23 Burst results for "Chief Business Officer"

"chief business officer" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:51 min | 3 months ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Week we take you back to voices 2021 where Conde nast Britain's Vanessa kingori set down with purpose coach and founder of 8 22 group Maury fontanez to discuss the benefits of leaning into intuition, leveraging gut instinct to support data driven decision making in the workplace. As Vanessa reveals in this interview, she had to become comfortable with being an outsider in fashion media and bringing a point of view that differed from the general consensus. Here's Vanessa kingori and Maury Fontana's at BOF voices 2021. So I wanted to start by asking you how in your brilliant career you were just promoted two months ago to chief business officer of Conde nast Britain's brands, you still oversee Vogue UK and Vogue in Europe. So a lot of responsibility, a lot of different balls in the air..

Vanessa Conde Vanessa kingori Europe Vogue two months ago Vogue UK Maury fontanez Maury Fontana Britain BOF Conde nast Britain voices 22 group 8 2021
"chief business officer" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

AdExchanger Talks

03:36 min | 10 months ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

"Yeah yeah i i i I would say that when you think about the point in time in which. We are becoming yahoo As as i briefly previously were back to growth. and we're seeing growth acceleration. And you know. I everyone labs growth and Growthy outcome of doing. What's right for consumers and per customer. And i would say that. Were coming into it with a lot of Strong momentum and that is something that is felt by your teams. And it's fun ride. It's fun to be in that context and then comes up polo and now we're our own standalone. I tend to think of edessa giant startup right that By very strong partners we an ecosystem that that is very broad so the the the general feeling if you will is one of optimism an opportunity. There's certainly the uncertainty that comes with change and that happens with every piece of change but your point i would say if nothing else i feel like we have been somewhat trained in in the you know the area of change I feel very bullish about our teams and how they quite frankly preventing the past that that they navigate through and continue to evolve coming out very strongly so so yeah so. That's that's the german sentiment. I mean i appreciate the sentiment of You know calling yourself the startup mentality. But it's a pretty giant start up right. It's like nine thousand employees. Something like that. Yeah so does it make sense Know considering there's been so much change and now there's new ownership and they're also new areas you want to get into so this might necessitate bringing on new assets but also keeping in mind. There's been so much change recently. Doesn't make sense to roll anymore attack or media or other assets into the yahoo stack or you just gonna like hang tight for a second But like what sort of acids would it be if the answer is yeah. We want some more stuff. Yes i would say One of the things that personally. Very exciting about these evolution. He's we think that Boldness on behavior is thinking a lot more deeply and expansively about a range of approaches that go on the way from you know continue to too strategic partnerships to buying. I'm the focus is really going to be on unleashing. Maximum put things that we have right so you mentioned some of the areas previously and were some of the areas that for example in in in cry your interviews Apple's leaders may have highlighted around sports on finance and advertising. And you know when you think about our strategy. I'll talk about advertising. Sonic example you know. The landscape continues to evolve. There's continued evolution of all of the area Advertising ranging from channels. You know we talk. Wwe in store media or retailing medium..

yahoo Apple
"chief business officer" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

AdExchanger Talks

05:52 min | 10 months ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

"Does the new yahoo or like yahoo take to like. Where do you guys fit in the grand scheme of the digital advertising ecosystem because feels like we're talking about a lot of things. I mean there's the court at tech there's nafta's experimentation with that. There's content commerce bedding there's Just lots of of stuff going on that. You're you're lots of fingers in lots of pies. But where does that place yahoo just in in the digital ego ecosystem at large. Yes so when you think about the the advertising ecosystem We see ourselves and You know i. I think To an extent our customers feedback is consistent with that. Which is a high growth leaving home for advertisers publishers given our tech the scale of our brands partners and our first party. That and i would say We take a community garden approach. Which differentiates us from Some of the larger walled gardens. If you will as well as some of the single stack players. That may lack i party. They doubt or they may lack the other side of this start. So so if you're only esp or you're only ns sp so You know as we think about this and as we think about take two we see our subsets as being that enabler of advertising in the changing these italico system when you think about emerging channels or you think about that abbreviation of identifiers again on on that front. We recently launched Yahoo connect tied the next generation solutions. Which are seeing i lord of adoption in the market and are tied to supporting that brother. Ecosystem in very unique ways had skated. When you say community garden maybe just define that. Because i have a sense of what i think. It means anything people You know use it. In a certain way like the opposite of walled gardens. But how are you defining community garden. Yeah lilly me. Let me use A couple of examples One example. Which i just mentioned the yahu connectivity so connected the is our solution for the cookie less work and we connect i-i've never it's a people. I very very large scale identity graph. That is coming from our trusted. I party relationships in all of the iconic brands that we operate so these days permission based We get that permission from tressler relationships with consumers and essentially the walled garden approach to that would be to say..

