25 Burst results for "Chief Curator"

Inside Frick Madison in New York

The Art Newspaper Weekly

03:05 min | Last month

Inside Frick Madison in New York

"Now on the eighteenth of march. The frick collection will launch frick madison. It's temporary new home on madison avenue in new york until now the collection of our master paintings and sculptures and decorative arts as in the gilded age mansion on central park bequeath to the public. By the industrialist henry clay frick when he died in one thousand nine hundred nineteen and it's more than doubled in size since then mentioned is now closed for renovation and expansion to accommodate collection and special exhibitions so the collection has moved a few blocks but in tune entirely different. Textual realm freak. Madison is housed in the bath. House architect muscle broilers brutalism masterpiece originally built for the whitney museum of american art in nineteen sixty six recently. The home of the met bria so had to bellini and titian van. Dyke rembrandt mir fragonard gainsbourg. Look in these alien surroundings. I spoke to the deputy director and chief curator xavier salomon. Who's overseeing the concept and installation to find out xavier. I wonder if you could cast your mind back to moment the e. I knew you were going to get the boy a building. Full the frick collection. Tell us what he felt at that moment. It was a combination of relief and absolute terror. I think You know relief because you know the plan was to really put the entire collection in storage be closed for a couple of years while we were renovating the building at the frick and then reopened so the idea that we had a place where we could display. The arts was a huge sense of relief and we had talked to a number of museums about getting a few rooms or a floor. And so did they have having an entire building. We could move. The offices and the entire election was absolutely exciting but terrifying. Because you know. Imagine moving the wallace collection to barbican. Oh the jack ready to this on pompidou. I mean it's just the idea of taking something out of its natural context. Let's say as we as we see it and bring it into something that's totally alien so as soon as we made that decision. That was a lot of thinking and a lot of backwards info about what to do with the building. Did you try out in your mind and on paper all sorts of different alternatives in other words. That wasn't a just a preconceived idea. We're going to do it in the way that you've ended up doing it now. Absolutely and the first phase was a lot of thinking a lot of backwards and forwards on various ideas. You know you have a blank canvas and the bank canvas is exciting but at the same time it's also terrifying because you have so many ways you could go and i still think there are other solutions. We could've used. I mean what we did is by no means the only the only option And i'm sure you know people will like it. People will criticize it. People will think it could have been done a different way but out of all the choices together with my team we filled. This was the most logical one for us and the one we wanted to pursue the one. We thought was most interesting but we definitely did play with all sorts of options on at the beginning. We didn't really exclude anything. I mean we started with even the idea of recreating the rooms in a building. The broil yet so just sort of replicating the rooms of the spirit of the rooms and then of course. We went in the opposite direction. And that's sort of why we got to

Frick Madison Henry Clay Frick Titian Van Dyke Rembrandt Mir Fragonard G Xavier Salomon Whitney Museum Of American Art Bria Central Park Bellini Xavier Madison New York Wallace
'Black grief and white grievance' at New Yorks New Museum

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:06 min | Last month

'Black grief and white grievance' at New Yorks New Museum

"Now. The new museum in new york this week open grief and grievance art and morning in america and exhibition originally conceived for the museum by the hugely influential curator of queen ways or before. He died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen grief and grievance features thirty seven artists to address the theme of morning commemoration and loss in response to the racist violence experienced by african american communities the title the museum says refers to quote the intertwined phenomena of black grief and a politically orchestrated white grievance against each structures and defines contemporary american social and political life. Curatorial advisory group has worked together to realize an interpreter. Basil's vision maximiliano gio knee of the new museum. The artist glenn ligon in ways. As regular curatorial collaborator mark. Nash and owe me beckwith scenic creator of the museum of contemporary art in chicago. He's just been appointed chief curator of the guggenheim museum in new york editor in the americas. Helen stolis spoke to beckwith about the exhibition. I wondered what's it been like bringing the show to its final stages making sure that oakley's incredible vision has been realized. What was your thinking through the process to make sure you've got this kind of final end stage oak. We have a brial mind. There were always so many things that he was thinking about and working on and he can have an idea a decade ago that manifests itself into a show much much later and so his ability to kind of hold and juggle things Intellectually and mentally that then get realized later was uncanny honestly the more that i read essays of his from about ten years ago i realized the core of some of this thinking was already there especially the core of ideas in grief ingredient. So all that is to say that this actually is unlikely to be. Oh quiz show believe it or not. They'll be more coming more things to watch and see. The man's ambitions were amazing and so lars they will extend extend far past life But in terms of grief and grievance started as a lecture series for harvard and oh a curator. He thinks through art a curious interesting. That i'm still speaking about him in present tense and so he thinks through ours and he started then to take. These ideas That he'd been mulling over these ideas around. What really are the kind of core conditions of american race relations. Where did they begin. What catalyzed them and what are the ramifications of that core This sense of black loss and a sense of white grievance let really in his mind got catalyzed around the civil war. What are those ramifications for the american polity right now our process as curatorial advisors which is what we've been calling ourselves has really been about trying to round out oh quiz vision where it was necessary. Okay already had a rather. Set schematic for the show. He had core objects that he was interested. In working with a painting of awesome blogs painting by daniel johnson another awesome. Blah's painting by jack whitten and a painting regime michel basquiat. He was really interested in these three objects as the ways to anchor away of of both thinking through reactions to Black and justice but also aesthetic forms that moved between abstraction and figuration between forms that are legible and gestures that deal. Mostly i think with the monochromatic. So these being the kind of catalyzing ideas for the show. were great signposts for us so then began to work with those themes and ideas for the rest of the checklist.

