're spooked by you know somebody who's coming entering in a truck to go poach you have to know Oh the difference and it turns out by looking at the pattern of movements and looking at historic data we rebelled. Tell the difference between each of that using system that essentially employed machine learning to separate yep these are incidences where were running into poachers. So these incidences where actually just you know there's a lion trying to make lunch out of this parental. The bottom line is by doing that. We were able to spot the poachers when they were nowhere. Near the preserve much less on the preserve of the rhinos are and this avoids. This is the kind of conflict where people ended up dead in large numbers not just the rhinos it basically I'd is nobody dies. You don't want the poachers today. They are desperate. You don't want the rhinos to be killed. We lose this species and of course the people who are incredibly brave protecting these animals. It really was an amazing thing to us because at the end of the day it worked and that's the kind of thing where you know A._I.. You sensibly as value that no human could possibly have achieved. It's not just about healthcare where.

Steve Mirsky Wilga Vanden Game Reserve Renat Sarai Saharan Africa Cooper Union Chief Innovation Officer South Africa New York City Meyerson Bernard Thirty Years Sixty Seconds
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I am being going by Vincent Morella. Bloomberg F X strategist, we are sitting here in our Bloomberg interactive brokers studios, talking about a conundrum that we face, which is we talk about all of the advancements in technology, but they all are predicated on a better grid on a better system of backdrop to enable high speed communication and connect joining us now to discuss this sort of relationship is Dr guide Dietrich he has chief innovation officer at Cisco based in Austin, Texas, Dr Dietrich, thanks so much for being with us, can you? I just give a sense of exactly this the necessity for there to be a five G grid or some kind of upgraded grid in order to enable some of the. Developments that you are working on. Absolutely. And thank you for having me. Stein. Jeez. Critical because we're going to be going from seventeen billion connected things to five hundred billion connected things around the world between now and twenty thirty before it was about connecting people. And now, it's connecting things. And we've got to have that that speed and a new experienced that five G is going to be able to provide in order to handle all of this new data and all of these new connections moving forward. Talk about things being connected is is this the Demane strategy now artificial intelligence moving into that area. Where? Relatively little human interaction and things kind of just do their thing. I think that human interaction is always going to be critical. But at the same time, they're going to be things such as self driving cars, right? The autonomous vehicles smart buildings smart cities, new quality of life experiences being able to connect people in the far reaches of countries in rural environments too to quality healthcare for the first time, in some cases, providing access to education, it's not just about a I it's about connecting people for the first time in many cases to to to first quality, healthcare and education and other services guy. Your title chief innovation officer. What do you do do you sit around room and just sort of? Innovate. Great question. I doubt they pay me just to do that. I actually ran a program called country digital acceleration or CD. A it's a program that's been around now for about four years, and we recognized the country leaders global leaders were coming out with these very aggressive national digital agenda's announcing a much fanfare, but then they really wouldn't go anywhere. And it's because there was no execution plan. So Cisco stepped in we developed a process whereby we could extract the most valuable pieces of that national digital agenda the things that are really going to impact the country such as GDP growth jobs creation and innovation and we help them get to that value. Faster. You know, Cisco has obviously its own products and services, but we also have sixty thousand partner companies and their products and services that we can bring to bear. And so we we help them get to the value of digitisation faster in terms of their government services education health care cybersecurity infrastructure in the like, you mentioned Australia United States held. How are we doing here? How will we matching up? What what innovations can we look forward to? Well, the the United States was a slow starter to be honest. Most of these countries have very explicit and aggressive national digital agenda's as I say, we're working with twenty five different countries around the world right now. But the US were working with the states because you know, the states have division right now in the states have have the agendas themselves to to execute. Against and so we started in Michigan. Nah. And we've made some investments in Massachusetts. Also now looking at Texas and Florida and several other states. How does the investment the sort of private public partnership work because Cisco is partnering with the governments to get these grids up and running is that a complicated kind of financial relationship. It really isn't. And and the reason is because first of all public private partnerships are going to you know, they've been around for a long time, and they're going to remain to be sort of the standard bearer of how things get done because you can't accomplish a city digital project or or a state or national digitisation project without involving government industry. And academia, we have found that now across the twenty-five countries that we work with that. Unless you have those three you're never gonna get to the real value of digitisation, and so all three or deeply involved. So you said Michigan is leading the way. When you do something with one state or one city does it translate to the next door or they all kind of different do they all have their separate needs. If you will. Well, I it's a great question. Because what we're finding now that we have such critical mass around the world that we're seeing a lot of opportunities for replication. So you look at something like healthcare, for instance, healthcare is a key pillar of digitisation across all twenty five countries in which we work, and we fully expect it to be across many of the states in the US in which will work same with education same with cybersecurity. I mean, there are just certain elements of the digital agenda that cut straight across all countries. Dr geiger. Thank you so much for being with us. Dr Dietrich is chief innovation.

