35 Burst results for "Chief Executive"

Truth Social CEO Devin Nunes Gives Us a Google Update

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:13 min | Last month

Truth Social CEO Devin Nunes Gives Us a Google Update

"Guys, delighted to welcome back to the podcast, our friend Devin Nunez, who served well almost 20 years in Congress at California's 21st and then 22nd congressional district. He is now the chief executive officer of Trump media and technology group running the Trump platform known as true social Devon welcome to the podcast great to have you as always I know that true social had been in a kind of ongoing tussle maybe is the right word with Google about making the platform widely available through Google, talk a little bit about where that is because I saw some news reports Google has banned true social and that's not true, is it? Well, finally, dinesh this is day ten of being fully open for every phone in America and the United Kingdom. So it was a long haul, but finally we were approved or in the Google Play Store. So most people either have an iPhone or they have an Android, and they happen to use the Google Play Store. So look, we're happy that Google finally approved us. And now it's just important for everyone that knows that it's been trying to get on true social if you have an Android, we're now open.

Devin Nunez Trump Media And Technology Gro Google Congress California Dinesh United Kingdom America
Hong Kong to end mandatory hotel quarantine for travelers

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Hong Kong to end mandatory hotel quarantine for travelers

"Hong Kong's to end mandatory hotel quarantine for travelers The territories leaders announced the city will no longer require incoming travelers to quarantine because of COVID fears in designated hotels after nearly two years The city wants to open up globally and remain competitive Chief executive John Lee has explained such travelers will also no longer need a negative PCR test within 48 hours before boarding a plane to Hong Kong instead they'll need to present a negative result from a rapid antigen test conducted 24 hours before their flight the measures will come into effect on Monday I'm Charles De Ledesma

Covid Hong Kong John Lee Charles De Ledesma
Bernard Shaw, CNN's 1st chief anchor, dies at 82

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Bernard Shaw, CNN's 1st chief anchor, dies at 82

"Former CNN anchor Bernard Shaw has died of pneumonia in Washington at the age of 82 according to former CNN chief executive Tom Johnson I'm Archie's our letter with a look at his life Bernard Shaw was a former U.S. Marine who became CNN's chief anchor when the network began in 1980 although he moderated a presidential debate and covered Tiananmen Square Shaw became famous for his calm under pressure during the Gulf War Here he is reporting on CNN in 1991 The sky over Baghdad is black You could hear an occasional truck or car go by But you wouldn't know that there's life outside these windows Sean left the business nearly 20 years ago He told NPR it wasn't worth it because of all the things he missed with his family while working

CNN Bernard Shaw U.S. Marine Tiananmen Square Shaw Tom Johnson Pneumonia Archie Washington Baghdad Sean NPR
Could New Allegations Derail the Entire Elon Musk-Twitter Merger?

The Trish Regan Show

01:49 min | 3 months ago

Could New Allegations Derail the Entire Elon Musk-Twitter Merger?

"Let me share with you this news that just came out from a whistleblower, a whistleblower complaint, the former head of security at Twitter is alleging that there was all this mismanagement and all kinds of spam accounts that reportedly, according to him, management knew about. So this gentleman filed a complaint with the SEC Securities and Exchange Commission, last month, it just became public this week, and he claims that he is uncovered, quote, extreme, egregious deficiencies by Twitter in every area of his mandate, including privacy, digital, and physical security, platform integrity, and content moderation. And he goes on to allege that the chief executive actually knew about all this, but in part because reportedly pay structure was tied to having less spam number of bot accounts, which Twitter, by the way, denies, then as a result, he claims that management didn't care enough. So this is, of course, very interesting to Elon Musk, who's arguing that the business isn't what he thought it was going to be because there are all these bots on there. Twitter has come out and said that this gentleman was fired for, quote, ineffective leadership and poor performance, and that the complaints that he filed is quote riddled with inconsistencies and inaccuracies and lacks important context. But nonetheless, shares of Twitter, in yesterday's session, fell 7.3%, they're actually hitting their lowest closing price in about a month and I would anticipate there's going to be more challenges for this company as it goes forward. It is a big legal question here because it's not going to change the fact that Elon Musk did give up his right to due diligence

Twitter Sec Securities And Exchange Co Elon Musk
Sebastian Reflects on the Presidential Clearance System

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:32 min | 3 months ago

Sebastian Reflects on the Presidential Clearance System

"Served in the Trump White House as deputy assistant to the president for strategy. As a result of that political commission, yes, that is what we were called politically commissioned officers of the president. I had to go undergo a background investigation. And acquire a top secret SCI, clearance. The clearance system in America, it's different in other countries. Has a very specific genesis and purpose. The intelligence communities, the 17 big agencies, there are many, many other small ones inside various departments and armed services, but the 17 American federal intelligence agencies serve one person in government. Their job is to provide intelligence, raw, or finished intelligence, to help the president of the United States make national security and foreign policy decisions. That is the only reason they exist. In fact, the whole classification system for documents for clearances exists for the president. It doesn't serve the chairman of the joint chiefs. It is not subordinate to the Speaker of the House or the vice president. It serves the president. That is why, for example, the president can give a clearance to anyone he wishes to, likewise he can strip only he can strip a clearance from anybody he wants to. If he wants to give his best buddy from high school a top secret SCI, code word, SAP program clearance, he can. He can just click his fingers and make it happen, because this system works for him. It is predicated, it exists to serve him in protecting America as the commander in chief. Likewise, should he wish to strip someone in federal government in the executive as the chief executive, he can strip them instantly. So the idea that a president or former president is a misusing classified information is impossible. He could wrap his fish in chips in classified information. If he wanted to, he could declassify in theory every single classified document or piece of information in U.S. government, who caused chaos, but he has the power to do so.

Trump White House America Joint Chiefs SAP House U.S. Government
FBI searches Trump's Florida estate for classified records

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

FBI searches Trump's Florida estate for classified records

"Presidential historians say nothing like this has ever happened in FBI raid on a former chief executive Southern methodist university's Jeffrey engel says it's one of the Trump presidencies fascinating parts We've had to reconsider how often we use the word unprecedented This fits the bill I'm having a hard time finding anything that reaches the scale and the importance angle says the Trump administration's history keeps getting rewritten I remember saying when Trump was impeached that this is the first line of his biography for the rest of his life Now I don't think that's even in the first paragraph Sagar Meghani Washington

Jeffrey Engel Southern Methodist University Trump Administration FBI Donald Trump Sagar Meghani Washington
Tyler Bowyer Calls out Maricopa County for Pens That Smeared Ballots

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:58 sec | 4 months ago

Tyler Bowyer Calls out Maricopa County for Pens That Smeared Ballots

"Another account of smeared ink was relayed on a social media post from conservative activist, Tyler Boyer, whose chief executive officer of turning point action that's Charlie Kirk's organization. He said we had several votes come through with the markers that got smeared in the machine, I mean, on and on. How hard is this? Penal county ran out of ballots. A voting site a Maricopa opened late after an inspector failed to report to work. The ballot shortages follow other election woes in pinal county. They sent out erroneous ballots to 63,000 voters last month. Well, if Carrie Lake is only up by a few thousand, I wonder if erroneous mailed out ballots to 63,000 could come into play, huh?

Tyler Boyer Charlie Kirk Penal County Maricopa Pinal County Carrie Lake
David Sokol Shares His 'Very American' Story

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:57 sec | 4 months ago

David Sokol Shares His 'Very American' Story

"A man who's lived the American Dream, understands that we are at a crisis point right now. Chairman and chief executive officer of teton capital and chairman of the board at the Atlas corporation, David sokol, welcome in studio. I'm glad to be here. Thank you, Sebastian. So first, a little bit about yourself. We talk about your book that you've just handed me America in perspective. Thank you kindly. But your story is a very American story, isn't it? Your grandparents right up to now. Yeah, my grandparents were immigrants from Poland and lived in a lower income rural environment in Nebraska and but you know my father professed every day the American Dream and all you've got to do is pick what you want to do and work hard and nobody will get in your way. And so yeah, and that's really the premise of which Adam and I wrote the book, which is to remind people that this is an exceptional country, but we have to maintain its institutions and it checks and balances or we're going to lose it.

