18 Burst results for "Chief Geologist"

"chief geologist" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:46 min | 3 d ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Air helpful, but they don't really work if there's not this loving, caring family relationship for the job. You see yourself? Welcome back to them here. Welcome back to the welcome back to the mirror and know you're not alone because this is not just a mirror. It's a reflection of an unstoppable community. It's every workout for everyone in the nearly invisible home. Jim. Come on, one more. It's a race across time zones. Come on, let's go. A group class in any room. One on one from anywhere. Relax your shoulders, John. Each member and every instructor here to lift you up, so join in now, three their eyes and see your best self in the mirror Current group We have is the bell Cara Group and or X Minerals is one of the founding companies are group is quite well known for the discovery of the large lot precio sis Silver deposit in Mexico for which I was the chief geologist of the time. We have two projects in Mexico, currently One is a joint venture with Pan American silver. It's called the Sandra Project. It's a silver project with a silver resource of 33 million ounces. Second project is called Cornetto. It's a silver gold project with the world's largest silver mining company for his Neil Project that I'm most fascinated with. Right now. It's our joint venture with Pan American silver. It's one where we have discovered part of a much larger System that is analogous to the left Pretoria Giant deposit, which is about 75, kilometers east of Sandra Project, their power line corridors. There are communications roots, really all of the infrastructure that you would want. We're establishing a good mining project. Mapping and geochemical sampling that is being done today the lead to a diamond drilling program for the first quarter of 2021. Matthew, Huh? Oh, sorry. It's okay. I just need you to listen to me. I know that a lot of times, Mom, it might not seem like I'm listening to you. But I am I hear you and what you say really does matter to me. I mean, let's be honest. No kid likes rules. But I get why we have them. I hear you and No, it's because you care all the talks we've had over the years, including what you've told me about not using alcohol and other drugs. They stick with me and believe it or not. They really do make a difference. Especially at times that matter, months. Hey, wanna drink? Nothing Some good. So thank you, Dad for talking and preparing me for what's ahead. Thanks, Mom for never giving up. And always being my biggest fan. Thank you for letting me know what you expect so I can try to meet your expectations..

Sandra Project bell Cara Group Mexico Cornetto Pretoria Giant Jim chief geologist John Matthew instructor X Minerals
"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

06:37 min | 4 months ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Jeans and extreme jeans dot com at his Fisher here, your radio route sleuth on the program where we shake your family tree and watch the nuts. Fall out. Guess who's back today? See see more Yes star, the ABC. Siri's the genetic detective. What is the status of the show? Is she coming back with another season? But mostly we want to talk to her today. About this incredible story about the grandson of Warren G. Harding. He wants to dig up the body of President Harding here, why? And hear his reasoning behind it? It's kind of a head scratcher. But it's going to be a fascinating conversation with C C coming up here in about 10 minutes or so, if you haven't signed up for our weekly Jeannie newsletter, yet it is free. We want you to get there through our website. Extreme jeans dot com or on our Facebook page. And of course, you get a block for me each week, couple of links to past and present shows and links to stories. You'll find pretty fascinating as a genealogist right now out to stowed in Massachusetts, David Alan Lambert, standing by the chief geologist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society and American ancestors dot org's How are you, David? I'm doing fine. Just sitting here watching the leaves fall from my trees. I guess. Summer's officially over in New England. Yeah, that would sound it. But that's the most beautiful time of year. It is until you have to rake all listeners wanna leave from New England itself. Envelope to the station, right? Yeah. Tell you what, Dave. I mean, growing up in New England myself. I think I've mentally blocked that part of my childhood out because I do remember jumping in piles of leaves, but I have No recollection of creating those piles of leaves. So I kn I know where you're coming from. Okay? We've got a lot to talk about here. Some great stuff coming out. Library of Congress. Yeah. 1.56 million historic newspaper photos. Now you Khun search with their newspaper navigator at the Library of Congress website. You could put on any topic you can put in names, too, And it's bringing up some amazing stuff. You got an interesting civil war Connection story with a photograph? Yeah, it was a photograph of a civil war vet in 1920 with his young wife and his brand new baby, And he was like 80 years old. Well, you'll be able to find this link on extreme jeans dot com. Definitely check it out. You might find your relatives and their baby well, we have to go across the world and go to the next database of interests. And thanks to Our good friend Melanie McComb, who works with me at any. It's Jessie Davis from Cory you stories this week. This one is a Russian state Public historical library offering free genealogy. Darkness. Yes, free. This is from a block called Lost Russian family dot wordpress dot com. The Post is from September 20th and it goes down. He gives you all the hyperlink sins, even a video on how to actually use the website. This is amazing, because I mean, I think of the early days of doing research the idea that you could find anything about families in Russia. In the old Soviet Union. Impossible. This is an amazing thing for people of Russian extraction. It truly is. Well, you probably heard of the USS Constitution. That's the oldest commission ship in the United States Navy and had a lot of active fighting on war beaching 12 when it attacked Jerry Air. Well, now there's a database with over 1000 individuals that you Khun search. This is on USS Constitution. Museum dot org's Last crew you could put in a family name. If you're doing a one name study, Or maybe you have the ancestry was in the Navy early on, And this goes through all of the crew, Not just the ones from the war of 18 12. I wouldn't that be fun, Tio, go through and find people with family names and then research their ancestry and see how you might be related to some of those crewmen. That's true, and you may have information that may help them. You may even have a photograph from some of these people or no one. They died. So check it out. And maybe you could give them information from your own archives. Wouldn't that be fun? It really would be going around the globe one more time. We're going to stop in Australia now and is a great website called Places of Pride. Got a W m dot gov dot eh? You places pride. Is now marking and photographing every war memorial in Australia. Thousands of these and you can see a map zoom right in. So if you have an ancestor or a relative that lived anywhere near a particular town in Austria, you Khun search on that place And it's great this as a crowd sourcing application. So if you have Australian route because I know we have listeners in Australia, check out places of pride. The Australian government. I love that. I think this is great. And you know what you're talking about here. David is several different databases that air emerging right now that we haven't seen before. Maybe this is the silver lining in the pandemic right now, As people turn their efforts to things they can do online. This is great. When I was first at home because of the pandemic, I created 1100 named database for American ancestors on all the Native American families from an 18 61 Senate report, and it's great for genealogists and just get married. Get nothing else better to do. Let's write a database. I think a lot of people are doing that. We're certainly seeing a huge uptick in people getting involved in family history. During this downtime, especially overto ancestry think they said they had a 45% increase in engagement on the website. So that's pretty exciting news. And you know what better way to keep busy during this period until we get this mess resolved by the way the other day, my wife found something interesting and heirloom in our closet that we didn't know that we had. Oh, I hope it wasn't a relative. No, it was not. It was actually my mother's jewelry box, which I have little occasion to go through. But my wife found a couple of square shaped cuff links in there. On one side. It was a watch that doesn't work anymore might have to get that fixed. And then on the other side, it was engraved with thanks. Jay G. And my wife immediately recognized that This was a gift to my father from Jackie Gleason because they worked together on the Gleason show back in the early fifties. Great stuff. That's excellent. Well, and you know, one of the things that tell people if you get something, something you could always ask us anything. But if you need to reach me, I worked at the New England Historic Geological Side 175 years old, and if you're not a member or haven't heard about it Goto American ancestors down or give you what you like. With our billion searchable records. You can use a coupon code Extreme and save $20. Alright, David, Thanks so much, And we will talk to you for ask us anything coming up here at the back end of the show.