Beckwith Maximiliano Gio Glenn Ligon Helen Stolis New York Guggenheim Museum Museum Of Contemporary Art Basil Nash Oakley Americas America Chicago Lars Harvard Jack Whitten Michel Basquiat Daniel Johnson Blah
Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

New Yorker Radio Hour

00:17 sec | 3 months ago

Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

"Guggenheim disappointed Naomi Beckwith as it's deputy director and chief curator. Back with his currently the senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, where she spent since 2011. The Guggenheim says she will oversee collections, exhibitions and publications. In her new role. Beckwith is the first black woman to hold the

Naomi Beckwith Guggenheim Museum Of Contemporary Art Chi Beckwith
Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

All Things Considered

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

"The Guggenheim has appointed Naomi Beckwith as it's deputy director and chief curator back with this currently the senior curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, where she's been since 2011 the Guggenheim special, oversee collections, exhibitions and publications in her new role. Back with is the first black woman to hold the position. The appointment comes after long time Chief curator Nancy Specter stepped down last year following allegations of racial bias in independent investigation found no evidence to support that claim. Liquid begins her position in early June.

Naomi Beckwith Museum Of Contemporary Art Chi Chief Curator Nancy Specter
Pioneering Black doll Baby Nancy enters Toy Hall of Fame

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

Pioneering Black doll Baby Nancy enters Toy Hall of Fame

"That twenty twenty inductees to the national toy hall of fame have been announced of the twelve finalists three toys made it twenty twenty inductees to the national toy hall of fame are the doll baby Nancy sidewalk chalk hand toppling game Jenga that announcement made by Chris bench the chief curator at the strong museum who adds it's no accident that the inductee these are always announced during election week it has been great to have it on the Thursday after election day because whether your candidate has won or lost or whether like this year you still don't know it is nice to know that there are some things like plate that can unite us all I Shelley Adler

National Toy Hall Of Fame Chris Bench Strong Museum Shelley Adler
Washington D.C. Museum Of The Bible To Return Looted Artifacts To Iraq

All Things Considered

01:31 min | 9 months ago

Washington D.C. Museum Of The Bible To Return Looted Artifacts To Iraq

"Opened around three years ago. The museum of the Bible here in Washington, D. C has faced several scandals over the way it obtained antiquities somewhere looted, even fake. The museum says it has corrected the problems, but it's been a complicated task. NPR's Jane Arraf reports. The museum now plans to send some artifacts back to Iraq that it didn't even know it had The Museum of the Bible was founded by billionaire Steve Green and evangelical Christian whose family owns the Hobby lobby Craft store chain. He wanted to show the book's history and impact. But he didn't know much about antiquities or the illegal market for them or show much concern. Three years ago, the US government find hobby lobby $3 million for lack of due diligence. The company returned to Iraq, thousands of clay tablets and other items. That had been shipped a hobby lobby from other countries. Some marked ceramic tile samples. Now, the museum's chief curator, Jeff Claudia, tells us they're packing up more pieces to return to Iraq because they can't tell whether they were looted his paperwork and very vague paperwork. So I don't know if he's purchased sight on scene or be reviewed before they were purchased. Flow has referring to what the museum now realizes, or more than 8000 clay tablets and other artefacts and acquired from dealers in the US, the UK and Israel. They're believed to have come from Iraq.

The Museum Iraq Hobby Lobby Hobby Lobby Craft United States Steve Green Jeff Claudia Jane Arraf NPR Chief Curator Washington Israel UK
"chief curator" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"chief curator" Discussed on KCRW

"Think I'm going to sleep with you just because you've taken me on your ring here wrong. That's the actor. So Hayek in the two thousand two biographical film Frida now comes this avoi- s- discovered in Mexico's national sound library, one that the archivists there say might be the only known recording of Carlos speaking. So lucky nothing school and began. Light. Not. Archivist believed this was recorded in nineteen fifty three or fifty four for a radio program that aired soon after college died archivists still aren't sure if it is call. Oh note, simply say it is a female painter who quote, no longer exists, whomever. It is reading, the words are Kalos. It's an essay, she wrote in the late nineteen forties about her husband, the Murless Diego Rivera, this part is about Rivera's is. He's a school thinking easy to get out of this is our bowl, djing dark, and intelligent, and find it difficult to stop, roaming. The almost come out of their sockets with their swollen, protruding told like eyelids they allow their gaze to encompass much wider field of vision as though they were built, especially for painter of large spaces in crowds to things. We know for sure it's not Selma Hayek doing the reading, and the real Frida Kahlo had a difficult life. She had polio as a child at age eighteen she was hit by a bus. She looks pained and severe in paintings and photos and Rivera, that husband with the is like a toad was a known philanderer so that light easy voice on the recording stands in contrast. Stefan, Ken is chief curator at Washington, DC's, Hirschhorn, museum and sculpture garden. He says he was surprised by the voice, where we discover is, is prison. Of course, it is very articulated, very proper voice and elevated Dixie. Shen and sense of, of image in metaphor in the language that, that speaks of a deeper, literary culture. Researchers have been hunting for other tapes from the radio show to prove free to Kalos voice is on the recording that the task is daunting. They have around thirteen.

Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Kalos Selma Hayek Ken Mexico Shen Hirschhorn chief curator Carlos Dixie Washington Stefan DC
"chief curator" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on Slate's Working

"So if it's bending painted with oil paint, a not gonna use on colors. I use materials are very rarely soluble that would not affect the original paint. If somebody in the future wants to remove those retouching, or whatever they will readily soluble and mild, solvents. What kind of painter you in this case, I'm using watercolor? I could've used some. We have many many things, but the watercolor seems to give me what I want 'cause you're just you just want that lay just kind of just take away. Yes, exactly. You're do the minimal retouching just enough that it unifies areas. And it looks like it's not touched and sometimes you leave little things because. The painting is over one hundred years old. So we don't take all the wrinkles away. If we don't have to how do you make that decision about what they wanna leave some signs of age. It's it's partially you I and then of course, we always consult with curator's like during the treatment. I call the chief curator to see to show her heart's going, and they say loose good. Looks. Is looking great or whatever. And then once I'm finished, I'm going to call her, and she will tell me, oh, maybe maybe you should do a little bit more here. If you think, you know, her I see other things that probably, you know, I didn't see or I had a different opinion. But it's minimal. So most just like refining. What you've done is the idea of leaving some of the signs of aging because viewers expect that because people think oh, I'm seeing an older painting. You have a crack I don't really think that the general public will know the difference. It's it's for it's more. You have to think about it a lot look at the painting a lot to make those decisions. So when you pass by painting for one second to just wanna see an overall, and you say all the painting is beautiful, but you're not going to all they should've retouched a little bit more on the chest. Little bit more here. There's a big loss there. So you know, nobody will. Really, no, do you ever walk into a museum and look at a painting and say, the conservative mess this up. It seems in question because I'm gonna work on another Susannah portrait there was in Washington. So I went to Washington to look at the show. There are painting was there to compare with other paying other portrait's very often. I like to do that we not only me, but a lot of conservatives go and look at other paintings from the same period from the same artist. And then see how do they look how they retreated if there were treated if they were varnished, how the varnishes look so you actually visually. You learn more how you're looking comparison with the others. And then you you can have a more educated way of deciding what are you going to do with your particular painting? There was a very polite answer you learn from your colleagues, you don't judge them to or you learn from your peers excellently, so you you talked about struck. Literal things you have to that sounds like kind of heavy duty work you'd be doing on a painting. So what is a structural, for example, this collection starting from the fifties? I would say where the conservation department didn't have conservation department. Here was not an existing sorry. So paintings were sent out to other conservatives, and because within heaven virement we had and all that lining was a very popular thing to do. What is lying lining painting means attaching a new campus to the back of the original with different hills in this particular connection wax wrestling at the of his were use extensively to line paintings. And then they were mounted in new stretchers all stretchers, probably were faulty or were not structurally sound. So we replace the stretchers. And then we retouched whatever had to be retouched sometimes you don't have to go in every touch environ ish and varnishes I said before was. Consider protective coating because it was against heard the environment and many other things, you know. Working is.

Washington chief curator Susannah one hundred years one second
"chief curator" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on Slate's Working

"And I feel really fortunate to have worked with so many fantastic people at the museum. I mean, I often joke that I came to this position. I I wasn't hired as a collection specialist. I was hired as a catalog, but I wanted to catalog the catalog or is that your job is basically just to take this print and get who's the artist was the very basic cataloging information exhibition history provenance history in that kind of database stuff. So it's interesting that kind of like an entry level job at museum. It's an entry level job in say a curatorial department. Okay. But it was one that I was thrilled to get and it was really happy. But I came in with very little background in architecture and design, but I was really fortunate that my teachers in this world were Perry. Burg dollar chief curator at the time and Pella and Tonelli's to the greatest curator's of this field in the world. Right. So I have had the great privilege of having all these amazing people to work with. And I think that's really kind of led me to where I am now. Now where I feel comfortable actually going to them. And they encourage this kind of give and take all of our current chief caters Martinez dearly. And he loves this kind of give and take ideas. What do you think about this? What do you think about that? So we really all of bash these ideas around. So now that we think we've started to get our arms around what your job actually is. Maybe maybe begun begun to. I know there's I definitely haven't hit the docking. Yeah. I can see the list, but I'm just I'll put it away. But the I mean, how would you say you spend most of your time? What is what's taking up the majority of your day? I'm sure you are familiar with the scourge of Email. Yes, it's which the buckets are emailing about all day. Well, often my buckets our time zone based right because we do a lot of things with partners in Europe. So when I get in the first thing in the morning, it's who in Europe. Do I need to work 'cause I want to try to get something on their day. Right. So it's knockout anything tapping their with Europe. And then that's often the very first thing, I do when I get is knocked those out, and then so if there's like a loan exhibition there, you're dealing with Paris. Or what I'm yeah. I I've I want to try to get that done on the soon side. So that I stay on top of those things. And then as soon as that's off my plate, then I'll get into the more kind of brain intensive things. I'm I'm a morning person. So if I need to write something because I write for catalogs or things that go online. I like to do that in the morning because then I can close my internet browser put on headphones and opened Microsoft Word and just right and try to get that done. And then after noon than it just becomes a endless potpourri of meetings..