yahoo nafta lilly tressler
"chief business officer" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

AdExchanger Talks

03:52 min | 10 months ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

"And this is just you know a few that come to mind. So that's these very rich ecosystem of our own Properties are on apps and the experiences that we power and then you know we think of ourselves as abbot of community gardens so all of the other at premium partners that we have in in that ecosystem and then when you think about the capabilities that he mentions this is really about. Our app tick on on content to commerce capabilities and on that front We are a very strong high-growth fully stacked platform that connects the buy side and the sell side with people for data at message k. Across multiple channels one second in the including that premium content and immersive experiences as well as our partner so i think hands was describing all of those components and how they work together and how they are better together if you win in terms of creating value for consumers and for businesses better together in also separate from You know the umbrella of of a telco. Yeah yeah. I again went off the aspects that i mentioned previously as as we turned back through growth on an unrefined strategies. It was quite clear that could unleash the most power as a standalone entity Unfortunately that's where we are so let's talk a little bit about apollo like what. Why did it make sense to go the private equity route with verizon media now yahoo And now i also ask because it kind of feels like everyone and their mother's mother's mother is going public So was that also an option. Yes yes oh. At porno really allows us opportunities across our offerings to scale and again and again unleash the potential that includes expanding in key markets thinking differently about the impact that are different areas of their portfolio. Have and and really be bolder faster and become even stronger. Some of these changes are Not always something that you see from one quarter to the other right so being part of a a a private umbrella if you will allow you to place bets. That made me out. Two three. Four eight quarters out and at the same time Really fast without necessarily worrying too much a about. Hey what's going to happen. Mix quarter which you know in the public umbrella. It's something that he's obviously at very important again. Obviously doesn't mean that we don't care about the next quarter by actually that we can be A lot bolder and potentially take every bed in one specific Pointing time against some support -tunities and then you know as as s as with many of these cycles at typically over time we continue to focus on how to at least the the maximum And certainly being in the public market may be an option. That's where let's many others keeping with apollo Dave said that they want to push aggressively And i think that's also where that haunts us in his internal memo into commerce content and also betting Which is interesting because those are all areas that verizon media as in media really embraced over the last couple of years..

verizon yahoo apollo Dave
"chief business officer" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