Teton Capital Atlas Corporation David Sokol Sebastian Poland America Nebraska Adam
The Woke-Industrial Complex With Vivek Ramaswamy

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:50 min | 4 months ago

The Woke-Industrial Complex With Vivek Ramaswamy

"Think that my guest and I are just making up this stuff about woke corporations and these scoring systems that are used for political perverse power games, yet we're not. Here, I think this is thanks to project veritas. This is a video from an corporate all hands meeting from Disney. With one of their chief executives, who talks about things, if I were an executive, I wouldn't be talking about inside an all hands meeting. Play cut. I'm here as a mother of two queer children, actually. One transgender child, and one pansexual child. And also as a leader, one of our execs stood up and said, you know, we only have a handful of queer leads in our content. And I went, what? That can't be true. And I realized, oh, it actually is true. We have many, many, many LGBTQIA characters. In our stories and yet we don't have enough leads. That woman that executive at the top of the chain is talking about her pansexual children at a staff meeting later, one of her colleagues talks about her not so secret agenda to gay the products of that corporation. Call me old school. I don't talk about the sexual habits of my children when I'm at a business meeting. But help me out with vac, you wrote, you literally wrote the book woke ink, where did this come from? What is the transmission belt for this politicization of corporate America? Because call me naive as far as I'm concerned, corporate America has one job provide me a service or a product at the best price. That's about it. Was it the hiring of the gender study graduates who then worked their way up to the heads of HR or is it a little bit complicated? More complicated. You've mapped this out. So how on earth did this insanity occur? Well, look, it took a whole book to explain it because there's not one silver bullet. But one of the underappreciated causes was actually the 2008 financial crisis. So I remember this because I got my first job at a hedge fund in New York City in the fall of 2007. It was on the eve of the O 8 crisis. And what happened with the O 8 crisis was something really interesting in this country, it was the beginning of a political realignment where historically the left was actually really mad at what happened with Wall Street. They got paid a lot of money when times were good. They got bailed out by the public when times were bad. I was an opponent of the bailouts myself. But what happened was that occupy Wall Street was on Wall Street's doorstep.

Veritas Disney America New York City
Truth Social's Devin Nunes Share Thoughts on the Durham Investigation

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:10 min | 6 months ago

Truth Social's Devin Nunes Share Thoughts on the Durham Investigation

"He was a California congressman from the 21st and then 22nd district for, well, 2003 to 2022. A premier investigator of government malfeasance and corruption, he won the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2020, and he's now the chief executive officer of the Trump media and technology group. Devin, welcome to the podcast. Great to have you as always. Let me start by asking you about this sussman verdict. The acquittal of sussman appears to be a real blow to the Durham investigation and also I think for some of us seems to suggest that Hillary has not just 9 lives, but maybe an infinite number of lives, this woman is always one step ahead of the posse. Can you spell out the implications of this verdict? Did you see it coming? And what does it mean? Yeah, I think you have to start with what Durham did with this, whether he meant to do it or not. We won't know until probably many years later, if we ever know, is that my guess is he probably tried to get sussman to plead. Sussman and the Clinton people said, you know what? We'll roll the dice. We'll see if you really want to bring this case in Washington, D.C., where they know they control the court. They have a judge that, you know, many of those judges now, I mean, they're big problems. Then of course, you have the tainted jury that was immediately tainted with Clinton donors, AOC, donors, et cetera, et cetera. So I'm not sure if Durham was kind of forced, tried to get sussman to plea because it was a pretty clear cut case, right? You had receipts. You had text messages. There was nothing that was confusing about this. It was a clean case of line at FBI, especially as Durham laid out the case. And then so in the process of that, you can either kind of decide well, Durham was forced into it and or Durham knew that he had to roll the dice, but the good thing with all of this is that we learned so much that Durham laid out, which was the grander larger case, which there was a major conspiracy that was going on

Sussman Durham Trump Media And Technology Gro Presidential Medal Of Freedom Washington, D.C. Devin Clinton Hillary California AOC FBI
Why Abbott's Baby Formula Production Originally Shut Down

Mark Levin

01:52 min | 6 months ago

Why Abbott's Baby Formula Production Originally Shut Down

"Wednesday's hearing today focused on the nationwide shortage of baby formula that has prompted parents to scramble to find ways to feed their infants The plant was closed after reports of four infants who grow either ill or died after consuming formula from the facility in FDA inspection allegedly found on sanitary conditions Four months later the plain is still closed but I should point out even though that's mentioned in this story they did not link the deaths or illnesses of those four kids To this Habit plant received 16 complaints between 2019 and 2021 concerning infants becoming ill after drinking products from the facility the company said in a statement bacteria found in areas of the plant that doesn't come in contact with the product haven't been connected to any known infant diseases And yet the chief executive apologized they make them get on their knees and beg for Forgiveness even if they're not the actual cause of the problem And then Congress of course comes in after the fact and pass some laws that they think will help And not to beat a dead horse here but we talked about the need to import formula from other countries the EU in some cases has stricter standards than we do Then you have to throw their feeding it to tens of millions of babies in Europe in advanced industrialized societies and they seem to be doing fine So finally Biden lips that I don't know what they were waiting for

FDA Congress EU Europe Biden
"chief executive" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:26 min | 6 months ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Set up here for a rally at a pretty important support level with consensus now having shifted quite bearish Peter thank you so much Peter So that acts on a capital this morning This is a joy in particularly timely David livingstone is carved out of Macquarie and Cambridge a career across European banking He is more informed than anyone I know in the European method of business and the challenges to the future assisting Jane Fraser It's Citigroup Their chief executive officer for Europe and points close Obviously sir you have never seen it like this before And we have a war in Ukraine all the different crises tell us how you establish optimism for business three years out givens tumultuous 2022 I won't disagree with you Tom but I think we can look to the past and previous challenges We remember the Gulf War remember the recession around that time a different nature and perhaps a different scale And if you combine that with the challenges for energy energy security as well as the policy around energy transition staying on the agenda I think we could use the same tools that we've used before which is focusing as companies do policy makers on productivity on reform and looking for those areas that as you say will be there in the two or three years time And so we shouldn't forget the agendas that we took into these crises while we focus on the solutions for them in the shorter term In the short term we have an agenda of war the anger of war the sacrifice of war On a business standpoint it is many Citigroup clients leaving Russia and many others as well How will we account for this rapid exit and loss of finance in Russia As you know it will have a very detrimental effect on the domestic economy in Russia as intended by the by the sanctions I think the challenges for the for the companies as they seek to manage their exits from the country is there are capital controls and there are other things in place And they also have employees They also have others who they need to take care of during this time And they need banking services for that they are too important That we've seen of different companies primarily been their need to respect their employees with in Russia I think that's part of it Yes Going forward I know that your chief executive officer has talked about the likelihood of a recession in Europe and that she sees it as quite likely How are you preparing for that Well I think we prepare for it by being with our clients and seeing what their things that they need to do but also by working with policymakers and you said in the earlier part of the segment what will the ECB be doing And I think we're looking clearly for the signals of whether inflation is going to be the primary concern of the ECB as it seems to be with the fed Or are they still going to keep a very accommodating stance in order to keep economic growth positive That's been a challenge for over a decade I think they may well change their stance this time Well then how do you dovetail the risk appetite of lending at a moment that could be on the precipice of a downturn at a time when interest rates are rising and shareholders are demanding profitability Well lending isn't the only tool that the financial services and banking system one of the things that we work closely with Europeans both at an EU and a member state level is really on that structural reform particularly post Brexit but the EU needs to go through to deepen capital markets and access for the company's small and large to capital and alternatives to the banking system EU today is over reliant on bank balance sheets And so going through those reforms getting more access as well as at the same building a domestic buy side industry which is nascent in Europe outside of Luxembourg David you read my mind there And the heritage of Europe is Bond note and Bill in the bank balance sheet That's right And that is the heritage of Citigroup back so far Are the bond losses now a catalyst for finally Europe modeling a more Anglo Saxon balance sheet If we see bond prices go down there you go wait a minute they're doing it better in America I don't think they're going to say that but it's good for TV I think there's the depth of the U.S. markets or markets around the world look at the jealousy of the U.S. particularly debt markets I don't think it needs to be that type of catalyst I think it does need though to be seen as an achievable goal and therefore it might need to come from a European level to member state level in order to get the pace of reform sort of sadly not been present in recent past Where do the American banks fit in here You have many competitors with many different strategies We over talk about Asia and the expansion in the Asia And we under talk about the expansion into Europe How do you see this in particularly coming from Australian with Credit Suisse for years How do you see American banks prospering and competing in Europe Well we see ourselves firstly as a global bank and in this region as a European bank But we have presence in 24 European markets But the rate of change the rate of change is something we're used to and it's not something.

