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33 Burst results for "Chief Information Officer"

Leveraging the Quadruple Aim in Healthcare Innovation with Jeroen Tas

Outcomes Rocket

04:50 min | Last week

Leveraging the Quadruple Aim in Healthcare Innovation with Jeroen Tas

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket today I have the privilege of hosting Garin Tass. He's a chief innovation and Strategy Officer of Royal Philips a position. He's held since February two thousand seventeen year experienced global executive and entrepreneur with the track record of leading innovation in healthcare, information, technology and financial services industries. He clearly sees the tremendous value that information technology and data can add to managing health, leading the company's Global Innovation and Strategy Organization he's responsible for emanate strategy planning RND Solution Design Medical Affairs Sustainability. Technology, platforms ventures. Ventures and emerging businesses, he's in charge of creating a pipeline of innovation in their various businesses that Phillips covers within healthcare. They are focused on delivering on quadruple aim, which is improving health outcomes, improving patient, experience, staff, satisfaction and lowering the cost of care, and in my interview with urine. He dives deep into how they're doing that with some great examples that you will enjoy. He's a respected thought leader and was responsible for turning around. Philips healthcare it business and has been instrumental in establishing health sweet as a new. New Open Industry Standard for the healthcare. Internet of things cloud platform year and joined Phillips in twenty eleven, leading it worldwide as group chief information officer in two thousand fourteen. He became CEO of Phillips Healthcare. Informatics solutions and services, overseeing digital health and clinical informatics from two thousand sixteen. He led the company's connected care and informatics business, demonstrating passion to create new models of people centric healthcare based on the power of information technology before joining Phillips Urine Co founded and served as president. CEO and Vice Chairman of the board. Board for emphasis and it and business process outsourcing company, which was acquired by HP in two, thousand, six, prior to emphasise. He was head of Transaction Technology Citigroup's tech lab. Who's responsible for innovation and development of the banks customer facing systems, including Internet, banking and self service devices from two thousand seven to eight. He was VPN general manager at EDS responsible for the company's global competency centers. He has been a winner of the Eny entrepreneur of the year award, and many more but in two days after. We're going to dive into how it's important to focus on the quadruple aim, but also how diverse mindset such as Mr is diverse mindset and experience across different industries can help us in healthcare and looking at different perspectives to drive the most value for our healthcare dollar, and to provide the best care for patients, so such a privilege to have Mr task on the podcast today. Yaron thanks so much for joining me. really pleasure to be there so so. What an incredible Just work that you do. you know had a chance to to really. Connect with you a little bit further when we were in Vegas. Together offer the health meeting. Bud what what happens in Vegas Stays Vegas. All right so there we go. Let's change topics. I'd love if you could just share what inspires your your work in healthcare? Well, I think like all of us. We have personal stories. have personal stories. It's related the to health and You know what really motivated me to to get into. Healthcare is when my daughter was diagnosed with type, one diabetes and She was rushed to the hospital and spend a couple of days in the ICU. And I think confronted me with. The Way Healthcare is organized confronted knee wits how technology is used. My reaction was wow this. This can be so much better you know in my daughter regularly says I'm I'm actually the the care coordinator because? Diabetes is a complex disease with complications and their mental aspects to it as well, and she says I I kind of have to coordinate between cared disciplines, and I'm also data aggregate, or because every time I go somewhere. I need to carry my files and explain what the what has happened,

Phillips Healthcare Chief Innovation And Strategy Phillips Global Innovation And Strategy Way Healthcare Diabetes General Manager Garin Tass Vegas Phillips Urine Co Philips Head Of Transaction Technology Executive Chief Information Officer HP EDS Coordinator
New York's LIRR App Rolls Out New Feature Displaying Train Capacity

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

New York's LIRR App Rolls Out New Feature Displaying Train Capacity

"The Long Island Rail Road saying its smartphone app can now help customers with social distancing the railroad's chief information officer bill Fisher explains how customers waiting on a platform can now open the train time app and see on their phones just how full or empty each car is on their approaching train they can see if there's a car with free space

Long Island Rail Road Chief Information Officer Bill Fisher
"chief information officer" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

10:58 min | Last month

"chief information officer" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Zero one four three five two or check out a lot online apocalypse valley city dot com our next guest is the chief information officer for the estate of north course on Riley Sean are you doing all I'm doing wonderful thanks for having me on well want to talk to you a little bit about you know one of a number of things but I guess this to start with the idea of a you know how the process of war but work moving a large part of the work force of North Dakota from an office or a cubicle somewhere to to at home and the that shifted to telework just give me a little overview on what had to happen and and in what kind of a time line sure thing so as we started having this this massive explosion of covert all around the world it really started day a huge change and help people needed to get their jobs done and within the state of North Dakota we had a little bit of time to plan we had just a few days ahead of time to be able to plan for the possibility that we may have to be able to move most of the work force home but the the reality if you came off a lot faster than anyone expected and what we ended up having is about forty eight hours to move a little over seven thousand people out of their offices and get them working from home just across the the state government side and when you add in what all the teachers put in and all those other I. T. teams across the state the reality is we moved about two hundred and fifty thousand people into either Telesco or telework all over the period of about forty eight the just within state government a huge move but the cross the entire state of North Dakota just a a massive mode trying to help everybody get to where they could be safe and be socially distant and still still be able to do their job and still be able to take part in a school system yeah because distance learning part of that too not only for you know that that the colleges but also K. through twelve right yeah absolutely so we we stood up from different systems for K. twelve to allow them to be able to communicate to other teachers to be able to communicate by no means the perfect system at all but when you stand up a system that can handle a hundred and twenty thousand kids when you do that in about four days you can expect a few bumps and bruises but overall we were able to keep people communicating teachers gone my three kids they're upstairs right now all three of them are on the kitchen table there done with school tomorrow so they're all doing their trouble learning right now so amazing now I would imagine chief information officer has to have a few worries in that amount of change that shorter time period he got a lot a whole networks in that environment I mean how do you secure all that yeah so in today's world the cyber realm really is the the Warfield of the day the reality is so the state in North Dakota in a normal month takes multiple millions of attacks per month and if you go back in the twenty nineteen the spring of twenty nineteen we were taking about five point seven million different attacks per month against our network by the time you got into the fall we were looking closer at fifteen million per month in a tax one covert happen everything of vastly accelerated from there and as you pick up all the systems you move them home the problem is now they're going to networks and environments that we didn't necessarily have the time to secure or necessarily even have the capability to secure immediately so what happened out of the gates is that we had all sorts of people who had had their own viruses in their own problems in the home network probably never know what didn't know that those things were there and we had to help clean up a lot of both options and lovable spot issues out there to be able to make sure that they could continue to work and sometimes it just isolate them from their own system but how about we saw ourselves we have this attack number that I just quoted but our real number that we watch on a weekly basis it's called our incident and that's the number of attacks that that we have to physically touch and do something with we have a artificial intelligence system that defends us against the vast majority so fifteen million attacks a month the vast vast majority are defended that way but we still line up having to touch approximately six thousand a month about fifteen hundred a week once the virus yet and once we started going to this massive telework we saw this huge explosion across well really across the entire world but even here within the state of North Dakota we went from about fifteen hundred a week to about seven thousand a week still a major increase and how many incidents we had to deal with him but it definitely will absolute top priority to defend the citizens information to defend the citizen's data but doing all of this as quickly as we did certainly gave us some some challenges to be able to try to make sure that happens correctly who's attacking who's doing the attacking you know it's a little up everybody hello the reality is this if you watch the news people like to blame the Russians for all sorts of things it's kind of a you know one to say Hey the Russians did it but the reality is is that from a real attack surface we see everything from the individual person to organized crime to nation state actors we see all of those different areas most of our attacks the come across are kind of smaller groups and they are groups of people it's not a ton of just individuals nowadays it's these kind of teams that whole purpose is to be able to embezzle money to steal credit card information to steal social security numbers those kind of things and then they go on sale they take that material on excel when you get into the more complex attackers Megan those hiring detectors they tend to want to steal information that is your research fixed so they're looking for intellectual property that's what's got the greatest value for them so the reality is is that we see a lot of attacks from all around the world we see a lot of attacks from inside the United States but it's a little bit of everybody out there now because it's become something that is pretty ubiquitous across the entire planet and we talk about touching one of the attacks then my words of the in the millions a few we're gonna get through it have they have they gone to a level where you know you've got a sort of the attack back today to get him out of there what does that mean do good to touch yeah so think of it think of it more as constant maintenance so you know if your your vehicle you've got to have oil changes you've got to have your belt change years sooner or later you gotta have transmission fluid it think of it kind of that way when it comes to computer there's a lot of maintaining that you have to do and then every so often you know you just blow a tire well you gotta stop and you got to change a tire so when it comes to what we're doing we're not necessarily attacking back we're changing the systems so that they can't get back in again and we're putting up walls were putting up different technologies that makes it so they just we cut off that accessibility we cut off their ability to be able to obtain that information yeah wow and the the M. there and so everyone of those that somebody somewhere or some network of computers that is just intent on no different than you would attack somebody on a battlefield with bullets in this case it's there it's there their computer trying to attack you know that for whatever stealing money or or or disruption or whatever but but if somebody wants to bring harm to the state or the coda and I would imagine people all around the globe yeah yeah and it really is truly a battlefield now in fact in the last three years here NATO has redefined cyber as an actual theater of war so in the in the old days there was no ground based warfare naval base warfare then came air then came space well in the last three years NATO and our our other allies around the world have defined the cyberspace as the actual figure before most militaries now have a dedicated organization to defend against cyber attacks many military actually have who attacked again that's amazing sounds like you're getting a pretty good size attack right now how long is it going over any other tips you would have for north Dakotans I mean obviously you you gotta you gotta you know higher ed system you got K. through twelve you got state government you got a lot of important things to protect but watching north Dakotans do yeah the north Koreans I would say so the first thing is to be vigilant realize that a lot of the emails that you're receiving that are asking you to go out now click on that click on that check this check that those emails for the most part a lot of them are they're called fishing it's spelled with a PH so make it different than when you're actually on the water but it's really it's the same thing strong Adeline you thrown out of a book on the end of it and they're trying to be able to get you to click on that email so that you can get over your information and that is a a pretty nasty pretty nasty way to be able to easily get in your system so be vigilant with those emails if you're not expecting it if it's not somebody you do business with when you get those emails that say Hey you know you are me eighteen hundred Bucks and I'm going to sue you and you've never heard of the person the likelihood is the email is actually a treat it's a phishing email attempting to steal your credentials and that's the easiest way for breaking into systems nowadays is they're they're just tricking you into clicking stuff that either drop something on your system or it allows you to hand over your credentials the other thing that people need to do is that they need to make sure make sure they're taking their security updates make sure that those are happening most of the newer computers if your computer.

chief information officer Riley Sean
AI in the US Federal Government  Interview with Suzette Kent, US Federal CIO