AdExchanger Talks

03:29 min | 10 months ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

"That's looking forward. But i actually. I would like to look backwards just for a second because when verizon originally bought the who i mean. Correct me. If i'm wrong but i feel like a big part of the vision was capitalizing on digital advertising telcos taking advantage of their data to attract advertisers. And it really seemed like a great idea. on paper but it also it just feels like it never really panned out and not just for verizon. It just didn't really pan out in the way that a lot of people hoped or expected I mean was it a flawed idea from the start or you know was it I don't know maybe just kind of cast your mind back for a second and kind of explain what what happened there. Yes what i would say is i. I'm foremost bryson was very supportive. I'm voluble home for bryson media really neighboring us to set a new strategy and turn the company back to growth and as we executed that turnaround and verizon the strategy s when it was pretty clear that we could unleash greater potentials as a standalone company. so who bryson st labra significant partner of ours on many friends reading from advertising to streaming to join us next development announced on investor and our products leverage rice. On the that. You're not people centric way as we do with all of that so i would say An again. I can't comment about other telcos. But what i would say that. I feel that the bryson media media era we see in verizon. What's that was very productive for our business and ultimately for bryce on the journey hasn't finished were only beginning this new face with verizon as a partner i loved what are what are some examples of verizon data that can be used You know in a like inappropriate way in a way that makes sense if by a variety of media. Now yahu a very simple example is measurement on a tribunal for the out of home and how career that cell tower a leverage for that. And it's interesting. Because i am just to quote hans vest berg to you the verizon. Ceo there is an internal memo that circulated to employees at the time of the apollo deal. And he said something like what makes the apollo offer so appealing is that it includes leveraging the entire verizon media ecosystem of ad tag affiliate relationships data insights targeting and reach and so not to ask the same question again but like what would be some examples of of that Like what does that actually mean in in practice. I mean i. i don't know exactly how hans vest berg feels about digital advertising but i feel like it hasn't been his or verizon's focus necessarily which is perhaps what makes sense for for yahoo to be. Its own thing now but but yeah like what what does that. What does that quote from from hans like mean in practice. Yes so let's talk about the system. I so as i shared with you. Previously i would start with our iconic brands that reached nearly nine hundred users every month with.

verizon bryson media bryson st labra hans vest berg bryson bryce yahoo
"chief business officer" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

AdExchanger Talks

03:52 min | 10 months ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

"And when you think about the moment in time in oh social media new see environments were on i think continue to be somewhat challenge and also tv and bdo where converging on consumers really looking for other ways to engage You know knew me. The annual experiences like expires. So you know when. I coupled that with Super diverse thriving team. That was self experts. Have been there early days of all of the technology and on so people that had joined since then all of that mix was super super exciting to me and i'm guessing that You know that mix is exciting to jim lens own who is The new ceo or seem to be So i mean the news is still really fresh that the guru got robin whose currency is going to step down. And he'll serve as an adviser and jim will will take over a ceo and he's coming from a tinder where he was the ceo for a little over a year. So i mean sort of the same question. i know. you can't jump into his brain. But i mean what do you think. Made him swiped right on a yahoo which. I have to apologize for that joke. Just like an irresistible reference but It's kind of an interesting move. Yeah yeah luke. What i would say. He's you know he obviously be sharing a lot more after he joins. He's joining on the end of the month By everything that kills through When i joined a operates on media is now we've been stronger as yahoo right so All of these Power behind iconic brands week turned the business back to growth And then we have been accelerating growth and there's so much potential to go deeper and people there again. I don't want to speak for him but You know all of these elements hold true and are an amazing opportunity. And so what does it mean from like an tactical practical point of view to be bolder. Like what will that actually entail. And how will that play out. I mean for for clients for your clients and also just for You know for users. That are really familiar with a lot of these You names these kind of Conic names but maybe they haven't been top of mind for them for for some time and there is perhaps an opportunity there. Yes you think across the board from sumer standpoint Moving faster when our offerings the of areas that You know we've seen the umbrella of a public company that is competing regulated market. You kind of potentially move as fast Going deeper with our consumers going deeper with our advertisers going deeper with our partners. Right on you know you. you may have seen some recent announ- announcements related to for example. What we're doing on the identity front What we're doing in in store media We just covered the Some nice innovation with Rebecca minkoff you off both having mercy on if teas so You'll begin to see a lot of these but in a nutshell. It's being able to move faster to go deeper to think more strategically and actually activate Those read these partnerships at befriends speed. And for me personally. All of that is Exciting quite frankly our customer service so seeing that and so..

jim lens yahoo robin jim luke Rebecca minkoff
Why Savant Systems' Acquisition of GE Lighting is the Future of High-End Smart Home

Project Voice 2021

03:03 min | 1 year ago

Why Savant Systems' Acquisition of GE Lighting is the Future of High-End Smart Home