Europe chief curator Martinez Perry Burg Tonelli Pella Paris
"chief curator" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on Slate's Working

"Of their original facade curtain wall of the UN secretary at building. Okay. So thirteen feet high and twelve feet wide massive the original like, aluminum and steel and glass skin of the building because they had to completely replace the curtain wall on the secretary. And we had it. You've just had that sitting in your warehouse since two thousand fifteen. Yeah. So it's like, how do you? How do you keep that thing very carefully because some of the classes very fragile? But the the bigger question was not so much. How do we keep it? It's how to show it because this thing is the skin of a building. But it doesn't stand up on its own. It's the skin it hangs onto a building. So we had to essentially create a kind of structure that can hang this things. So that people could see it and that involved working with architects and engineers trying to figure this out. So that was so when I say something like an outgoing loan. That's not just here's this drawing. It's often. All right here. We have these pieces of the United Nations building. How do we show them? And so it can be even. Alone can still be a very involved process. So again, tell me like when you were figuring that out what were you personally doing where you going back and forth between an architect to is. You know, coming up with the designs, or what was what was your role? My role was the kind of project manager. So I was working with our curator's. Our chief creator Martino steely, and Sean Anderson and other curator Barry bergdahl, former chief curator, and the engineering firm that we did the curtain wall, which is Heinsohn associates, very big curtain wall engineering firm in New York to kind of frame the debate as to how what is it? We want this object to tell this a piece of a building. How do we want to show this to people that will give them the clearest understanding of what it meant to be a Colonel the UN secretary, by the way, it was the first curtain wall building skyscraper in the United States. So it's really kind of sitting in between all of these different parties. Metal fabricators engineers architects curator's to kind of. Bring the project to fruition to to end that best speaks to and represents the ideas behind it when you are loaning artwork. Is it typically another institution comes to you and says, we know you have this in your collection. We would love to show it ourselves or this. There's some travelling show, or is it you proposing something to them so MoMA generally is the recipient of these things. Some museums are in the business of putting together big shows and kind of selling them to other institutions doesn't really do that so much which museums sort of do that or the Victorian Albert museum in London has a long history putting together incredible exhibitions that are meant to be toured and go around feature design museum, which is in Germany, there's and then other museums pay for the rights to to show that vision. So you're you're typically getting requests from other institutions, we're getting requests, the the two exhibitions we did recently in Australia and in Paris were kind of jointly organized between us than these borrowing institution. And so that was a little bit in between the two it's not exactly them coming to us. And it's on exactly generating it. It was sort of done together with these institutions and sume you're the one who's fielding a lot of those requests, I'm feeling all of your fielding all of their quests. So what typically are other institutions asking for from your guys? Well, it's interesting because you can imagine if you're talk to my colleague, Lilli, Goldberg and painting and sculpture, she probably gets a request for a demo day Avignon or starry night. Like every five minutes is that request ever. Get granted. No..

chief curator secretary UN United Nations Goldberg Victorian Albert museum in Lon project manager Heinsohn associates Martino steely United States Lilli Avignon Germany feature design museum Australia Paris Barry bergdahl New York Sean Anderson thirteen feet
"chief curator" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

08:55 min | 2 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Stewart Ashman executive director and chief curator of the center, for contemporary arts the cultural hub. For Santa Fe and New Mexico and we have a special guest today we have had a houseman. Hannah is, the new development director at the center for contemporary arts but she has a great story so we thought we, would have her on the radio. And let your listeners, know what's going on so Hannah thank you for being here and tell us a little bit about how you, as we say in New Mexico landed up at CCA Well thank you for, having me good morning Really my parents landed here even further. Back my mom and her family and Taus so I am. From to sukey New Mexico grew up there my parents built a great adobe mountain to sukey when, I was little as a baby and Grew up. Here it's my hometown I love it when I was nineteen I decided to fly the coop My sister. Was in Miami. And so I was, visiting her back and forth and Just loved. The culture and cuisine and the art and everything that was going on in Miami so I left New Mexico and found myself which happens. To a lot of people in. Florida at transplants just there, and I never laughed so it. Was twenty years later when I said to myself I it's time to come home and, so it really was Kismet because a friend of my family new Stewart really well and and we talked and I had seen a position. Already as c. c. a. and I just felt like it, was a great fit so I've worked. In development for a good, number of years and I'm so happy to be home So. That's great that we brought you here I knew the story, but I wanted you to tell it And so you were development director. At the Miami children's, museum right yes I was so in totality I worked there for probably eight years I worked there twice so I went there in my first anti came in, working for them when I. Was younger and then worked for them for. Another two and a, half years mainly focusing on major gifts Fundraising for the south Florida community and then special events which. We did a. Lot of them so Gallus and I kind of finished off with a bang organized. An? Eight hundred, person event that raised over, a million, dollars in Miami, and so felt really, good about what I did for south Florida am working to do that for, our community here in Santa Fe and raise some. Much needed funds for CCA right in you as you were. Growing up before you, left CCA played a role in your life right I mean you go to the movies, they're absolutely and. You know as a kid here I think it's it's funny, to? Kind, of see different generations and. How they you know what they do. Here in the community. Because when I was a kid there wasn't much to do I mean you had you know the cinema 's you had maybe once in a while you into, a gallery but pretty much City which I guess it does now but it shut down pretty early. And we did a lot of outdoor activities so but yes art and culture played a huge role I grew up in artistic family they, joke and say that I am the family member that has a real job because everyone else is pretty much an artist in my family so from musicians to writers my my. Dad and momma. Writers and so yeah growing up it was always art was a big part of. My? Life and, also volunteering I spent a, lotta time, volunteering at different, organizations around Sanofi and, your uncle is a well known folk musician sid Hausman right he is he, is right now he does a lot of he's. Been traveling Zona lot and doing playing on the trains there. And so, he he's, a great player growing up I always remembered him playing the banjo primarily but now he's, really focused on On the ukulele early yeah interesting Yeah And he's a singer singer cowboy. Poet Jeweler he. Works down at Llewellyn jewelry as well. So he that's his, other side gig he's a renaissance. Man which my father is as. Well so my, father plays. The guitar, he's a writer heated theater so yeah I'm lucky to. Grow up in such a creative family so where? Did, you go to school in San I I went to to, sukey elementary And that was for three years and. Then my mom moved me to. Thank you Marjorie mostly because she worked at Santa Fe prop and so that was really easy for her. And I'm actually a mom of a three year old so. I get now sort of the struggle, of trying to you? Know it's great to have like that proximity to be able to pick up your child after. School so interesting him Andrei loved it and. Then. I was lucky enough to. Be able to get a scholarship and go to Santa Fe prep and so. I spent the rest of my. High school there you went to the university. Of Miami which one you are I'm. In Miami studied theater, performance because I spent my whole. High school career acting and singing. I don't know, if you. Remember jinx, Junkin sure I took classes with her I'm starting at. Five and remember those classes fondly and she was? A, character and then I also took I did a lot of choir so, I was able to? Get a scholarship from the Santa Fe corral I don't know if they're still desert crou- to. Get a scholarship so I also did choir. When. I went to Miami I. Love singing I haven't done much of it and then I did radio for. Four years WVU am I Started and. I had a show for four years so that was a challenge because when you're you know You know that young and they they give you sort of a. Regimented schedule and say. Okay we're going to give you the, slot from two to four in the morning that one was okay. But when they start giving you like you know. The earlier slots. And then you have to, be up so that was a really good. Experience for me I enjoyed it radio is, really fun I loved it So what Richard because might be taking? Your job over Am I talking too much I have, my dad's I you know. I kinda talk too much, sometimes my my husband says can you tell, that? Story a little shorter please And so your husband. Sean what does he do so. He is. A set designer designed over a hundred shows in his career at this point for the. Theater community so I'm really proud of him he's freelance so. He's able to travel. And, work all, over the country which is. Exciting right now he's designing, the graduate for the play NOP Scott opera? House Oh that's great I'm, Scott. In, Maine Maine Great, so And I must mention he was an apprentice at the Santa. Fe opera so that's how. We You know I. Wasn't even here when he was here but he had a great connection to. Santa Fe too so Yeah well. It's you know from our end obviously from the moment we first connected it was a fit? Fit McGahan a glove and how we heard about you is, through Meredith nation whose husband was the headmaster at prep and we. Were looking for a development director and she said. You gotta talk to this person and we hit twenty five. Resumes so it was good that you were the, one so we're gonna, take a, little break in just a moment, you're on, coffee and culture here on talk radio twelve sixty one zero three point seven KTAR see Santa Fe's news talk. Leader so,.