Cisco United States Dr Dietrich chief innovation officer Texas Michigan Vincent Morella Bloomberg Bloomberg interactive brokers Austin Dr geiger Stein Massachusetts Australia partner Florida five G
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Chief innovations officer at Hackensack, Meridian health, one of the largest teaching and research hospitals in the nation. He's also a world class oncologist working with research universities, like New Jersey institute of technology to revolutionize healthcare. The cross fertilization between academic institutions like NJIT and the life. Science industry is essential the conversions of science as we sit here today. The most exciting and dynamic. It's been in the history of man, we're on the verge of quantum computing nanotechnology is real and is evolving very rapidly. So we can build scaffolding and structures one atom at a time genomic editing in stem cell science is are all parallel tracks that are converged together and change what we understand to be managed. We can now Jeanette it sells and make us if you didn't have a disease NJIT, New Jersey institute of technology. Learn more at storiesofinnovation dot NJIT dot EDU. This is a Bloomberg market minute. Major league baseball now has its first gambling partner MGM resorts international and the tiny couldn't be more ironic as we come up on the one hundredth anniversary of the reason, you usually don't say baseball and gambling partner in the same sentence. The coincidence. I think an interesting what as we approach twenty nineteen. Of course, the black SOX scandal baseball economics expert, author and New York University associate dean, Vince Genero on the nineteenth. Nineteen World Series. Members of the Chicago White Sox were accused of taking money from gamblers to lose. But it is a different time. Now, the legalization of sports gambling has the major leagues looking at ways to grow their fan bases and PJ partners. Don Cornwell says casino companies are looking to do the same thing if you can have a lead in sports betting, you might be able to attract a younger demographic. But not players twenty nineteen is also the thirtieth anniversary of Pete Rose's baseball band. So we'll this new clear his way into the hall of fame. Genero says don't bet on it Joan Doniger, Bloomberg radio. What would you say about the firm that supports your advisory practice? I love that. I can call in and get expert advice. I loved that you answer the phone and that I'm not a number. I love the sense of community..

NJIT Chicago White Sox Bloomberg baseball Vince Genero Hackensack officer Pete Rose Don Cornwell New York University partner MGM resorts Jeanette associate dean Joan Doniger
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Housing alliance. Dr Andrew Cora is chief innovation officer at Hackensack. Meridian health one of the largest teaching and research hospitals in the nation. He's also a world class oncologist working with research universities, like New Jersey institute of technology to revolutionize healthcare. The cross fertilization between academic institutions like NJIT and the life. Science industry is essential. The convergence of science as we sit. Here today is the most exciting and dynamic. It's been in the history of man, we're on the verge of quantum computing nanotechnology is real and is evolving very rapidly. So we can build scaffolding and structures one atom at a time genomic editing in stem cell science is are all parallel tracks that are converged together and change what we understand to be vanity. We can now Jeanette it sells and make as if you didn't have a disease NJIT, New Jersey institute of technology. Learn more at storiesofinnovation dot NJIT. Dot EDU. This is a Bloomberg market minute. The sports industry has not produced any stars of the caliber of Michael Jordan. But it is a dragging the interest of Michael, Jordan. The NBA star is part of an investor group backing east sports startup axiomatic gaming Joe pill, cabbage of the marketing firm digital surgeons says Jordan isn't the only one to get in on the action. I think Rick Fox was one of the earliest one. Yeah. He started the the owner of the team echo Faulk a couple of years ago, and it's only gotten bigger from there. You.