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:51 min | 2 months ago

AI in the US Federal Government Interview with Suzette Kent, US Federal CIO

"Hello and welcome to the today. Podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh. I'm your host Ronald Schmoozer. Our guest today is who's that. Who's the federal chief information officer of the United States? Hi thank you so much for joining us on today. Well thank you Kathleen. Nice to join you. Yeah welcome Suzanne and thanks for joining us today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role as Federal Cio Berlin Kathleen Ryan through that Canon. The federal chief information officer and that role. I have the our pleasure of working with all the agencies of the Federal Government Executive Branch. And how we use technology. That's both the policies as well as a looking at how agencies actually perform against those policies and intense. So it's an exciting face because the most important thing is how we use technology to serve mission and I came to the federal government after almost thirty in industry most of that in financial services show when we think about many concepts particularly around. Hey I for use of delivering services to citizens the importance of privacy and transparency and ethics. Many of those things were part of my career in the private sector so happy to join you today really excited about this topic. Because it's one of the things that as I look across. All the technology areas that are part of the role of the Federal Cio. The opportunities here and the come in across the agencies is really important in this area. You know that's really great because you know. Artificial intelligence is a transformative. Technology is transforming industry and society and governments across the board. It's part of what we've been really thrilled to cover as part of our now hundred forty or so episodes of today plus all of our research. So it's really exciting to see that the federal government United States has made a priority. So where do you see federal agencies today in their adoption? That's a great question Ron and I actually think it's across the board and I'll share some examples of what I mean by that but I'm GonNa Start with emphasizing the way you open the question investment in a I both in private sector and in use inside. The federal government is a priority of this administration and there have been multiple statements and commitments about that and most of the examples and things that I'm going to share. Obviously were about what we're doing inside the federal government and what agencies are doing but but your question I see it across the board and what I mean by that is some agencies like Department of Energy and Dod Nath. Nsf COMMERCE HHS. They're more than and they range from. Having formal focus business units and teen data curation expanded infrastructure in a multitude of projects and investments. And their own you know high performance computing capabilities and other agencies like va PSA labor transportation and interior. They may be in a little different place. And maybe in some cases not as mature across that entire spectrum of investments but they have targeted mission project. They've pilot initiatives they're driving maturity of data capabilities their computer capabilities and workforce skills development and of course every single agency has opportunity to use a AI as it's embedded in many of the products that we're getting from our commercial vendor partners so they're bringing in elements of Automation Analytical Advancement. Hey I and some of those mature data use capabilities as we leveraged commercially available product. So that kind of a broad spectrum across all the agencies yeah that's a really good overview and I know that for our listeners who have been following us for quite some time we've interviewed various leaders from government and I think that every agency does have their own adoption and maturity but it's really nice and refreshing to see that everybody is working towards that. I know that the United States also wants to train an AI. Ready Workforce as we continue to bring ai into every aspect of our lives. It's important that we have a workforce that's able to feel comfortable and work with and Bill. So can you share with us what that means to have an AI? Ready Workforce how the US government plans to get a already workforce. And maybe what? Some of the long term projections are for this type of training. This is one of your questions that I was most excited about and so I will do bear with me kind of for a longer answer on this because an angry ready workforce is really a big statement. It's an important commitment as well because the goal extends beyond the technical workforce to our entire workforce the missions face and how we interact with the American people. What makes a difference technology versus? Some of the things that we've seen in history is that this is really driving a paradigm shift and what I mean. By that is many of her legacy technologies. They captured aided they move data. They store it. They present it but largely the State Action John Interpretations for she'll done by people and as we look at a I the human land and people at interpretation. Does it change but the capacity and the capabilities that we have changed significantly. And I'll give you an example of shared in the past one of the things I was very excited about. It was one of my favorite simulations that combine weather data transportation data power grid data labor and Commerce data to answer really complex question or a simple question with a lot of complex factors as. Where's the optimal placement response teams during the hurricane? So you had to look at kind of. Where is the weather impact can be made? And what the impact of water and wind on road power. Where would people be they somewhere? They worked in where they live. And that makes us think differently about all the people who have to be involved in building that capability beyond technicians deep mission expert individuals who understand implications of the mission. And so with that kind of long answer. I'll take it a second step and then talk about actual training. I was recently visiting one of our university chains who are recipients from some federal grant. Ai and they were taking that scenario that I just mentioned to even further step by saying if we know what's going to happen. How can we recover faster? Where will there be treason degree that needs to be removed? And what is the workforce that we need to repair flood damage not only use the capabilities to minimize impact to speed up recovery? When you think about this type of scenario that fundamentally changes are end to end workforce those designing and developing from a technical stage. Those are part of the mission. The subject matter expertise in multiple kind of rings of impact that scenario so to train our workforce to leverage the powerful capabilities. We need not only but commitment from the technical side but mission operations in the business teams who understand and have the insight to help us identify e contract and reconstruct some of those complex interactions and in all of that for the citizens that were serving. We have to invest in the transparency in plain ability. Of how both that data and technology are being used so it is a very different approach to technical operational and service delivery and the way that we are looking at. The training is kind of end. Those different components hands on skill but literacy in. How a an information is used and heard the term Dev ops in development but how we empower our in the workforce through the business processes changes how we design and deliver the capabilities because we have to expand it throughout the entire business process from the genesis of the data to the experience of the end user. So that is somewhat of a long winded answer. That part of the transformational capability when you actually address the entire flow from end to end.

Federal Government United States AI Chief Information Officer Federal Government Executive B Kathleen Walsh Federal Cio Cio Berlin Kathleen Ryan Ronald Schmoozer Suzanne Canon RON Dod Nath Department Of Energy John Interpretations
How to keep kids safe online during the pandemic

Glenn Beck

01:29 min | 2 months ago

How to keep kids safe online during the pandemic

"Whether it's working learning or just trying to communicate with friends and family internet use is way up as we'll adjust to so much time now spent staying at home so with all of the screen time how do we keep our kids safe joining us a cyber security expert former White House chief information officer and author of the book manipulated to reset Peyton Teresa thanks for being with us and my first question is what is the right age to start talking to our kids about online safety the right agent to any age where you're handed device here kids so you can start very simple when you hand it to a toddler you can say something like mommy or Daddy has set up something very specific that you can use this for and then you build upon those role as the kids get older right so what are the most important things we should be teaching our children about online safety absolutely the first one and be where I'm clicking on sort of the sensationalistic headlines I'd never seen before video often times we call that click bait and oftentimes that could take them to a place on the internet you would not want them to go could introduce them to strangers the second thing is monitored that means they're taking a look at children and even young adults the names of them very authentic expression the state is very organic and they tend to trust the information in the mean and don't realize that can be a source of disinformation

Chief Information Officer White House Peyton Teresa
Interview with Oki Mek, Special Advisor, HHS

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:10 min | 2 months ago

Interview with Oki Mek, Special Advisor, HHS

"Hello and welcome to the AI. Today podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh and I'm your host Schmeltzer. Our guest today is okay. Mack who is the senior advisor to the chief information officer at the US Department of Health and Human Services? Hhs So okay thank you so much for joining us on Ai Today. Thank you for having caffeine wrong. Yeah thank you so much for joining us. You'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. And tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at HHS. I am a. I am the senior adviser to Sasebo. And I'm also the technical integration. Lead but edgy reimagined but my background is really cybersecurity but my principal around cybersecurity. That just knowing cyber alone is not enough. You really need to know and understand the business I've been with. Hr FINANCE BUDGET GRANTS ACQUISITIONS. I was leaving sponsored to help onboard new employees for personnel security and badges and laptops. So I find that to be very critical and crucial in terms of modern nine station in the government just knowing to three sixty just understanding what you know what budget stream is coming through. What is the budget calendar Audi acquisition services and products and even just getting people on board with badges an laptop? Just getting that three sixty view and been very critical in terms of you know modernizing trying to innovate in trying to change the landscape Embracing Emerging Tech and dealing with big data paradigm shifts excellent. Yeah it's definitely the government's been very interesting. Adopter not just technology in general but especially with artificial intelligence. Because you know is is a transformative technology. Just like You know many of the other big transformative waves in the Internet and mobile and big data and the cloud and now five G. and then blockchain so all of these technology transformative right. They had changed a whole lot of things or multi. System the multidisciplinary and so obviously there are many ways that we see being applied to government agencies organizations. And we've been very impressed. One of the things that been talking about here a lot today is sort of the many ways in which is being adopted. Not only an industry as a whole but especially in government very impressive actually some of these ways that hopefully it's making the government more responsive more efficient more effective more. Give it more visibility into things. So can you tell us some of the ways that? Hhs is currently adopting AI and various solutions. And maybe how those ways are unique to. Hhs or perhaps similar to what other of different governmental agencies are doing in this space so we start of area to the CIO. And I started a program like celery leveraging ai machine learning and blockchain. It was the first watching network that had been authorized to operate in the federal government but in terms of a I think we are using similar to agency mainly we use it to clean and format the data and as you know you deal with a lot of data set the day. I need data. The biggest thing is cleaning the data. Ninety five I believe ninety percent of it is cleaning the data. People WanNa do they WANNA do machine learning they WANNA do. But they don't focus on they're gonna up a root of baking because Clinton. The data is the biggest component of that process. So we use a machine learning to basically normalize the data from different data sets using supervised and unsupervised learning to normalize the data. And then we also get into linear regression as well in terms of predictive analysis. One of the main thing that we'd do accelerate is looking at prices paid and just as so large we do about twenty five billion in spending on products and services just minding data and cleaning the data at it was a big call just to look at. Why are we buying things that different prices and a good example is? I'm just throwing the example while we buy that. Dobie pro at cms for aided aqua- eighty dollars per license and buying that CDC thirty dapper night or licensed an opportunity to mind data to come to the table to be able to negotiate a different price. You can't come to table to negotiate without having that insight so data claiming and looking at data mining and looking at predictive analysis the three main usage for a for us. That's great you know Melinda. We produced a report last year. And then we did a follow up report this year Dataprep prep and data labeling and I think that a lot of people underestimate how long it's going to take to actually get their data into a usable state so it's great that you pointed that out because I think that people underestimate the time and the difficulty that sometimes it can be actually get data in a usable state. Data's the heart of AI. So you need that. For these systems to learn as a government agency adoption of new technologies such as artificial intelligence can bring its own unique set of challenges that sometimes the private sector doesn't always run into. These can be issues around privacy data usage. What can and can't be used where it can be stored so can you tell us some of the challenges you've seen with Ai. Adoption in your agency and how you're overcoming them by the biggest mistake that people do is looking at the technology before they look at the business and the mission of agency. I always say that does no such thing at it. Project and the business project with it components. You have to start with the business. And what are you trying to saw? Most of these challenges that the EPA my experience I've been in a government close to twenty years half awaiting contractor in private industry and also have in federal government. The challenge is not the technology challenges to culture is leaning chain change management and. I don't think we do not a strategic planning. Just because we have one hundred idea doesn't mean we pursued ideas. We need to look at you know strategic planning comes into play. You may have one hundred ideas but you should only pursue one idea through strategic. Planning you know. The first thing is really feasibility studies. I didn't even feasible to at any regression issue. Anani downstream impact. Accountability is big. I think in terms of trying to modernize. Can you prove a concept just because you have this idea? People might think is a crazy idea but if you do it at a tangible way that you could prove that idea is feasible and it's scalable because you wanNA start small and scale that big as well. Sustainability is huge as well just because the project is a success. Doesn't mean that sustainable as your culture your agency your privacy mature enough to take on this new shining toy you know this new technology but the important part is marketability I we. I can't overemphasize that did not marketability is people. Don't think that the government market but you have to market you ideas. You have to win. The hearts and minds of the workforce the people that They coders you have to be able to market in different ways to senior leadership to middle managers workforce. I think culture is the biggest obstacle. But I think doing a thorough strategic planning analysis and putting emphasis on marketability analysis is key and the biggest part of marketability is human design is really engaging the workforce I'll model in terms of accelerated that. We're not building the solution. We are allowing the workforce to go to solution getting them engaged yet here at thoughts and pain point incorporating agile depth. Bob You know building something. Every two weeks and bring him back to them is a Saab issue and we cycled out every two or three weeks and that really is the key of getting people to lean in and to win the heart and mind of people.