Santa Fe Miami New Mexico director Stewart Ashman writer south Florida Hannah CCA Taus executive director Sanofi Florida Gallus c. c. a. chief curator Llewellyn jewelry Scott Maine
"chief curator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sector has actually been very. Very powerful in terms of expressing themselves so I think the great at that is coming out of this country is something which needs to be put Out in the global at seem for the people to. See the voices of these people and the voices of the people of Zimbabwe at is needed when things are had because it really, tells the story of the people today. Zimbabwean needs to celebrate the new cultural policy that is in place that allows at to be taught in schools That, would? Also means that a lot of people who are not educated, who do not understand the appreciate at or get appreciate that in the near future Albert what do. You think the future holds for arts and culture in Zimbabwe the sky is the limit it's all open I can assure you that every day almost virtually every day youngsters right wanting to be held in one way or the other India artistic endeavor And I try way I can. To help them so therefore for that reason. I can see that the future is bright Rafael finally Ascii what, do you think needed to allow arts and culture to thrive in Zimbabwe going forward to. What we need to do is, to also purchase material for this new curriculum which is now in schools so much that couch can also get appreciated way towards not appreciate remember that for us, as a as a museum audience building is still a very big issue I'm sure these translate into museum, across the continent because remember museums we only for white people and there are other. People. Who still feel the same way so for us as cultural managers we? Have a role to play. So much that. At least we can educate these people so that they can understand, and? For the visual artist in this country this guy is limit, because everybody Across the, continent we always look at the wind of change that everybody's looking at Africa so it. Is our preparedness is a continent, it has preparedness is a country that is going to take us into another stick the. Chief curator of the National Gallery of Zimbabwe Rafael Chiku Kwa and the, poet singer and musician.

Zimbabwe National Gallery of Zimbabwe R Chief curator Albert Africa India
"chief curator" Discussed on DirtCast

DirtCast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on DirtCast

"Two seconds right but yeah just call it like ancient chinese secret really crazy chinese time i would've well i mean that's just fine it's just two words together so the costume institute is generally so the chief curator of the costume institute is this tall british scottish man andrew bolton and he's the one who's in charge of sort of selecting the themes figuring out what the exhibit is going to be it's like a whole year long kind of like extravaganza that leads to just like a really fun red carpet you don't get to really see inside unless it's like approved footage which i enjoy because i find those things so boring are like the the carp yeah and it's like the carp the carp is great you also get to see inside based on either approved footage or celebrities instagram's last year if you'll recall a bunch of celebs smokin bogeys in the bathroom at the met which to really go sh it amazing i is amazing as ing ghost but it's like our fries laugh you know like an hour after yes friends of the podcast matt viviana from the tiny harding anti carrigan nineteen ninetyfour museum recently did an entire exhibit called celebrities smoking in the bathroom at the beca create it all of these artworks based on those instagrams and curated them it was awesome the other thing too no i think about the met gala is that it's sponsored heavily because it costs shitload of money right well so it's like andrew bolton is the person in charge of picking the theme but also wink yet entirely.