David Alan Lambert Australia Warren G. Harding United States Navy New England Library of Congress New England Historic Geologica ABC Jackie Gleason Siri Fisher Facebook New England Historic Genealogi Massachusetts Soviet Union Russia Jessie Davis Melanie McComb
"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:06 min | 5 months ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"It's your chance to ask questions, and then we'll see what we can come up with. And David Alan Lambert is back. The chief geologist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society in American ancestors dot or GE. And David Aaron writes from Lake Minnetonka in Minnesota. And says guys, I'm new genealogy and I live in a house that was built in 18 75. Is there some way for me to learn about who lived here and the history of the home? David, you've done stuff like this. Oh, yeah. I mean, I live in the house was built in the 18 nineties and I wanted to know was final balls in the backyard. I wanted to know who put that trash there. Not that I wanted to give him grief. I wanted to know who they were. I started basically by looking at the family deed because told me who we purchased it from. And then I went to the registry of deeds as I would advise our listener too. And then backwards, trace your own property. So you have on your deed. I will say this is the same property has conveyed to the grand Tour the person that you bought it from. On a date, maybe a volume page. So just look up that deed and continually go back and back. The one thing you have to be a little concerned about is that the property itself. Is going to be dated, but it may just say buildings on probably see me not planned exactly the year your houses built or confirm it. At least now There's other things. You can do It me there's obviously with genealogy. You now get some of these names from the deeds, the nationalistic kids so that the census records right goto local historical societies and see if they have old photographs of the neighborhood or even the house, especially since it's an older house. You might want to research the local vital records find where the people who lived in your house. Maybe there's a nearby cemetery and they're buried there. Or who knows even you buried in your backyard. One thought to David and I've done this before with great success, and that is go to a newspaper digitized newspaper site and just put in the address and the town and see what stories come up about things that happened at that address. That's true, and just keep in mind that he ever Number of crew may have guns. So all of a sudden if it doesn't make sense, just see with the local historical society or maybe the town assessor's office if they ever remember the street. But I would say that there would be really easy to take this project on involved. The whole family increase the genealogy of your home said Now what did you find out about your house? Dave? I mean, it's pretty old. It's like you say, your family hasn't owned it the entire time, have they No, In fact, on the record of the town that says My house was built in 1917. Truth of it was built in 18 97. I've even found newspaper articles like you're saying that talk about the house being built. They talked about who built it, and where they came from, I know was built by to Nova Scotia carpenters up with the Newton, Massachusetts named Robertson and Simpson. I know that in 1930 for the property was then on for 25 years by a Dr Charles Henry Grey. He was a doctor in Cambridge and went to Harvard University on the first car in the city of Cambridge. And about here during the influenza epidemic and live in my house and then eventually bought it. And when did your family get it? 1965 1965. So you're now that he's been in there 55 years. Wow. Yet for generations have lived here for my Children's great grandparent's right down to my kids. That's a great history and you've been able to find all that and put all that together. And what about the stuff you found in the backyard? What was back there? It was a medical doctor. Probably a lot more medical elation you probably here to think of from the 19 twenties medicine bottles probably afoot. Pick some of them broken, but some of them quite hole in some of them still with courts in them with the medicine in them, so A nearby stream is probably not the safest thing in the world, but I'm sure it's not a mass cleanup side, either. Oh, boy, All right, thanks so much here and for the question..

David David Aaron David Alan Lambert Dr Charles Henry Grey Lake Minnetonka chief geologist New England Historic Genealogi Minnesota GE influenza grand Tour Dave Cambridge Newton Harvard University Nova Scotia Massachusetts Robertson Simpson
"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:56 min | 5 months ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"And the home of David Alan Lambert, the chief geologist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society in American ancestors dot org's David, How the heck are you? I'm doing good. I'm actually doing something kind of fun feeling up to New Hampshire with my family, my daughter, my youngest daughter's turning 17, which makes me feel really old and I'm going to re create some photos that were taken when we went to story land in Glen, New Hampshire. In the early 19 seventies, when I was wearing suede fringe, green and brown jacket. I don't know why my mother put on. I want to see those pictures. David, I want to see them and you've got some other news happening right in your neighborhood. Right now. We do Last week they flower to return to Plymouth Harbour and the Mayflower or two is a 64 year old recreation of the original may flowers to the best of their knowledge of what it would look like. It has been in Mystic, Connecticut, undergoing a multi million dollar restoration over the past three years. So she's safely home implement. That's great. I saw it in 2008. I was out there is the only time I've ever visited Plymouth. And at that time I did not know I was a Mayflower descendant, but I was admiring this ship. It's a fabulous thing, and a lot of people could go on, tour it and get a feel for what it had to be like to be below deck on the Mayflower. Not pretty. Well, I'll tell you, Sometimes you find things below decks. In this case, it's below floorboards. Our next story from extreme jeans Dark Tom, There is a manner out in Oxford Hall in Norfolk, England, and under the boards of the floors of this Tudor house and then the attic. They found pieces of paper dating back to the 15th century in a rat's nest. Wow. Yeah, and there was like a Bible and a box of chocolates. I mean it. It's full wrapping from like World War two something I'd be Terry's gold Leave chocolate assortment. Hopefully, there's none in there that the rats didn't take away well, and you know they were shut down because of co vids. So they had this time and they started going through the rafters in all these different places and found this incredible stuff. Wouldn't you know that it would be the mice that were the great preservationists for this stuff? A Norfolk all digging deeper and going a little further north. Some older artifacts been found. There's a lot of metal detectors in Europe, looking for Roman angle sacks and treasure that may be buried under the old ploughed fields of England. Well in Scotland, A metal detectors found this horde. Of bronze age buckles and horse harnesses, and it's amazing what he had located and now it's an archaeological dig. That's taking days not just digging in the ground pulling up a coin. Wow. And this goes back. What to like, 1000 BC or something like that? Oh, yeah, Bronze Age definitely is dating that far back. But this 1000 bc the 900 BC and it's It's amazing. And this is the most complete horse harness they've ever found, and it's preserved by the soil. And they also on a sword. Can you imagine going of the metal detector and finding a sword as I found pull tabs. And additionally like pens. That's about it. Yeah, I think the metal detecting thing you'd have to have a certain amount of patients for that. You know, there's an interesting story that isn't thousands of years old or 400 years old before its 100. In 16 years old. Well, maybe 115 years old, the oldest American Hester Ford, who was born in Lancaster, South Carolina, when Teddy Roosevelt was a president and picture you're going to love this family dimension ready for the amount of DNA matches she could have. She has 12 Children. 48 grandchildren, 108 great grandchildren and about 120 great great grandchildren and she's still with us. This is the thing and they're not really sure whether she's 116 or 115. Why me? I guess it could be like Satchel Paige go ate the birth record. And guess what? It should be about his oldest Satchel Paige, yet that's that's true. I think he was born in 1907 or something like that. So and so happy birthday, whatever year he wanted to be unhappy. Birthday yesterday. That's incredible. And to the family. I mean, what a great celebration that's got to be. It's got to be tough to be stuck with the whole Covad thing going on. But nonetheless what an accomplishment and how many people get to see that many descendants? How many does she have now? Total. It's going to be over 260. Of one person. She started having kids when she was a teenager. This year, there's probably more being born with 108 great Suren Children in 48 grandchildren. I think she's sadly outlived your own kids. Yeah, I would think that would be very difficult for her to keep up the birthday card list, you know?.