"Across all industries and the data that is associated with these technological solutions sets us on the path to global scaling an unimaginable business growth. Which is the best way for me to introduce my colleague and my friend betty. Davita betty is a global executive with expertise in digital transformation and consumer financial services. Betty is currently the chief business officer and member of the board for finn. Connector a technology company which connects digital platforms and solutions and financial services companies via an api platform to accelerate digital transformation and open banking. Betty is also the founder of bet. Deb solutions a fintech advisory practice where she works with emerging companies on strategy value creation partnerships and the path to global warming previously. Betty served as the chief commercial officer of digital payments labs at for mastercard and prior to that that he held various leadership positions at city. Which is where we work together. Welcome betty thank you betty as the first question. I'm certain our audiences would be interested in your perspective of the digital transformation. That's taking place today in financial services we'd love to hear what are you seeing in the market and what business problems are being solved with these continuously evolving technologies. That's it's a loaded question. And i'll try to answer at At a couple of kind of macro levels and then try and get a bit into What we're seeing in different regions around the world. I mean at the macro level. It's clear that financial institutions can't continue to develop everything here right the notion of proprietary developmenh is just. It's not sustainable from the standpoint of the speed and velocity by which they need to turnaround new solutions. They've got a competitive landscape of thousands of been tax in stored ops that are entering the market and providing services at a level that You know consumers. Sme's incorporates see in their everyday transactions. And so there's so much friction that's been taken out of the equation with many of the digital giants and these new solutions. Banks can't continue to

Betty Davita Betty DEB Mastercard SME
EU: 100 Million More Pfizer/BioNTech Doses to Come

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

EU: 100 Million More Pfizer/BioNTech Doses to Come

"The pharmaceutical company by on tech and its US partner finds a sense they will provide one hundred million more doses of the coronavirus vaccine to the European union this year the two companies say the twenty seven nations executive commission has exercised an option to purchase the additional doses bringing the total number of shots set of delivery to the E. U. in twenty twenty one to six hundred million the announcement offers a much needed boost to the E. U.'s sluggish and much criticized vaccine rollout biotech's chief business officer Shawn Merritt says deliveries of the company's M. RNA based vaccines this year will cover two thirds of the E. U. population the block has so far administered about one hundred five million shots to its population of some four hundred fifty million people I'm Charles the last month

Twenty Seven Nations Executive E. U. Shawn Merritt United States Charles
Prepare To Work Hard and Find Your Niche with Rebecca Smith