NJIT Michael Jordan Dr Andrew Cora Rick Fox chief innovation officer Housing alliance Hackensack Bloomberg Faulk NBA Jeanette
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"Of my six years of investment experience in silicon valley just won the worst non a single case where investment where the was have very strong patent protection so the fact is most of the start up companies got started not on some kind of pan pending technology and that is just a reality and you don't really have to have them as always good to have some pan protection but that's not a prerequisite and therefore when you look for is typically the real customer needs and that have not been adequately men by the competitors and then you move in try to create a better mouse trap if it will the mousetrap may not be pandal but you happen to know how to deliver it at the right value at the right time and that in that regard i think to try to encourage our students to not only have a mentality of innovation and entrepreneurship but also to offer them the skill set the learning experience one they're still on campus will be really crucial for us so that is another part of my job that's chief innovation officer's position for the uh system that's what we're trying to do so before we talk about some of the you know some of the ideas that you have in terms of sparking innovation i'm still curious about how the research that you have access to which i would envision as being fairly sort of niche and specialized and how do you chess late that into some obvious sort of low hanging fruit and how do you accelerate that process and oftentimes those companies that would perhaps be interested are located elsewhere.

chief innovation officer chess six years
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"Joining us you for having me at of course we'll take a short break and win re returned will be joined by david i from the office of technology transfer over at university of hawaii and we'll talk about something called high end this is marks cafe support for bite marks cafe comes from the hp our local talk show fund whose contributors help hawaii public radio sustain and grow its locally produced talk show programming mahalo to the saint andrew's schools which includes the priory school for girls the prep for boys and queen emma pre school cutting kapila sunday is my favorite program because it allows you to discover so much hawaiian music there's such great horned music coming out and to be able to find out about the artist listen to the songs listen to variety of music is one of the most satisfying ways to spend a sunday afternoon member supported have public radio radio with vision listen and see welcome back to bite marks caffeine joining us david david is the new chief innovation officer over at the university of hawaii's office of technology transfer program is called high end or the entrepreneurial network developers which supports entrepeneurship innovation and new venture initiatives and of course we'll find out about the high n and also some of the sort of new things that are happening at the office of technology transfer a walk youtube marks cafe while thank you thank you david i want to i did a one of butcher your your background or your list of great things that you've done so i've given you the opportunity to share what you have done over the course of let's say the last ten years or so.

hp hawaii priory school caffeine david david chief innovation officer david i university of hawaii saint andrew ten years
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The chief innovation officer at carnival latin market in panic market leader cruising braying this year's hurricane season was not kind to carnival but the company says businesses rebounding and bookings are up for 2018 is looking very good in the salad unom an old on really every dimension cruise operators promised new technology will reduce the lines and waiting that can deter travellers and bloomberg reports robot bartenders and thrill slides aboard ships will soon seem outdated royal caribbean symphony of the seas will be the world's largest cruise ship when it debuts in the spring it will have an ice skating rink the doubles has a laser tag arena a norwegian ship will offer electric gokart racing i'm geoff colvin jer bloomberg business on wbz newsradio 1030 wbz news time three thirty nine investigators says state trooper is in the hospital with nonlifethreatening injuries after his cruiser was struck by a drug driver in randolph happened early today the injured trooper was parked at emerge between routes ninety three and twenty four in an effort to slow down traffic is other officers were dealing with a rollover crash with an injured six people a little further down the road police said the troopers of urgency lights were activated what is cruiser was rear ended by another vehicle driven by a woman the driver not identified she was arrested at the scene iran warning against what they call bore illegal gatherings protesters rally for a third day of demonstrations driven by anger over economic problems reporter eric randolph is in tehran geico the government or surprised now they are prepared for it they haven't pulls out the big guns as yet they've they've taken a fairly softlysoftly approach to it so far there were quite a few arrests from the who protest at mashhad and elsewhere iran strongly condemning a tweet from president trump supporting the wave of economic protests sweeping major cities in iran a local media report quotes iran's foreign ministry is saying the iranian people who give no credit to the deceitful and opportunistic remarks of u s officials or mr trump the trump administration terminating the appointment so the remaining members of the president's advisory council on hiv and aids the council's executive director released a statement saying the current members of the.