chief curator costume institute instagram matt viviana ninetyfour museum andrew bolton harding carrigan Two seconds
Harvard, Bain and Boston discussed on BTV Simulcast

BTV Simulcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

Harvard, Bain and Boston discussed on BTV Simulcast

"It's really it's really the same issue real estates are more stable assets we've we've had a great team come over to ban capital from harvard has been in top top performer for the last ten years it worked out great for both sides we're very excited about that team and again they're going to be selective they they stick to specific niches that they know about so for example funding biotech a office space dr office space things that have demand and and we'll we'll ask the test of time withstand some of these trade increases excited about teams at bain and excited about certainly teams celtic it's wonderful to have your hand very fortunate i don't think we've ever had a better team of bain and certainly the celtics team is is just a working magic every night and hopefully the magic we'll continue everyone in boston steve how thank you so much for being with us wants of cpu is being capital coach and co owner of the boston celtics now drama among management at tesla continues ceo elon musk announced a thorough reorganization among management in a memo to employees monday he added that tesla was changing its structure to improve communication combined functions and get rid of activities that aren't vital to the success of the company's mission and the news comes after several executives announced the departure in recent months coming up much more from the institute of contemporary art right here in boston moose beat with the museum's chief curator and discuss how art has evolved through technology and if you like bad news check us out on the radio you can listen on the bloomberg radio app dot com and in the us on sirius xm this is bloomberg.

Harvard Bain Boston Boston Celtics Tesla Elon Musk Chief Curator United States Bloomberg Celtics CEO Institute Of Contemporary Art Ten Years
"chief curator" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on 710 WOR

"In the department of art history and archaeology and she worked as an educator at the metropolitan museum of art where she was responsible for adult and college galleries in the african wing but now you've got some african american journalists who are tweeting seriously at brooklyn museum says earnest owens a philadelphia journalist there goes the neighborhood another kimberly seldon tweets people from the african diaspora are frustrated with white people being gatekeepers of our narrative i'm sorry this is ridiculous this woman is completely qualified to oversee the african collection at the museum and there should be no racial tests to have only black people can can look after black art that is ridiculous that is political correctness run amok the museum's chief curator send the statement kristen as the perfect choice to build upon the brooklyn museum's track record as an innovator in the collection an exhibition of the arts of africa so there's this base on skin color and not credentials so people who are criticizing her the museum is already starting to waver a little bit they put out a man be be statement to say we've been listening closely to the debate about our recent appointments to our curatorial team we're listening and we hear you as we think about ways to engage in this conversation with the care it deserves we want to assure you that you can count on us as ever if they rescind the hiring of this woman i will be there protesting outside the brooklyn museum i pay totally qualified to head up the african collection at the brooklyn museum speaking of the race issue.

brooklyn museum chief curator kristen metropolitan museum of art owens philadelphia kimberly seldon arts of africa
New York museum slammed after hiring white curator for African art exhibit

Flashpoint

02:20 min | 3 years ago

New York museum slammed after hiring white curator for African art exhibit

"To us between seven ten eastern time you can go ahead and give us a call what and what was that he daryl it was between one hundred hours and three hundred hours zulu time yes yeah i like that yeah pick up the phone number is eight five five four five zero three seven three three surely there is something that you that it's up something in your soul is so important that you must tell the world while we are the outlet for you you could post facebook and dozens of people may see it or you call here hundreds of thousands could check it out new york post dot com apparently the brooklyn museum has sparked outrage in the black community after tapping a white woman to curate its vast african art collection on monday museum appointed kristen when miller luna she's thirty one who has a phd in african art history from princeton university lecturers in columbia university's department of art history and archaeology and once worked as an educator in the metropolitan museum of art where she was responsible for adult and college gallery tours in the african galleries so she sounds pretty qualified she's got her degree from a ivy league university and lectures at an ivy league university and has in fact worked at the met in african art history despite the stellar resume her hiring left some wondering why qualified person of color did not get the post seriously at brooklyn museum at brooklyn i guess this is a a tweet of twitter thing goes the neighbor there there goes the neighborhood for good opined philadelphia journalist ernest owens on twitter people from the african diaspora are frustrated with white people being gatekeepers of our narrative tweeted kimberly kimberly seldon museum defended the decision christon is the perfect choice to build upon the brooklyn museum's track record as an innovator in the collection and exhibition of the arts africa said jenner the museum's chief curator in a statement museum said it was committed.

Facebook Brooklyn Museum Kristen Columbia University Ivy League University Brooklyn Ernest Owens Jenner Chief Curator Daryl New York Princeton University Metropolitan Museum Of Art Twitter Philadelphia Kimberly Seldon Museum Three Hundred Hours One Hundred Hours
"chief curator" Discussed on Little Gold Men

Little Gold Men

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on Little Gold Men

"So richer what did you say that you were picking shape or water i think that i think that greenwood wall respected certainly and it's cool when like trump as nerve like somebody goes from rock musician to film composer i just think that maybe that music is still a little too alienating for people even though it's much more accessible than like his stuff in the master whatever yum yummy he spent on trying to get nominated by any thinking they cut getting disqualified for using existing music which is a at a weird thing about this category via who because he and win okay so we're going to get into the animated documentary and foreignlanguage film features which are a tricky category for me personally since i usually have a hard time catching up with all of these but that won't stop me from making predictions so let's start with foreignlanguage film which is a really interesting lineup because i think the the of the runaway favorite that i expected to be in their bpm which richard i think was your favorite movie of the year didn't get nominated to the fantastic woman the insult loveless on body and soul end the square i'm really at a loss and you've got to tell me what to predict i pretty sure beter lina fantastic woman and the square uh loveless nothing's right unbelievably dark russian film about people who are straight up awful and i don't think that's that oscarfriendly the insult is quite interesting but maybe a little bit simplistic a lebanese film and the on body and soul is is fine but i think that the square is super super interesting swedish film about a guy who's like a cure chief curator at a big museum and basically it's a.