AI HHS Caffeine Bob You Kathleen Walsh Audi Senior Adviser Mack Schmeltzer Saab Senior Advisor Principal Sasebo Chief Information Officer Clinton
"chief information officer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:21 min | 3 months ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Now back to Silicon Valley insider once again your host Keith to correct to to to give them food will be in and the former chief information officer we're talking about his company will be in which they're trying to improve productivity through Calgary it looks weak forever too I'm going to continue talking about video conferencing tools I know I've talked about it last few weeks what is really important as more or more people are adopting the technology I mean there's even photos of governments around the world taking pictures with their resume copy of on and if anything would have gone he's taking off unfettered and we talked about earlier held whom have some security issues of the working on very quickly too involved it's important to realize that if you don't understand the technology you should really be very cautious about how you use it in so many conferencing the normal chatter we were doing school lessons are doing talking to your friends and family on the world E. L. that's not always the Phillies over the information but when you deal with like a bank or a government entity or something secure you should always realize that there are some really and so you have to be really cognizant that in new platforms not everything is always completely worked out and there are huge increase of hacking activity happening right now sabar crime related to code nineteen is a very opportunistic time for hello especially if people are disoriented I personally have been getting a lot of email related to hate your company you pay in invoice your company needs to finalize a contract we have remote workers all related to understanding that people are not in the regular routine that out at the regular work hours what always be vigilant keep on top of your environment if you don't understand technology find out from someone who does not prohibitively.

Keith chief information officer Calgary Phillies
The COVID-19 crisis is making the internet more available

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:31 min | 4 months ago

The COVID-19 crisis is making the internet more available

"Millions of people and more every day are working from home or learning from home during the corona virus outbreak. And that means we need the internet now more than ever Wi fi virtual private networks to connect securely to work broadband cellular connections so is our digital infrastructure up to the task and how can companies and even cities prepare for such a massive unplanned experiment. Jonathan Rankin tall is the former chief information officer. For the city of Palo Alto California. He says there's enough infrastructure but it isn't always evenly distributed there is available bandwidth in the US the big telcos of builds some significant infrastructure across the country. What we're going to have to see is communities. Get access to that broadband. They're still in the United States. Nineteen million people who don't have access to broadband in part of the problem is it can be a little expensive for for many homes and also just some communities. Don't have the prerequisite technology in place. So maybe having millions of Americans all of a sudden do remote work. It's going to act as a strong encouragement for government intervention more spending and for the Telco companies to also step up as well where they're still got right and we have seen even just in the last few days companies say that they're going to drop data caps that they're going to increase speeds for lower income users is going to be any going back after that. I think we're GONNA have a lot of questions I mean. I hope people to wash their hands after this event is over. These are good behaviors and we need to continue them. Some of our experience suggests that if we get over this we may go back to our old routine and all the wonderful things that the private sector's doing to step up right now. Dr. Mayo resort to the way we've been doing things. I don't know the answer to that. You know it'll depend how things really start to progress over the next few weeks I think if it's long term which I certainly hope not people will get used to it and there might be a greater inclination to to keep it in place or perhaps offer access to lower income communities providing them with reduced course and more access as we see more people effectively adopting remote work because it works right like. Do you think this is the moment when we will all say? Oh Hey turns out? The Internet really is a utility. Well I think we'd all agree now that the Internet is magical. It's absolutely magical me liquid. It's enabling us to not only have millions and millions of workers all over the world work from home but it's allowing scientists to collaborate in a speed that we've never seen before collaborating on vaccines sharing information between science organizations and governments and working on the medicine so the Internet you know we have to say is is quite a magical platform for humanity right. Let's talk about security for a bit. What do companies have to do? I mean some companies work with very sensitive information and require people to be offsite even to onsite to access it. What can they do? There's gotta be continual investment in Cybersecurity. This is not a you. Write a check once and you're good to go. You got to build a little department depending on the size of organization immature big airline company or a bank. You're going to have a huge security organization and you're going to be investing likely hundreds of thousands if not millions of dollars a year in keeping the security good so on the enterprise side for sure absolutely for sure. The costs are high in their continuing. To increase on the home side. Does enough low cost tools. I mean there's actually a handful of VPN software that a home user can console that's free and then there's some premium services that are relatively low cost so if you got VPN some backup software. Antivirus and anti malware. You're you're in good shape you know in the twenty first century. Don't we can guarantee that you're going to have absolute security. This is something we're going to have to live with and fight for a longtime Jonathan. Rankin tall is the former chief information officer for the city of Palo Alto California. He also wrote the book smarter cities for Dummies when it comes to the digital divide and making sure everyone has access to the magic some. Isp's are stepping up. Spectrum is offering sixty days of free access to homes WHO HAVE KIDS IN K. Through twelve or college students if they don't already have it comcast says it's doing the same for low income households in its service areas

Jonathan Rankin Palo Alto California Chief Information Officer United States WI Comcast Dr. Mayo ISP
Business Capabilities

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:45 min | 4 months ago

Business Capabilities

"Alex. The topic you covered was a business capabilities and especially for those who might be listening. Who or whom the topic might be esoteric. You provide a bit of a definition as well as why you thought it was a relevant topic for work. Yeah absolutely Allow me to start with the definition because let me hear business. Capabilities may have different concepts Items minds so when we talk about business capabilities really. Talking about the organizational competencies that brings strategies to live at all levels and across the organization. They essentially the organizational building blocks that established the vital connection and the accountability between forward looking strategies and actions. I would say they are close to the lifeblood of the organization They determine the value of business impact but also the value of business outcomes I would say that particularly particularly relevant Because they are as part of Quad competencies and business capabilities if you the old concept However the extent to which technology determines business success irrespective of whether you are technology company are not as never been greater than today business capabilities ensure that the business center city and the business outcome oriented focus off leaders and execution out on targets. They allowed the assessments. The mapping and the focus off an execution they allow us and the executives to math improve and evolve organizational structures and go well beyond project. A productive element lifecycles You know from our conversations and collaboration with the technology and business executives across many industries. The Voice of the seniormost technology executive has never had more weight We see that in the CIO boss and beyond CIO roles That you have extensively written and spoken about as well as the realities are fines executive leadership teams and the board rooms. The people we interact with Administrator James and Peter let me talk a little bit about the outlook so what do business capabilities look like So I think As the convergence of business and technology continues Probably ever faster pace And probably more foundational ways For both organizations and consumers I think the maturation and evolution of business capabilities will gain importance. I believe the focus will continue to shift and frankly broaden from business capabilities to more integrated business and technology and digital strategies and ways in which organizations can improve the agility and thereby ability to prepare for strategic to its As a final point I would say that the ability to make these pivots and to adjust to changes that can come from the internal environment maybe the ultimate litmus test of how much you're any given business capability really is And that's one of the many ways in which we Showcase business capabilities and use them job on his Asia tour of improve. That's great at Alex. The two executives that you spoke with about this topic where Angela. Yocum the chief digital and technology officer of Navan held. I should mention. She was also the chief information officer rent a center. Vp international the CTO of Astra Zeneca prior to that and Somali Godbolt Executive Vice President and chief information officer of lows who had previously been the senior vice president of technology digital at target prior to our time. At Lowe's talk a bit about This topic in how relates to these two executives in their companies. Yeah I'm glad through so So I think what's really wonderful. Is that not only? Are we able to To be able to talk to a very high caliber of pima executives We also have able to to talk to Executives will represent very different industries the industries that the respective organizations in so no one held is a fast growing in the healthcare space They are not not for profit organization. with five billion dollars revenue But their customers I ultimately their patients. And there's almost one hundred million of them in the case of November out And they really come to the organization With their most important questions than needs relating to their health and their well being So as the as a C. D. O. N. Seal With the CIO reporting to her Angela has a huge bug. Voluble a very broad range of business capabilities. That she's really in charge off and that ranges from things like digital health Which has been a major focus for Angela and health but it also includes things like patient. Care these are really century-old capabilities But then he terming as I said the health and wellbeing The customer syndications So that critically important so I would say really. There's few industries that have seen so many life changing opportunities that I mean possible or realized through technology S. Healthcare and there's certainly plenty of potential for future innovation in the healthcare space On the other hand ends and her team do not only drive the advancement advancement of patient. Care but they're also operate in a world Takes lots to be a leader She operates bay diverse and interdisciplinary team. just remember that Angeles. Ps for example Combination of business leaders scientists and doctors. And you can imagine that leadership in that space Comes with a lot of cultural challenges and business challenges and Angela them every day and that makes a lot of interesting insights when it comes to business capabilities

Angela CIO Somali Godbolt Executive Vice Seniormost Technology Chief Information Officer Executive Alex. Navan S. Healthcare Lowe Astra Zeneca Officer Asia Senior Vice President Administrator James VP Peter CTO
The Dublin Digital Identity Project