Satchel Paige David Alan Lambert Hester Ford New Hampshire Norfolk England Terry New England Historic Genealogi Plymouth Harbour Plymouth chief geologist Covad Europe Scotland Connecticut Mystic Oxford Hall Teddy Roosevelt
"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:00 min | 5 months ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Is back the chief geologist of the New England Historic Genealogical, citing American ancestors dot org's and David, We have an email here from Margot Jansen from Albuquerque, New Mexico, and she says, Guys, I've run into books about cattle marks in family history libraries, and I'm wondering What gives? How can they help me? Well, you don't have to travel too far afield to figure gentlemen, here in New England or anywhere Colonial America because they're everywhere. Generally speaking, if you find town records, they're going to find this sort of inventory. If you will. I mean, let's think about this in the modern sense. You have a dog? Yeah. License, Right, right. Gotta level the number on the license. Well, we're not out there cropping the Doge's years if you will, but your cattle if you went out to the local common like Boston common or a central part of the town, they would have common where your animals were Greys. Well, Bessie was out there in the field and got away and into the woods. She's a nice fat cow farmer Brown on my thing. That's mine. You could say no, that's mine. How would you tell the cattle mark you have registered with the town? It could be a slip a crop circle, Half moon diamond cut into one of the ears or both ears of the animal so essentially This is what we would learn to develop in Southwest later brand so owed Albuquerque. I'm sure there were ranchers. It's still tattoo or brand their animals. This is exactly what the history of cattle marks. These were even found in Atlanta candidate for instance, Nova Scotia was settled by New Englanders Township books up in Nova Scotia, which, like town records, I find my wife's ancestor, Patrick Nowlin, arriving first in 17 92 on the scene in the town records. How Is cattle mark. I also find in 18 29 Patrick now on junior getting the transfer of that cattle. Mark. Why is it the transfer has no death record for his father. No probate, But there is a mention of the sun getting this cattle mark transferred because the father had died. So you could find when somebody comes into town could be their arrival in the community have to mark their cattle. And when somebody died, or perhaps even moved, you might find it. So it's transferred to somebody else. They're really geologically important. Sometimes they're drawn out. Sometimes they're just described geometrically what they look like. So could they actually sell? A cattle mark to somebody else. If they were leaving the area well, they would sell the cattle that had marked and then transferred in. So that's why all the records and I seen ah lot of books of that myself and always wondered, boy. What could I do with that? I've often seen also newspaper ads where people found a cow somewhere or something, and they said it has the mark. And then they described the mark trying to get it back to the proper owner. Have you seen those? I have. That is where you kind of have strays that are mentioned in the newspapers, and that would decide like a red half for with the smart and that's how they did it. Sometimes people have gone to the point of trying to draw them. They're pretty common description, so square slit by half moon or circle. You confined cattle marks is late as the early 20th century being recorded in town records, especially in rural areas were farming is more prevalent later on, you'll see that certain animals will have tattoos in their ear versus something is hard to believe that they would be cutting their animals. Here were a pair of shears, but that's what they did, because That's how it was done in the old days. Well, that's a great question. Thank you so much for it, Margo and coming up here in just a little bit. We will be back with yet Another question.

Mark Bessie Albuquerque Margot Jansen New England Historic Genealogi New Mexico chief geologist Patrick Nowlin New England Nova Scotia Boston America New Englanders Township David Southwest Margo Atlanta
"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

01:57 min | 5 months ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Com. Dr. Bessinger has a lot to say about that. Hey, if you haven't signed up for our weekly Jeannie newsletter yet, you know you got to do it. Just get on our website extreme jeans dot com or on our Facebook page and get signed up for free. You can check out my block each week, along with a couple of podcast, current and past and stories that you'll enjoy as a genealogist. Right now it's time to check in with David Alan Lambert, the chief geologist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, and American ancestors dot or how are things in Stoat in Massachusetts? Mr Lambert? McGee? Yes, By the way, you know, we were just talking about this DNA thing and everything going on with keepsake DNA, David, I've got my half second cousin that I tracked down 14 years ago. And he's been sharing stuff with me that could be of mutual interest to us both and trying to see how this lab might work. And he texted me the other day and said, Hey, how would you like your half Great aunt's teeth? He found a bridge with two teeth on it that were in her mouth while she was on her deathbed. And apparently, he never was able to throw it out and never knew what he could do with it. And now we're going to run it through keepsake and see if we can get her DNA off of that. He sent me a picture and they're not pretty. Let me tell you witness well. You just never know what people are going to find exactly. Well, it's 20 with relatives I ever talked to AA group in Denver two weeks ago, and I talked about finding your Family that your ancestors left behind. In this case, it was England four days to the day I gave that lecture. I get a DNA match 18. Santa Morgan's and ancestry rating to me says I remembered a story. My grandmother told me about her brother named Wallace and I searched and I found your tree. This is so important to put trees beyond your own ancestors online..

"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

02:30 min | 6 months ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"My report arrived on time. The story of my family with supporting documents was very fulfilling. Tom G. Google REVIEW Don't wait any longer. Request your free quote today at legacy tree dot com Legacy Tree genealogists, We do the research. You enjoy the discoveries. Jeannie's it is Fisher and everyone loves stories from tales of daring Do xda Family legends about great aunty Gemma's secret recipe for scones? Stories connect us to our past makes sense of the present. And create the future this year. Roots tech, the world's largest genealogy conference celebrated the story of you. The event kicked off by celebrating 10 years of roots Tech with a look back at the stories the genealogy community has created together over the years. Attendees enrich their stories with classes about DNA and records and new technology. Keynotes this year included the inspiration behind the film, the blindside Leanne TUI, Pulitzer Prize winning photographer David Kennerly and the NFL's all time Being Russia, Emmitt Smith. If you missed any part of these stories, you can purchase a virtual pass to gain access to 29 additional classes. The full virtual passes available for only $129. You can watch the free session and purchase a virtual passed right now at roots tech dot org's well Jeannie's What a time We're all going through right now. And with all this time on our hands, you probably agree. The best lemonade we can make out of this is to sharpen our genie axes and learn how to extend our family trees, Gather more photos and documents and discover those remarkable family stories are descendants Khun Benefit from for generations. Well, I have more time now, too, And I want to help you learn what you need to know. That's why I've created a new Facebook group Genealogy and family history Breakthrough strategies. I'm so pleased that so many of you have already signed up and helping us to create a supportive community of family history. Researchers on this page weakened, brainstorm and share ideas on how to tear down those brick walls that we all have. So feel free to join us. The Facebook page again is genealogy and family history. Breakthrough strategies feel at home with others who live in our genie world and want to make the most of this unique time. Genealogy and family history. Breakthrough strategies join us. All right. We're back with David Alan Lambert, the chief geologist of the New England Historic.

"chief geologist" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

03:23 min | 6 months ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on Business Wars

"Not Listeners, this episode contains disturbing descriptions of violence. Please take care while listening. It's nineteen sixty six and in De Beers Art Deco headquarters in Johannesburg Gavin Lamont stocks down the corridor, wearing shorts. Lamont is a geologist with greying hair and Pale blue eyes, his head and neck, or sunburnt, and his tanned legs are as thin as match dicks. For years, he's hunted diamonds in Botswana, but now. The AX is about to fall. He knocks on the door of his boss's office. Come in. Inside Lamont Seized Beers chief geologist Justin Murray at his desk. Murray's wearing a pinstripe suit and looking over a map of Botswana. Gavin, please sit. I'm afraid it's bad news Harry Oppenheimer's very pessimistic about the chances of finding Botswanan diamonds. And I agree. I just need more time. Gavin. It's been eleven years at diamonds. There I know it. Think of what finding them would mean promotes WANNA. About Swan as the latest African nation to shake off European rule. But. This landlocked nation faces brutal. Challenges is the size of Texas, but has just twelve miles of paved roads. The average wage is eighty dollars a year. Many of its half a million people are close to starvation. Diamonds could change everything. Murray sits back in his chair. Gavin. We're not a charity. You found nothing not even Garnett indicating the presence of a pipe of Kimberlite, or let alone a kimberlite pipe that contains diamonds and is economically viable, but that's because we're looking in the wrong place. What do you mean there's this new theory called warping? It suggests the earth constantly moves because of tectonic shifts millions of years before a give me the map. Murray spreads aftermath of Botswana. The, country looks as if it's being gripped in claw, formed by the neighbouring white supremacist nations of South Africa Namibia and Rhodesia. Lamont points at a location near the Rhodesian border. We focused our search on the river here, but what if a war in the earth's crust cut the river in half millions of years ago? Now. If that happened, we should actually be looking here. Lamont points to an area two hundred miles west of the river. Murray Lamont with pity. I think you spent too long in the Desert Gavin. But Against my better judgment. You've got three months. Lamont smiles, but he knows it's only a brief stay of execution. Because even if he is right the proof. Is Hidden in eighteen hundred square miles of remote desert. Time is against him. And Botswana. Agian is the payments platform bill to help your business grow with you and you can accept payments in-app online in store, touch free, and.

Gavin Lamont Murray Lamont Botswana Justin Murray Lamont Desert Gavin De Beers Art Deco geologist Harry Oppenheimer Johannesburg chief geologist Kimberlite Garnett Texas Swan South Africa Namibia Rhodesia
"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:17 min | 7 months ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Your family tree and watch the nuts fall out. And we have a real Navy mariner kind of base show going on today, a lot of interesting stuff happening. We're going to be talking to Daphne Palmer Jean Accomplice. She's written a book about pirates and their families and their wives have what their lives were like. In fact, you're going to find that pirates weren't quite the stereotype that you knew them as well. Be talking to her in a little more than 10 minutes And then later in the show, we're going to talk to a guy named Ray Weiss. And Ray has been researching his Mariner ancestors for decades and then traveling to the places that they sailed to, and in fact, he's getting ready to go see three more of them in the coming weeks. We're going to talk to Ray about how this all got going where he's been what the experience has been like It's going to be pretty fun. Plus at the back end of the show. We're going to talk to our friend Melanie McComb from any H GS. And coming up later on in the show. See Seymour from the ABC, Siri's the Genetic detective talking about her upcoming episode, the final episode for this season. Hey, just a reminder. If you haven't signed up for our weekly Jeannie newsletter, yet you've got to do it. It's absolutely free. Make sure you get all the stories that you'll need is a genealogist to stay caught up on what's going on, catch my block and of course, links to past and present podcasts. Right now. It's off to Boston to talk to David Alan Lambert, the chief geologist for the New England Historic Genealogical Society in American ancestors dot org's David. How you Doing? I'm doing great into its your dental of its born in Amsterdam, New York on December 9th, 1916 Happy 103rd. Might not mean anything to you. But if I told you Spartacus and issue Israel stage name is Kirk Douglas Kirk Douglas 103 this week. That's unbelievable. It really is. All right, Let's get going with our family. He's to our news. Where do you want to start now? The big story right now is, of course, the acquisition of Jed Match which has been in the news and many of you, of course, have a jet match account and have uploaded your data. It has now been acquired by Vero Jenna company out in California. And right now that doesn't look like there's going to be any change to what it is. It looks like it's still going to be free. Or just watching over the next few months as things transpire. Yeah, see how things evolve. We know one thing that's evolved really well. Is this work that has been done in Ireland to sort of reclaimed the archive back in 1920 to the four courts burned and you saw the movie Michael Collins with Liam Neeson years ago, you might have seen the bombing. 1st 4 courts had the archives senses the church records a pro Bates for Ireland, most of them went up in flames. Now they're looking to reclaim them by looking at research people did before 1922 or transcribed or maybe a duplicate copy of something that was in another place in Ireland or in England, or somewhere else this that amazing and they say that they have found farm or information that was lost in that by doing this technique than they ever imagined possible, and it's all going to come out in 2022. On the 1/100 anniversary of the bombing. Well, I'll tell you, my Lamberts are going to be searched high and low on that one, because that's my biggest problem is that there's not a lot of early Irish records and we came over in 17 92 well before the famine and all this, by the way, it's going to be indexed is well, so you're going to be able to research this in a way that nobody has ever been able to do it before. Well, I'll tell you the next story. We have to dig a little deeper to find that many of you may have photographs of your ancestors in the Civil War in in Camp Nelson, Kentucky. They've done some archaeology and they've found a lot of Hair dye bottles where our ancestors may know. It could be that their hair color was so light it would have looked washed out in a photograph. So that looks like before you had your picture done. He did your hair. Yeah. This was an amazing story. I had no idea that if you had light hair during the Civil War era, the picture would come out like really, really white, so they would die their hair And this was all from this camp extraction. They were doing all kinds of digs at this camp Nelson. They also found, for instance, the name The photographer carved out on a piece of metal that they found in this camp. Isn't that incredible? Yeah, a stencil or something that we would have used its a great calling card. They've also found who the photographer was, is an image of him in the article, which you confined on extreme jeans dot com. I tip my hat to Dickie's mom who always have some great ideas for our family History news..

Ray Weiss Kirk Douglas Kirk Douglas Jean Accomplice Camp Nelson Ireland Bates New England Historic Genealogi Daphne Palmer David Alan Lambert Melanie McComb Jed Match Jeannie ABC Vero Jenna Boston Dickie Seymour chief geologist
"chief geologist" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

04:34 min | 11 months ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Radio and Wet Stone magazine comes point of origin. Podcast dedicated to exploring back connection. We traveled the globe to connect with immersed in different food ways from Korea to Norway from Nigeria to Appalachian Mountains and beyond buying point of origin. Season two on the iheartradio APP. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. This Day in history class is a production of iheartradio. Welcome back everyone. I'm eaves and you're listening to this day in history class a show where we pill back. A new layer of history every day today is March. Third Twenty twenty. The Day was March third. Nineteen thirty eight. A group of oil prospectors working for an American company discovered a commercially viable source of Petroleum Mayor Demaim in Saudi Arabia since then Saudi Arabia has consistently been one of the world's top oil producers. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was established in one thousand nine hundred eighty two when even so combined four regions into one st through conquest even so called for searches for oil a resource that had demand and would be big source of income for a country that needed a boost in its economy in nineteen thirty three. Saudi Arabia signed a contract with the Standard Oil Company of California. Also known as so cow. So cal was granted the right to prospect for oil in Saudi Arabia's eastern provinces side note. So cal is now. Chevron in September of that year American geologist arrived in Saudi Arabia to begin surveys of the land by car airplane. A couple of months later the California Arabian Standard. Oil Company was formed. Cassocks name was later changed to Arabian American Oil Company or Aramco. Geologists began surveying an area around ideological formation near the city of Demaim on the east coast of the country drilling. The first began in April of nineteen thirty. Five in terms of the second whale started in February of Nineteen thirty six soon. More wells were authorized in the area. Those wells did produce some oil but most of them eventually produced more water than oil. Demaim Oilwell number seven at first seemed like it would also be fruitless. The well reached more than three thousand feet beneath the earth. And no water or oil had been found but chief geologist Max. Steiner key thought that they would find oil in the will and he told the company to keep drilling they did and on March third nineteen thirty eight. They struck a significant amount of oil within three weeks. The well had produced over one hundred thousand barrels of oil. In the beginning the oil was sent to. Bahrain barred for export but in nineteen thirty nine. The first tanker load of oil was shipped overseas now. That castle had found oil. It continued mapping and exploring Saudi Arabia looking for more by nineteen forty nine Kazakh. Now Aramco had reached a production of five hundred thousand barrels per day by nineteen fifty. The Trans Arabian pipeline. Had Begun Operations Aramco already paid Saudi Arabia a fee and other benefits but that year. Aramco began to split its profits but the Saudi government nineteen seventy-three the Saudi government purchased twenty five percent of Aramco by the next year it increased. Its stake to sixty percent and in one thousand nine hundred eighty all of course oil rights production apparatus and facilities came under government control by this time demaim oilwell number seven alone have produced more than twenty seven million barrels. Eight years later the company became Saudi Aramco over the next few decades. The company continued to expand its operations and production fuelling Saudi Arabia's economy of course oil production in Saudi Arabia has been an issue closely tied to economics politics and the environment today. Saudi Arabia is the world's second largest crude oil producer. I'm East Jeffco. And hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. Feel free to share your thoughts or your innermost feelings with us and with other listeners. On social media at t the eight th podcast.

Saudi Arabia Arabian American Oil Company Standard Oil Company Saudi government Aramco Begun Operations Aramco Demaim Twenty twenty Demaim Oilwell Wet Stone magazine Appalachian Mountains California Arabian Standard cal Chevron chief geologist California Bahrain
Americans find oil in Saudi Arabia - Mar. 3, 1938

This Day in History Class

03:44 min | 11 months ago

Americans find oil in Saudi Arabia - Mar. 3, 1938

"Today is March. Third Twenty twenty. The Day was March third. Nineteen thirty eight. A group of oil prospectors working for an American company discovered a commercially viable source of Petroleum Mayor Demaim in Saudi Arabia since then Saudi Arabia has consistently been one of the world's top oil producers. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was established in one thousand nine hundred eighty two when even so combined four regions into one st through conquest even so called for searches for oil a resource that had demand and would be big source of income for a country that needed a boost in its economy in nineteen thirty three. Saudi Arabia signed a contract with the Standard Oil Company of California. Also known as so cow. So cal was granted the right to prospect for oil in Saudi Arabia's eastern provinces side note. So cal is now. Chevron in September of that year American geologist arrived in Saudi Arabia to begin surveys of the land by car airplane. A couple of months later the California Arabian Standard. Oil Company was formed. Cassocks name was later changed to Arabian American Oil Company or Aramco. Geologists began surveying an area around ideological formation near the city of Demaim on the east coast of the country drilling. The first began in April of nineteen thirty. Five in terms of the second whale started in February of Nineteen thirty six soon. More wells were authorized in the area. Those wells did produce some oil but most of them eventually produced more water than oil. Demaim Oilwell number seven at first seemed like it would also be fruitless. The well reached more than three thousand feet beneath the earth. And no water or oil had been found but chief geologist Max. Steiner key thought that they would find oil in the will and he told the company to keep drilling they did and on March third nineteen thirty eight. They struck a significant amount of oil within three weeks. The well had produced over one hundred thousand barrels of oil. In the beginning the oil was sent to. Bahrain barred for export but in nineteen thirty nine. The first tanker load of oil was shipped overseas now. That castle had found oil. It continued mapping and exploring Saudi Arabia looking for more by nineteen forty nine Kazakh. Now Aramco had reached a production of five hundred thousand barrels per day by nineteen fifty. The Trans Arabian pipeline. Had Begun Operations Aramco already paid Saudi Arabia a fee and other benefits but that year. Aramco began to split its profits but the Saudi government nineteen seventy-three the Saudi government purchased twenty five percent of Aramco by the next year it increased. Its stake to sixty percent and in one thousand nine hundred eighty all of course oil rights production apparatus and facilities came under government control by this time demaim oilwell number seven alone have produced more than twenty seven million barrels. Eight years later the company became Saudi Aramco over the next few decades. The company continued to expand its operations and production fuelling Saudi Arabia's economy of course oil production in Saudi Arabia has been an issue closely tied to economics politics and the environment today. Saudi Arabia is the world's second largest crude oil

Saudi Arabia Arabian American Oil Company Standard Oil Company Saudi Government Aramco Begun Operations Aramco Twenty Twenty Demaim CAL Demaim Oilwell California Arabian Standard Chevron Chief Geologist California Bahrain Geologist Cassocks Steiner
"chief geologist" Discussed on The Great Fail

The Great Fail

06:59 min | 11 months ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on The Great Fail