chief curator trump
"chief curator" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on KCRW

"Moment and the assistant is trying to respond to him everybody's trying to get him to stay quiet but he wants they quite 'cause he's a little kid areas and know any better and he doesn't these not interested in being polite classic swedish guy has nothing to lose is i'm way out and yeah well that happens a lot of there there is often a character in your piece pieces who has nothing to lose yeah but you know i think that i'm interested in setups where the social contract is broken in some way in all i think that is it something i we are sensitive to as human beings is that there's an on outspoken social contract in every situation basically and when someone is breaking that's a social contract what ardent new rules how should i react how should i correspond and i think in those moment is says so much about ourselves than our behavior and how we talk and are trained to deal with it with with these moments and this is a boy died i was found of the idea you know if you're an adult man and suddenly it comes a little boy accusing you for doing the wrong thing it's scary isn't it holier i think that happens of a few times in the in the movie and at every time with the actually you set the square in the art world where there all these social contracts about what behavior is and what art is supposed to be and once the body violates that contract nobody knows how to respond i mean there's a interview the very beginning of the movie where this is ridiculous statement about public nece i can tell you about that takes that actually it's elizabeth most say character that is having an interview would cost bind up pace crease down the chief curator intimacy him and having cheese taking excerpt from something she found on the web page of the museum and.

elizabeth chief curator
"chief curator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The to the digital world and um and you know finding new and exciting outcomes from of the artis of the show are women or africanamerican correct um have some of these artists in your opinion not died in detention that they've deserved i think that i mean when we were putting together that together this exhibition but we wanted to do was reflect the diversity of the collection itself and in that was that drove that of course we are cognizant of including women including african american artist including nonwestern artist when we could but our primary i think i mean i i think our primary goal was to pick the strongest works and it just so happens very happily that uh half of the monographic presentations are by women uh there are a lot of african american artists are included in this exhibition and it wasn't and it was again because the work was just so potent so great um and had something to say i think to our audiences today and that is what we wanted to achieve curious how much of the museum's collection is actually on view at any one time i know this is very bad all park sort of a question but do you have any sense of there having gone through the warehouses in long island city it's it's a it's a tough question to answer exactly but um but yet super bowl like less than ten percent at any given time and as you know where currently in the process of um expanding the museum so leave we have even of more reduced gallery space at this point sal it we do we we show we show whatever we can at any given time and what's interesting about that is that the the fact that we do show about ten percent of the collection has rarely driven you know people often think of the museum as having a permanent collection of course the we own these works permanently but the display in the presentation of the collection is anything but permanent even in the autumn could a previous operations that were more of the kind of historical progression through the 20th century kara and um and thompkin the chief curator of our painting and sculpture department working crossed crossdepartmental lee with curators from drives and prince and film it cetera would change the galleries on an almost weekly basis and.

super bowl chief curator ten percent
"chief curator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The to the digital world and um and you know finding new and exciting outcomes from of the the of the show are women or african american correct um have some of these artists in your opinion not gotten detention that they deserved i think that i mean when we were putting together that together this exhibition but we wanted to do was reflect the diversity of the collection itself and in that was that drove that of course we are cognizant of including women including african american artist including that nonwestern artist when we could but our primary i think i mean i i think our primary goal was to pick the strongest works and it just so happens very happily that half of the monographic presentations are by women uh there are a lot of african american artists um included in this exhibition and it wasn't and it was again because the work was just so potent so great um and had something to say i think to our audiences today that was what we wanted to achieve and curious how much of the museum's collection is actually on view at any one time i know this is very bad all park sort of a question but do you have any sense of that having gone through the warehouses in long island city it's it's a it's a tough question to answer exactly but um but yet super bowl correctly less than ten percent at any given time and omni as you know where it currently in the process of um expanding the museum so leave we have even kind of more reduced gallery space at this point sal he we do we we show we show whatever we can at any given time and what's interesting about that is that the the fact that we do show about ten percent of the collection has really driven you know people often think of the museum as having a permanent collection of course the we own these works permanent but the display in the presentation of the collection is anything but permanent even in the um could of previous operations that were more of the historical progression through the 20th century kara and antitank in the chief curator of art the painting and sculpture department working crossed crossdepartmental lee with curators from drawings and prince in film it cetera would change the galleries on an almost weekly basis and.

super bowl chief curator omni ten percent
"chief curator" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The transition from smallboy's to dogs shakespeare mentions them it described somebody is being cut child dog fitch ideally to run in the wheel curtailed wings at times cut it was a way that they used to differentiate between the dogs in the night bility on the dogs belonging to ordinary people these are concur title with ones that were pushing for years he move it in a must be dished at one west this vexatious turn spits gone unless the skulking is caught the serb knowing spoils and online at fault mining cc wesley chief curator at historic voyle palaces of london charles darwin commented on the dolts is an example of genetic engineering he said look at this bit though that sample of how people can reads animals twos suit particular needs la la la on the sunday times be dog often had a day off the dogs will allow to come with a family to church not because of any concern for the spiritual education part because the talks were useful us foot woman interestingly there are also a few reckless of 10 speights being employed in america benjamin franklin's pennsylvania cassatt advertisements the tense but dogs some wheels the sale attend switch was active at the state house in philadelphia straight house was where all the old their slice of beef in their hail the owner in seventeen 45 advertised smick dogs for sale evidently he was also breeding them i'm william always weaver author of several books on food f nar graffiti in seventeen out to the wife of william pan founder of pennsylvania the rights to england that she wants a wheel for her turn spit dogs blend of butter churn if they're getting turned a spit for meat they can also turn a turn for making butter in this country the dogs.