Insureblocks

10:33 min | 5 months ago

The Dublin Digital Identity Project

"For this week's podcast. We'll be discussing discussing the very interesting project called the Dublin Digital Identity Project and I'm very pleased to have doug McCullough chief information officer her for the city of Dublin in Ohio USA. Doug thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. Quick introduction on yourself sure so my name is Doug McCullough chief information officer for the city of Dublin Ohio. It is a small city really a suburb on the North West Corner of Columbus Ohio which is in the middle of the state I am a private sector guy and I may government guy. I've worked for four different state of Ohio agencies and two cities in the united estates and I really love municipalities into innovation into smart cities. I'm into smart ability obviously into blockchain. A it just really interested in sort of emerging technologies and how I can help public sector organizations integrate them into their daily operations Excellent excellent and I think also inside you're going to be able to share with our audience later in this podcast so straight off the bat as it has cost me here in Intra entre blocks. Could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work. Well I'm sure that many have gone before me and failed. I probably will fail as well and I take no credit for getting it right but I will say that I can tell you what it is to me and from my perspective because this is one of the most simple technologies while also being one of the most complex and I don't want to oversimplify it but you Kinda have to a small Description I see. blockchain obtain is a technology infrastructure innovation that combines existing technologies like databases peer to peer networks encryption distributed computing algorithms to form a different way of distributing compute data storage and data security so in its most basic form it works by recording pieces pieces of data into structures. We've taken to calling blocks. The definition of these structures is such that they exist within a chain in that if they do not not come after another block or not part of another block they by definition do not exist. This structural definition allows the existence of a block to carry certain certain cities simply by the fact that they exist in other words to bear Fi. The data of a block one needs to verify its position in a chain that contains other defined blocks each addition to this chain makes the entire structure more and more difficult to invalidating. But if you did and there is a press process process for invalidating a chain the fact that a change to this basic infrastructure would invalidate the whole further makes scenario more trustworthy so that certainly is over technical and quite possibly wrong But the important thing to me and from my perspective is that as an infrastructure it is superior to other databases databases networks or distributing distributed computing models for certain uses and the High find it to be superior for is data transactions injections not necessarily data storage but data transactions. What happened when where and with perfect while if this was was an incorrect or definition what correct one is so thank you so much for that it was it was really good definition? I'm GonNa will definitely always As he knows. So well you know. There are many different schools of thought when it comes to blockchain and different tribes who who liked to defend their view of it right so so could you tell us a little bit about the city of Dublin and just in our Irish listeners where referring here to the city of Dublin in Ohio USA. Not Dublin. Orlands so I love to hear more about your lovely city. There are folks in Ohio. We know Dublin wealth and the rest of the world who have heard about it but for a lot of the world people people are like. I don't know what you're talking about. Here's a bunch of Dublin's in the United States as well But as I said we're a small community of around fifty thousand and up apply. Some years ago started along the path towards innovation through fiber optics in developing one of the first publicly-owned city owned fiber optic networks networks. And so we're kind of a techno-centric kind of a place that has embraced using technology to advance its economic development interests from air. We've been kind of a leader or innovator when it comes to smart cities up whether it be a sitting next to smart Columbus on being part of that same region or being being a part of the Intelligence Communities Forum in which we compete and go for awards where that is the city has an institute the Global Institute for the study the of the intelligence community to help share some of what we've learned about intelligent communities in smart city development and derive more from around the world and share those lessons since with other communities so we kind of want to be a conduit and in a light in showing how communities can use technology to improve the lives absorb their citizens. And that's kind of our brand at this point. I mean it's fascinating because you know just to remind him what the point is said of the city of fifty thousand people and you are quite forefront of developing new technology and. I'm sharing your best practice. What you've learned for me you know you sound very much like a city similar to Silicon Valley and also what is amazing because as it is a subject of our podcast that you've managed to develop a digital identity project based blockchain technology? Why how did your city managed to get to this point to be so tax heavy? Well well there are a few advantages and a few good moves some investments that the city of Dublin made that strategically placed us in a different position. So if there's there's any other cities out there listening you'll recognize some of this first of all. We did introduce me as a chief information officer. and honestly if you're not a very large arch city like a Boston or New York or Los Angeles or Atlanta or a London. You don't have a chief information officer you have an. It director director whose job it is to keep the technology running. Not necessarily to envision. What's next in what's new and so- Dublin Did that they invested in that in part because we're small there's less to run and there's a lot of innovation happening here in our region. We've got a great research institution Asian in in Ohio University and the Ohio State University. And there's just a lot of resources here that make it possible for us to do it. But if you're another city Anderson later saying it. We're not doing that it in part. It's because it's difficult for a city to hire someone in give them that job so hello. Dublin is benefiting from brilliant brilliant now so you've developed a digital identity project based on blockchain technology. What problem were you looking to address? This is interesting Because I WANNA put you in your listeners in the in the stance of considering what a city is we tend to look look at cities and say Stay in your lane plows. Snow Mow the grass. Fix The potholes and cut my taxes. And I'll be happy happy. And we don't think about all the various services and things that a city doesn't in has been doing but if cities do not innovate than we are going to be disrupted roughed it just like any other business. If he didn't think that the United States post office could be disrupted and of course. It is being disrupted because we always thought that we will deliver letters in boxes and Amazon changed all that you know taxes are being disrupted. Everybody's being disrupted cities can be disrupted and I think that that could be devastating for us. So it's my job to try and stay ahead of that and to continue to. Innovate we are candidates for innovation. Just like anybody else. I do believe that there's going to be a new distributed data environment just as the web changed to everything Blockchain the distributed data environment is going to change everything and we don't want to get caught off guard We were concerned about and remained concerned about preparing for kind of leaner government. government As it is now may not look the way. It is automation boxer. We're subject to impact by those as well. So what happens if we have far fewer people in a lot more automation. They're a how're we going to build the service model that serves people I mentioned you know sort of a digital disruption Russian of government just like anybody else right. Now I'm out in the Wilderness crying about this. Nobody believes it but I think we're going to see it happen Also mentioned sort of a declining in degrading trust in a sort of a more dangerous data privacy in firemen for people and we expect this to have but negative impact on citizens in public transactions. If we don't prepare for that Mrs all before thinking about blockchain as a potential solution But then also generally just as a person who uses technology I desire new level control or autonomy Regarding my data and I think that cities are local governments or even national governments can play a role in providing that security and privacy to citizens perhaps through some sort of a service but then finally there's a huge amount of pressure for cities to become smart cities to become programmable to use data to make decisions and I'm afraid that we're all gonna run into a big brick wall if we can't identify people or other private things that need to be identified in order to program around them We're all very excited about cars. Driving down the street being automated but if we don't have a mechanism for identity that's going to be a problem so should have government Create a new identity Regime I feel that blockchain gives a lot of control and privacy obviously back to citizens so that if we do need to program aspects of our lives that we would control of privacy back into citizens hands Eh.

Dublin Ohio Chief Information Officer Doug Mccullough Columbus Ohio United States Ohio University Blockchain Usa. Silicon Valley Amazon Publicly-Owned Orlands Ohio Usa. Ohio State University Intelligence Communities Forum
Livingston County Administrator Dies Suddenly in October

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Livingston County Administrator Dies Suddenly in October

"The sudden death occurring in October in Livingston county for the county administrator and the county commission on a go shooting with a company to bring in a new exact here's Tom's report after the sudden death of lives in county administrator can hinted in October the search is on for new county leader a county commission is negotiating with Okemos based hiring solutions to conduct the search for a new administrator hiring solutions has been used already by lives in county to hire an EMS director and is currently being used to find a chief information officer loosen daily also reports that the firm was also use to bring on Hinton back in twenty fifteen cents Henson's death of deputy county administrator Cindy Cadillac has served as acting county

Livingston County Administrator TOM Director Chief Information Officer Hinton Henson Cindy Cadillac New County
"chief information officer" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

Bitcoin Radio

10:32 min | 10 months ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

"What's going on everybody? This is going to BBC bitcoin lives avs glad to have everybody listening. It's been a good weekend. I hope that everybody had an enjoyable one themselves. this is Joe Blackburn your host and I am excited today about you know bringing on Nick supper and you know when we bring people on and obviously I tried to have a guest each and every episode and you know there's just so many different types of people in this crypto space. I liked to focus on as everybody knows you know making the space as easy as you know just usable as possible. I have you could almost like I ask a lot of the quick fires the session about you know like you could you see Bitcoin is a political party or could you see you know bitcoin having a political party of some sort and the reason why I always ask that question is because personally speaking you know I liked to think about the blockchain as a political agenda you know and when I usually hear that I typically think of that as a negative like someone's got a political agenda where we all have an agenda and if I'm hungry my agenda is to go get some food right. That's not a negative and I love the transparency of the blockchain blockchain for government. Maybe not on on an individual basis but I do love it on a big basis a governmental basis and the idea that blockchain can influence the government or the way that people vote or the way that people are able to know what they're voting for to me is like the overall goal like for Joe personally but to even get to that point to even implement those things certain domino's have to fall and that is people just gotTa start understanding what the what the blockchain offers and you know where we're going with blockchain and that to me I ask I ask people these questions all the time people that have been encrypted or traitors their crypto Hodler's whatever they might be and I'm like what do you want to get out of blockchain and unfortunately the answers ninety nine point nine percent of the same. I WanNa make some money. I'm like yeah me too but is that it like. There's other ways to do it. Besides this whole of crypto space sometimes and just so short short sighted sometimes there's all list you know but I understand it. I've been that person. I'm not always not that person right. I mean I can be that way but today we're going to bring on a team team or we're bringing on nick. Who's part of a team that that goes back to you know trying to create something that does make this make sense more? You know I mean when I get on pay power when I get on Vin when I'm trying to go check them out. Check my checking account. I don't sit there and wonder how this thing's working. It just works and that's all I care about like. Can I get this money from here to there or can. I make sure that what I'm logging into is is my own account etc right and then we also is getting into it so I say that for this reason is as complicated as as the blockchain can be complicated crypto can be sometimes you know there are people out. They're trying to make this situation and that just comes with the opportunities that that people find you know that there's big holes in the space and they go they go and try to correct correct it and that's kind of what next GONNA come on. I'm actually gonNA bring him on very shortly you know in L. At nick introduce himself and we'll hear a little bit about him but you know take the seriously listen into how people are transitioning space and of course I wish nothing but the best for Nick and Debbie team for the project but you know if if he doesn't do it somebody's going to it looks it's like he's got a good strength stranglehold on at least the concepts here and this is why obviously I'm Brianna what bring him on if I didn't think they had a a pretty good opportunity to to to do something a special you know but also I need to make this very clear. This is not an endorsement of the David project per se as far as on bitcoin radio level. You know between radio level is not sitting here saying hey get this or I don't own. This token doesn't mean I won't one day this is not a paid interview or you know endorsement of any sort this is just literally something very interesting and they were voted on settles going to interview the top two that we voted on cryptic coin trader and Nick happened to be the person in that that was in second place so they interview but I just want to be very transparent about that out from our perspective all right. Let's go and bring it in a gone before I gave him more boring. What's up nick welcome BITCOIN radio man? Hey Joe thanks for having me on really really glad we could finally make this work now. You've obviously been someone who's been part of the community for for some time you you've. You're the and you know you're really involved in the project and Mu Multiple ways. If you want you just introduce yourself real quick accepting Arrow. I'm the chief information officer at the project so basically I oversee all the development of all of our technologies and tried to make them make sense to the outside world which is why this on Allison shows like yours for sure man for shirt now in what you guys have done what you're creating seems to be something that is this is what's desired in this space and there's other people who have tried before in the past. I'm sure there's more that are trying right now or in the future but you have stuck out to me for the last few months I've I've noticed more and more people talking about Davey and what you're what you're trying to accomplish. I mean that and I say that in a good way that you're making some noise there's waves coming around. You know where Davies popping up here popping up there so before we get into what did he actually is. Let's let's talk about Nick Real Quick Nick. How'd you even get in the space? What what what inspired you to start heart doing all of us? I mean you know nothing crazy much like a lot of people that are in the space. I started as an investor bought east when it was like a dollar and of course kind of after a while after the Dow hack gave up for a while and then was pull back into it actually as a as a freelancer for for duty and that's that's actually I started this company and of course throughout that time that three year to year span I was studying watching quite a bit and and did again follow aw cryptocurrency after after the burns had worn off a little this absolutely and I can understand all that too and that's you know it's a very relatable I guess introduction or at least how you get started where where is it that you you start taking this more seriously. Though you know obviously divvy popped up. How about you know what gave you the desire to say? Hey shoot look. I've been burned here but I'm GONNA go ahead and start a project. How did how did you start making sense of that? Well really As much as the Dow was a disappointment it actually opened my eyes to what was possible with smart contracts with theory specifically specifically and that's when I started to as developer get a little bit more interested in that aspect of it the technical aspect and less interested in the trading day trading stuff and that's what I just started digging into Andreas anomalous book ask Bitcoin and things like that and started realizing like Whoa this is actually a pretty revolutionary and this needs to be in everyone's hands like right now and then of course got the up to the and jumped at it for sure man no and again again you know I'm glad that you were able to come on the show today because you know much like what I talk about and what I try to process out loud and make sure people know is that I'm a huge fan Dan of mass adoption for more reasons than just bitcoin needs to go up one day and as my introduction said you know I do see this as a political. I don't want to say uprising or even been revolution although it is both of those in some senses. It's not that for everybody right instead. We gotta be always be very careful with how the audience perceives what I'm saying so much much like what I believe you know I know that not only do do you believe that you actually went out and did something about it with the project and that is we've got to make this user experience or and this year it's user interface. Even you know really easy is this the concept can be such a deterrent to some people you know the moment they download a coin base happened. They gotta bring it and they gotta sit somebody else and like what the heck you're doing. Or how do I what does He. What does this even mean as wallet well? That's what the DB project and I mean I don't WanNa say that's the only thing you guys are doing and we'll get into that but let's just start off with that concept. You know what is your philosophy behind the diddy project there nick when we started in two thousand seventeen we'd even worse user experiences out there and coin bases as greatly improved still they're still complexities all these things and we figured there has to be a movement at some point to actual usability and actual user experiences. You'll get every other finance app you mentioned Ben Moon Pay Pal at the beginning beginning at the show right and those are obviously pristine user experiences for the most part everything has problems but if we can't if we can't make something that's at least as good good but hopefully better then it's never going to be adopted by normal people sorry to say no but you know nontechnical people. That's the truth though people who are not in Crypto in other words right right exactly so we took that and built a philosophy around it that really is focused on user experience I and so of course we created our one click master nodes but we didn't WanNa stop just at at Masters because we see that there's a need for a vertically integrated ecosystem just like Tesla. The mosque saw that there is a problem with with car manufacturing the whole car value chain is staggered and piecemeal together and then a user or the driver in this case end up paying for all right so he created a company where he's designing building and even providing the fuel for cars you you know fuel so to speak. He built a very integrated ecosystem while it's really capital-intensive initially. It's paying off in a major way as we're seeing with this so we wanted to do the same things crypto. Basically you know I've actually been saving this analogy for the right show and although you know this kind of in the right show in some some respects it's not really the ideal one but I'm going to go ahead and use it and the second but you brought up you know how with Tesla Elon Musk and you know how when when Tesla was I the idea of Tesla and to be able to charge you know these these batteries right if you're driving across country entry. Where are you going to stop and charge your battery at you know I mean it's not cheap or easy to charge your battery and for someone?.