Yeah, She's Driven

07:33 min | 1 year ago

Prepare To Work Hard and Find Your Niche with Rebecca Smith

"Let's talk about what who you are how you got online and what your favorite platforms are. So let's start there. yes. I'm originally from england. I came to america. Twenty two to get my commercial pilot's license. Because i thought that was how is gonna travel around the world but it turns out when you get you commercial pilot's license. You don't get to go to bali short trip so hang on a second. This isn't quite what i signed up for. But i did my training in long beach and i grew up watching laguna hills on mtv. And i was like one day lauren. Conrad and i'm gonna drive down h. And i'm going to be in my convertible. We're gonna have lunch together. And so. I always have that vision of wanting to live in southern california. I didn't realize that a pilot's license was going to be the thing that got me here. But when i got here i fell in love and i didn't end up becoming a pilot. I got my whole license but came to america on an old one visa and started to go jobs like this. British jackson turns out a lot of british people. Thinking the same thing in la special. But i did go for an audition to be on a youtube channel and that was probably about ten years ago now nine ten years ago and i got the audition and i found out that my one talent in life is talking and working out at the same time. I can do that all day long. So i started working for a channel on youtube. Grew it to like three million subscribers. We eighteen months. I got paid forty dollars per episode but it was just the excitement of being part of youtube and it was workout videos. And i found something that i knew. This was my thing after about a year and a half. They decided they didn't want to film anymore. I didn't understand why no problem and it took me about a year and a half to get my confidence to fill my own channel and have my own videos now. Been doing that for coming on six seven years. I've got my own fitness that we have a pocus. I just had a best selling book and life is great. But it's really been a lot of grit determination and hard work. But now i'm in a place. Where just loving life and just enjoying everything that's happening so talk to us about the. What is the team. Look like to be able to build videos and editing and all that stuff. What does that look like when you when you start when somebody says okay. I want to assemble cheang because nobody talks about the team. The talking about you should do this. Here's the tactics. let's start there. I love that question. And it's so funny because i think it's always something that i'm working on so i do have a team now but when i'm very first study doing youtube and i still have my camera like a souvenir i had one hundred and fifty dollar sony camera setup on a tripod and i would shoot myself and i had the camera and i didn't realize until about six months later that you could flip the camera so that you can actually see yourself so no joke i would get into the show. I would do my jumping. Jacks put my arms in the air go round replay double check that i was in frame and then go back again. Yes you guys were always learning. So there's a war you if you have a flip camera that you can actually build meals but we didn't have fancy iphones back then. So this hundred and fifty dollars. Sony camera and then as i started to get more things coming on i would have insurance and are actually find people of craigslist. That's where i found most of my employees. Because i have much money at the beginning to help so i started to get people who would do things like my cleaning and my laundry so that i could spend time on that so it was like. Where can i navigate my time. Where is it best spent. And what can i delegate to other people with the money that i have like that sits like what do you have and use that phospholipids. Six years of having this company. I now have a full app team. I have somebody that does my emails. I have a chief business officer. I have a video an editor a personal assistant. Somebody puts all the input in the app. And has that runs my social media and mound. My mom is also working for me. So like i have like nine ten people that a part of my team but at the beginning i did everything i edited did. The blogs did the calendar. Absolutely everything and as things got better. I've been able to bring more people on at a different level. So okay she craigslist. So what did you do run on ad on craigslist. Or he just started surfing people on the job descriptions and setting the messages in. How did you know even how to lead them. You know what i mean like. That's like all right now. we're i. This was hilarious. This more. No kidding this is talk about the flip. The camera thing. I had the flip the camera moment this morning. I'm driving down the street. And i own a virtual system company fifty voice. Okay i own want. And i literally. I'm driving down the street. And i'm talking to the woman who is running dot company. 'cause i don't run that company at all. I have one meeting a week. And i don't run the company and i said wait a minute as a as a running strategy for that committed. Why is my company. The other company hardcore business. Why are we looking for social media. People to post are to put my social media. Team is like all of a sudden decide to be trainers and they're all gone right and there's all happened like the last six weeks and so i find myself postings or outdated like eight figure company and i'm back to posting right and i go. Why am i looking for a virtual assistant. Why don't you go find me. Virtual system works. That would be great for this job and so you know sometimes the common sense is in common and you know one of the things i think you probably develop skills on is like Like okay we find them on craigslist or wherever. And how do you get over the hump of not knowing how to lead them or what to ask them to do so for me. I've done everything in my business. So i knew how to set up even the web stuff. I knew how to write a blog. I learned all the skills myself then. I put an ad out honestly. It was for like an intern. Like hey social media person needs how with you know inputting blogs or whatever was the i was doing. I basically wrote my own job description of what i needed. Help with like you need any experience because at the time the people that i was hiring work. Twenty twenty one twenty two. Because i couldn't afford to pay them. You know somebody who was thirty five and had ten years of experience in like managing a team. So i like she learned all the skills myself i would put an ad out and then i would meet them nor at my house but like a nice cafe because it looked better right. So i do these interviews and i have interviewed. I've really got it down. At the beginning. I was interviewing like ten fifteen people a day for two days straight instead of just doing a quick zun things like oh. It's right in front of us. Why don't you just young paul with them because you know in the first i believe ten seconds if this is going to be the right person for you like with. It's just a feeling and for me. It didn't matter about how much experience they had. It was if i liked you and if we connected and if we gelled so like great i like you. You're a cool person. I'm gonna have you come in and then we're going to do an internship so for a couple of weeks just to see if you've got it and you know we're right fit. I'm gonna teach you these skills that i know. Then y'all gonna do it tell. Show tried to tell them what to do. Show them how to do it with them. