36 Burst results for "Chief Executive Officer"

Fresh update on "chief executive officer" discussed on TNCnow

TNCnow

00:37 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chief executive officer" discussed on TNCnow

"Mom saturday afternoon. At the muggle handy city nc marketplace at champlain. Melanie mirani louisville does aiming show and you over one hundred. People see marzi nasa. Hopefully she would be able to join us later on as a bizarre cours on men but in the meantime omar's yet farsi. Share lung for an added. Livestream now yawn byron and visa. At and now you own. I donate or no so. I hope you had agreed meat. So far and sinai you. I save and healthy anna mehanna name week and natal and if you're somewhere out there if you're working on a saturday the i hope you're also safe and join us honestly slung nominee though at by mom shopping shopping moon an emc marketplace now. Speaking of shopping mars bars. Yeah i don't have bus. One island had bobby chris. Asthma marzi rc. We have sixty three days before christmas. Grab this offering mercy. Im are you by made regard lhasa. Your loved ones name as all rabbit island phone. After i've been thinking about for every christmas season we go to the more we go to bazaars about double meeting happing munaf. I'm gonna lost adding miles. How am i began diva. So if you're not comfortable going out on a physical score he he don't the nc market viscous. Yeah we bring the products to you via the online platform. Bastl who ionian lumumba's in year nord. Nothing every saturday by faith year. So i you know. We're also live on youtube hassle if you're watching the show via euro tv screens. I suggest that you should cable infamous inscribed batting cages search. Tnc now subscribe and hit that notification. Then okay i can see give i shocked. Hello maybe enzo thank you for sharing marzi off the thank. You freshness freshest indicate that have very. Sean thank you watching all the way from thinking. Cpi and thank you for sharing. I theory andrea laggy. Women on colombia. Thank you so much. I and so please. Share share shares all. If you're france guessing we have a very special guest in store for you the day. Sapping every goosing. Who am i gonna do. An arm and among our home wooden fines was also allowed mader stein as abiding so dopamine. No i mean who will find harissa in your my your bed. Obama had a poem Dan dan among this please For example that in this bizarre aba champion orlando enough and Next start within a gone. Greece checked had been governmental well-known bizarre you and banning donated in bazaars shot the knows during I am but if you're looking for a venue to sell your. I am welcomed aids at the nc market maze. All you have to do is message on facebook either than you. Channel at uc market vis. That was but was up at impact. Ohio muggy guests nikos adding show. Hello masks or mass. I an issue here at the nc market as in busy musica and shepherd. I mostly direct line again director. She thank you so much mind area for always being with us here that the nc market day super appreciated yan and south also miss apple. Our chief executive officer who has trusted us with this show icees and step with i in vienna and please do not forget also to stay tuned because we will be launching our christmas lights trine bazaar all commendable and christmas livestream. Bizarre it's coming. Suan probably end of november and december. So annapolis them. Christmas livestream bazaar online night bazaar year it to number one at and so last year we when we showcase a lot of off last year. Mungo bugs especially in perfect for gift items. So this year. As i'm untying among our half a chosen Guests from the predeceased all the way up to season five and mabamba. Nc lana supersede super christmas sale on your announced magog nfl. Okay and also morrissey advice he. We also have our Mystery box challenge. I and this is a very exciting featuring pnc marketplace where is a lozada shop. 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It's zero nine three nine nine three nine seven one zero that was official one hundred vessel g cash entry for our misery buffs challenged pakistan. I'm copying receipts. So then you channel by messenger. He on police and not inside messenger have had. I'm a validate the in entries. And then this affirmative action on my screen. Neither confirm mammon nevada main entries okay. And then he said your mystery boxes via gogo express our trusted. Perrier's nepalse is sponsoring global. Express chinaman google expressly bite. That i express my i so i on a mystery box challenge. She's marcy at farsi. I didn't know mandy by maggie. Exciting adding war so within though we deliver when i'm in the annual mystery box. Okay so again or official. Jiyush number is zero nine three nine nine three nine seven one zero again. Our official cash number is zero nine three nine nine two three nine seven one zero up on as i add so daniela houston san diego official misery. 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"chief executive officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:42 min | 4 months ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"I mean your company has just grown by leaps and bounds and the value adding is is just phenomenal. So as you think about the future and maybe it could be near or long term future. You know let's do some horizon view in here. What are you most excited about. Yes so when. I look across each of our business units. We have an enormous opportunity ahead of us so in women's health today the vast majority of pregnancies are still got screen with these advanced tests. Noninvasive prenatal testing like panorama test to the overall market is only about thirty percents penetrated. So there's a long way to go before we're testing all of the four million plus pregnancies in the united states so we have a lot of room to run their a very big upset opportunity and then would look at cancer and organ health together. We're just scratching service there. What's going to be a very large market opportunity. The total available market together for all of our business units around fifty billion dollars. And we're just at the very early stages of penetration so for example in oncology are at terror product is now been approved by medicare for colorectal cancer in we estimate the approval would would cover about one million blood draws per year. Now that's one of the largest specialty diagnostics ever proved and it's only colorectal. Cancer should hours be fan to bladder cancer lung cancer. Breast ovarian cancer. You know we're talking about tens of millions of potential blood-red could be happy in a yearly basis. And that's really exciting. To think about road is gonna come out on that as as we access inserting fully country markets notches from the standpoint which obviously exciting but of course you know thinking about the patients that were going to help. I think the ability to change the way medicines practice for sure. Yeah that's super exciting. Congratulations on that by the way while. The future's bright and really the way that we that we approach you know our patients the way that we approach our employees health. These types of tests are super important. Or if you're a pair right. Managing many many lives thinking about the bigger picture of people's health and helping stay. Proactive is truly the future and should be the present. And i think natasha's doing a huge job of great job of doing that. And so steve. I just want to recognize you and your team over there for the amazing work that you guys doing. What kind of closing thoughts would you leave us with. And what's the best place for people to learn more about you in the business yellow again. Thanks for having me spend time any. Anyone can go to our website or google This year we've got a lot of content up there about the company about the different tests in products that we offer you now survey about twenty five percent of all pregnancies in the united states that we have a very big up to the us a both on college. He working all this very exciting. So i think the genetic testing and diagnostic testing in general are going to continue to play a much larger role on healthcare as we move forward. I think it's a great position to continue your ship there. So we're excited about the outlook for the company. Be certainly excited about what you guys are doing. As well and i would highly welcome an update call you know maybe in six months to a year now you guys are moving fast over there to hear what updates you guys have. And what difference. You're making it would be great. We love to do that. Awesome steve pate. Thanks for jumping on and looking forward to staying in touch. Great thank you saw.

six months natasha united states steve google each This year both steve pate around fifty billion dollars today about twenty five percent four million plus pregnancies tens of millions one about thirty percents about one million blood draws
"chief executive officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:15 min | 4 months ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Members that have been diagnosed with cancer in some are being tracked with our recurrence monitoring prides Terra cd apac that we can make areas royale. Sell it really is truly inspiring to be baking impact on patient's lives in such an exciting field as genetic testing. Yeah really agree of opportunities. Huge what we could do with this testing and and so many different applications so walk us through what you believe. Steve are big ways that you guys are adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes so we all do technology that can look at extremely tiny quantities in dna. Sit down to less than a single molecule in. Its uber boy. And we've employed that technology cross. Women's health on college in organ helps so in a women's health space from a simple cuba blood as early as nine weeks of pregnancy. We can diagnose genetic conditions in the fetus and that's very important for women and for the pregnancy and for the family to be able to get that kind of information very early on in the pregnancy at potentially avoid a diagnostic procedure. So this idea that you can just simply a blood draw rather than having to go in for an invasive procedure that's constantly carry. Some risk is very important. In the oncology space we detest called signatory where we're focused on detecting disease recurrence and there. We showed with our tests that we can actually detect the recurrent disease up to two years in advance of imaging and so being able to detect cancer. Recurred early can have a very significant impact. On patient's lives and overall i think it is going to change in many ways. Change the way. Ecology medicines practice today as technology evolves further. And then. we're gonna health again you know. we're noninvasive. Wage attacked a organ rejection so unfortunately today about thirty percent of patients that get a kidney. Transplant will lose their kidney. Within five years in about fifty percent of patients will lose your kid in ten years so with our technology where detecting organ rejection early so.

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:49 min | 4 months ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Hey everybody. Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez. Here today. i have the privilege of having the amazing steve chapman with us. He is not terrace. Chief executive officer and serves on the company's board of directors. Mr chapman joined nato in two thousand ten as the vice president of sales later becoming chief commercial officer and then chief operating officer as coo. He led the company's commercial entry into the highly competitive noninvasive. Prenatal testing market in which the company's panorama test became the market leader despite being forced to market. Mr chapman was appointed ceo in january of twenty nineteen and has been instrumental in extending the terrace core technology to address new oregon health and ecology markets achieving rapid commercial growth for the prosperity transplant test and establishing the terrace leadership in molecular residual disease testing with another product. They have called tara since he became. Ceo of notre terre is achieved a year on year revenue growth of over forty percent and has consistently outperformed earnings expectations prior to the tara. Mr chapman worked at genzyme genetics where he was credited with delivering record-breaking commercial growth and strategies that change pregnancy genetic testing. He's no stranger to this genetic testing environment and today. I'm i'm privileged to have him here. He actually started his career as a researcher in the department of human genetics had way designing raise identifying. snp's associated with multiple sclerosis. Just an incredible individual Very brilliant mind and super excited a chat with him today. So steve really appreciate you joining us if they saw a really appreciate you having me great to be here absolutely the work you're doing is a huge difference. Steve you guys around the cutting edge of genetic testing and how were actually using it to make a difference. What inspires your work in the space. The diagnostics base in genetics. Today testing particular is very fast growing sector of the healthcare market. It's very exciting. There's a lot of change very fast paced with innovation It's a very exciting place to be the all. But i think my inspiration. His grown over time to be more about the impact that we're making on patients and a lot of that has to a my personal experiences as having kids using the products using genetic testing important growing. My family it's really shown me you know our personally impacted gatien's on a day-to-day basis. And now i look. We moved to cancer. Moving away from prenatal hells having had friends and family.

Steve Today today steve two thousand steve chapman chapman january of twenty nineteen over forty percent a year nato ten coo sclerosis ceo tara
Tanium CEO Orion Hindawi on Cybersecurity and the Shifting IT Landscape

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

02:07 min | 5 months ago

Tanium CEO Orion Hindawi on Cybersecurity and the Shifting IT Landscape

"Orion. You're the co founder of chief executive officer of a company founded back in two thousand seven Many of our listeners will certainly be familiar retained but in the off chance. There are few who are less familiar. Maybe you can take a quick moment in provide an overview of the business. Sure so we started the company with basic thesis that very large companies that you think about forty five hundred large big enterprise kind of environments neither in government or in the commercial side Really struggled with basic stuff around. It so when we first got there a lot of companies really struggled to know how niaz ups they out when i say assets i mean almost anything with a chip nazi think about desktop laptop server. Vm cloud. I o t o t like all these things that they've got they don't know how many of them they have They often don't know where they are. What they're doing is using them. What data's on them. What abilities they have. They really have very sparse. Data about What they're trying to manage the compete standpoint and in addition to that they've got tons and tons of little tools. That are supposed to do that for them. So in many cases they've got twenty or thirty or sometimes even tools that are designed to give them visibility on their it assets and yet the visibility is really pretty fractured and untrustworthy. So what we've built is a platform that lets you see everything you've got the chip in it. Really great data about them and then allow you change them and so whether that's patching things because they've got abilities whether it's finding data that shouldn't have spread somewhere and removing it whether it's learning users of they've got a performance issue and fixing had a really broad set of things that they wanna fix but Really kind of finding and fixing within ninety stock and having a system of record that they trust about all the things with chips in them that i think are becoming incredibly critical especially in work from anywhere but frankly even before were super critical for almost every company. We talked to

Interview With GAVIN FISHER, CEO of GAVIN PRODUCTIONS

Voices Of Courage (Walk The Talk)

01:56 min | 5 months ago

Interview With GAVIN FISHER, CEO of GAVIN PRODUCTIONS

"Hey everybody welcome back. This is brandy j. voices of courage. Walk the talk today. Have with me to amazing. People are the name of gavin and hannah brits and they are part of gavin production beggar gavin because blessed up going on my ad here yup gavin production. Okay gavin production. Alright saw kevin. He's let the world now who you are and why you are so maybe i'll think you I am getting fisher and where literally. I'm from very tiny town in illinois very calm and I run. I'm chief executive officer as well as gordon directors chairman at gavin productions. And what. I basically is i managed. Gpo peril gavin productions Our all of our podcast. I know we're trying to start you other things in mind But yeah i basically had run that But when you talk to me trust me. I'm not going to be like that one like kid. He's like i'm so famous guy. And i'm so read like no. That's not me because trust me. I'm not rich rust me and whenever like when you first you'll understand that i'm not that person at all is an orange. No hannah's in 'cause. I say i'm not rich because i'm not within. I walk into her house with my coach. Backpack on me and pull out my bring light. The he has a special chair for his bags to saint special chair. Then everyone knows not to sit in for ulmer

Gavin Gavin Productions Hannah Fisher Kevin Gordon Illinois Ulmer
Call for an Australian National AI Strategy

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

02:01 min | 6 months ago

Call for an Australian National AI Strategy

"Hello and welcome to moscow screen. Tv now taking sick weekly be joined once again and welcome. Ron gushy. They chief executive officer with the australian industry association and the industry there's cooling for at least a two hundred million dollar investment into strays i- strategy a national strategy. So we'll get an update from ron. On how the. I w i i is going in. They recent coal app to government. Run galaxy that chief executive officer with the i aa i run. Thanks for joining us once again. Thanks to the chris. Much rishon artificial intelligence in the release came out. From the i w i do like how you guys up right off. You know you you kinda push and comment very very quickly. And promptly on government initiatives Maybe if he can give us not died or background from the realistic climate decoding for two hundred fifty million dollars for a billion dollar investment into the i. nationalized strategy. What's what's the background to this. And you we are cooling for is significant allocation In my phil- budget what the premises whibley kate. Primary industries are exposed when we look at the level of being made my in iowa offshore. of dollars. Investments across europe and asia and and in that region and that means that we are at prime ministries are at risk of becoming uncompetitive and probably unattractive globally and consumers that will become a country. Can she was rather than the juices. And it's a pity because the strike. Has i recognize leadership position experts in zenaida and and the kowloon basements across fiddles night governments have been targeted towards raicevic in i Small small bits and pieces fashion in an s fragmented with that any extra commercialization agenda

Ron Gushy Australian Industry Associatio Moscow Whibley Kate RON Chris Phil Iowa Zenaida Asia Europe
Box Agrees to Take $500 Million Investment From KKR

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:28 sec | 7 months ago

Box Agrees to Take $500 Million Investment From KKR

"500 million KKR's leading a $500 Million investment in box. In a deal that will see KK our tech executive. Bethany Mayor take Box CEO Aaron Levees place on the board of the Cloud software company. Levy will continue his boxes chief executive officer after the deal but will step down as chairman. The private equity firm said it will receive preferred convertible stock in box as a result of the transaction. That's a big one. Doing some deal. It's a big one. It is a big one. Absolutely. Erin

Bethany Mayor Aaron Levees KKR Levy Erin
No new Galaxy Note this year, confirms Samsung CEO

Techmeme Ride Home

02:03 min | 7 months ago

No new Galaxy Note this year, confirms Samsung CEO

"Samsung says it is considering not launching a new slate of its galaxy. Note phones this year. Now they say that this is in aid of streamlining its product lineup. But isn't that the truth or is the truth really something else. We've been talking about lately. That growing global shortage in semiconductors quoting bloomberg samsung electronics warned it's grappling with the fallout from a serious imbalance in semiconductors globally becoming the largest tech giant to voice concerns about chip shortages spreading beyond the automaking industry. Samsung one of the world's largest makers of ships and consumer electronics expects the crunch to pose a problem to its business next quarter co chief executive officer code dong jin said during an annual shareholders meeting in seoul. The company is also considering skipping the introduction of a new galaxy note one of its bestselling models this year. Though said that was geared toward streamlining. Its lineup quote. There's a serious imbalance supply and demand of chips in the it sector globally said co who oversees the company's it and mobile divisions despite the difficult environment. Our business leaders are meeting partners overseas to solve these problems. It's hard to say. The shortage issue has been solved. One hundred percent and quote if samsung is publicly talking about future products. You know that the silicon is serious said. Avi green guard analysts and founder of consultantcy texts. Potential co said samsung may decide not to introduce its galaxy. Note during two thousand twenty one second half breaking eight years long streak of annual watches for the marquis line. The note series contributed roughly five percent of samsung smartphone. Shipments over the past two years. Idc estimates but accounts for a more significant chunk of revenue. Because it's one of the priciest in the lineup. Quote note series is positioned as a high end model in our business. He said it could be a burden to unveil to flagship models in a year so it might be difficult to release note models in the second half of the year. The timing of note model launch can be changed but we seek to release a note model next year

Samsung Quarter Co Code Dong Jin Samsung Electronics Bloomberg Avi Green Potential Co Seoul IDC
How The Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center Is Supporting Bay Area Small Businesses

Voices of the Community

04:27 min | 8 months ago

How The Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center Is Supporting Bay Area Small Businesses

"Ari when you speak tool walking down the street and it was devastating. You know half the storefronts were closed. You hear the stories. You know what's happening. And people are appreciating and recognizing the real importance in a of small businesses. And how much they are part of the social fabric of our communities. This is the chief executive officer. Sharon miller and program director. Tim russell of the renaissance entrepreneurship center. Today's episode is part of our efforts to better understand the impact of the covid nineteen pandemic on the small businesses and entrepreneurs that make up the economic fabric of our neighborhoods. We to feature the voices of the renaissance entrepreneurship center. Who's thirty year. Mission is to bride intensive entrepreneurship training networking and mentorship to support the launch and growth of women owned businesses through their. Us small business administration sifford cisco women's business center and to find out what they're doing to help our survive the economic meltdown. Let's hear from sharon and tim. What they and their regional team renaissance are doing to help. Small business owners survive and thrive during the pandemic. i'm joined remotely via zoom by sharon miller the chief executive officer and tim russell the program for a renaissance entrepreneurship center. Thanks for being here. Sharon and tim thank you. Thank you for having us. I'd like to start because once again renaissance entrepreneurship centers one of those really wonderful services for small businesses and entrepreneurs and anyone who has an idea of starting businesses in the san francisco bay area. That a lot of people just don't know about so i would love to start with having each of you provide the audience aetna the renaissance entrepreneurship center. It's programs both in san francisco in the east bay. Which will have sharon you provide. And then tim have you provided the mid peninsula and south bay. So sharon great. So renaissance is completely dedicated to entrepreneurship. And our focus is helping to provide access to people who don't have traditional access to training resources a network. So that's where we come in. People come to us with great ideas a ton of passion and then we provide training access to capital access to markets and access to networks so that training that we do really focuses on intensive classes. That take people from the idea feasibility. Stage into the business planning stage and further to the gross state so we're helping people to perceive themselves as entrepreneurs understand what it takes to be an entrepreneur. Start that business. And once they have it grow the business. So you asked about san francisco and the e spe. We do work with people at all levels of business in both locations in san francisco we are the san francisco. Us sba women's business center so we add further services for women. There anyone out san francisco or the bay area could come and take our classes. We also have a center in bayview hunters wait that focuses on that community and in oakland we are working with businesses in oakland richmond and east contra costa county thank you. I was great and tim. How does renaissance center support entrepreneurs in san mateo and santa clara county. Just basically the piggy back off. What sharon said. We are an organization that is regional and the south bay and then the serving the san mateo county and santa clara county and small businesses and entrepreneurs. We really are coming alongside of those entrepreneurs and small business owners and helping them turn their passion the prophet in. I think that's what we really strive for is giving them the tools they need because we already know that they're gifted they're gifted at what they do but they need to support the technical assistance to be able to really be sustainable so we really are working with those communities. Churn says that are under served under represented by coming in and giving them the tools so that they can watch and grow their business and again like i said earlier turn their passion to profit

Renaissance Entrepreneurship C Sharon Miller Tim Russell TIM San Francisco Sharon ARI South Bay Cisco Aetna San Francisco Bay East Bay East Contra Costa County Santa Clara County Oakland United States SBA Bayview
Witnesses Praise Merrick Garland, Joe Biden's Pick for Attorney General

Tim Conway Jr.

00:41 sec | 8 months ago

Witnesses Praise Merrick Garland, Joe Biden's Pick for Attorney General

"Witnesses have been called on the second and final day of confirmation hearings in the Senate for attorney general pick Merrick Garland. One of the witnesses attesting to Garland's character and judgment was interim president and chief executive officer Wayne Henderson. With the leadership conference on civil and human rights, he called Garland uninspired choice. Attorney general must be seen by every member of the public from every community as a fair arbiter of our legal system, whose sole duty is to serve the national interest. Alan was also praised by Republican witness former independent counsel Ken Starr, who spent years investigating Democratic President Bill Clinton. The Senate Judiciary Committee is set to vote on Garland Monday. The full Senate could act

Merrick Garland Wayne Henderson Garland Senate Ken Starr Alan Senate Judiciary Committee Bill Clinton
Using AI on Healthcare Data to Improve Outcomes at Scale with Tashfeen Suleman

Outcomes Rocket

05:44 min | 9 months ago

Using AI on Healthcare Data to Improve Outcomes at Scale with Tashfeen Suleman

"Workum. Back to the outcomes rockets saw marquez. Here today i have the privilege of hosting the outstanding. Tush phen- suleiman. He is the chief executive officer at cloud medics health. They are a clinical a. I platform personalizing healthcare delivery through data. And a i. The company wants to allow patients and providers to better manage health using the state of the art technologies that integrate with existing hospital and pair networks to achieve the best outcome. Cosmetics offers tools to both patients and providers to system with their journeys and workflows. Tachyon's an approval technology leader and. I'm really excited to have him here on the podcast today to talk to us about the work that they're up to at cloud medics touchscreen. Thanks so much for joining me. Thanks for having me absolutely so before we dive into cloud medics and the work. You guys are doing with a and healthcare. Tell us a little bit more about you. What got you into healthcare. And we'll keep you in it so as you mentioned. I have a technology background. And i have always intersected with being be across cross section being technology and building real world applications the can have a meaningful impact and so was about five or six years ago that We had a healthcare scare in our family. My father had a subdural hematoma which is a internal head bleed which went undiagnosed and it almost cost him his life but he fully recovered and we caught it on time and i was at microsoft at that time and that became our my value cried to try to figure out what happened and how we can avoid such events for thousands millions of people in the future that was what became the genesis of cloud. Medics which is look at data from different sources and do across sections analysis round different insights and Present those insights to providers and payers so they can improve efficiencies and reduce events such as the one that happened to my dad. And so that's the biggest inspiration of why we started the company but facile were now. I think everybody who works at the company has had a brush with healthcare Whether it was done personally or member or a friend that no and so you may have seen this your software you know. Healthcare is When everything works at works but when people fall through the cracks they technically have a heart fall. So that's our rallying cry to build tools that can forecast some of these events and Put in front of the best things that patients payers and providers can do in order to get ahead when they when they have such a healthcare scare. Yeah nets You said it right and there's so much that could happen and so many misses that can happen. We you know the. I forget what the number is. But it's pretty high the number of things that that could go wrong and reasons why outcomes don't work out within healthcare because of some of those misses and so i'm curious what exactly you guys are wanting to do here with cloud medics in the healthcare space. Tash being tell us a little bit more about it. Yeah so if you if you really look at healthcare from a macro perspectives. You have a provider who takes care of you. If you are sick you have a pair who Reimbursed says or bites insurance to the patient so they can have the best care and that works well for macroeconomics for a small population sets that have a one to one relationship in some s one to a few relationship of the provider and the patients. Where does it breaks down as when you have millions of patients and And the one one. Too many mapping come into place where you have limited number of providers and in number of hours that you can spend per patient in order to figure out what's What's what's the root cause of their ailments and so the us healthcare system has become very good at solving the current problem but not the underlying problem that the patients may be facing and as You know s. We are now entering a explosion of data where both medical literature and the complications that come out from the different co morbidity. Different diseases that patients have. It's very hard and complex to manage and so looking at that population level. Big data and large volume perspective is what claude. Medics is really good at where we pull. Data in from electric health records from a payer's and from patients and create a unified workflow where different stakeholders can slice and dice. The data for from different perspectives. So one of the ways to look at it is if you're a provider and you wanna get in information on operation risks or operation journeys you know because we have such a vast amount of data we can look at beijing of different touch points as they go to different sections of or different progression of the disease we could predict n began outlined the future off that patients may look like given a huge history of previous patients them in the past so we can look at retrospective data and project that feature in terms of allowing a provider to come up with a better treatment or a better outcome for the patient again. Were not looking to replaced physicians. We wanted to work in tandem with physicians.

Cloud Medics Health Suleiman Tachyon Marquez Tash Microsoft Claude United States Beijing
"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

04:47 min | 10 months ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"So that's an example of a domestic sex trafficking case where You know in this case. She was traffic from another state. But a lot of our cases here in los angeles these are girls who were born and raised in los angeles. And you know almost always. They're running away from from something because there's either some type of sexual abuse at home or Domestic violence many times. Two young kids tell their parents that they're gay. They're also you know not accepted and so they run away thinking that they can be accepted elsewhere and unfortunately there are pimps and traffickers who just swoop in and prey upon them. Because they know they're vulnerable and they just simply want to be loved and you know have a way to support themselves. Not that. I want to focus on this because i really don't but how young start for most of our sex trafficking cases. It's around eleven eleven years of age but it ranges all the way up to like late twenties. But you might be surprised to know that our youngest client has actually been two years of age. Our oldest client has been sixty four so it really gives you an idea of the range and what we know for sure is that traffickers target not necessarily age although in some cases for sex trafficking they do target girls and young women but it's really targeting vulnerability so kids and adults alike. Who are either looking for a better opportunity to improve their lives or running away from a particularly difficult situation. Life domestic violence or sexual abuse at home. I'd heard it was said or read at some place. Life expectancy for somebody who is pulled into trafficking can be as short as seven years because of the drugs and the lifestyle and the beatings and the lack of nutrition. I mean are many of our clients. Cast is kind of considered an extended family even after they graduate from our programs. And so i can tell you. Firsthand that former clients we have have had cancer chronic health problems and even though sometimes it's difficult to relate it back to the traffic eighteen experience. How could you not exactly. That's exactly and that doesn't even get into. I mean that's just physical health. Think about the mental health consequences right. So we've developed a training program for mental health practitioners because you think that mental health professionals would know how to treat a survivor of human trafficking. But the reality is that it's such a an emerging issue that it's actually not taught at school emerging issue that has become the second most profitable criminal artillery on the planet which is mental health practitioners. Really know how to do this. The reason why. I was attracted to you into cast in the work that you do. I'm and i'm thrilled. That there are people who are working very very hard on policy and educating law enforcement and all of those things but i wanted to see more grassroots of working with the victims and the survivors. And in fact. I'm sure surprise some people when you just set it that our was with you for two years because i'm sure people thinking fast it's like a three day program a little shelter. We come in for the weekend and then we're throwing back onto the street but that they stay with you that long and so. I know we've used up so much of our time here but can you just talk about you. Know the services that cast offers but also with the call to action of what can our listeners do. how can they in their communities. You know we don't yet have cast a coalition to abolish slavery and trafficking in every city. Right that's you know. I want to say that it's actually. The reason i joined cast was because they made a commitment. The board and the founders of cast made a commitment to provide comprehensive and long-term services which is very resource intensive. I mean be involved with abandoned..

los angeles two years seven years three day second Two young kids sixty four around eleven eleven years eighteen experience artillery late twenties
"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

03:58 min | 10 months ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"She stated our shelter actually for just under two believers told the real quickly what happened that she finally somebody did address what was going on. Fbi showed up and yeah so. Alice was actually in slaved in early in dubai so she was trafficked in to dubai. I she's originally from kenya and then from dubai. The family moved here. They had dual citizenship out to the l. a. area moved to west los angeles in one of the most affluent communities there and she was forced to basically work around the clock. She wasn't allowed to sleep very much because she had to be quote unquote on call for the child she was taken care of and interestingly enough she had this amazing relationship with the small child and when she escaped the child was distraught and crying. And i mean. I think that's important to know that for people who ask the question. Why don't they leave. Oftentimes it's out of a loyalty to the children that they're taking care of like. How sad is that that they know. They're being treated wrongly and badly but because they care so much for the traffickers child or children they stay because they feel responsible. That really hits my heart. 'cause i'm dislike like what's happening is this deep exploitation really really good people people you want to live in your community. And so you know with alice. She was enslaved in this penthouse with. I mean just beautiful surroundings and yet. She wasn't to talk with her family. She didn't have access to her passport. That's one of the key things. Traffickers do is confiscate all of their legal documents including for us citizens to our traffic by the way they'll take their identification and for me. It's very symbolic right. It's like when you take someone's identification away. You are truly taking away their identity right. I own you. And so with. Alice in this penthouse. She was practically starved to death when she arrived at the shelter she was skin and bones. I mean i actually remember crying on my way home after meeting her at the shelter because it was like she had marks on her face from lack of nutrition. She was so skinny when it just it was so sad and the truth. She didn't have a whole lot of life in her at that time. And which is very different as you saw from who she is today. How long has she been a slave to this family in this case. Gosh don't quote me on this because we've handle a lot of cases but for alice. I believe that she was enslaved for a total of two and a half years. Total and it ranges. I mean we've had cases where they've been enslaved for you know a couple of months to twenty five years. I mean it really is a big range depending on the opportunity to liberate them right and so analysis case for liberation. She actually match with another nanny. So this family just had another baby and their policy was that they had one nanny for each child and so they were here and the us and so they brought in a nanny who was an american citizen through a nanny service and so she came in and of course she kinda got vibe because all the workers seem to be kind of making eye contact and nervous and so when she was alone with alice and they actually took the kids to a movie at a movie theater..

kenya Alice west los angeles dubai twenty five years two and a half years alice today each child one nanny one l. a. two believers key things Fbi one of months american
"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

03:39 min | 10 months ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"Every day and they choose not to in their minds. They really believe that they are treating these victims better than what they would path back home like it. It's so messed up. I absolutely really. They have a process of dehumanizing people. And i really have come to know that. This is a class issue right. So they target people who are vulnerable in communities usually from their same country of origin Because they know they can they know that they can add cheap labor or slave labor and not have to bother with paying them even though they're bringing them to a country that clearly has laws around wage and hour and human rights around how all workers must be treated and they do this because they simply don't see them as human beings they do see them as animals or less than animals sometimes and they're treated like that they're there to take care of their children so they're they're not seen as human beings or as but yet they're there to take care of the children of the on my i just i can't even make the words come out because it's just so it got using to me. That's the one thing that gets me too. I mean as you know. I'm a mom to a daughter. And you know i just can't imagine treating someone who should be part of your family and treat it that way when they're taking care of the people you love most in the world and you know not only that but in most of these cases the workers so the slaves are practically starve to death. I mean with the woman that i introduced you to. There were weeks on end where the traffickers did not restock the kitchen. The the slaves were actually made to live on a whole different floor so this family was so wealthy. They had two floors of this huge penthouse. Basically and the workers did not live with them. They were there to only take care of the family and to clean the penthouse where the family lived and it just shocked me when i learned that they were practically starved to death. I don't have words for that. I really don't and yet these are the same people who are taking care of their children of their pets and caring for their families it. Just it doesn't make sense. I realize but what. I've learned is that traffickers don't they don't make sense and they have ways of justifying this horrible behavior when i set listen to this woman talk and now she's oh my gosh she's dynamic and she's she's making a difference in. She looks amazing and she has that story to tell which is going to save many many lives. What happened to those traffickers. Yeah so the young woman's name is allison. She's a very active member of our national survivor network and has trained the military. She's trained law enforcement. She's done so much but most importantly what she's done is used her experience and therefore her expertise to raise awareness and educate no everyone from the general public to politicians. And i remember win alice. I came to cast..

allison two floors one thing alice
"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

05:46 min | 10 months ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"That's that's a good question and they don't run because of the psychological coercion and the threats that they have to live in day in and day out like a good example. Is you know we served this woman and she at the time. She was in her late twenties and She basically the trafficker basically told her every day dogs in this country. Have more rights than you. If i kill a dog. I'm going to go to jail. But if i kill you. No one's going know and no one's gonna care because you don't exist in. This country was trafficked for labor. In that particular case it was a sweatshop yeah it was a labor trafficking case in a sweatshop and that was the threat that she used and you know traffickers do this all the time because they know that they can get away with it Most of the victims who are trafficked in this country both domestic meaning american girls as well as Immigrant survivors people from other countries. They haven't had the greatest experiences with law enforcement. Like for example. Most of the american girls we serve our survivors of what's called si sak commercial sexual exploitation of children. So they're traffic mostly when they're anywhere from eleven to fourteen years of age and again day in and day out. They are told that they can't go to law enforcement and when they do try their arrested for prostitution related charges so there was treated as criminals rather than victims exactly it's reinforcing to them what the pimps and traffickers are telling them every day. That law enforcement isn't going to treat them as a victim or or anything else but as a criminal and so we have a long way to go to reform those systems that technically are designed to not only curb crime but to help victims of crime. Right we have a whole office in this country. Victims of crime through the department of justice that's designed to help victims of crime including crimes of human trafficking but we have a long way to go to really reform those systems and it doesn't mean that all police are bad..

eleven fourteen years both american twenties
"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

03:42 min | 10 months ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"Let's say about gosh. what was it. Maybe fifteen years ago trafficking wasn't really even talked about in terms of statistics. And then what happened is it became the third largest criminal enterprise but now today in two thousand fifteen it's now tied with arms trade and so that tells us that this is a growing criminal enterprise where criminals can easily make a profit off the backs of human beings. I mean when you think about it. Human beings can be recycled over and over again. Right they can be sold to one gang. And then to another trafficker. I mean they can be recycled whereas when you use drugs or arms. They can't so easily be recycled in that way. so it's very profitable for traffickers to get into this business. How many slaves or their world boy there are. I mean statistics. Range all over the place. But i think we can safely say that there is at least twenty seven million slaves living in the world today at least living in slavelike conditions that includes sex trafficking as well as labor trafficking and that from brothels in bangkok thailand to children being forced to work in the brick industry in india to here locally where people are trafficked into the agricultural sector so trafficking is very broad definition of what is known as modern slavery people who are forced in some way therefore either through physical four or fraud or some type of coercion even sometimes psychological coercion to stay in a situation where they do not have the freedom to leave and that's usually done by the traffickers threatening them in their lives if they try a laws and key especially to the young women and moms that we serve. That's what they use they with the young girls they'll use their moms or sometimes their grandmothers. Whoever they're close to they'll use that to control them saying if you try to escape this happened just in one of our cases. This young girl was fifteen. Try to escape. We will kill your grandmother in mexico. We know where she lives. It's this address so no fifteen year old is going to try to escape when grandma practically raised her not was like her grandma was the love of her life and they knew it and they used it against her and likewise for the young moms and sometimes dads that we serve. They'll say look. We know your kids are living with your parents back home and if you try anything funny we will kill them. Let me tell you and so these threats go a long way to further. Control the victims. Who are already held captive. And i think what's important for new people who are new to this issue you know. In the media they tend to portray victims of trafficking has been chained to bed sore being locked in a room and certainly we have had those types of cases. I don't want to say that doesn't happen. It does but the majority of our cases are such where survivors or victims at the time. Are you know walking the kids to school each day. The children of the traffickers. Or they're doing the shopping for the family. So out of the house away from their captors and people listening to this thinking water on the ryan exactly..

bangkok india mexico today fifteen years ago two thousand one each day one gang least twenty seven million sla third largest criminal enterpr fifteen year old thailand four cases fifteen
"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

03:42 min | 10 months ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"Which is going to be quite the education that all of us need to receive the whole planet needs to listen to this message simply because i think it's a hard topic for people to listen to. I think it's one of those things that people want to pretend does not exist. And that is the whole idea of slavery and trafficking. And i've tried to educate myself or the last several years and in the process of educating myself have looked up to be experts and gotten to know these people and the woman that i'm sitting with right now truly truly is such a wonderful representative this issue and someone who is on the forefront of making a difference not to mention the fact that if you saw her she'd be a model she'd be top in the salon. She's beautiful too. I don't know why said that. I'm sitting here and sitting here with k. buck. I don't know maybe make people think that you're supposed to look like you know at grasping sags that tomb on the inside your toilet brush necessarily out. Yeah but i've also seen you in action. you know the importance of somehow marketing. Which that's got to be a tough thing to do marketing what you do and what you're all about to be able to bring a celebrity light and a focus of fund raising so that people will give money because that's at the end of the day what you need. You need attention. You need money. And you're brilliant at that is wilson came. Welcome to masters. Thank you win. I'm thank you for having me here today. I'm just thrilled to be here to not only talk about the issue of human trafficking and what casts does but also the partnership that we have with you and paul mitchell schools. And i'm so appreciative of that. It's a pleasure so let me read a little bit about k. And who she is so you have a little bit of background here. So for twenty. Five years of experience leading innovative anti trafficking initiatives in the united states and abroad joining the coalition to abolish slavery and trafficking which is called cast. Cas three k. Leads one of the longest running anti slavery. Organizations in this nation under ks leadership cast was one of the first organizations in this country to advocate for laws to protect victims develop model programs for survivors and open a shelter for trafficked women and their children. I mean this goes on on you. Receive all kinds of awards the people that you work with organizations that you worked with. You have a lot of experience. Which i'm going to ask you to share with us. You lived abroad in asia for five years almost six years. Yeah that's right. So i lived initially in japan and i worked with the asian women's shelter and at that time honestly human trafficking was not on anyone's radar across the globe and so we worked on a program where they accepted survivors of trafficking in this shelter and it was a first of its kind at the time and that is where i not only learned about human trafficking directly from survivors themselves. But it's also where. I just caught this incredible passion for this issue You also recently received an award or some acknowledgement at the white house. Tell us about that. Yeah that was great. I mean i should also h was a little bit more than great..

japan five years asia Five years twenty today k. buck united states white house asian six years one of those things first organizations one paul mitchell schools wilson came last several years first ks
FBI Warns Of Groups Calling For ‘Storming’ Of Courthouses Nationwide And In Washington, DC If Trump Is Removed

WBZ Midday News

05:16 min | 10 months ago

FBI Warns Of Groups Calling For ‘Storming’ Of Courthouses Nationwide And In Washington, DC If Trump Is Removed

"And FBI bulletin obtained by ABC News said an unnamed armed group called for storming State capitals, government buildings, courthouses and the U. S Capitol. If President Trump has removed from Office before Inauguration Day, The Homeland Security Department said it would implement the inaugural security plans six days earlier starting Wednesday, when the House could take an impeachment vote. The FBI said the group is planning attacks in D. C and there have been specific threats against President elect Biden, Vice President elect Harris and members of Congress. Aaron Carter SKI ABC NEWS New YORK In Boston, the FBI here says it does not currently don't have any plans. Armed protests at the Massachusetts statehouse over New Hampshire. Rhode Island, Maine Governor Charlie Baker says there's nothing law enforcement. Is aware of here. There are currently no known threats with respect to the state House or any other public building. At this time in Massachusetts, and on we will continue to monitor and track the information that's out there on we will be appropriately prepared for anything that might happen. President Trump meantime, today, taking aim at the prospect of being impeached again, The president calls it ridiculous. This impeachment is causing tremendous anger. Speaking to reporters for First time since the Capitol attack, which Democrats blame on him, the president said the impeachment push is dangerous, but we want no violence, never violence. The House will begin debating impeachment tomorrow, charging the president with incitement of insurrection in urging supporters to March on the capital, but the president's taking no responsibility for the riot. Saying his remarks to backers were totally appropriate. Soccer Megane Washington's president Trump visits section of the US Mexico border wall today on way to celebrate the completion afforded 50 miles of fencing this year. Hidalgo County Democratic Judge Richard Cortez wants the president to stay away in order to prevent large crowds that might bring more positive covert cases. We just modified order to ask all our hospitals not to do elective surgeries because we're 18.8% of our hospital capacity in Texas, the Legislature opening up today and Austin ABC is Jim Ryan says. Talk of Unarmed demonstration and lingering threats of covert 19 of rattles Some lawmakers nerves. Even images of the riot at the U. S. Capitol might not be enough to keep Texas 181 legislators from attending the opening ceremony at the state Capitol. With the specter of a novel coronavirus infection is a different matter to Democratic state representatives from the Dallas area plan to skip the event for fear that it might be a covert 19 super spreader hand there's a B C's Jim Ryan. The first U. S execution of a female inmate and 67 years was supposed to happen today. Right now, though, a court has put that on hold. The judge granted the stay late Monday, citing the need to determine Lisa Montgomery's mental competency. The Kansas woman got the death sentence for killing Bobby Joe, stand it and cutting out her baby. She was planning to raise the child as her own. That girl is now 16. Montgomery had a history of faking pregnancies and tricks dented into believing the two were meeting up so Montgomery could adopt a puppy. Montgomery's lawyers have argued that sexual abuse during her childhood lead to mental illness I'm Julie Walker, Boston native Casino mogul and GOP mega donor, Sheldon Adelson has died of the disease. Jim McKay has more on his life. Adelson was born in Boston and grew up in Dorchester. He rose to become the chief executive officer. The Las Vegas Sands Corporation, which owns casinos all over the world. Adelson was one of the early casino executives that look to spearhead American based casinos and Asian markets. In his later years, he became known for his major political donations him and his wife were known as the biggest backers of President Trump's re election campaign and 2020. He had been suffering from a cancer related illness recently in the past week. He had taken time off for surgery, his wife confirming this morning that he died of a long illness. Sheldon Adelson DEAD at 87 Jim McKay WBZ Boston's news radio in Massachusetts. Raised filmmaker has died. Director Anna Rose King died January 3rd after losing her battle with lung cancer, family says King died in New York City hospital She directed a total of seven films. One of which was inspired by the passing of her broadcast executive Father Roger King, the movie titled Good Enough Centers on the New York City based flight attendant who seeks to find a lost relative after her father's death. Popular television hover Syria's soon we'll be making its way to the tip of the Cape for filming of their 10th season. WBC's Kim Tunnicliffe takes a look selectman in Provincetown have approved 20th Century Fox is request to film the American horror story anthology in town from February 1st through March 6th selectwoman Lease, King says This could be a big boon for businesses in the area struggling because of the pandemic. It's off season. You're talking about bringing a lot of economic activity town at a time when businesses Could really use those dollars. King is a bit concerned about large crowds gathering due to the popularity of the show. She's seeking assurances that crowd control measures will be in place which enforce existing covert 19 rules and regulations. The cast of 100 will include Kathy Bates, Sarah Paulson and Macaulay Culkin. Kevin Tonic, Left WBZ Boston's news radio. Listening

President Trump FBI Homeland Security Department President Elect Biden Vice President Elect Harris Governor Charlie Baker Jim Ryan Massachusetts Judge Richard Cortez Boston House ABC Aaron Carter U. S. Capitol Montgomery Abc News Lisa Montgomery Jim Mckay Hidalgo County
Waiting for passengers, American puts Boeing Max in the air

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:38 sec | 11 months ago

Waiting for passengers, American puts Boeing Max in the air

"Boeing may be on the verge of selling more of its 7 37 MAX planes, details from Kemal's great Herschel Bloomberg News reports. Ryan Air could make the announcement as soon as tomorrow. Europe's biggest discount airline already has 135 MAX jets on order and options to bring that total to 200 or more. Analysts say a significant order from a customer like Ryanair would bolster confidence in the ground and Max and help replenish a Boeing backlog has been depleted. Since the start of the pandemic. The airline's chief executive officer, Michael O'Leary, has called the Max again Game changer that will allow Ryan air to add capacity while reducing fuel burn. Neither side is commenting beyond that. Greg Hirsch Holt Co. Moh

Herschel Bloomberg Ryan Air Boeing Kemal Ryanair Europe Michael O'leary Ryan Greg Hirsch Holt Co.
Coronavirus Vaccine: Race for a Covid-19 Cure

Bloomberg Best

01:41 min | 11 months ago

Coronavirus Vaccine: Race for a Covid-19 Cure

"Now the race for a vaccine was part of a discussion that I moderated from our recent Bloomberg New economy form a panel. It really looked at how the world can ensure that we never ever have another catastrophe like Covad 19. That panel was with Stefan Bonsall, chief executive officer at Madonna. Regina Dugan CEO it welcome Leap, and Dr Wu Zun Yo, chief epidemiologist at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. We began by hearing from a Dernis CEO. On their vaccine. We announce that the first experiment disease or face pre study To study your 50,000 participants. So the most 95% because see, but the piece of experience more excited is the fact that off 11 equal with severe disease. They were all of those people were no on the vaccine. And so if you think about it, what does that mean? I mean that once we get the final data, we should be able to see this is confident that if you get over thing 95% chance of you know this news. And if you get is easy with my symptoms. We need not have cereal this season that we know that that's what he's been a big impact in terms off hospitalization for patient with the worst. I seen you professionally in the world's there. It will be impacted has had, but only in human life, of course, but on the mental health on the economy. We think this could be a game changer. And so what we're doing now is the thing the final data or locked up. Submitting these regret origins is there on the world. And hopefully I will be getting the vaccine approving the emergency use before the end of the year. We're making us much Philip this week, and then we said we'd have before me in a very expensive meat, and those is Ready to ship as soon as we have rigged artery

Stefan Bonsall Regina Dugan Dr Wu Zun Yo Chinese Center For Disease Con Dernis Severe Disease Bloomberg Madonna Philip
ThoughtTrace With CEO Nick Vandivere

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

03:22 min | 11 months ago

ThoughtTrace With CEO Nick Vandivere

"Nick command of you're welcome to its great speed today. Yeah thanks peter. And it's a pleasure well Nickie where the chief executive officer of thought trace and for those who are listening. Who may be less familiar with the company thought it provides one unified platform to discover and understand what matters in your contracts and documents talk a little bit about how you bring that to life in a bit more about the company itself. Please yes early. So i i would say we describe ourselves as a document understanding company that utilizes ai to help people understand meaning an intense very complex document business problems so if you like your minds really go to to law firms legal in a vigorous nature of contracts which is which is certainly a found little use case for what we do but i think the end of the day you have business users could be asset managers. They could be people working in private equity doing your diligence. They can be folks that are looking at things like title around route. Land valuations people that work in manufacturing with large assemblies. I think like that they're professionals out. There documents professionals spend a tremendous amount of time in a lot of values that they create is centered around their ability to understand a lot of information that is bound up in documents a little dents difficult to throw in their specific and that's really the solve those problems in do it in a very very chunky way for for our customers well having spent time with people in law firms and asset managers people in private equity at some of the other examples you gave. I must say some of those. I forgive me for painting with a broad brush strokes. Some of them are late adopters in terms of technology. And i'm curious how you've obviously successfully made the case to a lot of these people who have special training and expertise in the case of law firms. They have a special degree at you. And i don't have and And made the case that this is something that's going to be a boon to them in add to their experience and benefit their customers the same time how he made that case in that help them with evolution that is that is a great question the risk of sounding heretical. A tech nations podcast. I think with those those were those late adopting users as to make make the thing that you do in the problem that you solved more about the job to be done are less about technology. So we're a company like we're company. Data scientists a professionals and subject matter experts and developers that sort of thing so we don't be wrong Very much geek out on technology that as saying but at the end of the day we've got to connect those dots for not just for companies but for the actual end users. The people that are in the software on a daily basis. We've got to connect the dots for them. In a way that makes sense to them. And a you know i think the moniker of late adopter or laggard that oftentimes get supplied. These are these people that work in certain industries is because the work they do is so highly specific. That jenner tools. Don't work right like we have to be cognizant of that in terms of how we think about solution using virtual anything for them. So it's you know. I think the key thing for us but for any company or a cio running running one of those companies is to try to look back at the solution set technology stack and do it through the eyes of the user and then and then really craft experience around that. That's that's that's our focus Works

Nickie Nick AI Peter
Zillow rallying like it's Zoom during pandemic housing boom

Charlie Parker

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Zillow rallying like it's Zoom during pandemic housing boom

"Is becoming the new Azuma during the pandemic. Greg Jared a. Bloomberg has this and focus report. Home sales Zoom on Zillow since home sales cratered When the lockdown began last spring, they've resumed with gusto, a combo of low mortgage rates and increasing familiarity with tech tools to search and view virtually has taken home sales to new heights and demand is strong. Ivy Zelman, CEO and Selman and Associates. People better focused on their homes during this pandemic Saturday night Live may make fun of the zoo map for business use, and if you were a pain to be honest, now, Zillow, the online real term that already had home search and view tools on board drew an average 236 million unique users monthly in the quarter. Record and up 21% from last year. Cheryl Bomber chief executive officer of homebuilder Taylor, Morrison says they put up a virtual platform quickly. Actually, we've seen week over week improvements since early April. I'm Gregg Jarrett Bloomberg Business for news

Azuma Greg Jared Ivy Zelman Selman And Associates Bloomberg Saturday Night Live Cheryl Bomber Zillow Homebuilder Taylor Morrison Gregg Jarrett Bloomberg
Women have been disproportionately impacted by covid-19

Forum

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Women have been disproportionately impacted by covid-19

"Been disproportionately impacted by the job losses during the pandemic to the point that some are referring to today's recession as a she session. Many of the pressures women already face in the work force, such as the gender pay gap barriers to advance. Men and lack of flexibility have been exacerbated. The crisis could, however, usher and new policy standards and support systems for women across industries and income levels. Here with me to talk about all this is Alexis Crib. Covic, senior partner with McKinsey and co author of Women in the Workplace. 2020 report. Welcome to the program. Alexis Crisco, Vic Chris. Covic. I'm sorry. I'm getting that right. Thank you for having me and we also have in helicopters. Litwin, clinical psychologist and founder of Latinos Think Big a network of professional women and Lumina. Modern psychotherapy practice. Welcome in helicopters. Littwin. Thank you. And Serena Khan, chief executive officer of Women's Foundation of California. Welcome to the program. Serena Con. Thanks so much, and Alexis Krukov itch. I'd like to start with you and some of what the McKinsey Workforce study told us. Why are women facing greater job loss than men? And where are we seeing the biggest impacts? Salute Lee. So the headline here is that we're facing a crossroads in corporate America today, and the reason for that is on one side this pandemic while a humanitarian crisis at its heart has created An opening for flexible work, and that's a good thing because that's the number one thing. Women have said. In the past, they need to advance more in the workplace environment. On the flip side, one in four women today is saying because of the pandemic and the context it's creating in their workplace environment and their home environment. They may need to step back or step out of the workforce. And one and four equates to two million women that would unwind years of progress of women's advancement in the workplace. And it's just something we can't afford to lose. And we're really seeing the gendered nature of work here to right Serena Khan, not only where Caretaking responsibilities end up falling when push comes to shove, but also who falls into this essential worker category and the disproportionate impact on black and brown women's who We're looking at a really layered intersectional issue here. That's exactly right. All of us are being impacted by the pandemic, but we're not all being impacted in the same way. Oh, the gendered impact of the pandemic are particularly profound for especially women of color working moms, gender non conforming folks this pandemic. Highlighting problems that we've needed to work on together to solve three the pandemic, So we know, for example in California. Freak O bed, two thirds of tipped workers, part time workers, minimum wage earners where women and primarily women of color even though California Is the wealthy of state in the nation. It's also has the highest rate of poverty and the people who are living in poverty in California are women of color and their kids. And so when we think about this pandemic, whether It's women who are the essential workers who are making up 80% of our healthcare workforce, or the retail and grocery workers. The essential workers that Are still working or on the flip side. They're the ones that have lost their jobs because the majority of us are working in the restaurant industry. Oh, our other retail industry that have lost significant Numbers of jobs, so it's a very gendered epidemic and Serena Con you've spoken about how there's no going back to normal that that normal wasn't that good to begin with, when it came to gender equity in the workforce. That's right. You know, this pandemic is shining a light on all that was wrong with Our country, our world, our state, and so you know, as hundreds of thousands of women leave the workforce to manage what is really an unmanageable amounts of caretaking remote schooling. You know, our child care costs were making up. Ah, upwards of, you know, 60 70% of the single moms income that's not sustainable and So you know, we have an opportunity here to think about what is the future that we want on. DWI can change some of those systems that we have an opportunity to really Think about care, work into value care and compensate that work fairly as we figure out howto move forward, But the pandemic has really forced us to reckon with how much care we all need, whether we're caring for our Children. For each other for ourselves for our elders on DH so we can build some new solutions for us that the women Foundation California we have believed Since our founding in 1979 that people who are closest to the problems in their communities are also closest to the solutions. And so we have innovative ideas coming out of community. Based leaders about what we can do post pandemics. I think it's important for us now, Tio You know, make sure that people are getting their basic needs met. So you know, one of the other things that we saw very early on in the pandemic is that not everybody was safer at home. That rates of domestic violence were spiking upwards of 40 to 80% and all of California 58 counties. So we and yet so as the need went up the Situation for the shelters was that they had to that They had actually left physical space because of the need to do physical distance event. Soon, though, there's a lot that Yeah, so there's just a lot that we're seeing and that we can think about solving. Yes,

California Serena Khan Serena Con Women's Foundation Of Californ Women Foundation California Mckinsey Workforce Alexis Crib Mckinsey Alexis Krukov Alexis Crisco Covic Senior Partner Founder America Lumina LEE Chief Executive Officer
FCC Chairman says he will 'clarify' tech legal shield

Techmeme Ride Home

05:08 min | 1 year ago

FCC Chairman says he will 'clarify' tech legal shield

"I try hard to leave politics out of this podcast. Believe me. That's why been staying away from the whole story about the New York Post and just son and facebook and twitter taking steps to limit the reach of that story on their platforms because I find that a mostly political story that's only secondarily a text story plus I don't know where I fall in terms of the argument around is this facebook and twitter crossing some sort of line. On. The one hand we want them to be more editorial right and on the other hand, we don't want them to be editorial at all and on the other hand we do and I don't know it's sort of maddening. But I do find myself agreeing with the people who say if twitter and facebook limit the spread of something that's not censorship they're not taking anything down. They're not preventing something from being published from getting out there. It already has been published. It is out there. It's more that they're. Not to amplify something that is already out there, and that's I. think a fair choice like if I decide not to cover a story on this podcast, that's my choice. If I decide to try to stay away from politics on the show, that's my choice. That's not me censoring something that's me saying that's not something I choose to talk about. Quitting Parker Thompson on twitter. I have read the argument a lot in the last day that social media is the Public Square? No. The Internet is the Public Square and it is infinite. Twitter is an Arby's on the square and your inside yelling about their lack of Vegan options being literal fascism and quote. So that's the most I'll say about that if I can help it but I did want to talk about this swirling around all of the things like this in the background is the whole discussion of amending section to thirty of the Communications Decency Act the thing that shields platforms like facebook and twitter from liability over content users post on those platforms. Well coincidentally, yesterday SEC commissioner a jeep pie suddenly said that the FCC will start a rulemaking action to clarify the meaning of section two thirty and that social media doesn't have quote special immunity denied to other media outlets and quote quoting Bloomberg the announcement came hours after Senate Republicans demanded the chief executive officers of facebook and twitter explain steps. Their sites took to limit the distribution of a controversial New York Post article concerning Hunter Biden the son of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden twitter and facebook said they did it because of questions about the articles accuracy and use of hacked material end quote. Problem is pie and the FCC have no authority over section two thirty like none. Quoting, Mike, MAZANEC IN TECH DIRT PIE is wrong. Almost everything he says in his statement the FCC has no jurisdiction over Internet websites. Previous lawsuits have already held that furthermore, the FCC has jurisdiction over section two thirty, which was explicitly written to deny the FCC authority over websites. The FCC has no power to reinterpret the law. The final paragraph is the most ridiculous of all pie is correct that social media companies have a First Amendment right to free speech and section two. Thirty as was written and properly regularly interpreted by dozens of court decisions. None of which the FCC has ever said a word about helps guarantee that right is not diminished through frivolous bogus and misdirected litigation. Also, the claim that the immunity is quote denied to other media outlets is straight up wrong. Any outlet is protected from liability for third party content on their websites. It's why Fox News and Breitbart can have comments on their websites. It's why things like Parlor and Gab can. Pie knows this he's just being disingenuous in terms of actual impact. All this will serve to do is row people up waste a ton of time and not actually change anything because it can't but it will create a huge mess in the meantime distracting everybody and wasting a ton of resources and quote. Actually went to underline something that Mike said there because a lot of other people have been making this point as well. If your concern is that platforms have a power to quell speech were take things down or limit reach or quote censor things if that's what you believe is happening if that's your concern, the last thing you WanNa do is monkey with section two thirty because if platforms are liable to be sued for everything that billions of people post trillions of times a day if they're suddenly opened up to lawsuits at scale, then believe me they will immediately and very aggressively take a ton of things down if they didn't they end up risking being sued out of existence. You can be unhappy with editorial decisions made by the platforms I. Often am where you can think that section two thirty is a bad thing I often do but I'm wondering if it's possible to do both simultaneously.