Russia Citigroup Jane Fraser Europe Peter David livingstone Macquarie ECB Cambridge EU Ukraine Tom fed America Luxembourg Asia Credit Suisse
Bidens paid 24.6% taxes on $610,702 earnings, returns show

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

Bidens paid 24.6% taxes on $610,702 earnings, returns show

"Monday Monday Monday Monday is is is is tax tax tax tax day day day day and and and and the the the the White White White White House House House House has has has has released released released released the the the the returns returns returns returns of of of of president president president president Biden Biden Biden Biden and and and and the the the the First First First First Lady Lady Lady Lady the the the the return return return return show show show show Joe Joe Joe Joe and and and and Jill Jill Jill Jill Biden Biden Biden Biden earned earned earned earned six six six six hundred hundred hundred hundred ten ten ten ten thousand thousand thousand thousand dollars dollars dollars dollars in in in in their their their their first first first first year year year year at at at at the the the the White White White White House House House House and and and and paid paid paid paid about about about about one one one one hundred hundred hundred hundred fifty fifty fifty fifty thousand thousand thousand thousand in in in in federal federal federal federal income income income income taxes taxes taxes taxes that's that's that's that's a a a a rate rate rate rate of of of of twenty twenty twenty twenty four four four four point point point point six six six six percent percent percent percent compared compared compared compared to to to to the the the the average average average average of of of of around around around around fourteen fourteen fourteen fourteen percent percent percent percent the the the the president president president president reports reports reports reports about about about about three three three three hundred hundred hundred hundred seventy seventy seventy seventy eight eight eight eight thousand thousand thousand thousand dollars dollars dollars dollars in in in in pay pay pay pay as as as as the the the the nation's nation's nation's nation's chief chief chief chief executive executive executive executive while while while while Jill Jill Jill Jill by by by by the the the the first first first first First First First First Lady Lady Lady Lady to to to to continue continue continue continue her her her her career career career career earned earned earned earned about about about about sixty sixty sixty sixty seven seven seven seven thousand thousand thousand thousand for for for for her her her her teaching teaching teaching teaching post post post post at at at at a a a a Virginia Virginia Virginia Virginia community community community community college college college college vice vice vice vice president president president president Harris Harris Harris Harris and and and and husband husband husband husband Doug Doug Doug Doug M. M. M. M. offs offs offs offs return return return return shows shows shows shows earnings earnings earnings earnings of of of of more more more more than than than than one one one one point point point point six six six six billion billion billion billion dollars dollars dollars dollars they they they they faced faced faced faced a a a a thirty thirty thirty thirty one one one one point point point point six six six six percent percent percent percent federal federal federal federal tax tax tax tax rate rate rate rate and and and and paid paid paid paid more more more more than than than than five five five five hundred hundred hundred hundred twenty twenty twenty twenty three three three three thousand thousand thousand thousand dollars dollars dollars dollars Sager Sager Sager Sager mag mag mag mag ani ani ani ani Washington Washington Washington Washington

White White White White House Lady Lady Lady Lady Joe Joe Biden Biden Biden Biden Jill Jill Jill Jill Biden Biden Biden Biden Jill Jill Jill Jill Virginia Harris Harris Harris Harris Doug Doug Doug Doug M. M. M. M Sager Sager Ani Ani Ani Ani Washington Washington
Are All Reagan Presidential Foundation Board Members Reaganites?

Mark Levin

02:07 min | 8 months ago

Are All Reagan Presidential Foundation Board Members Reaganites?

"It looks like mostly the board Of the Reagan foundation Which I feel a very close affinity to our Friends and surrogates and confidants of the chairman Fred Ryan to make sure he has no challenges And your little fare early on he was staff assistant at the pregnant president Reagan in the office of presidential advance Where of course he would have met his friend Fred Ryan Just giving you some examples Let's see here We have John lonsdale cofounder managing partner 8 VC a U.S. based venture capital firm which manages $4 billion Something is strange here mister producer Why all these individuals these investors these finance guys there aren't many reaganites on the Reagan border directors ladies and gentlemen and McLaughlin core locus is Steve Forbes is Then you have Susan McCall businesswoman former diplomat and philanthropist She served as the U.S. ambassador to the republic of Austria under whom And is currently president of S and R capital investments We have Rupert Murdoch and Lachlan Murdoch those are two reaganites Peggy noonan really a reaganite name only Ted Olson used to be an old buddy of mine but he's crossed the railroad tracks Gerald parsky chairman of aurora capital Jim Patterson chairman chief executive officer for sole owner of the Patterson group Canada's third largest privately held company I know that was here oregano

Fred Ryan Reagan Foundation John Lonsdale President Reagan Susan Mccall VC Steve Forbes U.S. Lachlan Murdoch Republic Of Austria Mclaughlin Reagan Rupert Murdoch Peggy Noonan Gerald Parsky Ted Olson Aurora Capital Jim Patterson Patterson Group Canada
Rep. Jim Jordan Says Biden’s ‘War-Triggering Language’ Is a Liability

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:54 sec | 8 months ago

Rep. Jim Jordan Says Biden’s ‘War-Triggering Language’ Is a Liability

"Congressman Jordan had this to say about I can't even call him president. The man who is the chief executive of America and his performance in Brussels and in Warsaw cut 9. I think you can say that here's a present potentially having more war triggering type language than probably any president in American history. So we need to be careful. We need to be precise and things we say, particularly the commander in chief of our country. I thought it was interesting that I think Alex vindman said that this was an historical speech. So historically The White House had to go out and correct the record after he gave it. I mean, you step back and think about it, Lawrence, we went from Ronald Reagan, tear down these walls and then to the toughness of Trump to now the president of the United States, President Biden given speeches where he basically says, I don't know what I'm doing. So that's very dangerous. Let's hope it stops. And let's hope that there's an end to this as soon as possible.

Congressman Jordan Alex Vindman Warsaw Brussels United States President Biden White House Ronald Reagan Lawrence Donald Trump
Texas Elementary School Celebrates Pride Week With Slew of Activities

Mark Levin

01:10 min | 8 months ago

Texas Elementary School Celebrates Pride Week With Slew of Activities

"Money the Austin independent school district is celebrating pride week and in part 5th graders engaged in a vision board activity for school policies Some of the options were and I quote we moved Pledge of Allegiance homo Marxism gender neutral bathrooms and LGBTQ sex Ed What happened to I mister badus It's not all inclusive LGBTQ sex Ed These people are after your kids ladies and gentlemen Those are 5th graders Those are 5th graders That is why Florida passed the law that had passed So I have to assume the chief executive officer of Disney Entertainment for families and those employees of Disney that apparently seek to destroy it pushing the same agenda Would agree with that for 5th graders Now how old are you in 5th grade mister Billy What are you Ten years old ten years old

Austin Independent School Dist Disney Entertainment Florida Disney
Allen West: We Need to Reassert the 10th Amendment