"Guy People looking for over the back. Welcome to episode three of the Great. Fail A podcast that examines the greatest success? Stories and they're spectacular fails would lead to the demise of the most prolific people brands and companies. I am your host Deborah Chen and this week. We'll be looking at bree. Exploit in March of Nineteen ninety-seven body was found in the jungles of Borneo Indonesia through the heat and decomposition covered in Leeches and maggots the human remains were so indistinguishable that the only thing that could be used to identify. The person was a molar and part of a shoulder among the broken bones. Its internal organs heart and liver or gone. Possibly due to animal carnage after laying the swap for five days. The police ruled the staff as a suicide incited. The man's identity as forty one year old Michael de Guzman a chief geologist of brex minerals. Who had been on his way to meet with executives from a partner company Freeport McMoran Copper and Gold de Guzman had boarded a chopper five days earlier bound for boo saying in minutes into the ride. Witnesses heard a loud thump and saw that the door had opened to Guzman had disappeared. Never to return again. What led an executive of a six billion dollar gold? Mine the Biggest Goldmine of the twentieth century to leap to his death. Well that was just the beginning of this extremely bizarre high profile story. Welcome to the story of BREX minerals discovered in nineteen ninety-three plunge to its death in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven. This case study was one of my personal favorites because it represented corporate failure on such a catastrophic scale it was a tale that involved three key figures the founder of bricks and two of its chief geologist and then some of the world's most sophisticated and intelligent bankers analysts and investors through the twists and turns. You'll come to see that. Nothing is quite as it seems and what happens in the end will leave you completely speechless. What's so upsetting and bewildering at the same? Time is that this is a case where a company actually turned the term fool's gold into a sad reality for about forty thousand investors all over the world. Now let's dig in one thousand nine hundred ninety. Three President Bill Clinton was inaugurated January a month later. The World Trade Center bombing happened in New York City on the business front IBM announced almost five billion dollar loss the largest single year corporate loss for US company during that time the cowboys won the Super Bowl and the conic actor River Phoenix died from a drug induced overdose in a Hollywood club and the premier forum for facilitating economic growth in investments into Asia. Apec held its first meeting in Seattle. Meanwhile in Calgary Canada David Walsh was sitting on a thirty cent. Stock Call Breaks Minerals originally founded in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine with no real assets. He was running out of cash and places to get it. Walsh was born in Montreal. In nineteen forty five and as the son of a stockbroker he needed to prove to the world that he too had the tenacity and business acumen to prosper in the financial world and he did with the same steadfast ambition as his father he might have even trumped his predecessor because by twenty nine he was named the youngest person in the firm's history to become vice president of brokerage firm. Midland. Dorothy but a year later funny enough. He got entangled in a bad situation where he arranged to help. A friend sell stolen stock shares to make some extra cash on the side after getting caught. He was forced to leave the firm and the position that he had worked so hard at. Call it winning the stock market or playing with fire. Walls tried to put the disgraceful ending behind him as he pursued a few other jobs. Here and there. Nothing really noteworthy until he moved to Calgary in nineteen eighty two. This is where he first got involved with mining by then him and his wife. Jeanette had been struggling financially for several years. They were heavily in debt and forced to declare personal bankruptcy despondent yet. Still Determined Walsh turned to his acquaintance. Canadian geologist John Felderhof Felderhof was born in Holland. Grew up Nova Scotia in had already made a name for himself when he was credited for discovering a massive golden copper mine in Papua New Guinea. You can say that. Felderhof was the mastermind and bringing together this unholy trinity when he introduced Walsh to his good friend. Filipino mining prospector. Michael de Guzman. Many would say that the Guzman was the most interesting character of them all. I took an excerpt from an article written about him in the Canadian encyclopedia. Shoghi Little Michael. Guzman was quite the womanizing polygamist. Who loved the spotlight? Associates described him as a gregarious companion. Who Liked to party hard and Sing Karaoke? He had a wife and six children in the Philippines but his career demanded constant travel. Two distinct mining outposts giving him plenty of opportunity to indulge in his affection for the opposite sex over the years he married three other women around Asia and somehow managed to keep them a secret from each other. Oh he was definitely a character and so the story begins with these three. The businessman Walsh his sidekick Felderhof and chief geologist deguzman as they began scouting for their Gold Mine and within months. They found a lead. Felderhof came back and convince Walsh to purchase an eighty thousand dollars. Plot of land by the BOO Sang River in Indonesia when he had found extremely compelling evidence that it was sitting on a large gold mine this was based on core samples that were discovered by Deguzman who was becoming more and more optimistic about striking gold. Walsh went to discuss this with his wife. Janette who had been struggling to live below the poverty line if they can just rangel enough to take one final risk they might be able to change their fate. She thought and so she agreed and together they went back to give. Felderhof the thumbs up Walsh instructed.

David Walsh Michael de Guzman John Felderhof Felderhof chief geologist Gold de Guzman Calgary Asia Borneo Indonesia Deborah Chen Call Breaks Minerals BOO Sang River Apec geologist Freeport McMoran Copper Bill Clinton executive vice president Indonesia Little Michael President
"chief geologist" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