Nick supper blockchain Joe Blackburn Bitcoin Tesla BBC Vin Masters Ben Moon Dow David Davey chief information officer Davies domino Elon Musk
I Am Not A Robot: The Story of CAPTCHA

Planet Money

12:53 min | 1 year ago

I Am Not A Robot: The Story of CAPTCHA

"Year two thousand everybody was signing up for Yahoo Email addresses. This was back before g mail and Yahoo mail was great. It was free. You could check your Email anywhere. But there was this one problem and a computer science grad student at Carnegie Mellon University became fixated on this problem. His name is Louis von on the problem was that there were people who in order to send spam from Yahoo accounts. They would obtain millions of Email accounts, literally, millions not not hundreds or thousands. But millions of fake Email accounts. Literally millions of fakey mill council this spammers who were signing up for millions of spam. Accounts weren't going to the yahu male page and just signing up for these accounts. One at a time. It wasn't like they were like the real Jacob Goldstein at Yahoo dot com. Jacob Goldstein ninety nine at Yahoo dot com. Jacob the barefoot dancer at Yahoo dot com. No spammers were writing simple, computer programs little bots that just kept filling out the Yahoo Email sign up form again and again and again day. Day and night and that would generate an army of Email accounts that could be used to sell fake Viagra or steal your Bank account information. Whatever Dow didn't know what to do about this. But Louis finan had an idea. So the idea was can we make test that distinguish between humans and computers, but also a test that is graded by the computer, if you've basically ever signed up for anything on the internet. You probably know the idea that Luis von Ahn came up with a picture of distorted letters and numbers, and then a little field below that picture where you type in the characters that you see, and we actually showed it to the the guy who was the chief scientists at Yahoo. Are he loved it? And within a few weeks. It was actually, you know in the registration flow of Email accounts at Yahoo. It was it was being used there. And we were super happy that they were just using it Lewis gave his little tested name was a long ridiculous name that made a short genius acronym. The long name was completely automated public turing test to tell computers and humans. Apart a train test is a famous old idea in computer science. It's a test where you try to tell if you're chatting with a computer or with a human being if a computer can consistently make you think it's a human being that is artificial intelligence, and this sort of turing test that Louis came up with it became huge. You may even know the acronym for this test capture capture capture has very compelling have show is a good name. Yeah. Because it's like capture them or Gotcha. Or something like that. Yeah. It was it was a good name, you know capture. Maybe you do not like capture and yet the twenty year history of capture is this window into a lot into artificial intelligence into digitizing millions of books also into a little cyber. Hello and welcome to planet money. I'm Jacob Goldstein. And I'm no L king. And I am not a robot. I'm not not not a robot. But if you were that's exactly what. Today on the show, a global decades-long work an internet that people actually use versus a spammy wasteland. It is computer versus computer. And in the end the computers are only gonna need us the humans to do. A little light data entry. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from quip quip was designed to make brushing your teeth. Simple affordable and even enjoyable one of the first electric toothbrushes accepted by the American dental association. Quip has a built in two minute timer that pulses every thirty seconds to remind you to switch sides sensitive sonic, vibrations for healthier gums and a multi use cover for brushing on the go. Get your first refill pack for free at G E T Q U IP dot com slash planet. Money. If you're in debt, don't beat yourself up life happens. Forgive yourself. Life kit is ready with a shovel to help. You dig out of crushing debt when you know better you do better check out life kid and apple podcasts or NPR dot org slash life kit. I should say that Luis von Ahn was one of several people working on capture of like tests around the same time. So he's not the only person who came up with the idea that people develop their own captures. But Lewis and his colleagues are the ones who came up with the name and their version was the one that really took off when you bought tickets online when you signed up for your mice basic count pretty soon people were taking Louise's little test two hundred million times a day. It was protecting the world from scalpers and spammers and bots and the world, of course, responded with gratitude every time that I talked to somebody about about capture, you know, the first thing they would tell me is how annoying they are. So I started feeling fair fair. I started feeling partly responsible for these, you know, two hundred million times a day. And each time you type one of these you wasted about ten seconds of your time. So, you know, I started just thinking is there any way in which we can make good use of this these ten seconds. This was in the mid two thousand and at this moment, there is this push. Bush going on to digitize old books and all documents. And at the time it was easy enough to scan old pages old pieces of paper and put them online. But computers were still bad at turning those scanned pages into useful online documents if not searchable you cannot change the font size. You cannot. I mean, it's just a bunch of kind of somewhat crappy pictures. Yeah. So it occurred to me that you could take all of the words that the computer could not recognize and we get people to read them for us while they were typing captures on the internet up to this point Lewis has been giving capture away for free. But now he thinks people might pay to have their print archives digitized one capture at a time, and he is sitting on over half a million hours of free human Labor Day. So he starts a company called recapture, and he goes out looking for customers. And what happened was I was actually giving a talk somewhere. And I was fortunate that the at the time the guy who was the chief information officer for the New York Times was sitting in the audience. Okay. And he said, oh, you know, what we have this huge one hundred and thirty year old archive of old additions of the New York Times. So maybe we can maybe you can help us the New York Times ended up being recaptured first client now when you solve the caption next to a few random letters and numbers there. Was also a picture of a word from an old issue of the times the computers couldn't read when you typed in that word, you weren't just protecting the internet from spam? You're also helping to turn a hundred years of old newspapers into a searchable digital archive, and I have to say, I just love this sort of while you're doing one thing. You're also doing something else like deficiency of this. Like, it just it delights me, you know, it's like the old dream of writing your exercise bike to power the lights in your house or something which by the way Lewis told me when he was like eleven he had that dream, and then he like looked into it and realize oh, actually like a person, right? An exercise bike as a terrible way to generate power. As Lewis was getting recaptured going Google came out and announced they were starting to digitize every book like every single book in the world or something they sold. Lewis was doing for the times and in two thousand and nine Google bought recap show and started using it to help digitize books and then a few. Later. Google started using captured tests that showed pictures of addresses on the sides of buildings when we saw those captures we were making Google maps work better doing a little more work for Google, unpaid. So that is the end of Louise's capture story, but a little digression. He started a language company where people did online translation while they were learning the length which same like doing one thing actually doing other thing idea. This company became super popular it's called dual lingo, in fact, it got so popular that they got rid of the translation part. Now, it's just this app that millions of people use to learn languages. Okay. End of Louis end of digression. So now, it is the 'oughts and for a while capture is working the spammers are held at bay. And then someone figures out a work around. Shady businesses started showing up online and offering to break capture for anybody willing to pay. Chris Canaan is a computer scientist who started looking into these businesses around two thousand eight and it's one of. Those things like until you actually think oh, actually let's go seek this up. See how hard it is to find. You might think. Oh, this is some shady cybercriminals underground thing. But Nope, you can just Google for it, you could find a dozen of these services. Very competitively priced with all that stuff. Chris wanted to know like what's going on here? Like is it for real do these services work? So he and his colleagues decided to act like spammers. I mean, they didn't do the spam part. But they did more or less everything else. They built a bought. And this bought went around the web bumping into captures. And automatically every time the bought hit a capture test. It would send it off to one of these services that offers to solve captures for money, and what do those services do exactly they pay human beings to sit in front of computers all day long and solve one capture after another. So some person sitting in front of a computer gets a capture from Chris's bought solves the test in a couple of seconds sends it back to Chris's Bhatt, which enters the solution into a web page and boo. Yes, that is the plain vanilla version just to see like. Does this work? How long does it take? But Chris and his colleagues also had some other questions they wanted to answer. So they did something else they made up their own captured tests to send out to the solvers. Some of those tests are said what time is it and the answer to those tests told them what time zone the people salting the test lived in. They'll wanted to know what languages the solver spoke. So they made captures with weird instructions in lots of different languages Chinese Spanish Italian Tagalog Portuguese Russian, Tamil Dutch, Hindi German Malay Vietnamese Korean Greek Arabic Bengali Canada Klingon in Farsi. I'm sorry. What was the one before? I see Klingon Klingon the made up language from Star Trek maiden. Of course, not. But they did it because they wanted to just like sort of push these services like how far will these capture solvers go. There's no way they're going to be able to answer this. But the answers we saw showed us. I think we got something like a one percent accuracy rate. But it. Was on something that was so incredibly long of a question that it couldn't have been right by chance. So presumably one of these capture solvers recognized that this was Klingon either new Klingon just because at the no or looked it up online. When was actually able to successfully solve this capture. That was written in Klingon you found the greatest capture solver on earth. Yes. Based on this part of the study, not the Klingon part put the languages and the time zones. They figure out that a lot of people seem to be doing this work in Russia, China and India, and they realize this is a huge industry. People have started calling it capture farming, and it is basically human beings opening the capture gates for an army of bots and capture farms work, usually they were right, usually they were very fast. So that so the services were legit. I mean, they were potentially illegal. But they did the thing that they said they were doing correct. Yeah. One of the most interesting things about cybercrime as a marketplace. Is that it works like any other like business to business type marketplace, your reputation is really important there. You're not gonna keep your capture solving business in business, unless you're actually solving those captures and how much did it cost one US dollar per thousand captures solved so incredibly incredibly inexpensive. But this is a task that takes a typical human, you know, about fifteen twenty seconds. Yes. But God, I mean, you really. Feel for the people doing the work. Yes. So if you are spam or these workers will solve captures for you around the clock for a tenth of a penny per thousand that price is obviously like mind breaking low, but it is still not zero. And it is still enough to weed out a lot of people it weeds out people who are just trolls making spam. Accounts for fun and people who are just posting garbage comments on million garbage websites hoping to sell a few extra dollars worth of garbage products. So even with the capture farms catches still are working to block a lot of people. But what would happen if you could teach a computer to solve the captures then you wouldn't need the farms and the farmers anymore. The price would go to zero and the spammers could go wild.