Twitter FCC Facebook Public Square New York Post PIE Mike Parker Thompson Hunter Biden Joe Biden Fox News SEC GAB Bloomberg Senate Arby Breitbart Chief Executive
Raytheon doubles job cuts to 15,000, citing airline downturn

WBZ Afternoon News

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Raytheon doubles job cuts to 15,000, citing airline downturn

"Raytheon Technologies is planning to eliminate more than 15,000 jobs this year at his corporate offices, jet engine maker Pratt Whitney and aviation in military equipment manufacturer Collins Aerospace, the chief executive officer. Greg Hayes announced the revised job cut numbers today during a Morgan Stanley analyst conference. The cuts are nearly double what the company had disclosed in July amid a downturn in the airline industry. During the pandemic

Pratt Whitney Chief Executive Officer Raytheon Technologies Greg Hayes Morgan Stanley Collins Aerospace Analyst
Assassin's Creed creative director Ashraf Ismail fired

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Assassin's Creed creative director Ashraf Ismail fired

"Be saw better tehmina essay has dismissed the creative director of the newest assassin's creed game. The latest result of the metoo reckoning at the French video game publisher that has been swirling for two months. Ashraf is male the director on this falls assassin's creed. Mahala was accused by a fan in July and June sorry of about his marital status in order to have a relationship with her shortly afterward at. Shortly. Afterward Ishmael wrote onto it or is mail wrote on twitter that he had stepped down from his role adding that he was quote deeply sorry to everyone hurt in this but you remain a US off employees. The publisher inform staff this week that he had been he was dismissed. As a result of Investigations Ashraf is male has been dismissed from you. We saw and is no longer employees. A UBISOFT spokesperson confirmed at Bloomberg is male didn't immediately. To request for comment. In late June dozens of people mostly women spoke out on social media about their experiences facing sexual harassment and assault in the video game in streaming industries many of those accusations centred on Ubisoft, which has since faced scrutiny for what many describe as a boys club culture chief executive officer eased will has promised big changes in interviews with BusinessWeek more. Than three dozen current and former Yousof employees painted a picture of a company that had been aware of many of these allegations for years since allegations emerge Ubisoft, his parted ways with top executives ten Tommy Francois and maxine blonde as well as several other employees in lower positions. Last month, the company pushed out chief creative officer Serge has who has coat. Sorry I know I'm not saying that French name. One of the more powerful people at Ubisoft. Is. Male. Spent eleven years at us off Montreal and also directed to previous assassin's creed games. Assassin's creed black flag in twenty thirteen and assassin's creed origin in twenty seventeen.

Ubisoft Ishmael Ashraf Publisher Director Chief Creative Officer Chief Executive Officer Mahala Montreal Twitter Tommy Francois Bloomberg United States Yousof Serge Businessweek Harassment Assault
McDonald's sues ousted CEO, alleging employee relationships

All Things Considered

02:59 min | 1 year ago

McDonald's sues ousted CEO, alleging employee relationships

"McDonald's has made striking new allegations against its former CEO of the company says Steve Easterbrook hid sexual relationships with employees and concealed the evidence. The fast food giant fired Easterbrook last year. Now it is suing him to get back his multi $1,000,000 severance package. NPR's Alina Selya HQ reports. What makes this case pretty remarkable is that it's been nine months since Easterbrook was fired. The reason a consensual relationship with an employee that amounted to sexting and American corporate culture typically is all about sorting these kinds of internal scandals quickly and behind closed doors. Here's Tim Hubbard, a professor at the University of Notre Dame. There's always this tendency to wanna settle it quietly and get it completely out of the media. But here we are talking about it again because now McDonald's Is suing Easterbrook, saying he covered up more inappropriate behavior. McDonald's made this unusual choice because back in November, Easterbrook left with the severance estimated at over $40 million. But in July, an anonymous tip led the company to search corporate servers and their investigators found explicit photos and videos sent from Easter. Brooks corporate account evidence of sexual relationships with three employees, including one woman for whom Easterbrook approved a stock grant worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. I think that there was an expectation as they were negotiating a settlement. That the former chief executive officer be open and honest. The company says he lied to get a better exit payout and is suing to get that money back. Few companies find these kind of public battles with former executives. MacDonald says. It's already moved to block Easterbrook from selling any stock he might still have from his equity awards. I don't really see the likelihood of him returning the money without A bit of force needed. I think it gets pretty nasty Easter. Brooks legal team did not respond to NPR's enquiries, and we should note that McDonald's is among NPR's recent sponsors. Mr Brooks, Compensation for being fired drew much attention and criticism last year. It included six months of severance pay shares and other equity, leading many low wage frontline workers to muse about their pay gap with executives. And use the moment to highlight allegations of rampant sexual harassment of female employees by male co workers and managers across McDonald's restaurants sharing to Johnny directs the time's up Legal Defense Fund, which is backing workplace sexual harassment lawsuits by McDonald's workers were going to say You can't do certain things that were going to take conduct seriously. And they should be taking it seriously when it comes to their workers being sexually harassed, and, at a minimum committed 40 million. They're trying to get back from Easterbrook to stop that. Easterbrook successor, CEO Chris Kempinski often speaks about re committing to company values of integrity and inclusion. On Monday, McDonald's told workers it's conducting in global survey and listening sessions to assess the state of its corporate culture.

Steve Easterbrook Mcdonald Mr Brooks CEO NPR University Of Notre Dame Alina Selya Chief Executive Officer Tim Hubbard Harassment Chris Kempinski Macdonald Professor Legal Defense Fund Johnny
"chief executive officer" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"The chief executive officer of the brewers association expects numbers to start cutting production in two to three weeks so there could be a shortage now everybody run out by your Miller lite I guess to run out and buy your whatever they get you make your own way well no well that's the thing though is the sort of stream uses the same yeah use the canister right yeah that does it's like it's so I don't know go get your toilet paper in your and your PBR if you expect to survive Bill Cosby is trending today he was hoping to be among the prisoners who are being set free around the country during the corona virus pandemic he's a convicted spy convicted sex offender of course he asked for a compassionate release his lawyers said the eighty two year old has a bunch of underlying medical issues that mean the virus would likely prove fatal if you got it well behind bars his lawyer said Mr Cosby was not given a life sentence nor a death sentence he was denied release because he's considered a violent offenders so he's not going anywhere wow and we're talking about tiger king just a second ago it's racked up more streaming minutes in its first full week of release than any other show according to Nielsen users watch more than five point three billion the minutes of the show between March twenty third and the twenty night that's more than fifty percent and head of the second show on the list which was Ozark as three point five billion minutes across the first ten days tiger king averaged nineteen million viewers making it one of Netflix's biggest shows today that yeah of course it went viral everybody was talking about it which is one big reason but then you gotta figure that the corona virus is the other reason like I got nothing else to do so yeah the combination of those two for sure well once is that five point three billion minutes in a week though yeah it's national cheddar fries day I'm here for that national look alike day and national pineapple upside down cake day today yeah where Graham all those things you have for that I'm here for the cheese fries you can have the pineapple upside down cake balls I'll take both thank you it's too sweet no no that's too sweet little bite when the bite earn and it probably cheese fries is it don't don't deliver well yesterday I had blood okay yeah I got the brace Getty dates like barbecue with cheese is only like the not the nachos with their fries right fried so good you know I got that Portillo's the whole can the screen in the live so there's not one one week back on she believes you can't I love it amazing little little port to Portillo's use all over the place I love it you know what this is a open a more or more during that today I'm and I'm gonna like the little I'll take a video of it we'll do blogs and a thousand Bucks traffic and accidents still causing problems in elk Grove village divine at Arlington Heights road inbound Kennedy of quick twenty minutes here to downtown inbound Eisenhower does slow at Ashland twenty nine minutes from fifty three and I'm funny green and that's traffic on one oh three five kiss FM healthcare workers like me are in a fight for your life and ours our government's neglect has left us without protective equipment president trump needs to lead make sure all essential workers are protected help us protect all workers which is responsible for the content of this advertising dot org authorized by any candidate or candidate's committee my name is Kimberly trail and as a lover in trader black art I spent all of my days thinking about black futurity I'm deeply committed to telling the stories of people who have unique visions and bring them to life those are people like the movement artist John bugs and Lubbock put together our we're in this kind of weird gray area a lot of times just people in the hood that appreciate what we're doing and we were from and I also like men went to contemporary waiting on the what that is yeah but it's a great challenge because we're showing the world that you know there's no boundaries of history but if I've learned anything in my years of studying uplifting black artists is that we all have the power to create something beautiful that's why I'm pleased to introduce you to people who are broken down boundaries it's a big deal they're a big deal and it's time we give them our attention listen to your attention please hello podcast with I heart radio on the I heart radio app on apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

chief executive officer brewers
"chief executive officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Chief executive officer I'm not United spoke to Bloomberg a little area this is an unprecedented time we've seen very strong demand for some of our essential food and beverage products especially in those communities in countries that have been hard hit we have three priorities and the first one is the health and safety of our employees only will stay healthy we can make a positive contribution here next of course business continuity is key so even under adverse conditions we're trying to maintain manufacturer although essential food and beverage products and then with the physical presence of in a hundred and eighty seven countries it's very important to us that we also give a helping hand open above the call of duty into communities around the world will will will present to you all you'll rule material supply guaranteed from the minute we saw this crisis has spread we were trying to improve inventory levels at all levels of manufacturing so inbound materials working process and also finished goods you're more interviews like this one on Bloomberg television streaming live on Bloomberg dot com and on the Bloomberg mobile app or check your local cable listings market headline breaking news twenty four hours a day at the Bloomberg dot com the Bloomberg business the Bloomberg business slash in Moscow European stocks paring gains alongside U. S. stock index futures which have turned lower as investors molest image of how soon economies can rebound when the corona virus outbreak eases we check the markets every fifteen minutes throughout the trading day on Bloomberg S. and P. futures down three points and Dow futures up twenty two nasdaq futures down eighteen the dax in Germany is up four tenths of a percent ten year treasury up thirteen thirty seconds yeah point seven three percent the yield on the.