"Family tree and watch them that's fallout it is so nice to have you along genies it is our first show of the new year of the new decade so much to talk about and what a great first show of the decade we've got actually we're gonna be talking to Gina Philibert Ortega coming up here in that just a little bit you know it's one hundred years since the first election that women voted in the nineteen twenty election and that she's going to talk about how you can actually find some records of your female ancestors voting some that actually predate nineteen twenty and she'll talk about some of the things that finally led up to the nineteenth amendment that brought women to voting and that it's going to be a fascinating conversation in about ten minutes or so and then later in the show doctor Henry Louis gates because it's a brand new season on PBS for finding your roots and doctor gates is going to talk about all the guests coming on this year he's going to give us a little preview of some of the things that they discovered the in the process of working with some of the celebrities so that's going to be a great for show the new year and I'm very excited about it right now let's head out to Boston and talk to David Alan Lambert he is the chief geologist of the New England historic genealogical society and American ancestors dot org happy new year David great to have you back happy new year to you now that we're in a new decade away are we would all come on now you see all the bands are on the internet about people saying that with the new decade doesn't start to twenty twenty one I'm in the camp that I don't care it's still the twenties to me well I take it that's an interesting argument when we got to the year two thousand right I mean I remember that because the fact that the first year isn't zero the first year is one and it goes one three zero right one two three five six seven eight nine ten that's that's fine the end of the decade would be that but you can't say that twenty twenty is in the teens you can't say that twenty ten is in the always you can't say twenty thirty is in the twenties so I just completely reject the idea this is the beginning of the twenties but the century didn't begin until two thousand one remember kids you heard it here first that's your I'm saying the way it is well what would be the warring twenty is you know obviously we had big things like the nineteenth amendment and women's right to vote as Gina will be talking about with you later and we have of course prohibition which will help my grandfather was highly connected with that yes that's right he was a bootlegger wasn't he was in fact apps even for the Kennedy family as rumor has it wow no documents to prove this right well the good news is to with the beginning of the new year we have all the stuff from nineteen twenty four kicked into public domain so we're talking about all the creative works this means the audio published music books and photographs in if you're writing family histories for instance in your looking for public domain photographs to illustrate the era you can now go up as recently as nineteen twenty four without worrying about copyright issues well you know okay it gets confusing with genealogy when you have part of the symbols of one of the nineteenth century some of the twentieth century how about twins are born in different decades yeah this is this is in Indiana I love it yeah a little jobs one came in at eleven thirty seven PM on December thirty first making her the last baby born in the hospital in that decade that her brother Jackson was born twelve AU seven AM yeah on January first twenty twenty so they're born in different months different years and different decades but thirty minutes apart well congratulations to two little babies will have something to talk about for the rest of their life is we you know we give you a heads up on a story that's been kind of going around with genealogist this is a headless body that was found in the key of of a suspected axe murderer this is a bootlegger outside a home and they found his torso and they've now through DNA but able to discover who those changes yeah this is a guy was actually found in nineteen seventy nine and was so well preserved it was thought he'd probably been killed within the previous five years and now because of the DNA dope project we have a different result nineteen sixty yeah that's what they figured out through DNA and in fact we're going to talk to one of the guys involved in the project the DNA double project one of the team leaders about this whole situation how they figured it out so we're gonna get that full story next week on extreme Genesys staked out already that well live in peace in the story together for walks a from part of in nineteen seventy nine isin a Levin your old girl in nineteen ninety one found his mummified hand so yeah I hopefully he's all accounted for now is still missing the head you know people that were in slaves obviously got the worst treatment in American history in my estimation in that the native Americans in Tallahassee Florida they've discovered that under Country Club is a cemetery of enslaved individuals yeah we're talking about under the seventh hole of a golf course of a country you have a estimate about forty graves have been found at this capital city Country Club in Tallahassee in this case he's are probably graves and ever had markers to begin with or at least anything of any consequence but that's a terrible shame at least now maybe right will be done and maybe the remains will be disinterred and buried someplace properly well they're actually talking about maybe shutting down that whole rearranging the golf course because you just you can't have people teeing off over by anybody yet alone driving it all starts over them yeah I mean yeah especially in this situation well all day I looked a shadow blogger spotlight for the first time of the year too windy Callahan a genealogist I know who has a blog called arbitrary nest dot com and she gave a really interesting blog piece about our trip to the north east and discovering her Nova Scotian roots so are very nasty dot com give some love to Wendy Callahan well that's all I have this week for many H. yes but if you want to become a member in the new year good to American ancestors dot org and you can use the coupon code Xtreme to save yourself twenty dollars all right David thank you so much and that you're gonna come back a little later on we're going to do ask us anything at the back end of the show of course I shall do that all writing coming up next really talk to Gina Philibert Ortega she's a very well known genealogist who focuses a lot on female ancestors and how to find information on them it's often very difficult she of course is celebrating one hundred years since women got the vote in the nineteen twenty election and we're going to talk about what led up to that finding our voting female ancestors coming up in just a few minutes on extreme jeans America's family history show.

Gina Philibert
"chief geologist" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Chief geologist of the New England historic genealogical society and American ancestors dot org and that day but we have a question from Tom he's in Tuscaloosa and he says David why was my ancestor listed under spam for his military service that that's a unique question and I have no idea what he's talking about do you it probably is that nineteen thirty census where they ask what military service for a war we you participating in the use acronyms so like the civil war is C. W. or W. O. R. for war of the rebellion World War one courses still does World War or the great war and then you get I W. Indian wars but yet for the Spanish American war be asking him is stale yeah that's probably what it's coming from more somebody had an abbreviation that they couldn't fit it on a card and then of course you have TI which is for the Philippine insurrection which was immediately following the Spanish American war so he gets probably what you've got Tom it's probably not his dietary concerns but his military service in eighteen ninety eight well I don't think they had any dietary spam back in nineteen thirty did they maybe that all they're probably still doing hard jacket if it's something hard jacking cold coffee were these acronyms used a universally through government records or just in the nineteen thirty census well I mean I'm sure anybody abbreviates anything under the you know the World War one is always been W. W. one before World War two was just the World War W. W. or GW for great war so I think people are just trying to shorten up the amount of work out that they have and they had a former something in a sense you know it's a very small little column so whatever you could squeeze in there and of course trying to spell of Spanish American war is probably not going to cut it so that that makes sense that's probably the way I did have somebody asked me the same question a long time ago in regards to something in the census in this and what is that mean and said well it's not food that's right well I know that in New York for instance in eighteen ninety they did a census of the civil war vets and their you know there's all kinds of interesting information I'm sure that they had to shorten a lot of things for these various little columns they make and an overall accounting of individuals and what they did in military service all right imagine if you had the spell of the hundred and first New York artillery or something like that so you're going to get one on one and why a R. T. shipping whatever it is important and for people to figure out what some of these acronyms mean when they run across them and most of that I would imagine is simply available online right it really is in fact it's also a good topic for us is anything anytime you have any military acronym questions I'm more than happy to engage you yeah early of course militarily we know one another violent show here no no family friendly absolutely and by the way if you have any questions at all for ask us anything it's really easy to ask us anything you just email us at ask us anything at extreme jeans dot com and they will be happy to consider your question of the course we have a variety of experts to come on so it really doesn't matter what the topic is ask away were happy to help and David thanks so much for coming on again and we'll catch you again next weekend good luck with the Bible once again thank you Sir well we have reached the threshold of the end of the show and thanks so much for joining us hope you enjoy the stories about the Scottish tunnel that's been found deep underneath the old country and of course the Mayflower steps that may actually be under a women's room in a pub you can't make this stuff up and of course thanks so much to sunny Morton who is come on talking about.

Chief geologist Tom Tuscaloosa New England
"chief geologist" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"It starts literally losing mass over time. And this is what I out lined the book, I went out with a USGS team up on a major glacier up in Alaska that they've been studying for over fifty years in tracking a very very. Sistan trajectory of mass loss across that. Glacier. And in their entire benchmark study program that covers a glaciers are Representative in regions where they exist around the the entire United States. And so they're all on down which Jekyll and this is in line with what scientists are seeing globally that all glaciers around the world or on down, which gentry in its exhilarated. And it's very disturbing because they also refer to glaciers is essentially the canary in the coal mine with climate disruption because they're now they're well along a pace of exhibiting the impacts that we've caused to the planet, and they're sort of an early warning indicator, and because of that that's why this is this concerning. I mean in some respects, the that's basically what you did you visited different Canaries as it were a around the the world it feels like one of those Canaries was in Miami. And you. With or I guess you went around with one of the the city engineers who was. In also I met with the chief geologist at the university of Miami. Tell us I mean. I think people understand that Miami is built on essentially, what is a sponge. And there is flooding is not sort of an event as much as it is a state of being now, it's feels like with Miami. But but tell us what you learn there. That's right. So I went around on in Miami Beach, actually with the city engineer at the time, grew smelly. And they were actively raising the the the levels of many of the streets three seats try to buy themselves tied to prepare to mitigate for rising seas. And he knew that that probably wasn't enough. It was a temporary measure, but it was better than nothing, but it was already causing problems because flooding is a part of daily life there every time there's a high tide, and then if you throw in some significant rainfall and even a flooding event, then you're going to have big problems. And that's what they were already seeing in Miami Beach where they were raising in one area, they'd re re raise the streets three seat. But, but then of course, you didn't you can't raise the houses in the buildings nearby one of these high rise buildings flooded. And then the building owner was unable to get insurance because then insurance company than said, well, sorry, we don't have to pay you because your ground floor is now a basement..