Lewis Yahoo Jacob Goldstein Louis Finan Google Chris Canaan New York Times Luis Von Ahn Louise Fakey Mill Carnegie Mellon University Viagra American Dental Association United States DOW
Report: Trump Uses Unsecured iPhone And China, Russia Are Listening In

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Report: Trump Uses Unsecured iPhone And China, Russia Are Listening In

"US policy in China's direction, they can do this in a way that nobody's ever been able to do this to a US president before because President Trump is reportedly insisting that he should still speak on his private unsecured cell phone despite the security risks and because of. That the Chinese know who he is speaking to they know what he and his interlocutors are saying in those phone calls. They know what arguments he's making a what he's hearing. And now the Chinese are shaping those conversations to benefit the Chinese government. Just an astonishing story right after that story broke in the New York Times last night. A former White House chief information officer from the George W Bush administration told fast company, quote, if true, this may be the largest most significant breach of White House communications in US history. Now, the one still terrible silver lining in the New York Times. This report from last night was the part where current Trump administration officials tried to sell the New York Times on the fact that they were quote confident that Trump was not actually spilling secrets in these coals that are monitored by the Chinese government. They're confident in that quote because President Trump rarely digs into the details of the intelligence. He is shown and is not well versed in the operational, specifics of military or covert activities. I mean, this is supposed to be the silver lining. You can see why this is still terrible. You can see this might be cold comfort to worry about the president's spilling anything in terms of national security or really important secrets and these calls that the Chinese are listening to don't worry about that. You know, he can't really absorb anything. All that secret. He doesn't pay attention to his briefings. With that was the glass half full part of this amazing story in the times last night. Well, the glasses not all that full. NBC news reports today that in fact, President Trump has been disclosing sensitive information in these coals that he has been making on his insecure private phone, and these

President Trump New York Times Chinese Government United States White House George W Bush Administration NBC China Chief Information Officer
"chief information officer" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on KGO 810

"The Armstrong and Getty show. Sean. And Joe, you know, we've got a late night joke off about the Cosby sentencing. Sean said, yeah, if you want a different rape story little rapier up in here from this rape story to this room. People were discussing out loud in the lunchroom, gang rapes. What was that the sort of thing that anybody other than sailors and cops talked about now a workplace setting. Everybody's discussing it because the the new story of the day wasted people in. Wow. Oh my God. Jack a teacher in port Saint Lucie. Florida was fired for refusing to give students partial credit for work. They did not turn into her. If she they didn't turn in their explore notebook project. Whatever that was the eighth grade history teacher gave them a zero for that project guy was one of the great threat to teacher would give you and if you don't put your name on it you get zero which is ridiculous. It's clearly my handwriting mean having things in all year long, but this school policy, according to the teacher is you gotta give them a fifty percent if they don't do any of the work whatsoever. She said, I'm not gonna give you fifty percent for something. You didn't do what was terminated kind of policies that the modern grade inflation. Don't hurt their self-esteem policy. A chief information officer for the school district disputed that if I could have done nothing to get a fifty percent than add just you know, twenty five percent or so effort to that. Right. Territory or somewhere? Sure, grab yourself a C at least. She wrote a message on our whiteboards students posted it on Facebook by kids. Mrs Dorado loves you and wishes you the best in life. I've been fired for refusing to give you a fifty percent for not handing anything in heart. Mrs toronto. Sibu way. There's a dispute whether that's why she was fired. I hate to ruin a good outrage story. Something tells me there's a little more to it. I'm sure there is. Feel like being outraged. There's also at some point do we need to talk about prop ten which is the latest idiotic unicorn riding ill conceived poorly constructed terrible mistake about to be perpetrated four. And by the people of California has to do with affordable housing and everybody with any sense is against it, including housing advocates. But it's got it. Sounds good. So it will probably pass. So I'm excited about this late night joke off about Cosby sentencing because I'm hoping that the rapist comedian is coming in for kicking. I would mind scene and get kicked. I wonder so you're going to judge these jokes. Yes. And whoever gets the bottom. Bottom grade cannot be on the supreme court. Editors point, obviously, no one can defend Bill Cosby unless you are his publicist. The most racist.

Bill Cosby Mrs Dorado rape Sean port Saint Lucie supreme court Armstrong Getty Mrs toronto Joe chief information officer Facebook Florida California fifty percent twenty five percent
 Insurtech - How Technology Is Transforming The Insurance Industry

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Insurtech - How Technology Is Transforming The Insurance Industry

"The last few weeks. I have received a few messages about the insurance industry. One saying Neil, do you know any podcast at tackle the insurance industry and one from a company called SE to helping the world's largest insurance and annuity carriers with the new capability to offer products to customers online and essentially help them move with the times now SAP Tuesday. Digital platform helps carries enhance or circumvent the traditional broker model to which mid market primarily millennials. All I two. So today I want to talk about how insurance companies can reach millennials because their old way of doing things just looks creepy as hell to them and also discussed the digital transformation of the insurance sector and the importance of innovation and court change. So book elope and hold until as I beam your ears all the way to Kansas. So we can speak with Vinod cashew chief information officer at SAP too. So a massive warm, welcome to the show Kato that listeners a little about who you are and what you do. So I consider myself to be a transformation player in what I call not so sexy insurance industry. It is basically an industry which is completely technology driven, completely dependent on technology and is full of opportunities. If you look at relation, you look at. Modernization of technology. This industry has been the lagging behind. I consider myself to be a builder and a transformation leader for last thirty years, and I have done this. I've been very privileged and honored to have done this across companies like Ed g opera, dential MetLife, and then also service providers like d. c. s. and now in doing this thing all lower in SE to, I'm so glad you mentioned that the the guy in the room that the insurance industry feels like too many people this been lacking behind for a long time, but that is changing, like you said. And I say to you, help the world's largest life insurance carriers with the new capability to offer products to customers online, but can you just helplessness visualize exactly what problems you solve essay to and also what makes you guys unique from the solutions out there. So what we saw for. Our clients and customers is internally through a lot of their the aging technology and there most of them are running on all the legacy platforms, legacy legacy architectures which are very much filed feed data feed, not completely integrated. And then through mergers and acquisitions, they have acquired a lot of these legacy platforms which has created this Cobb where for them that for them, the adulation to do something of either launch a new product or be able to service existing customers and the right price points create new operating models. Create new service models is almost next to impossible based on the current platform. Now, the choices they have are do it yourself and the do it yourself. Joyce has. Nationalize that existing technologies, they don't. You jealous. It comes back to, I look at my IP and my peas might depot. It comes to domain knowledge. It's very easy to find a job program, but finding someone who has done life in new nudity insurance, business processing for many, many years and also can do Jolla programming. That person is what is weighed in gold for me. And that's what my partners are. Majority of the times they're missing. They entered these large transformations hundreds of millions of dollars industrializing the platforms there cycled to at least a couple CIO's. And then third CIO comes in and says, I got to do something different. It's not working out what I provide them in. See two is an alternate to. It's an alternative to say, you can keep running your current business. You want to be doing greenfield running new launching new products, faster better. You want to enter and do something direct to consumer. You want to do something more digital in nature.

SAP SE Cobb CIO Neil Kansas Vinod Metlife Chief Information Officer Joyce D. C. S. Thirty Years
"chief information officer" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on KGO 810

"The Armstrong and Getty show. I just said, Sean, Joe, you know, we've got a late night joke off about the Cosby sentencing. Sean said, yeah, if you want a different rape story little rapi up in here from this rape story to this. Reporter people were discussing out loud in the lunchroom, gang rapes. What does that the sort of thing that anybody other than sailors in cops talked about? Now in a workplace setting everybody's discussing because the the new story of the day wasted people in. Wow. Oh my God. Jack a teacher in port Saint Lucie. Florida was fired for refusing to give students partial credit for work. They did not turn into her. If she they didn't turn in their explore notebook project. Whatever that was the eighth grade history teacher gave them a zero for that project guy was one of the great threat to teacher would give you and if you don't put your name on it, you get zero which always is ridiculous. It's clearly my handwriting. I'm having things in all year long. But this is cool policy. According to the teacher is you gotta give them a fifty percent if they don't do any of the work whatsoever. She said, I'm not going to give you fifty percent for something. You didn't do what was terminated kind of policies that the modern grade inflation. Don't hurt their self-esteem policy. Chief information officer for the school district disputed that way, if I could have done nothing to get a fifty percent, just you know, twenty five percent or so effort to that. Right. Me up territorial or somewhere. Sure. Grab yourself a seat at least. She wrote a message on our white board is students posted on Facebook by kids. Mrs Dorado loves you and wishes you the best in life. I've been fired for refusing to give you a fifty percent for not handing anything in heart. Mrs toronto. Sue any way. There's a dispute whether that's why she was fired. I hate to ruin a good outrage story. Something tells me there's a little more to it than I'm sure there is but feel like being outraged. There's also at some point do we need to talk about. Prop ten which is the latest idiotic unicorn riding ill conceived poorly constructed terrible mistake about to be perpetrated four. And by the people of California has to do with affordable housing and everybody with any sense is against it, including housing advocates. But it's got it. Sounds good. So it will probably pass. So I'm excited about this late night joke off about Cosby sentencing because I'm hoping that the rapist comedian is coming in for kicking. I would mind seen him get kicked. I wonder so you're gonna judge these jokes. Yes. And whoever gets the bottom. Bottom grade cannot be on the supreme court. Editors point, obviously, no one can defend Bill Cosby unless you are his publicist. The most racist fixes trial in the history of the United.