Chief executive officer United Bloomberg Germany
"chief executive officer" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on KTOK

"Is the chief executive officer the CEO of the American diabetes association which is the nation's largest voluntary Health Organization and the global authority on diabetes but here's the thing Traci not only talks the talk she walks the walk because Tracy herself has been thriving while living with type two diabetes for over fifteen years and she's the first CEO in the organization's almost eighty year history that is living with type two diabetes so welcome Tracy thank you so much Shelly so glad to be here so you are absolutely the experts that we need to cut through all first off what is the official definition of diabetes diabetes is really when your blood glucose levels and sometimes those are called blood sugar levels are higher than normal and this is called hypoglycemia if your body does not print deuce enough insulin or make insulin your blood sugars will rise and that is the cause of diabetes I often talk about you know I try to target my own diabetes blood sugar to be around eighty three that is a a number that people who are not living with diabetes and what their normal fasting blood sugars really are what is standard me Tracy is the numbers here at one AM eleven Americans has diabetes but the next figure just killed nearly half of all American adults have diabetes or pre diabetes that means half of America is basically sick right Shelly it is astounding this is one of the biggest Affan Dan Max health crisis is of our time you are so right there are thirty million people living with diabetes one out of two are living with pre diabetes or diabetes and there are eighty four million people living with pre diabetes but ninety percent of those people don't even know that they have it because you're not necessarily feeling this by the time you go to the doctors or the hospital with complications from diabetes you have been living with elevated blood sugars for quite some time and that's why this is so on water means people don't know and I don't think people understand the seriousness of this epidemic and they are is a debate in the medical community there are some who call it pre diabetes and there are some who say if you're pre diabetic you should treat yourself like you're diabetic I know there is the official diagnosis and then the the other but there are steps that people should take if they are pre diabetic correct you're hitting on some things Shelly there are two actually there multiple types of of diabetes the most common ones that people talk about there is.

chief executive officer CEO Health Organization Traci Tracy Shelly America official Dan Max ninety percent fifteen years eighty year
"chief executive officer" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"McDonald's chief executive officer is left the company after violating a company policy by engaging in a consensual relationship with an employee the fast food giant said former president and CEO Steve Easterbrook demonstrated poor judgment McDonald's for bids managers from having a romantic relationship with direct or indirect reports in an email to employees Easterbrook acknowledged he had a relationship with an employee and said it was a mistake McDonald's board of directors voted on Easter Brooks departure Friday after conducting a thorough review the board of directors names Chris kept them ski who recently served as president of McDonald's USA as its new president and CEO Julie Walker New York convicted killer fatally stabbed a former co worker during nineteen ninety two burglary Charles Rhines was executed by lethal injection at seven thirty nine PM in South Dakota this is down all are calm apple has become the latest tech giant to contribute to solving California's housing crisis the company's two and a half billion dollar pledge includes a billion dollars to build new homes for people with low to moderate income this apple is also donating a billion dollars to a home buyer mortgage assistance fund and three hundred million to make apple own land in San Jose available for affordable housing fellow San Francisco Bay Area tech giants Google and Facebook each has promised about a billion dollars to the effort to build more homes the bay area's been swamped with a fluent tech workers leading to bidding wars for a limited supply of houses I'm my company walkie police arrested a man suspected of throwing battery acid on a Hispanic mad he says his attacker asked him why did you come here and invade my country police said Monday they arrested sixty one year old white man and are investigating the case is a hate crime for the stores to townhall dot com hi Patrick pause one thing I can get them to kind of plans do you have full Smith said this is Bruce golf news scores of X. dot this is the wind packs a mostly about social connection those in V. D. I. Q. Dr Sandham Adela seem good also on to the tune of intelligent Mr titles and feeling that oil price for tight as a dentist in the aisle.

"chief executive officer" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"And chief executive officer of the Pacific research institute that's a think tank based in the bay area that she found a back in nineteen seven nine please welcome back to the program Sally pipes they sell here you don't well thank you getting ready for the debate tonight is the what what one the docket for healthcare with Bernie Sanders and I was the foreign what what is on the docket for healthcare well I mean I think it is I think it's going to be very the number one issue in this election right now that Elizabeth Warren seems to be in top spot and she is a minor on to Bernie Sanders single payer Medicare for all she is still supporting it although she won't say you know how much it's going to cost and how will it be paid for she thinks that the rich the rich will be able to be tax in order to pay for it but if you know where your honor enough which people to cover a program that would cost between thirty two and forty trillion dollars over ten years so she's going to have to come up and say you know how it could be paid for so we'll see if she does that tonight because she is the right thing rising in the coal and park Bernie has had a heart attack and thank god within America right in in base and I am not in not in Cuba and not in Cuba right exactly well what is the position of some of the others what's the what's the health care position of common Harris welcome here at the court being a senator from California to help she has been in favor of single payer Medicare for all but she's a flip flop or on the on the issue your during the the first debate she said she put up her hand yes I support Medicare for all men later that night I didn't understand the question no I really am and for a slower approach to Medicare for all a public option she was in Ohio as speaking it and an old folks home and she'd already get said before that she supported single payer and it's ninety two year old lady at the nursing home that just let leave our health care alone and I thought that was terrific so I think one of the reasons that comma have been falling in the cold and the people fear the flip flop but they don't really know where he stands I would say deep down you know she is very level I think she does support single payer meeting there would be no private health insurance left in this country and we would all be on a government run plan such as in Canada where I'm from where you have long wait the average waiting Canada today from seeing a primary care doctor getting treatment by a specialist is just under twenty weeks Kerik ration pretty older people and no access to the latest treatments long wait for MRI CT scans and things like that but I think that's what she what she really wants that she she she can't hurt that she said also in that CNN debate back email earlier this year and within in January in Iowa which is that that she supported single payer and then later that day she also said she didn't she ever see with speaking too fast because let's see Sally pipes is my guess is with Pacific research institutions also columnist with Forbes I'm still confused about whether or not Medicare for all means also for illegal aliens where where do they stand on that what what question of course in California you know Larry the a governor news and signed a bill which would allow which would allow about ninety thousand illegals now up to the age of twenty sixteen nineteen to get medical in California at a cost of ninety eight million dollars I think that a lot of young people under twenty six that are illegal immigrants will probably come to California just to get to get free health care even though young people tend not to be a sticker older people like myself but what in the end he was in the second debate when at the time the people at their candidates were asked if they supported yeah health care for illegal immigrants every single one of them put out their hand grenades at about eleven million illegal to again be eligible for for government run healthcare I think that number eleven million is probably low but they think you know it Bernie Sanders is that healthcare is a right and everyone should have a right whether they're legal or illegal I totally disagree with this I'm an immigrant myself and I you know had a hard time getting through all the various systems in order to become an American American citizens before that you get a green card and so I'm very much a game you know not very many great not pregnant that you know if we can offer you know free health care free education and free welfare programs three there wouldn't be as many illegal in this country Sally pipes I sent you an article from NPR call trump is trying hard to thwart obamacare how's that going in the list what they consider to be the five biggest changes to the law since president trump taken office first of all do you agree that both the five things that the list are the five biggest changes at that have taken place well I think that you know as as you know the president ran when he was running for president on an agenda which would repeal and replace obamacare I thinking with elected because of that because the American people found a bomb the care wasn't working for them you know the high premium high deductible small network of doctors and hospitals and in many cases only one plan a computer crime on the exchanges so you know that the issues that are in that article the five thing I mean both of them are good things the individual mandate being eliminated that was a good thing many young people would just pay the individual mandate penalty of six hundred ninety five dollars or two point five percent income because of a lot lower cheaper than buying an exchange plan on average for young people about four hundred fifty dollars a month so so it wasn't working and and the people who are older and sicker put a lot of pressure on the system and then pay them for insurance companies had to raise premiums even higher on the issue of Medicaid work requirements I think that is a very good idea we now have seventy three million people in this country on Medicaid the program for low income Americans anyone earning a low one hundred thirty eight percent of the federal poverty level and quite a lot of these people there are two what will not go and get a job because they don't want to lose that there's three Medicare Medicaid and they also don't really want to go to work this is a way to get people those people who can work and are able to work off the government program and you know get back into the labor force and contribute to society cost sharing reduction subsidies to insurers have ended is that good or bad I think it was it was a good thing I mean I I totally agree president trump was right on that the insurance companies are being paid these cost sharing reduction subsidies to cover the cost of the people on obamacare who are we're getting subsidies and if you know the number of people on obamacare on the exchanges better healthcare dot gov or state exchange is it's really been pretty constant for twenty fourteen through now about anywhere from up to maximum twelve million down to about ten eleven million eighty six percent of those people who are on the on the exchanges are getting subsidies about ten million people are getting subsidies two million are paying and of the two million paying a lot of people who you know found opinions were to hide actually Glock their their healthcare so it is a it is a good thing that the insurer should not be subsidized by the government to cover them my guess is short term okay this is Mike my guess is Sally pipes with Pacific research institute Saudi we take a break we come back you said that healthcare is going to be probably the top issue in this election what is president trump argument what is he going to say I've eliminated the individual mandate I've eliminated cost sharing I've done this I've done that what is he going to say in order to turn the numbers around the show him being under water on the issue of healthcare I'm.