advisory council mr trump local media tehran reporter geoff colvin royal caribbean bloomberg executive director chief innovation officer president foreign ministry iran mashhad government eric randolph economic problems randolph unom
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Where are you where you would have talked about digital those really i think the two things you want to think about his house the internet changing culture and then what are we do how do we innovate to do to get to the next place so i think if you can get the organizations get the word digital out of your organization and and really think about how the internet is changing culture than this is a super smart industry that that understands culture may be better than any other so people get on the right path to maybe you're title she'll be chief innovation officer i would take it okay all right thanks here the voice is a completely different kind of fashion industry gathering bringing together the movers shakers in trailblazers of fashion and uniting them when the big thing entrepreneurs and inspiring people who are shaping the wider world through a programme and provocative tongs interactive discussions in an unforgettable activities voice this marks new ideas and solves real world challenges like enacting fashion industry leaders and entrepreneurs with visionaries reveals is diverse science technology health and wellness booed veil politics the arts milosevi philander me before we start voices will be hungry again in december two thousand seventeen if you like this thanh please do saved the day in look out for more information and business of fashion dot com slash voices for more details.

chief innovation officer thanh
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"What's the innovation bonus point unless there are kp eiser you know the key performance indicators and and the hr incentives for innovation much like there are for execution in ancona matter because most people are coinoperated do east at that level and having the low level staff want to innovate while the operating exacts are wanting to execute and are actually incentive to do so crates uh you know the the corporate equivalent to cognitive dissonance and the organisational structures change for example you have a chief innovation officer great who does the report to very rarely does it report to the c o and having a seat at the adult table which the biggest misconception that companies have about applying glean thinking well that somehow all too you know the magic happens here i of sis set up a corporate incubator i'm running lean then look at all these teams that come out of the the incubator in his event exciting well that's the wrong matter metric is humming those of kind of gone into production or affected revenue were you know anything move the bottom line and what what's our expectation he you know you've outlined these hindrances and obstacles until applying you know lean thinking in in be companies and and and in government and i just wonder how pessimistic you are or are they going to be able to figure it out all not pessimistic at all it it turns out um you've got to be able to see disruption coming down the road and you got to figure out or we're gonna wait till it hits us could be maybe were just interested in shortterm gains or are we going to put the innovation processes in place which are very different than the canonical steadystate execution processes we know how to do this people have been talking about this for decades the differences we not now need to do it with speed and we now have the methodology to do it with speed which you really need is just a parallel process on top of execution one operates on your current business model but the other helps do both continuous innovation for the existing business model but creates new ones as well and companies do have an advantage here they can acquire innovative companies.

chief innovation officer ancona
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"You decide to joe burco become the ceo rebel so they're all of this you know all you've been through what why mart i was i had been an stanford and then a plum sold we moved up to wine country in santa rosa you know i was going to serve on boards and teach entrepreneurship soon roma state and then paolo hakkinen who again in mention is the chief innovation officer of the company was the ceo at the time i got introduced to him by paul hawkin who is the father of sustainability uh one in the most brilliant man you know he had one of the most brilliant children but it would follow and i had hurlers yeah that's his son so paulo has sustainability in his dna so he he had introduced me when nast i tried to hire apollo and then we kinda loft touch and he reach back out into me through linked to iran and saikia want to tell you about this cool company i have and do you wanna be a board member so like all right sounds pretty cool i love paulo so lemme lemme go forward and the more i began to know this company in the more as lake oh my god this has got the magic that i've seen in these other brands and i became entrenched with it and you know here i what i found in it and then i'll tell you what happened in a conversation with my husband so what i was finding is.

stanford paolo hakkinen chief innovation officer ceo paul hawkin paulo joe burco santa rosa nast iran
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"You can sort of get the flavor from the system by describes that we're not particularly interested in hot acid businesses at this stage we don't really want to earn hospitals we don't think we need to do that without particularly want to be in the equipment business we don't particularly want to be in the pharmaceutical business all of those are globally competitive industries the capital intensive they have long development cycles and technology replacement cycles so that some way away from ping an's natural adjacent seas on natural adjacent sees a database businesses where we can add value so in the clinic platform for example or in the good doctor or even in the state health insurance remote diagnostics can be a huge opportunity and there's a vast amounts of innovation happening in that space around the wolves in the states in europe and in asia on india's an interesting source of innovation there as well alongside china so are remote imaging four radiology full ct scans for industrial pee on an remote diagnostics whether they be i based or even simply centralized expertise i rumoured patient care all kinds of solution is fascinating just like the you know the general principle would be doing one thing into amazing wild but at the sky let you can do it in china rule india actually it changes the dynamic really almost like you'll perfecting techniques and then applying them to different industries which you know it's kind of a perfect and move on which i find absolutely fascinating it seems like you've got a billion dollar fund but you've got sort of trillions of opportunities in the area democratise hans i i think that's right i think i think what's was probably little understood is.