Bill Cosby Mrs Dorado rape Sean port Saint Lucie supreme court Reporter Armstrong Getty Mrs toronto Facebook Florida Chief information officer Joe California fifty percent twenty five percent
India's Wipro first quarter profit beats estimates

Bloomberg Daybreak

02:36 min | 2 years ago

India's Wipro first quarter profit beats estimates

"Karen Moskow we are just about three hours away from the opening of US. Trading let's get you up to. Date on the. News you need to know at this hour US futures are heading. Lower after President Trump said he's ready to Levy tariffs on as much as. Five hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports Mr. Trump made the remarks in a pre taped interview with, CNBC this morning European equity indexes are also falling following those remarks the dollar is also. Weakening after President Trump criticized Federal Reserve policy the president said yesterday. That he doesn't like. The central Bank raising interest rates Meanwhile that. You want is recovering. From. A steep decline amid speculation officials. Were seeking to. Stem the drop at the same time stocks in China's search effort report said regulators will loosen rules on the asset management industry cheers of banker. Soft are up three percent in early trading after the company. Reported earnings the top. Testaments we get more from Bloomberg's Charlie. Pellett sales and profit got a boost from customers signing up for more. Internet based storage processing and office productivity software surveys. Of customer chief information officers show an increase in companies signing up for or planning to, use Microsoft's cloud products revenue from cloud computing rose eighty nine percent in the quarter Charlie Pellett. Bloomberg daybreak thank you Charlie the other shoe is dropping four sketchers shareholders the. Footwork company has lost a quarter. Of its value. This morning amid concerns over slowing growth rising costs and lower than. Expected projections and we're watching GE earnings crossing the Bloomberg right now second quarter Adjusted profit beating analysts estimates revenue also. Beat shares are up eight tenths. Percent now about one percent in early trading Honeywell now. Crossing the Bloomberg second quarter adjusted profit. Also beating analysts estimates it boosted its forecast for the year. Bob and Italian bonds and stocks are lower following a report. That finance minister. Giovanni tria may be forced to step down the Italian treasury is now, pushing back against. That report though calling it quote, pure, invention and futures. This morning are moving lower, with us in p futures down eleven points Dow futures down. One hundred thirty two now and NASDAQ futures down ten the Dax in Germany is down nine tenths percent CAC in Paris down one percent and the footsie one hundred is down a third. Of a percent. Ten year. Treasury. Down to thirty seconds yield two point eight. Four percent yield on the two year two point five nine percent NYMEX crude oil up three, tenths percent or twenty one cents to, sixty nine sixty seven a barrel COMEX gold little changed at twelve Twenty-three ninety an ounce the euro a dollar, sixteen forty nine.

Bloomberg President Trump Charlie Pellett United States Karen Moskow Treasury Nymex Federal Reserve Honeywell China Comex Footwork Company Giovanni Tria Cnbc BOB Microsoft GE Finance Minister
"chief information officer" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on The CyberWire

"And we thank cyber for spa seraing our show my guest today is tubby cut ga he's the former chief information officer for the nation of estonia where they enjoy a national digital identity system he's a special advisor to the european commission and is currently ceo of a company called proud engineers our conversation focuses on a stony as digital identity system and how it affects privacy and security i've done this is a so it's the food distributed solution man to connect those different districted systems in his though not have like every person that unique identifier at the student news in private sector in healthcare in government is everywhere so if the information about the first can actually combine different data sets between different sectors specificity so we have very strong baseline for for data and every failing in who is there fifteen years fifteen years mandatory they have to have a digital identity so government demont's everybody has with each side end this way using the identity began consign documents civic and open up into gate bells the open any government private so it's very news they actually have to say that it's leadin despite news the penalties different bike some people using dining cards some people mobile some people use days so it's important that everybody has its by the day so important what's today was using now where there any privacy concerns that went along with that funding get this question from you as my guys dr price some people think that nothing's connected the then they have to give away the primus i mean it might be truly the government has like the danish ship or like they have they want to have full control over the day number might say china is democratic country be believed about their notes north european countries like speeding finland being featured collection of more privacy protective compare being i mean i think an example know who has looked your have birds in your let us him in on his no i do not i know and that's the point ever every patient records sinister stitching but also i can see who has loaded buildings they changed it but meaning that i actually to have more control over my day competitive you and that's the point if you don't want to be control of faking dictatorship countries you will in the system into that everybody has a bower to see who has access posted data if there's no reasonable explanation this person gets fry or costa jay and saw the you become your own beak providence say policeman or doctor is they have access to your dana she said inouye don't have a reason they will bake it go from the system lose the so stunned that late you can build those digital systems and can get the bags of missile systems keep the private or even better you can increase the premise because if there's something in my affect i have some kind of mental problem in is so i i can't actually card so even bill ever talked to nc day is have to have a reason of their something i truly want forget than the twenty to cover them i'm allowed to do that so so if you think about it this way it can get both services so increased primis how does it compare when it comes to things like identity theft given example if you are able to to court and prove that somebody has stolen your identity carbon you haven't given your anybody if to prove that the corn that somebody has stolen right in the government base the up to five million yours and in has never been used so what are your recommendations what could the united states for example do to improve our identity systems the question of the system it's question reaction have pain disolve contras think that they want to be digital but if you ask them why i mean i can ask you why you america wants to the garment why you're too complicated baskets it's difficult to make many compromises assigned date like life in new newest grew estonia so so white white minor by you actually have to do that i mean me well i suppose there could be cost savings there could be security advantages certainly things could be easier i would love to see for example medical records to be easier to navigate in to.

chief information officer fifteen years
"chief information officer" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

O'Reilly Data Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

"Then also playing algorithms i still do that myself because i find that it helps me not only understand the underlying algorithms and the trade offs that you make but it also helps you keep track of what is really innovative and what is incremental in terms of the work that's going on in the research and development space in machine learning so you're one of your titles is chief data officer so describe what a chief data officer at your company does and what you'd think kind of public perception of what the chief data officer is is there a difference between a chief data officer in my opinion is a person who thinks about the end to end process of obtaining data governing that data and transforming that data for the useful purpose so his or her purview is relatively large hugh my review into it to be exactly that thinking about the entire data pipeline proper stewardship proper governance principles in proper of that data i think that as the public learns more about the opportunities that can come from data i think there's a lot of excitement about the potential value that can be unlocked from it from the consumer standpoint and also many businesses and scientific organizations are excited about the same thing and i think the ceo plays a role as a catalyst in making those things happen with the right principles applied so why why do we need a separate role apart from the chief information officer well i would say that if you look at back into history a little bit you'll find that the need for the chief data officers started to come into play when people saw a huge amount of data coming in at high speeds with high variety and variability but then all.

officer ceo chief information officer
"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"Same about this school and that school or not necessarily exactly the same but same enough so that we can build one solution for them all and and move that ahead now what are things that people would typically assigned to a chief information officer is obviously connectivity and enable the the organization to function whether it's a server's or email or providing you know network to application sir but i think there is an additional element of your job which is do you enable the students to also take advantage of this technology unlike let's say university boy where they still have to do the basic infrastructure but it's pretty much the students come in with their own devices in you know the public schools you have to figure out ways to enable them is that's your job as well that is that is that's one of the things that historic we've been letting the schools figure out for themselves and they've done a great job i i like to point out that most chief information officers struggled to figure out how to do innovation and they stand up an innovation center i've got two hundred fifty six of them of course i have two hundred fifty six innovation centers how do i get all they're all different yeah so part of what i'm trying to figure out is how do we get to a place where again we have that choice and flexibility you're not gonna put a chromebook with a keyboard in front of a kindergartner the can't yet read but a touch screen device shirt that works well so you need that kind of flexibility for what works for that student if you've got a high school student that is working in an academy focused on performing arts or media production you giving them a mac because that's what media professionals used a annandale out if they're doing architecture construction they're using autocad and sorry autocad only comes on a pc.

chief information officer
"chief information officer" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on Super Station 101

"To detect and respond to cyber threats evaluators from the department's office of inspector general also discovered the interior technicians did not implement a sweeping array of mandatory government wide defense measures ordered up after the disastrous opm attacked the office of inspector general hack didn't investigate blocked intrusions and left multiple compromise computers on their networks for months at a time according to a redacted report which was issued just a few weeks ago ultrasensitive security clearance files have been removed to the defense department but among other things the oh g report noted that sensitive data pardon me at interior could be taken out of the departments networks without detection network log showed that a computer at the us s geological survey an interior bureau was regularly trying to communicate with computers in russia the messages were blocked but the us gs facility staff did not analyze the alerts they also found dangerous or inappropriate behavior by network users including the downloading pornography and watching pirated videos on russian and ukrainian websites computers discovered to be infected with malware were scrapped as soon as possible and then immediately put back into use meaning little or no effort went into examining the scope and nature of such threats to the broader network simulated intrusions of ransomware attacks created by the examiners were carried out with increasing blatancy without a response in the case of ransomware for nearly a month also the report knows the department cyber security operations team was not privy to a list of interior socalled high value it assez prepared by the chief information officer due to its sensitive nature so in other words federal computers eaten up our which are reaching out with some detectable files on them that the russians are not only able to hack into but that we are apparently just delivering to them on a silver platter or they can hack into my computer all day long are the all they're gonna see me trying to send them emails or maybe they need to hack into your computer so they can see that we're sending them emails listening to well hey y'all come on come on we're nice people here just won't talk vlad come on we can do this joe lock it just join us in studio.

chief information officer russia vlad joe
"chief information officer" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Pinera's chief information officer the website was taken down eight months later now didn't get credit card information you only got the last four of the credit cards but you would get a user's name address phone number last four of their credit cards used the troubles in the place that it's not very secure at all loyalty member yeah yeah but even leo here's here's the scariest leak the underwear company leaked wait a minute which underwear what your underwear is not secure and then lord and taylor and saks fifth avenue or are you talking about my fitness pal yeah under armour under my fitness bell one hundred fifty million accounts but wendy these are most of the time not including credit card numbers they may include passwords in the case of my fitness pal they reset the passwords or credit everybody to reload in what's the risk what's the danger of all of these leaks think the the largest danger of these sorts of information leaks in general is twofold if there's information about the users they can either be used automated in account takeover attacks on other sites or the information in this is something that i saw when i was working for the retail intelligence sharing in analysis center is that criminals can take the information about users and turn that into a scam against each user in other words they can contact the user and pretend to be the retailer and say and sort of authentication themselves by saying we you know have this information on you you know your order number four five six seven eight you know on this date and get them to give up even more information in in response so that's another.

Pinera chief information officer leo wendy taylor eight months
March 15th Sports Update

Kilmeade & Friends with Brian Kilmeade

00:59 min | 2 years ago

March 15th Sports Update

"As jurors hear more testimony in the murder trial of the prominent atlanta attorney accused of insider trading the former chief information officer for atlantabased equifax is indicted on federal charges go to wsbradiocom see the sketches of a fake cop accused of sexually assaulting two women in atlanta and cobb county former ohio state coach thad matta turns down georgia's offer to become the dogs next men's basketball coach nc double a i four in dayton texas southern and syracuse punch their tickets to the big dance georgia state plays cincinnati and a two seed fifteen seed matchup friday in nashville it's raining training from disney's wide world of sports braves over the phillies five to three wsb news time one thirty one wsb breaking news first and accurate dan from the voices you trust to twenty four hours on news ninety five five and am seven fifty wsb.

DAN Syracuse Texas Basketball Thad Matta Ohio Cobb County Atlanta Murder Attorney Phillies Disney Nashville Cincinnati Dayton Georgia Chief Information Officer Twenty Four Hours
Former Equifax exec charged with insider trading

The Mark Arum Show

01:33 min | 2 years ago

Former Equifax exec charged with insider trading

"Dependable forecast is coming up equifax is chief information officer has been indicted on federal charges of insider trading are alleging that mr yang receive insider information material non public information related to the breach at equifax that's us attorney bj pack who says a grand jury indicting the former high level executive with equifax mr yang alleging insider trading and also security fraud us attorney says he potentially faces time in prison after twenty five years in prison from the promo side at the federal courthouse robert wilentz ski wsb both atlanta in cobb county police have released composite sketches of a man believed to have impersonated a police officer and assaulted two women we have both of those composite sketches on our website meantime we have a cobb county police sergeant wayne dealt telling wsb point we we have two separate investigations going the similarities are such that we are in communication however we would not be able to definitively say is the same person to we actually have a suspect in custody and then we can compare evidence with that individual students at brookwood high school participated in that nationwide walkout despite warnings a disciplinary action several hundred students at brooklyn high school walked out in silent protest junior emma hearn was among them it was complete silence no murmurs no goals nothing and it was cool to see kids from all different demographics all different backgrounds different races different ethnicities different genders all come together for one common goal students held up yellow cards with.