Miami Miami Beach engineer university of Miami Alaska USGS Jekyll chief geologist United States Representative fifty years
"chief geologist" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"On defense spending. Which was good for both sides. We both wanted it. But also increases that are side wanted on. Childcare and a number of other issues, we got that as well. So these are good negotiators. They can come to a consensus. Even agreement isn't reached by the fifteenth government could partially shut down again in an engineering student from UCF facing felony gun charges after admitting to police that he had an AR fifteen on campus. Anonymous tip made the crimeline lead. UCF police to nineteen year old max chambers chief Karl Metzger says when officers questioned him on Tuesday. He led them to an air fifteen and several drop in auto Sears in his car parked outside of his on campus apartment, he knowingly and flagrantly disregarded. The law, and that's unacceptable to us. I don't think anyone would consider it. A good idea to have a machine gun on a college campus. This isn't Afghanistan chambers is charged with possession of a machine gun and bump stock. He's been trespassed from the UCF campus. Darrell Moody, News ninety six point five WDBO and all the cold weather seven an impact on even the animals, again, not too bad here in central Florida tonight, but up in Michigan Zucchero animal. Supervisor Jamie were Keller says safety for the animals and staffers is the number one priority. Even if it's not dangerous for the animals that can handle it right now is starting to really get to where we ought to keep staff safe to so these next couple days, there might be a couple more animals that they might be able to handle it. But we may not be able to safely get them outside. They may have to take a daybreak yourself. So apparently, Tony the otters are among the animals that have been a bracing the freezing temps, according to the Michigan Zubin animals the Africa exhibit as you can imagine her being brought indoors, I'm taking a look at our handy dandy interactive radar right now in across the entire state of Minnesota. I mean the entire. Tony the warmest temperature right now. Negative seventeen that's the warmest in the whole state. That's the warmest in the whole state. And that's the real temp. This isn't a winch actually negative seventeen. I think the coldest one I'm looking at right now is negative twenty eight you know, yesterday, we were so stunned with with temperatures. We were thinking about you know, how does the plumbing keep working how to cars work, you know, people if the electricity goes out in their home how dangerous that is. And all that we didn't even really think about the animals, right? I'm sure I'm sure there's a Chicago zoo. I mean, this is just crazy when you think about it. Oh, it's big city suits like this is just some remote era. I mean, we're talking to Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Chicago. I mean, the whole entirety of Iowa. It's man, God bless Florida. I I want to go back to the Pembroke pines story for just a moment. Kev. Okay. We got an open mic from a lady who was saying the same thing that I said when I heard that story. Hang on. How do you dig a tunnel in Pembroke pines, Florida? It's less than seven feet above sea level. That's the same thing. I said when when that story when we first heard that story this afternoon, I was like in Pembroke pines if you dig like four or five feet, you, you know, you're digging you're hitting water. Yeah. It does make a lot of sense. I mean, it's like at the beach when you're a kid, and you're trying to reach water, except you know, it's real there. But apparently Pembroke pines must be built up or something where this Bank was because there is indeed a tunnel under the ground going under the Bank is the fact they got a horse jockey or something. I don't know how they did it six thirty seven on Orlando's evening news. Keep the open mics coming on everything. And we'll get to the roads in a moment. First Tom Terry with a look at the Wednesday night forecast of cloud cover leftover giving us a blustery evening. But it could be colder. We didn't have that blanket of clouds. We'll see lows in the low to mid forties and highs in the low-to-mid sixties tomorrow still only peaks of sun better chance for a shower by Friday they extended five day forecast. Four times an hour. From channel nine eyewitness news. I'm certified chief. Geologist's ob- Terry forty-seven in Sanford this evening, we still have forty eight here at news ninety six point five WDBO in now. Jackie O'Brien with your SafeTouch Security triple team traffic. Yeah. Actually getting out of red alert for the first time today. So far those delays. Westbound are starting to thin out. You're still heavy from par to the four hundred eight still about fifteen to twenty minutes, and it's going to be heavy all the way down to the turnpike, but definitely thinning out. You're going to see some slowdowns now westbound at Sand Lake from the beach line past Central Florida Parkway, and then that World Drive to lay past the four twenty nine eastbound still heavy at OBT looks like Kelly to Amelia, Ivanhoe up to Lee at.

Pembroke pines Karl Metzger UCF Florida Jamie Jackie O'Brien Tony Chicago Afghanistan Tom Terry AR Darrell Moody Iowa Sanford Africa Orlando Michigan Zucchero Supervisor Sears
"chief geologist" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Gang this summer back cut off from the outside world sixteen strangers will live in a house dentist's cameras will watch their every move microphones will record there every word let the games figure for every temptation they say it's what else is gonna pay don't miss the event to your temptation fee brothers sunday wednesday and life thursday talk to you use of to me mr paddling starts off still the cell jeans jim delhi gene bradley j j talking wbz deputy seventy four degrees exactly like last year i j talking that he dan ray we have david alain lambert with his new england's derrick genealogical society chief genealogists thank you for permanent this microphone sorry grabbed that microphone bring it right on unifil for a i'm delighted to be here thanks for having me on and you say you go way back to wbzn houston's and the wbzn absolute thirdly at so i spend my 80s listening to laura combustion definitely and i remember you from back in the day i sense then you've got to business and says 93 chief geologist for the organisation new hampshire new england historic genealogical society so what do you.

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"chief geologist" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"chief geologist" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"You along as you make your journey into genealogy and a column for me each week right now let's head out to boston and talk to the paul mccartney of the ginnie alaji world david alain lambert the chief geologist from the new england historic genealogical society american ancestors dot org how david how do i replied that thank you now it is not for me that was actually a post on our facebook page somebody posted up there david alain lambert is a rock star and then somebody put on agreed he's the paul mccartney of genealogy which is strange because your hair is definitely not here's what i also don't have the people to take care of my hair like travel he does i well i'm flattered and so that's a good read yeah i got to actually interview paul mccartney wants a incredible time and was a great honour for me so to work with you is even better what i suppose it's better than being referred to the keith richards the world absolutely hey before we get going here we've got to talk about this ransomware attack david because it's happening as we all know all over the world attacking mostly businesses but as it spreads out we are all in danger with this thing here a few ways that you can protect yourself and your information i mean it kills me to think of any jeannie losing their life's work if they haven't taken some of these steps so the first step anybody recommends who's in expert is backup your files regularly that's why we have the cloud that's why we have all kinds of backup hard drives a ransomware attack hold your stuff hostage until you pay they actually encrypted and when you pay then hopefully they will unencrypted the second thing is pay attention to links and emails from strangers never ever ever open them feudal recognize it forget it it's better to miss something that's good than to open something that's bad you.

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