Mark Levin

01:16 min | 9 months ago

Allen West: We Need to Reassert the 10th Amendment

"And this is what governors are supposed to do They're more focused on what goes on within the state than what goes on without the state I don't mean to the exclusion of it But this is really the difference in many ways between a senator and a governor governor is the chief executive of the state And he has power under the state constitution and power under the federal constitution that needs to be exercised to protect the citizens of his state That's your view right That's absolutely the view and the other thing and we've got to do we've got to reassert the Tenth Amendment because when you look at the constitution article one section 8 there are 18 things is really fall upon the jurisdiction of the duties and responsibilities of the federal government And the Tenth Amendment says all of those powers not delegated to the federal government are reserved to the station to the people And that's what federalism is all about And we have completely lost that understanding of federalism so that we got a federal government that is up there handing out edicts orders mandates and decrees which are not law They get they're trying to force the states to follow it And so we need to answer two constitutional nullification to push back and say no you're not going to mandate people to get vaccines No you're not going to shut down an oil and gas industry And that's what I seek to be is a strong governor that is going to be rooted in the constitution and reassert the Tenth Amendment

Federal Government
Black Lives Matter Suspends Online Fundraising

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:32 min | 10 months ago

Black Lives Matter Suspends Online Fundraising

"Questions have also been raised up what's going on at the top of BLM G and F and nobody knows there's no one in charge. It's a slush fund. It's a shell. It's a mystery. The organization is not appear to have a chief executive officer for over a year. According to the Washington examiner, which did great work on this, former CEO Patrice color stepped down in May of 2021, following criticisms of her personal finances she went on a shopping spree. She bought homes across the planet. Literally, Canada everywhere. This appears, they gave all these different excuses, but then this one gets even more interesting. BLM gnf has now off the suspend its online fundraising operations, tens of millions of dollars were also certainly raised during a period when the organization had no leadership team. And then of course, were the houses, spike dot com writes. Again, this is a terrific piece. One of the main reasons caller stepped down was due to the controversy over her real estate buying binge, which she purchased four homes valued at $3.2 million. Colors signed off on the deeds for a house in Inglewood, California worth half a $1 million, a custom ranch property located in rural Georgia, which was equipped with an airplane runway. And at $1.4 million mansion in ritzy topanga, canyon, a short drive from Malibu. You think all of this would make people want to know what happened to the billions pledged to BLM or the millions given to BLM G and F, but nope, the media doesn't care at all. Why would they be bothered by such things?

BLM Patrice Color Washington Canada Inglewood Ritzy Topanga California Georgia Malibu
Xi urges Hong Kong to get control as COVID-19 cases surge

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 10 months ago

Xi urges Hong Kong to get control as COVID-19 cases surge

"Hospitals in Hong Kong are struggling to keep up with record numbers of new coronavirus infections as the city's leadership doggedly sticks to its zero coping strategy China's leader xi jin ping because weighed in on Hong Kong's current coronavirus spike saying it's the local government's overriding Tosca to control the situation Hong Kong is currently facing its worst outbreak of the pandemic topping two thousand you could beat nineteen cases a day with healthcare facilities beginning to overflow chief executive Carrie lam has been sticking to the zero covert policy despite geographical and other differences between the city and China itself she has been able to control the virus within borders the strict zero tolerance policy that involves total lockdowns on mass testing of millions I'm Charles de Ledesma

Hong Kong Xi Jin Ping Carrie Lam China Charles De Ledesma
"chief executive" Discussed on Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

"Think for me. It's just reminds me of that passion. You know it's it's more than just the grind of everyday in this job whether it's at the home on the home front in the office it reminds me. Passion is really what drives us as human beings and finding ways to give back to others kind of lean under your passion while making a difference. That's why it's important to a also think that it's our responsibility as a society to support each other. You know in that can look support different for different people. But it's our job to elevate the whole amasses. And i take going back to the worldly travels that you have done through so many different cultures experienced many different cultures that they gives you a way to connect to people and their needs and forty in those needs in a in a really real way absolutely. Well it's it's interesting to just think society young american culture where it's a selfish culture in i culture over and so many other older cultures around the world that just doesn't exist and so the the idea of giving back is as top of mind because it's already a part of what the culture stands for families living together and the elderly staying with like. There's so many things that our society does not do in so this concept of giving back. I think we need to forcibly pushed to the horford because it's not already brained in our everyday. That's a really good point. That's that's interesting. thank you for that. So where can people learn more about you and your business yes so we actually just launched a new website sightings tightly. We're really proud of its barefoot. Pr dot com. I it's it's a labor of love to get our own site live. Ii collection of. We are as an agency as a team as a family. If they get really does bring our stories the forefront so that about best place but good check it out for sure. The question is closed with our. What three pros wisdom would you like to leave with the audience today. Okay what re pearls leads done Will my first one is just to be unapologetically. Yourself is one of the greatest compliments. I've ever been given from one of my own team members and it's stuck with me as just the unapologetically who you are and who you're meant to be I think the second is is don't be afraid to take risks but make them calculated risk. Think thinking through as much as you. An autonomous It's sometimes you just have to take the leak out would be one. I'm an if you don't wake up happy with what you're doing every day. Even every day is in a good one. Then don't keep doing it. That's my strong belief. You need love what you do even ask again. You could still have bad days but at the end of the day. You need to love what you do in your life. Good ones very good vines. Sorry this has been a pleasure. Thank you for joining us today. And you're having me. And i look forward to senior next week at extraordinary connect in person and in real amazing women. So thank you so much for joining us being ear. I hope you liked this episode extraordinary women radio if you dad. Please share this podcast with your own. Special tribe of women and help spread the lab the dreams and the inspiration. Are you ready to raise up your voice your visibility and your business. I invite you to join the conversation in my facebook group. Extraordinary women can act. This group brings together change maker women entrepreneurs who want to elevate their business or impact. It is a place for powerful connections and collaborations. It is a place to be inspired of lifted and fired up for action to learn more about my work that helps women. Entrepreneurs may cargo connections to mindful gross strategies visit my website at cami gulnur dot com till next time my friend. Listen to your heart. Follow your dreams and be you..

horford facebook
"chief executive" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"I mean your company has just grown by leaps and bounds and the value adding is is just phenomenal. So as you think about the future and maybe it could be near or long term future. You know let's do some horizon view in here. What are you most excited about. Yes so when. I look across each of our business units. We have an enormous opportunity ahead of us so in women's health today the vast majority of pregnancies are still got screen with these advanced tests. Noninvasive prenatal testing like panorama test to the overall market is only about thirty percents penetrated. So there's a long way to go before we're testing all of the four million plus pregnancies in the united states so we have a lot of room to run their a very big upset opportunity and then would look at cancer and organ health together. We're just scratching service there. What's going to be a very large market opportunity. The total available market together for all of our business units around fifty billion dollars. And we're just at the very early stages of penetration so for example in oncology are at terror product is now been approved by medicare for colorectal cancer in we estimate the approval would would cover about one million blood draws per year. Now that's one of the largest specialty diagnostics ever proved and it's only colorectal. Cancer should hours be fan to bladder cancer lung cancer. Breast ovarian cancer. You know we're talking about tens of millions of potential blood-red could be happy in a yearly basis. And that's really exciting. To think about road is gonna come out on that as as we access inserting fully country markets notches from the standpoint which obviously exciting but of course you know thinking about the patients that were going to help. I think the ability to change the way medicines practice for sure. Yeah that's super exciting. Congratulations on that by the way while. The future's bright and really the way that we that we approach you know our patients the way that we approach our employees health. These types of tests are super important. Or if you're a pair right. Managing many many lives thinking about the bigger picture of people's health and helping stay. Proactive is truly the future and should be the present. And i think natasha's doing a huge job of great job of doing that. And so steve. I just want to recognize you and your team over there for the amazing work that you guys doing. What kind of closing thoughts would you leave us with. And what's the best place for people to learn more about you in the business yellow again. Thanks for having me spend time any. Anyone can go to our website or google This year we've got a lot of content up there about the company about the different tests in products that we offer you now survey about twenty five percent of all pregnancies in the united states that we have a very big up to the us a both on college. He working all this very exciting. So i think the genetic testing and diagnostic testing in general are going to continue to play a much larger role on healthcare as we move forward. I think it's a great position to continue your ship there. So we're excited about the outlook for the company. Be certainly excited about what you guys are doing. As well and i would highly welcome an update call you know maybe in six months to a year now you guys are moving fast over there to hear what updates you guys have. And what difference. You're making it would be great. We love to do that. Awesome steve pate. Thanks for jumping on and looking forward to staying in touch. Great thank you saw.

six months natasha united states steve google each This year both steve pate around fifty billion dollars today about twenty five percent four million plus pregnancies tens of millions one about thirty percents about one million blood draws
"chief executive" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Course and potentially save the kidney so across each area. What is all oncology in oregon health. Were making very significant. Impact and really changing the way medicines practice. It's really two things that stand out steve. Out of what you just shared his number one it's noninvasive and number two it the leading indicators and you know we've been practicing reactive medicine for so long having tools like these that are hyper tuned into certain indications can really help us get the results were looking for and then in the noninvasive nature is also something specially in the in the women's health space something that could go along way. Talk to us about what you believe makes tara different and better than what's available today. Yeah so appreciate bring up this idea of invasive verses not invasive because i think that that is one of the broader trends particularly women's health we look at maybe getting a blood draw a rather than doing unified named jesus or or cbs. You know historically everyone. It was over the age of thirty five would get amyot or cvs procedure automatically and there was no discrimination around. You know whether you are high risk or not other than your age and and so now he's not invasive test not only you not need to necessarily get the invasive procedure but also made sure that only the right people are going in for that procedure so we definitely have reduced the number of unnecessary procedures. Now when you look at what makes technology different. I think the messenger information that is probably in the field of colorectal cancer on our product. Signatura showing colorectal cancer today. Unfortunately about twenty. Five percent of patients experienced recurrence. So they're diagnosed get treated and they go into remission and then unfortunately later recur. Many of those patients have poor outcomes after they've occurred because it's detected too late so with our technology. We take a piece of the tumor and we create an individual test this based on your trimmer signature. This just for you. So there's no other tests out there like your tests and we use that to detect very tiny fragments of the tumor in your book. Now the result of that is that we can detect cancer recurrence colorectal cancer ninety three percent of the talent up to eight months earlier than what you would on imaging is so being able to detect worship cancer recurrence mushroom earlier than imaging has a very significant impact in colorectal specifically if you can detect the cancer center you have a chance to operate it. Remove the cancer recurrence for move metastasis before. It spreads all over the body and that can save patient's lives so the ability to detect cancer recurrence early in the ability to allow the physician kicking intervention. They can potentially save. The lives are very significant. Differentiator compared to how cancer recurrence is monitoring for today which is generally with imaging or with generic biomarkers like ca which have a low sensitivity. Specificity is. it's it's really exciting. It's making an impact on patients but it's also highly differentiated from the traditional state of care and traditional workers. That are out there. Yeah some great distinctions. There steve appreciate that. And i think about the market as as it sits today. You know we touched on this the for a long time. It's been reactive. it's been fee for service. it's been really sick care. And one of the challenges that diagnostics has had specially stuff like this. Is that like okay. Well how does this fit into my fee for service. Everybody wants to do good. Mean i'm not. I'm not saying everybody listening to this. Knows right. we wanna do good. But ultimately things aligned to the financial structures the reimbursements. How much of your success do you think has to do with this corner. That returning where where more people are wanting to do value based care. yeah. I think it's definitely very important and i think we can do. Things like reduce unnecessary procedures. Like for example. I mentioned in the windows health business when we tell you your positive with our tests panorama. There's ninety five percent chance that the fetus is affected if we're talking about particular conditions like down syndrome for example. So when we tell you your positive you really need to get that. Invasive procedure in get the confirmatory testing with the old by workers. If they told to your positive there was only a one in twenty chance that you actually were positive. So that means nineteen out of twenty women that went into the hospital had an invasive procedure. That's very costly. They actually didn't need it is when you look at the pelvic Impact in and you look at truly giving the right procedures to write patients. I think we're doing can ever very significant impact on the area where we're certainly gonna see an impact for belt. Economic standpoint is on apology administration of you know therapy. So we published a study in twenty twenty with princess margaret cancer centre at merck looking at the use of the drug katrina in one of the challenges. I think with immuno therapies. Today is that is difficult to patients are over treating because physicians don't have good tools yet to know whether the drug is is in fact working or not in so many cases just continued treating you know rather than maybe switching to another drug or treatment. And sean with our technology is that we can very quickly identified the issues that are responding to immunotherapy. And that's really important because identifying the patients art responding allows the physician to switch faster to another course of treatment. So i think that area like on kaldi there's also going to be very significant. Health economic impacts been really is more about. I think getting the right treatment to the right patient in. Yeah we like to think about more not just how we can save money for the healthcare system but how it can improve the quality of care for patients in impositions while sides. The thank you for that. And so what would you say is one of the biggest setbacks you've experienced and a key learning that came out of that yes so i think one of the biggest setbacks that everybody was in short march twenty twenty type framework when code did hit the big a lot of uncertainty around how we were going to be able to continue to manage the business and access physician offices. Impatience came out. Us was really this ability to shit quickly to both remote working for employees but also promote access to our tests through things like me so twenty nineteen tampa we get about ten thousand mobile draws now you about fifty thousand a year or more so we we see this very dramatic shift in business people accessing testing mobile capacity to get their blood drawn or to interact with a medical professional counselor so we took a challenge time. It was tried to offer business. Not only to serve customers during covid also look at. How healthcare technology will intersect long-term to improve the customer patient experience. Yeah that's great stephen and a phenomenal job of evolving..

nineteen ninety five percent ninety three percent twenty twenty women Today stephen each jesus two things about twenty today both about fifty thousand a year Five percent margaret age of thirty five about ten thousand mobile twenty twenty up to eight months
"chief executive" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Hey everybody. Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez. Here today. i have the privilege of having the amazing steve chapman with us. He is not terrace. Chief executive officer and serves on the company's board of directors. Mr chapman joined nato in two thousand ten as the vice president of sales later becoming chief commercial officer and then chief operating officer as coo. He led the company's commercial entry into the highly competitive noninvasive. Prenatal testing market in which the company's panorama test became the market leader despite being forced to market. Mr chapman was appointed ceo in january of twenty nineteen and has been instrumental in extending the terrace core technology to address new oregon health and ecology markets achieving rapid commercial growth for the prosperity transplant test and establishing the terrace leadership in molecular residual disease testing with another product. They have called tara since he became. Ceo of notre terre is achieved a year on year revenue growth of over forty percent and has consistently outperformed earnings expectations prior to the tara. Mr chapman worked at genzyme genetics where he was credited with delivering record-breaking commercial growth and strategies that change pregnancy genetic testing. He's no stranger to this genetic testing environment and today. I'm i'm privileged to have him here. He actually started his career as a researcher in the department of human genetics had way designing raise identifying. snp's associated with multiple sclerosis. Just an incredible individual Very brilliant mind and super excited a chat with him today. So steve really appreciate you joining us if they saw a really appreciate you having me great to be here absolutely the work you're doing is a huge difference. Steve you guys around the cutting edge of genetic testing and how were actually using it to make a difference. What inspires your work in the space. The diagnostics base in genetics. Today testing particular is very fast growing sector of the healthcare market. It's very exciting. There's a lot of change very fast paced with innovation It's a very exciting place to be the all. But i think my inspiration. His grown over time to be more about the impact that we're making on patients and a lot of that has to a my personal experiences as having kids using the products using genetic testing important growing. My family it's really shown me you know our personally impacted gatien's on a day-to-day basis. And now i look. We moved to cancer. Moving away from prenatal hells having had friends and family.

Steve Today today steve two thousand steve chapman chapman january of twenty nineteen over forty percent a year nato ten coo sclerosis ceo tara
"chief executive" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"chief executive" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Hey, I am a pro, like members of Congress know that whether in person or virtual, we are together strong representatives from churches. Pro life groups and advocates also remarked on the need to stay vigilant in the cause for life. Bernie Bennett reporting more vaccines in the mixed against the covert 19 coronavirus, Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research chief Dr Mid time Maman. Says that company is pleased with its vaccine. We believe overall in a nutshell that this vaccine is for everyone. That we see that we can prevent Cove it In many cases, we can prevent hospitalization. Those that even contract hold it on half bottle of disease have a milder course of disease, and nobody doesn't benefit from this vaccine. As we see it. Johnson and Johnson's single shot vaccine was 66%, effective overall of preventing moderate to severe illness. Meanwhile, Novavax says it's covert 19 vaccine appears 89% EFFECTIVE. Chief executive offers Stanley Eric says a recent British study turned up some positive findings for his company's vaccine. You can't cry out I should point out that we got 89.3% efficacy against the combination. Of the coma, 19 string and the UK variant. The announcements come of it worry about whether a variety of vaccines being rolled out around the world will be strong enough to protect against worrisome new variants. On Wall Street, The Dow down by 6 20. This is town hall dot com. Pounds and pounds of for our hair balls have hairballs Marquette Mama..

Johnson Johnson Pharmaceutical Researc Congress Chief executive Bernie Bennett Novavax Dr Mid Stanley Eric UK
"chief executive" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on KTOK

"And will be sworn in As the 46, president of the United States. One person who will not be in attendance. The 45th President Donald Trump, Mr Trump will be the first commander in chief to skip the inaugural. And more than 150 years. The last time was 18 69. Going Chief executive Andrew Johnson. He tested the incoming president Ulysses S. Grant, and the feeling was mutual. If you dated back to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. That promoted Johnson to the presidency. Now, Andrew Johnson's racist views offended Grant, who ran the Army. In February. 18 68 Johnson became the first president ever impeached by the House. Grant supported the removal. He and Johnson accused each other of being liars, cheats and frauds. Senate ultimately acquitted Andrew Johnson by just one vote. President Johnson was so unpopular during his tenure that the Democrats refuse to nominate him for a second term. Republicans ran grad who won easily now the two foes would be together for a transition. Grants reaction upon his election quote. I will not occupy the same carriage with Mr Johnson going to and from the capital. Putting the White House records, Johnson told his cabinet quote. We owed it to ourselves to take the ground that we could not with proper self respect. Witness the inauguration of a man whom we knew To be untruthful, faithless and false unquote. As his successor was about to be sworn in. Andrew Johnson stayed inside the White House. At noon, he stood up shook hands with his Cabinet members headed out the door saying, Quote I fancy. I can already smell the sweet mountain air of Tennessee. And that's where he returned to, and here's something else you might not know. In interviews later in life, Johnson repeatedly used the following line when asked why he refused to attend the inauguration quote..

President Johnson president Ulysses S. Grant Donald Trump Abraham Lincoln Chief executive United States White House Senate Cabinet Tennessee Army
"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"So that's an example of a domestic sex trafficking case where You know in this case. She was traffic from another state. But a lot of our cases here in los angeles these are girls who were born and raised in los angeles. And you know almost always. They're running away from from something because there's either some type of sexual abuse at home or Domestic violence many times. Two young kids tell their parents that they're gay. They're also you know not accepted and so they run away thinking that they can be accepted elsewhere and unfortunately there are pimps and traffickers who just swoop in and prey upon them. Because they know they're vulnerable and they just simply want to be loved and you know have a way to support themselves. Not that. I want to focus on this because i really don't but how young start for most of our sex trafficking cases. It's around eleven eleven years of age but it ranges all the way up to like late twenties. But you might be surprised to know that our youngest client has actually been two years of age. Our oldest client has been sixty four so it really gives you an idea of the range and what we know for sure is that traffickers target not necessarily age although in some cases for sex trafficking they do target girls and young women but it's really targeting vulnerability so kids and adults alike. Who are either looking for a better opportunity to improve their lives or running away from a particularly difficult situation. Life domestic violence or sexual abuse at home. I'd heard it was said or read at some place. Life expectancy for somebody who is pulled into trafficking can be as short as seven years because of the drugs and the lifestyle and the beatings and the lack of nutrition. I mean are many of our clients. Cast is kind of considered an extended family even after they graduate from our programs. And so i can tell you. Firsthand that former clients we have have had cancer chronic health problems and even though sometimes it's difficult to relate it back to the traffic eighteen experience. How could you not exactly. That's exactly and that doesn't even get into. I mean that's just physical health. Think about the mental health consequences right. So we've developed a training program for mental health practitioners because you think that mental health professionals would know how to treat a survivor of human trafficking. But the reality is that it's such a an emerging issue that it's actually not taught at school emerging issue that has become the second most profitable criminal artillery on the planet which is mental health practitioners. Really know how to do this. The reason why. I was attracted to you into cast in the work that you do. I'm and i'm thrilled. That there are people who are working very very hard on policy and educating law enforcement and all of those things but i wanted to see more grassroots of working with the victims and the survivors. And in fact. I'm sure surprise some people when you just set it that our was with you for two years because i'm sure people thinking fast it's like a three day program a little shelter. We come in for the weekend and then we're throwing back onto the street but that they stay with you that long and so. I know we've used up so much of our time here but can you just talk about you. Know the services that cast offers but also with the call to action of what can our listeners do. how can they in their communities. You know we don't yet have cast a coalition to abolish slavery and trafficking in every city. Right that's you know. I want to say that it's actually. The reason i joined cast was because they made a commitment. The board and the founders of cast made a commitment to provide comprehensive and long-term services which is very resource intensive. I mean be involved with abandoned..

los angeles two years seven years three day second Two young kids sixty four around eleven eleven years eighteen experience artillery late twenties
"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"One that you and i go to probably very often living in los angeles and they were there and they took the kids to the restroom at the same time. And that's when alice said to her. This was after a few hours and like alice getting the courage to actually talk with this woman. She was afraid that this woman would actually tell the traffickers and then alice would be good as dead and so because remember. No one knew where alice was. Her family didn't know nobody knew she was like no one knew where al was and so she summoned up the courage to talk with this american nanny and said please help me. They're holding the here against my will. I don't have my passport. they stole it. You know i don't get to eat. She basically told her story in five minutes flat in enough time to get back to the movie theater where the trafficker was waiting for them. And you can imagine how this american nanny like. She was just like what is happening. Who do i call. I mean she was so light full of anxiety and also fear right. 'cause there she is sitting beside the trafficker now in a movie theater so they went home and she kinda got her thoughts together and left for the day because that was the arrangement and she had actually given alice like slipped her a piece of paper with her phone number on it. And you know. Alice was nervous because she also didn't have access to a phone but she found like she was able to get access to a cell phone through one of the traffickers mother had said okay. I'll give you one but you use it for just family emergencies. And she used it to call and meanwhile the good samaritan the american nanny was already on the phone with the fbi called our hotline and we arranged than for the fbi to basically what's called an operation but it means raid the place where trafficking is occurring and. They did so it all happened. When alice was out at a ballet class with the little girl she was taking care of and she came back. She was basically escorted allowed to go to go anywhere alone. She had to be escorted with this little girl and when she came back there were twenty. Fbi agents waiting and you know they were basically investigating and asking questions of the traffickers..

los angeles alice five minutes twenty Alice one Fbi One american
"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"Every day and they choose not to in their minds. They really believe that they are treating these victims better than what they would path back home like it. It's so messed up. I absolutely really. They have a process of dehumanizing people. And i really have come to know that. This is a class issue right. So they target people who are vulnerable in communities usually from their same country of origin Because they know they can they know that they can add cheap labor or slave labor and not have to bother with paying them even though they're bringing them to a country that clearly has laws around wage and hour and human rights around how all workers must be treated and they do this because they simply don't see them as human beings they do see them as animals or less than animals sometimes and they're treated like that they're there to take care of their children so they're they're not seen as human beings or as but yet they're there to take care of the children of the on my i just i can't even make the words come out because it's just so it got using to me. That's the one thing that gets me too. I mean as you know. I'm a mom to a daughter. And you know i just can't imagine treating someone who should be part of your family and treat it that way when they're taking care of the people you love most in the world and you know not only that but in most of these cases the workers so the slaves are practically starve to death. I mean with the woman that i introduced you to. There were weeks on end where the traffickers did not restock the kitchen. The the slaves were actually made to live on a whole different floor so this family was so wealthy. They had two floors of this huge penthouse. Basically and the workers did not live with them. They were there to only take care of the family and to clean the penthouse where the family lived and it just shocked me when i learned that they were practically starved to death. I don't have words for that. I really don't and yet these are the same people who are taking care of their children of their pets and caring for their families it. Just it doesn't make sense. I realize but what. I've learned is that traffickers don't they don't make sense and they have ways of justifying this horrible behavior when i set listen to this woman talk and now she's oh my gosh she's dynamic and she's she's making a difference in. She looks amazing and she has that story to tell which is going to save many many lives. What happened to those traffickers. Yeah so the young woman's name is allison. She's a very active member of our national survivor network and has trained the military. She's trained law enforcement. She's done so much but most importantly what she's done is used her experience and therefore her expertise to raise awareness and educate no everyone from the general public to politicians. And i remember win alice. I came to cast..

allison two floors one thing alice
"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"That's that's a good question and they don't run because of the psychological coercion and the threats that they have to live in day in and day out like a good example. Is you know we served this woman and she at the time. She was in her late twenties and She basically the trafficker basically told her every day dogs in this country. Have more rights than you. If i kill a dog. I'm going to go to jail. But if i kill you. No one's going know and no one's gonna care because you don't exist in. This country was trafficked for labor. In that particular case it was a sweatshop yeah it was a labor trafficking case in a sweatshop and that was the threat that she used and you know traffickers do this all the time because they know that they can get away with it Most of the victims who are trafficked in this country both domestic meaning american girls as well as Immigrant survivors people from other countries. They haven't had the greatest experiences with law enforcement. Like for example. Most of the american girls we serve our survivors of what's called si sak commercial sexual exploitation of children. So they're traffic mostly when they're anywhere from eleven to fourteen years of age and again day in and day out. They are told that they can't go to law enforcement and when they do try their arrested for prostitution related charges so there was treated as criminals rather than victims exactly it's reinforcing to them what the pimps and traffickers are telling them every day. That law enforcement isn't going to treat them as a victim or or anything else but as a criminal and so we have a long way to go to reform those systems that technically are designed to not only curb crime but to help victims of crime. Right we have a whole office in this country. Victims of crime through the department of justice that's designed to help victims of crime including crimes of human trafficking but we have a long way to go to really reform those systems and it doesn't mean that all police are bad..

eleven fourteen years both american twenties
"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"Let's say about gosh. what was it. Maybe fifteen years ago trafficking wasn't really even talked about in terms of statistics. And then what happened is it became the third largest criminal enterprise but now today in two thousand fifteen it's now tied with arms trade and so that tells us that this is a growing criminal enterprise where criminals can easily make a profit off the backs of human beings. I mean when you think about it. Human beings can be recycled over and over again. Right they can be sold to one gang. And then to another trafficker. I mean they can be recycled whereas when you use drugs or arms. They can't so easily be recycled in that way. so it's very profitable for traffickers to get into this business. How many slaves or their world boy there are. I mean statistics. Range all over the place. But i think we can safely say that there is at least twenty seven million slaves living in the world today at least living in slavelike conditions that includes sex trafficking as well as labor trafficking and that from brothels in bangkok thailand to children being forced to work in the brick industry in india to here locally where people are trafficked into the agricultural sector so trafficking is very broad definition of what is known as modern slavery people who are forced in some way therefore either through physical four or fraud or some type of coercion even sometimes psychological coercion to stay in a situation where they do not have the freedom to leave and that's usually done by the traffickers threatening them in their lives if they try a laws and key especially to the young women and moms that we serve. That's what they use they with the young girls they'll use their moms or sometimes their grandmothers. Whoever they're close to they'll use that to control them saying if you try to escape this happened just in one of our cases. This young girl was fifteen. Try to escape. We will kill your grandmother in mexico. We know where she lives. It's this address so no fifteen year old is going to try to escape when grandma practically raised her not was like her grandma was the love of her life and they knew it and they used it against her and likewise for the young moms and sometimes dads that we serve. They'll say look. We know your kids are living with your parents back home and if you try anything funny we will kill them. Let me tell you and so these threats go a long way to further. Control the victims. Who are already held captive. And i think what's important for new people who are new to this issue you know. In the media they tend to portray victims of trafficking has been chained to bed sore being locked in a room and certainly we have had those types of cases. I don't want to say that doesn't happen. It does but the majority of our cases are such where survivors or victims at the time. Are you know walking the kids to school each day. The children of the traffickers. Or they're doing the shopping for the family. So out of the house away from their captors and people listening to this thinking water on the ryan exactly..

bangkok india mexico today fifteen years ago two thousand one each day one gang least twenty seven million sla third largest criminal enterpr fifteen year old thailand four cases fifteen
"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

Masters Podcast Club

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on Masters Podcast Club

"Hi everyone wind claybon here. All that we live in amazing times with incredible advancements in science technology and many other fields human trafficking and slavery still exist in heartbreaking numbers around the world at this moment. Twenty one million people worldwide are victims of forced labor and one in six runaways in the united states are likely to become sex trafficking victims in honor of national slavery and human trafficking prevention month. This week's podcast features an interview. I did a few years ago with k. Buck ceo of the coalition to abolish slavery and trafficking cast was one of the first organizations in america.

"chief executive" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Prick. She was on Charlie Rose. She did CBS this morning 19 years old Elizabeth Holmes dropped out of Stanford CNN. I mean, on and on and on. No one has ever seen this year of the first one. How her company Theranos was poised to change healthcare forever. If she had made this work, she would have been the next Steve Jobs. But today Elizabeth Holmes is under criminal indictment. She pleaded not guilty, but she's facing up to 20 years in prison if convicted. So how did it happen? It's a story of greed, and it's a story of incredible deception. In the drop out. We'll look at how Holmes initially won over everybody from investors to politicians to the media. I'm Lawrence immunity, and this is the Fox business report. Stocks were mixed in afternoon trading as investors monitor updates on politics in Washington, including hopes for more stimulus relief. Shares of Intel are surging after the chip giant said it ousted chief Executive Bob Swan. He'll be replaced by VM, where Chief Executive Pak Gil singer after activist hedge fund third point urge sweeping changes at the company. Intel also said it expects to exceed its fourth quarter earnings and revenue guidance in terms of target is slightly lower. Despite reporting a 17% gain in same store sales for the November December holiday period, lifted by strong digital sales and dollar general is offering its staffers a deal, get a covert 19 vaccine and received four hours of pay. The retailer, which has around 157,000 employees, is among the first large U. S employers to incentivize staff to be vaccinated that your box business Or I'm Hillary Barsky invested in you. Newsmax.

Elizabeth Holmes Steve Jobs Charlie Rose Chief Executive Pak Gil Intel Hillary Barsky chief Executive CBS Bob Swan CNN Stanford Theranos Fox Lawrence Washington
"chief executive" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Find out the real story on Use Radio 8 40 W H A s All right, coming around the bottom of the hour, and Bob dominate the world Famous Bob Dominic, come on and talk to us about Vietnam stories and everything else and sports. But meanwhile it's such a treat. Because we have courted Dino for not once but twice. So life was a nice maybe heard. That's what I heard. Yes, we're here actually, at the open, which is after the open, which is a little bit crazy. Yeah, it is. But we'd hold steady here kind of flat. With a pretty much across the board, NASDAQ s and P endowed pretty much flat. Yeah, Now, the one that we're watching today is the NASDAQ 100. It's outperforming the S and P 500 just by a hair. Same with the Dow, which are both little changed, but the NASDAQ Right now it's up about 3/10 of a percent because People are watching Intel Intel is soaring today because the chip maker named a new chief executive officer, Intel has been under pressure from activist investors to kind of change and fix its game a little bit. So they're hoping with a new leader, the who was the former CEO of the company VM where they're hoping that this is going to be a change for Intel and that they're going to have a better future going forward. But another thing that investors are watching this morning is we have a big bank earnings coming up later in the week s, So we have the big guns for talking JP Morgan Wells Fargo. And this is the real traditional kickoff to earning season. So that's something that lot investors air going to be watching. And especially in the next two days. And that was my daughter leaving the room because, of course, that I bore her baby leaving the studio booth that although you know my daughter was like that enough of this, I'm I'm walking right? Out the door, eh? So anyway, we are today. It's 10 30 right now. So, taking a look at the Dow. It's up 12 points at the S and P s up 10th of 1%. And as I said earlier, the NASDAQ is the big winner of the day. It's definitely tech heavy, and it's up 3/10 of a percent with the news radio weighed 40 WH S Bloomberg money report according to hope. 21..