smallboy chief curator speights benjamin franklin philadelphia founder pennsylvania shakespeare charles darwin america william pan england
"chief curator" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"You did that better than still got studies chris benches the chief curator for the national toy hall of fame also while this is happening while we're talking to him and i'm probably going to yell at him a stupid at some point here on espn will be throwing a football the mardi smith the whole goal of it is for marty smith oh now they're doing it they're doing the miami notre dame stuff mardi smith is going to catch the ball and jump into the pool a ball thrown by still got stu gotsis will not be surprised you sports center was waiting for him downstairs all his dreams come true throw football and sports centre with mardi smith and there were likes to god's hurry up hurry up to god's hurry up and he's like i'm hurrying and they waddle's back in here and vigorously sips water would it be totally disrespectful to chris bench to pot up the the live feed as got is throwing all that's fine will do that with chris bench that's fine let's do that chief curry or for the curators for the national toy hall of fame this year's finalists therein right they're not finalised the paper airplane whipple ball and clue are in a magic eightball matchbox cars my little pony pez dispenser play food risk sand transformers ono all out the finalists that are out the chris bench joins us now this is a bogus list it's a bogus hall of fame he represents it and it's very powerful hall of fame and it's very important hall of fame but this guy what are you doing here with why is it's paper why is paper in the hall of fame.

chris chief curator espn football marty smith miami stu gotsis mardi smith
"chief curator" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"You did that better than still got studies chris benches the chief curator for the national toy hall of fame also while this is happening while we're talking to him and i i'm probably going to yell at him a stupid shots at some point here on espn will be throwing a football too marty smith the whole goal of it is for marty smith all now they're doing it they're doing the miami notre dame stuff marty smith is going to catch the ball and jump into the pool a ball thrown by two guts stu gotsis will not be surprised you sports center was waiting for him downstairs all his dreams come true throw football and sports centre with marty smith and they were likes to god's hurry up hurry up to god's hurry up and he's like i'm hurrying and they waddle's back in here and vigorously sips water would it be totally disrespectful to chris bench to pot up the the live feed as you got is throwing oh that's fine we'll do that with chris bench that's fine let's do that chief curried or for the curators for the national toy hall of fame this year's finalists therein right they're not finalised the paper airplane with a ball and clue are in a match agape all matchbox cars my little pony pez dispenser play food risk sand transformers ono all out the finalists that are out so chris bench joins us now this is a bogus list it's a bogeys hall of fame he represents it and it's very powerful hall of fame and it's very important hall of fame but this guy what are you doing here with why is it's paper why is paper in the hall of fame.

chief curator espn football marty smith miami chris bench
"chief curator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We're back with island way who has projects in the city right now and nicolas bohm the public guard funds director and chief curator in the southwest corner of central park where we you have a piece called guilded cage it is the gold a nod to donald trump whose towers just a few blocks down fifth avenue yes i think i have the privilege to view the sculpture just two blocks away from the are famous trump power and uh you know i on gilded in gold caller her so we know that saw the price than so favorite color and i hope he can likes saved my work because this is arrested the twelve in york say the under this is made the four although he thought the bag much time in the city yeah i think he should have one more time to to low cut a heart rather than just golf and but you know maybe it's lucky snatching the see if he's so it would not block because his traffic all the time nicolas there're there pieces all over there's something had coup uniondale five fences there's another installation at a private building at 48 e seven street will maybe i should ask you that way way why there didn't is where you live for awhile yeah that's seven street and a avenue is my my rest in the now was staying there in know way cadiz the village sunday in lose lot artists in zaire i've met and ginsburg korean odd madda lotto musician send the heart has to be spend a lot of time on street on the.

director chief curator fifth avenue york golf uniondale ginsburg nicolas bohm donald trump
"chief curator" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"chief curator" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Where i live you know the what has led up to the modern home thank you lucy lucy wars lease chief curator at historic royal palaces that's the independent charity that looks after kensington palace state apartments the tower of london hampton court palace and others in london and she's author of a book called if walls could talk and intimate history of the hall if you'd like to hear more you can get the audio version of luci's book for free from audible just go to audible dot com slash something that's audible dot com slash something and sign up for their free thirty day trial and free audio book download and then just search for lucy worsley wor s l e y lucy wars lease book if walls could talk that's audible dot com slash something raise your hand if you like confrontation yeah most of us think of confrontation as something to avoid at least until things get so bad that then we just have to explode and then the confrontation turned into a fight and nothing gets accomplished but what if there was a better way well apparently there is according to barbara packed her barbara packed her is somebody i've known for a long time she's an expert on business etiquette and she is really good at helping people deal with other people several years ago she wrote a book called the power of positive confrontation and more recently released in audio cd called the power of positive confrontation the skills you need to handle conflicts at work at home online and in life welcome barbara good to talk to you again and so this idea of positive confrontation seems like.

london hampton court palace luci barbara lucy lucy chief curator kensington palace london thirty day