Equifax Chief Information Officer Mr Yang Bj Pack Executive Fraud Us Attorney Atlanta Officer Wayne Brooklyn High School Emma Hearn Cobb County WSB Brookwood High School Twenty Five Years
Graphene: A New Power Source?

The 3:59

04:16 min | 2 years ago

Graphene: A New Power Source?

"The. Welcomes, the three fifty, nine Roger Chan I'm Ben FOX ribbon. I'm Alfred hang will use Alexa to send cash to your buddies. Ben. You've got a scoop on a Cup making this happen. Yes. So give us the details but going on here. Yeah, it's a Virginia company called day own. They work with governments and banks to create a lot of different biometric and security software and platforms. They created this way for you to actually send money to your friends and families, peer to peer payments using Alexis. So it's not as simple as saying, Alexis and mom fifty dollars, but there is a chance that eventually could get that easy. And how does this work? Because like can I go to your house and like Ben, send Roger, fifty bucks. No, so San Roger fifty for I. If I'm going to send you money, I would. I have to set you up as pay online on my now, right? Yes. Podcast. And then after I say that I want to send money, I still have to use my phone open up my phone verify that I actually want to do this payment. And then you have to do some sort of authentication whether it's using face ID, touch, ID, opin, something like that. So there are some additional like feel like that's just another like that's really annoying. Couldn't you just pay on your phone? Would it be simpler to just take out the electric potentially? It could be an also, this isn't this isn't out now day on his hoping to partner with banks where this could come out in the next nine to eighteen months idea would be that eventually voice -cation could be available through Alexa, be eventually as easy as just saying, Alexa this person, and as long as they're setup as your pay you could do is that so you know, after mobsters loan sharks have beaten up so badly that like you can't hand them the money or use your hands to use your phone that you guys your voice to do it instead is exactly. Yeah. I always say, as I explained this to people that are like, what if somebody has a gun. To your Mike, somebody has gone to your head in your house really big problem. You're probably gonna read. Exactly. All right. What's next up? Haven't heard of material called graphene. Graphene is a been layer, pure carbon atoms tightly packed into a honeycomb structure. The care about is can do amazing things because super thin superstrong ideal way to transmit Power. So in theory, this could be used five G of material over promising told me us too theoretically charge a phone in his little seven seconds because it can hold a lot of Power on the phone for days. I'm so super thin and super-strong the way just so you know, damn man over here. Stop flexing offered. I don't. I think a lot of potential. I'm on Ben side here. I'll see it when I believe it. When I see it. It definitely promises a lot. The material is absolutely fascinating. Stephen Shanklin's read about it. We've heard about in the past about sort of the different applications for it. Obviously the, I think the most attractive for most people is application in battery Power. Mostly in the research world. It is katie's talked to the sort of the graphene something experts at mobile congress to ago. And you know, she thought this might be happening in a couple of decades, but they're saying they're saying two, three years, no way not commercially, but I imagine like it'll start showing up in research are indeed with companies right now is totally Akkad Isaac, but I imagine it will actually get a lot closer reality than we think those are in days hoarding, all the cool tech for themselves for sure. Lastly, new development equifax trauma offered. You've got all the details. Yeah. So this is a breaking news story. A former equifax executive used to be their chief information officer. He knew about the breach August and sold his stock ten days before they announced it publicly making nearly a million dollars. How do you waited until after he only would have lost one hundred seventeen thousand dollars. So now he's facing these charges over that. Also he's been fired over this as well. Ouch. Okay. First of all, it's just alleged at this point. He hasn't actually been convicted yet. That's right. More details on the story. Check us out on it. After Ruben amount for dang, as we'll see.

Akkad Isaac Ben Fox Alexa Roger Chan Alexis Virginia Equifax Mike Stephen Shanklin Ruben Partner Katie Congress Chief Information Officer Executive One Hundred Seventeen Thousand Eighteen Months Million Dollars Fifty Dollars
"chief information officer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Us we just pay them off changed the firm wear change the chip process change that software so an insider could actually affect huge huge numbers of chips and things which would go into the voting machines as well as as other appliances as well also cherry ramsey with the nsa now which cyber pointing to national it's just a software hack can go in and actually hacked the infrastructure the offer development infrastructure of the companies that are developing software for the machines and actually at the very beginning put them our hand so that when that software as downloaded on the machine it already has the male where incited and these are things that read the newspaper today we're seeing this done every single day and so as you know kind of the bottom line is are the voting machines special no they're really not their hardware software and we kind of demonstrated that that this can happen so i think this this kind of a few follow logically this scenario is should give each one of us it should cause us to pause and really be concerned about the elections on our processes in these voting machines of the future thank you so mr diligent as the mit the that were the head of the through the the uh helps enhance the cyber security of state and local governments who are the ones that the administer elections what are going to do about this mary but intractable problem the radio jungil again with the center for introduced secured the what i'd like to do to maybe set the context was it was mentioned that i was chief information officer earlier for some time ago and in a triple story that to me helped put in context what can we center for internet security do and that was nsa used to come in annually and do a penetration analysis of each of the services air force being one and then we get a debriefing i'm sure there are a lot better today it back then my biggest fear was if anyone who was sitting in that room who was from the outside i would be fired immediately because nsa was very successful in penetrating our systems are winter and i should this.

cherry ramsey chief information officer
"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

28:56 min | 3 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"And then in terms of your oversight i mean maybe tell us a little bit about what your ecs has in terms of its responsibly over some of the other agencies i know there's 18 of executive done thumbed department but then there's dealy uh me how do you relate to them so this year the legislature was able to pass a bill sb fifty that um gives the cio oversight over it projects within the dealy and you each for what's called ivan vi our internal validation verification surreally all we're trying to do is isn't sure that if there is a large it project going on that the vendor is meeting the requirements of the contract and that the contract is it are the project is on time and on budget excellent well we left take another quick rape low we get back we'll talk a little bit about the upcoming hoi annual coachella you're listening to bite marks cafe support for bite marks cafe comes from the hp our local talk show fund which helps hawaii public radio sustain and grow its locallyproduced talk shows mahalo to contributors a coffee orange lifestyle medicine hawaii pacific university and lupone no initiative welcome back this is bite marks cafe i'm bert lum and i am rhinos hour and we are talking to governor david egei an state cio todd nakabo now before we jump into the hawaii annual code challenge i do wanna ask todd and the governor because both of you have talked about data and of course we're both kind of data geeks and.

rape hp hawaii hawaii pacific university bert lum executive cio david egei todd nakabo
"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"So we talk about office three 65 one of the biggest things is that it is a subscription base application were you know every year supposedly the price goes up so we're on a threeyear rotation or three year contract and we're one of the only state said didn't see uh twelve to fifteen percent increase in our subscription we saw half a million dollar reduction for the next three years on our office we 65 subscription right and that's again because were trying to use and are trying to ensure that everything every dollar that responded there is a positive return on investment for the tax i gotta ask moving probably paper vendors copier vendors are probably a little unhappy about some of the changes your there are a lotta vendors that are there are not happy if you per se for some things that redoing but one of the first things that i did when i came into this role was i brought every single vendor that was supplying any type of it to the state abroad him into my office and i asked him what value heavy brought to the state in the past two years if they couldn't answer that question uh we reconsider that they're not we wanted to do business early early and as you both know being the geeks that you are there's there's you know as we transition and a move into paperless process you know that just allows us to do more with less there's so much that uh we have and that were responsible for state government is not an issue of people losing their jobs right as we.

return on investment fifteen percent million dollar three years three year threeyear two years
"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"A state agencies were able to come to us and say look this is the business problem that we have and this is a solution that we really need can you help us and that's really what we did was enable them through office three 65 to solve those business problems now when we were you're talking about the paperless a solution i think anybody's worked in an office has been called into a coalition party i can imagine with a legislature you everybody got twelve binders at the start of the session there's somebody with a cart has to move paper around there's probably a copier in every third office what are my questions for you tatas have you on on the bottom line realized the kind of benefits you talk about it certainly saving paper and saving forest as important but for taxpayers or they say are we've by all this expensive technology signing up for officer sixty five and going you sign is that just chip trading one bill for another argue seeing financial benefits so yes the answer is yes the governor also tasked me with china come up with more effective ways of running government and one of the biggest things that we started to ask within state government was you know what is the return on investment what is the roy the roy for all of these projects and that's where a lot of times questions aren't asked or weren't being ask is why are we doing this project what is the return on investment and we've set up an entire governance process that now determines whether or not an it project moves forward piece on the return on investment so there certain projects that we won't move on because there's not a positive return on investment.

officer china roy return on investment
"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"One of the biggest tacit we had to take on his how can we reduce and enable our state employees to process paperwork quicker to dude digital signatures and that was one of the first projects that we launched then i think to date over two hundred thousand documents that have been digitally sign without within the state and that certainly saves a lotta trees do not go rice i you nodding when he mentioned email you know your background is an engineering i heard you with bert way news i'll even describe yourself as a geek we're happy to have you in the club in terms of getting your work done daytoday i mean what were some of the technology of technological challenges that you faced personally that you saw benefit from these this progress well as you as you may be aware i was very involved with um cleared technology and it when i was in the state legislature so i was a big proponent of modernizing that system in obviously legislature you know you've got seventy six our senators and house members and it's a relatively a selfcontained uh independent organization so it was easy to make decisions but we transform that organization from um like being totally paper bound to being total league a paperless in a relatively short period of time so it really was making that commitment to that same kind of m paperless effort we ihc so much value especially when you look at state government then it's tens of thousands of employees in many many different facilities and recognizing that hit so it's a lot less expensive to uh to route documents via email or electronic louis than it actually is to move the paper so our it was really with that perspective gnawing and remember the legislature we went from.

digital signatures bert louis
"chief information officer" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"chief information officer" Discussed on Malicious Life

"In fact in the third quarter of two thousand sixteen alone the number of ransomware was eleven times greater compared to even the first quarter of the same year the ransom wears themselves became more sophisticated being corruption improved in the operated on a wider range of platforms including more by just like in the cases of spam and beat us here to a flourishing criminal industry was developed it's sort of like a business and a feed program skull day rents or is a service where you can participate and you is there supply day ransomware deteriorating and they get it to overskated each and every time or you don't write any at all you're just a distributor for example a you're a criminal in a remote country and you have access to methods of fair distribution for i know maybe you control and local ice speedy or a other methods so you approach the people who actually wrote to the ransomware and you agree to distribute ransomware in exchange do dividing dilute that really streamlines the operation i mean sort of a an industry now ha parked focuses on what they are good at africa level if i can write a very solid encryption program doesn't necessarily mean that i can effectively distributed around the world maybe i need someone with the debt skill so i bark is chief information officer at cyber reason and has spent the last few years studying cybercriminals organizations you saive claims that when it comes to talent crime organizations have a wide array of candidates to choose from one of the transit we're seeing in sophisticated cyber crime organisations is the migration of talent of you know human talent from nation state actors in certain geographies into cyber crime organizations.

chief information officer africa cyber crime