Intel Bob Dominic JP Morgan Wells Fargo Dino Vietnam chief executive officer CEO
"chief executive" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on WTOP

"If we go to Jeff Playbook ended, 2020 and record eyes retreated to start the new year by the close of Alice. Down 383 points. The S and P 500 index in the NASDAQ Both finish today. Down about 1.5%. Construction spending. It's the highest level in the least 18 years. In November, the jump in construction spending was led by the construction of new houses. Airlines are starting to see possible light at the end of the tunnel, Delta Airlines chief executive says His airline will be positive cash flow by spraying. The U. S airline industry. Lost an estimated $35 billion last year. Esquire magazine's list of 100 restaurants, America can't afford to lose. Includes one of D C ourselves and DC's West End, Esquire says Nowhere in D C is fine dining done finer. Ourselves open 21 years ago, although it is currently temporarily closed. Deftly pull double duty openings. Thanks so much Jeff Coming up. Georgia Georgia Election official refutes the president's statements on the call he had with the States Secretary of State all of those details coming up. It's 4 56 brighter futures start with a boost of positive energy. That's why at Pepco, we're committed to bringing this energy to each customer and every corner of our community. Especially when times are tough.

Jeff Playbook Esquire magazine Esquire Delta Airlines Pepco Georgia chief executive America president official
"chief executive" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"chief executive" Discussed on WJR 760

"For Kids Happy Holidays to everybody. Our first guest is Robert Standing. Robert is the chief executive officer of the Ben Hogan Foundation. Prior to his role, Robert was a business leader in the aerospace industry for nearly a quarter of a century. As a member of Shady Oaks Country Club since 1984 and independent member Before that Robert had the opportunity to observe Mr Hogan for almost two decades before the legendary golfer passed away in 1997. Robert served on the board of Governors at Shady Oaks Country Club from 2000 and 1 to 2000 and 11, serving as president of the club in his last year on the board. It's my pleasure to welcome from Fort Worth, Texas today, Robert Sennett. So, Robert the Vent Hogan Foundation is synonymous with golf, of course, but also perseverance and integrity. And for our listeners in the Detroit area in Michigan and well beyond tell him about the Ben Hogan Foundation, and some of the most important things you want everyone to know. Thank you, Larry. And thank you for having me on your show. With the Ben Hogan Foundation. It was established by Mr Hogan's great niece, who is Lisa Scott, and she was the heir to Mr Hogan's a state as he had no Children, and then we're fairly young foundation in about 2000 and seven we established the Ben Hogan Foundation with the pretty simple mission, and that mission was just honor the legacy and celebrate the life of the late great Ben Hogan. We have a yearly golf permit. We have Ah, about 200 soldiers play in and we do some things with the families just to kind of give the soldiers a day off and allow us to serve them for a day. So use development, education and under in the military or the three Core components of what we do to celebrate. Mr Hogan was there three wonderful components. And so we're talking with Robert stand and who is the CEO of the Ben Hogan Foundation and Robert? I was recently in Fort Worth, and you treated me so kindly, So thank you to you and Julie and everyone else. And I had the opportunity to see the Ben Hogan Learning Center at the first hear Fort Worth. It was so very impressive. There's another one under construction serving another part of Fort Worth, and so tell us about your involvement with Ben Hogan Foundation and first tee, because, as you know, with Donna Bach is one of our new board members. She's on your board. The Children's Foundation is now operating the first tea of Greater Detroit and some day we hope to be a strong is the Fort Worth first day but tell us about the bed Hogan Learning Center in Fort Worth. Well, we treated you kindly Larry because we want We want you to come back and see us again. You can count on their trust way. Want way love for you to come back and visit again and we hope you will do it often. You know, I mentioned earlier. The youth development. You know, there's one of our core tenants and early in our foundation. We were trying to think of the best way to accomplish this. And that was pretty early. When the chapter of the first tea of Fort Worth was established, they were only a year too old. And we became so very impressed with the first tee. And not only was it teaching young people, the game of golf, which Mr Hogan would appreciate, But more importantly, it was teaching the young people character and honesty and integrity and those nine core values that they have in their curriculum that they worked to instill in the young people so We saw a pretty neat partnership and we saw pretty neat synergy there. You know, if you think about an iconic example in the world of sports oven individual that stood for honesty and integrity and perseverance and those things you know what better example had been hoping So we decided that we wanted to help them build a facility in Mr Hogan's name, and in 2011. We created the Ben Hogan Learning Center and opened it here and for worse. And you know, early in the program they had about three or 400 kids, and this last year, we had $80,000 just phenomenal growth numbers. The first tee of Fort Worth has the highest retention rate in the world. 87% of the kids come back and most of those that don't come back Graduate high school. They're not eligible to come back. So we have a terrific retention rate. We have terrific growth in the program and one I think one of those powerful statistics I have ever seen is if a young person in the first year Fort Worth that she's birdie level. A second level. They have a 100% graduation rate from the Fort Worth Independent School district. So we similar to Detroit. You know, we're struggling with our public education. Do not have perhaps the best statistics, but a young person that she's birdie level every single one up graduate high school, which is a compelling statistics on success. Well, it says so much about what life skills and perseverance. These kids are learning from first tee and then also combined with the important elements of the Ben Hogan Foundation. It's It's a formula for success. And in the statistics certainly drive that home. So congratulations about that. Thank you. First he had already created, You know they're nine core values. But whenever we looked at the synergy between how Mr Hogan lived his life and how he exemplified those core values, we thought, what better way to do that? Then, with a partnership with the first team, there's another learning center under construction, and that's gonna be opening up in the not too distant future as well. We do. We were out there last week, working some of the artwork that we're gonna put in there. But we're looking to have AH, would love for you to come in for it. But I think we're gonna have a ribbon cutting on March. The 26th. Okay for our second Ben Hogan Learning shooter in Fort Worth, and they have pretty similar statistic out there. We started doing some after school programming few years ago, and we had 30 kids in it. And, uh, this year we had 1230 to 1230 to 12 3rd. So pretty nice slope on that curve. Yeah, Not only did I have the opportunity to spend time with you and your executive director but also Kevin long from the first tee, and he's one of the best executive directors in the country in the statistics prove that as well, So what a great combination of people on programs So we're talking with Robert Stand it from the Ben Hogan Foundation, headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. Great place. And so Robert as we come to the end of 2020, and many of us are applauding that for obvious reasons. What's in store for the foundation and 2021. What are you looking forward to is? The year starts over? Well, we have a big year playing because of many of our things in 2020 were deferred because a covert and we hope that we get the pandemic behind us sooner than later. But early on in the year, we're working to put another documentary together on Mr Hogan. We're working with Charles Club. Does a serious they started about three years ago called the Charles Flog Challenger, Syriza's and they do Three of these a year and Mr Hogan will be the first..

Ben Hogan Ben Hogan Foundation Ben Hogan Learning Center Fort Worth Vent Hogan Foundation Robert Hogan Learning Center Fort Worth Independent School Detroit Robert Standing golf Robert Sennett Shady Oaks Country Club Larry Texas Children's Foundation chief executive officer