"chief executive officer" Discussed on My Career Fit

My Career Fit

11:53 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on My Career Fit

"Impact makers headquartered in Richmond Virginia and as a for profit management and technology consulting firm that is committed to contributing one hundred percent of its net profits to the community over the life of the company their community contributions rival companies one hundred times their size due to this revolutionary model as founding beat corporation impact makers has been named best for the world for the past six years as well as listed among the INC. Five thousand fastest growing companies list for the past seven years on today's podcast. I have the pleasure of speaking to chief executive officer Louis Broom. Hi Louis Broom Ceo of impact makers. I'd like to thank my personal. History has really positioned me well for this role. I've worked in industry with twelve years working on Wall Street running leading global. It teams on some pretty interesting projects. So I've been very technical roles I've worked in consulting for a while. This is my second. Ceo POSITION FOR CONSULTING Company. I have experience as an entrepreneur. Both in consulting and food service believe it or not is Baker Chef In College I started a community activists organization trying to make the world or better place. So I really couldn't be happier in this role and I'm very grateful and humbled to have this opportunity so I've been it impact makers for three years and for the last six months. I've really been leaning the organization through a brand refresh and by brand. I mean more than just updating our logo and website. It's really been a about Canada's more focused on how we create value for our clients and being clear on who our clients and why right so beyond this latest strategic imperative on a daily basis Think of my role really enabling and mobilizing the collective wisdom of the organization And the efforts And and how do we really live our brand and tactically? This means in our participate in either of our go to market solutions Help think through how to structure deals and our business development pursuits of course engage with clients to make sure we're exceeding their expectations and ultimately making sure we're focused on supporting our community partners through pro bono work in financial contributions as I mentioned at the top of the episode. Impact makers is a founding B. Corporation a certified B Corporation is a business that meets the highest standards of verified social and environmental performance public transparency and legal accountability to bounce Prophet and purpose and they're accelerating global culture shift to redefine success in business and build a more inclusive and sustainable economy. I asked Louis unpacked for us. More about what? Impact makers does and more about their social mission as a B corporation. So let me tell you about our position ourselves in the marketplace. In how I believe that differentiates us to win in really starts with our mission which is to make lasting impacts in. How do we do? That is by our model for delivering value to our clients We have Very technically strong teams delivering holistic solutions across our core services of cloud data cybersecurity and enterprise agility while at the same time we provide strong consulting services that ensures that the technical solutions were building our line to our clients. Business needs expectations and that the solutions are adopted. Bar Client organizations so that they can actually realize the value of the solutions. We appreciate that. The problems that we're all brought into solve will cost change in our clients organizations and that and that changes heart so to make sure we're able to create this tangible value with our technical solutions. We understand we have to be good it consulting while. All this may not sound revolutionary. Unless you're one of the big four. This is not really easy to do but we do it. It's unusual for firm our size of a little less than one hundred people to make this happen at a price value. That beats the big four all day long but finally a real differentiator is our unique model of being a for profit company. That works as a social enterprise for good in the community. Our clients like this about us but our staff loves this about US and it's what drives so much of our culture and that really brings in top talent. It attracts talent like no other. People want to come work here for our commitment to our community which tends to mean. They are people who are just committed individuals so when they're working with our clients they're working from sort of committed. Dna having a lasting impact. And how that translates for our community partners is their funding is focused on their mission. You know they're operating budget to build out a cloud solution or to build dashboards or to build an analytics platform right. They don't have that kind of funding so when we're able to throw a pro bono work come in and actually allow these organizations to scale work more efficiently. Give them insights or give them capabilities that they really couldn't afford to buy. That is really making an impact them just through our team being able to do what they do. Day In day. Out For our clients. These are four values maximize integrity foster collaboration cared deeply and make a lasting impact. Which is also our tagline and while they're all equally important and powerful we really believe cared deeply and make a lasting impact or quite unique and differentiated and it really is what makes our culture stand out against other companies. I don't know many other companies that would claim that one of their values is care deeply and what that means Saas tactically. Is We care deeply about that? Client success you know we care deeply about other human beings so we kinda just go out our work sort of through that lens so many ways you know having that deep set of values Really I think builds on our culture and really makes us a differentiated place to work with their headquarters in Richmond. Virginia clients across the East Coast in an emerging office in Washington DC. I asked Lewis to describe what truly sets. Impact makers apart from other consulting firms and what kind of associates or consultants truly thrive at impact makers. Yeah in in many ways. I think what really makes us? Different is our ability to be technically proficient while also being good consultants a LOT OF TIMES COMPANIES CONSULTING COMPANIES. Our size tend to be one or the other. We believe that our differentiation is the fact that we're we're bringing in people who understand the art of consulting and they understand how to communicate with clients how to manage their expectations but while also having really strong deep technical expertise on our teams so that we can kind of you know. Solve both pieces of that puzzle. We'll given what we've discussed really safe. Are you know we're looking for people that are interested in doing team? Based collaborative consulting were making a lasting impact is really important to them. So this means a couple things Looking for people that want to combine their technical capabilities with an ability to what I call being a true consultant and it means people. He realized the value being a trusted advisers as important as being technically proficient. But there's one other thing that is important for candidates to understand what considering impact makers as a place for the next career and that is do they want to be part of helping to grow company specially companies. That's trying to do something very unique in the marketplace. The work for consultant here is yes delivering for clients working with our community partners to make them better. But it's also. How do you help build impact makers so how do you help us build the internal processes so we can scale And so it's important for candidates to realize that it's about helping to grow the company as much as being a consultant and we realized that this may not be you the place for everybody and that's okay. Lewis also gave us a window into impact makers strategic direction and where they see the company heading and how that also translates into hiring in terms of what kinds of roles. They're looking for in the marketplace so strategically our long-term growth plan is to create. Take the model that we have That were building today and replicate that in other geographical locations Were focused on building out our presence and the DC metro area. We have identified and created relationships with local nonprofits And so we're starting. Do Pro Bono work for them in the DC area so if we were to move into another city like Nashville or somewhere else you know. We want to take our whole package and move that to that geographic location and that includes having pro. Bono partners creating relationships with the community and being connected in with our neighbors. And how do we make that a better place to live right now? Where we're focused strategically is building out those internal processes so we can scale. You know we're looking at how we take our holistic solutions and line them to specific verticals that we work in specifically being healthcare providers healthcare payers the financial services market as well as a look one state governments. We're looking for strong consulting backgrounds for example folks with two plus years working for large consulting company. So they get what it means to be a professional consultant but it also means we're looking for folks who have had a more technically focused role in their pass in but feel they have a strong aptitude for consulting. This could be a clown engineer for example that sees the value in our consultative approach. And they won't be able to make the client better not just deliver technical solution and again this may not be a fit for everyone and that's Ok for my final question. I asked Lewis as I do. All my guest. How will you know if you've heard the right person for the job in the first year? How do you measure success for these roles? A great thing about consulting and how we operate is easy for everyone to see the value. They are creating For instance do clients like working with you. Do they want you to stick around? Because they see the value bring we call this client stickiness. There are also some hard measures for success like utilization which is a measure of how billable someone is as a consultant but there are other ways to measure success in delivering high quality work helping and business development pursuits not having to sell but helping to strategize and develop the materials in these pursuits mentoring. More junior resources And learning development. So that you become more valuable to our clients and we you know in your bill rate can increase so these are some other ways in which you know you can measure success beyond just utilization. You know we're looking for people that are interested in doing team based collaborative consulting were making a lasting impact. It's really important that you've been listening to the. My career fit podcast. Do you think your rate fit for this organization head over to their website today to learn more and apply online. You can find everything you need to know in the show notes on this episode. Thanks for listening. And remember to rate. Subscribe and comment on the podcast. You just heard..

consultant Louis Broom Lewis Ceo INC Richmond Virginia chief executive officer Canada US Richmond Virginia Washington DC B. Corporation Nashville engineer B Corporation DC
"chief executive officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Era Getty chief executive officer of Aries management says his firms conversion to a C Corp last year. From public partnership has boosted liquidity in the stock and June era spoke to Bloomberg's Erik Schatzer at the Milken institute global conference in Beverly Hills, California think the base of all good credit decision start with asset selectivity. So the way we think about performing through cycles as we have to find the best companies and make sure that were invested in them. So we have a couple of benefits being that we've been in the businesses long as we have. And we have as much capital scale, probably the most significant of which is the size of our current portfolio. So right now, we have about seventy billion dollars of direct lending assets globally. We have investments in over five hundred middle market companies. What we're finding now is over fifty percent of our new deal flow is coming from people that we have an existing relationship with. So the underwriting of those deals much easier than going into the market. What about the other fifty percent though, because nobody is trying to underwrite bad credits. Yeah. So if it's a new borrower. Why would they take money from Aries? If there's somebody else another lender who's willing to offer. More generous terms. In other words, flip the relationship. A new price is one element. But at the end of the day what I've experienced over twenty five years, making direct loans is there's a service component. So when someone borrows from somebody like areas, they're looking for flexibility, creativity and structure the ability to scale with them the ability to be good partners. They're looking at acquisitions and growth investments. So prices one factor when someone decides to choose as a lending partner, but unlike what we've seen the liquid markets. It's not the defining factor in every decision that people make how on a broader basis, are you managing the deterioration of credit standards. Well, you know, it's funny when you think about credit as I said, it's all about asset selectivity and covenants only come into play in situations where bar is underperforming. So if your underwriting and sound and you're backing good companies, whether you have coverage or not, hopefully, you're going to have good outcomes. So we're trying to do in a market where structures are deteriorating. Whether that's definitions of the data or weakening of covenants is continue again, focus on quality first. And then get the best structure and the best terms that we can. But at the end of the day after forms is going to come from developing relationships with the best companies. There's no way around that. There's an interesting and awfully large deal that may come to market sometime in the near future. Warren Buffett has pledged ten billion dollars of equity toward an Occidental takeover of Anadarko is now battle between Oxy Chevron is that the kind of deal that you would be eager to lend into well, you that area. So in our hundred and thirty billion about one hundred of his in in credit and of that hundred about seventies in the private market that's thirties in the in the public markets. So for deal of that size that would tend to find its way into the liquid part of our of our business and again for a high quality bar with a well-structured transaction. We'd have Slough left played have there been any discussions as far that it involved Aries. Aries made the case in a recent white paper for a much wider universe of credit activity, as you pointed out, you're already indirect lending, you're already in public debt. But you're now talking about other things what's the opportunity there. Well, credit we're sitting here at the Milken conference. So if you go back and you look at the history of alternative credit markets and just take the high yield market when the high yield market, I came on the scene. No one ever heard of it that was truly alternative credit today. That's a two trillion dollar market. The leverage loan market followed on the heels of the belt -ment of that market. That's now one point two trillion dollar market. So when we start looking at things like direct lending back to your earlier question about the competitive dynamic in the flow of funds part of what you're witnessing is just the evolution of a third alternative market, which is direct lending. What we're seeing to your point is when you think about what drove the growth of these markets. It's it's been the D banking of certain parts of the capital markets. It's been changes in the regulatory capital framework. It's been changes in the appetite of the capital markets for smaller borrowers. It's been a shrinking of the securitisation market. So what we're seeing now is on the heels of the direct lending emergence is a whole sector of the alternative credit market in asset-backed an asset based investments that's exhibiting some of those same growth trends off of some of the same same things. The cynic would say that you see opportunity in this market because you're now a publicly traded company, and you have to grow a U L. I don't think you have to grow a UM as a public company where we hope is that if we perform well for our investors and delivered good returns, they give us more money which fuels growth. I think the jeopardy is as a public company if you pursue growth just for growth sake that could lead to bad investment returns and first and foremost areas has to be focused and obsessed about glittering returns for investors. Are you going to raise funds that allow managers to Rome? Widely and more freely among different classes of credit within alternatives. It's.

Milken institute Bloomberg Era California chief executive officer Erik Schatzer Warren Buffett Milken Getty Beverly Hills Rome C Corp Anadarko partner Oxy Chevron Slough two trillion dollar
"chief executive officer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive officer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Coming up, the White House science and technology director is one of the speakers at the American Association for the advancement of science meeting in Washington DC and a rush Holt former congressman and CEO of the association is doing the introduction. Rush. Hold your chief executive officer and executive publisher of the science family of journals. And it's my pleasure to introduce to you. Now, someone who has recently been appointed and confirmed and sworn in to the administration. Someone that the science community has been expressing pleasure about since his nomination and his confirmation and his swearing in Kelvin grove the Meyer is the director of the office of science and technology policy in the White House and chair of the the National Science and technology council, which is the coordination of the cabinet agencies dealing with science, and technology, and engineering issues. He had his formal oath of office only this week. He was sworn in a few weeks before. But this Monday the same day as the signing of the artificial intelligence initiative Kelvin grove Meyer, head his ceremonial swearing in with vice president Pence, he's a solid scientists has policy expertise and experience, and he has a sense of science and society and of science and government. Meyer is on leave is regents professor. He says without pay of meteorology at the university of Oklahoma. A BSN meteorology from the university of Oklahoma and a PHD in science from the university of Illinois Champaign Urbana. He has he's been chair emeritus of weather views, and has was a co founder of the National Science Foundation engineering research center for collaborative adaptive sensing of the atmosphere. Which goes by the acronym. Kasa? Oklahoma know him for his newspaper weather column. Many of us in the science community know him because he was appointed by George W Bush and subsequently by Barack Obama two two six year terms on the National Science board. He's been an adviser to the government the governor of Oklahoma. He's a trustee of various scientific and educational associations and corporations. He's a fellow of the American meteorological society and a fellow of the triple AS. Everyone who worked with him finds him to have a very accessible.

Kelvin grove Meyer National Science and technolog National Science Foundation National Science board trustee Oklahoma technology director university of Oklahoma White House chief executive officer American Association university of Illinois Champai American meteorological societ Barack Obama Washington Holt congressman regents professor