health insurance asia india china ct scans europe billion dollar
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"A loss funding round we have a clinic platform coal wonder clinic which supports an enterprise platform for about thirty percent the clinics in china uh we actually have an administration platform that supports the government health insurance in about two hundred fifty cities touching an astonishing six hundred million people in china to wear actually administering health payments and we're helping those municipalities manage frauds and manage over servicing what would love to do is eventually potentially take over the liabilities in manage the liabilities on behalf of some of those municipalities on natural basis of course we need the days fled to be able to drive that and we need to have some ability to influence the the way in which health services are delivered in those municipalities fascinating until it's all the way through is an executive it really is an ecosystem sitting beneath all of that we have something we cola health data clouds and that's essentially a profile it we're building up of everybody that we touch and we really see the future is being an information led future and out business being in information business increasingly we see financial services and the value that can be generated as depending less on capital and physical assets and much more on information assets and ultimately the value coming from data use cases and we see the same thing in health and ultimately of course if you take that view and we think about our core competency and core assets as data than you don't really need to have fixed industry boundaries at all and there are many other industries that could where similar model could be applied could be travel it could be retailing it could be education etcetera we have some of those businesses we have a at a platform cold auto harm which we acquired interestingly from telstra australia about a year a half your arm in beijing which is the largest auto trading websites i in china so we've got some of those but i guess as we look in the health space.

china health insurance health services financial services telstra beijing executive australia thirty percent
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"In financial services so we have a very broad spectrum of businesses and therefore the applicable as he all finn take technologies is extremely broad as well obviously we have to focus on what's going to provide the most yield what's going to be most helpful what's henry bus complementary on the health take sides your health is a really interesting space for us on this a thesis where it's arguable this our health is actually an even bigger opportunity over the longer term than financial services in china just given the state health system today continuing pressure on state health budgets the fact that you know you've got a rising while wealth profile in the population you've got an ageing population and you've got a dramatic shift its oranje taken place will continue to take place in consumer expectations and some of the health services in china are absolutely excellent today some leave quite a lot to be desired and have a lot of evolution potential out what wear interested in health is really on informationbased businesses our interest in health space arose out of our own health insurance business private health insurance is eighty five percent of the market today for health spending fifty percent his government the rest is out of pocket we have a very large position within that five percent this knows scenario we can see where that can't grow it above thirty percent almost forever just given where we are right now we've alongside our health insurance we've got a a a platform cold good dr dot com which is a tiny bits in practice online mostly driven by chechen image with real doctors some some of them are employed by us and summa a broader network think of it like the uber of doctors fainted kid the similarily that has one hundred forty million users today it was valued at three billion dollars in its lost federation round.

financial services health services china health insurance finn henry three billion dollars eighty five percent thirty percent fifty percent five percent
"chief innovation officer" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"chief innovation officer" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"Lastly i think the group while it is overwhelmingly a chinabased enterprise and of course it has some global portfolio management activities at has historically had a venture capital activities on a global basis but overwhelmingly its client franchises in china when now at a point where we can be looking in a very disciplined and fulfull way about international trinity's and some of those opportunities might come through partnerships in the font it was really interesting in an amazing really a billion dollar funds for pena fifth intact this is a huge thing infant second healthcare particularly i guess he's the the things that are interesting you in that space is it so diverse or the moment but the like you say you you know stranger to innovative technology so what's the particular interests so i know you'd probably gonna get inundated from if you safety in a biotech or something you suddenly going to get set of inundated with emails about it will block china whatever but sort of syria and the ring which are realizing unip end begun has the broadest range of licences and businesses in financial services in china so we're very large insurance company with the largest insurance company the will binoche at cap big lifeinsurer a big pnc ensure we are lodge bank uh we are large securities company we've got a an asset management group we have a trust business we have a whole raft of newgeneration businesses that have been created most in the last five or six years.

china pena syria financial services insurance company venture capital binoche billion dollar six years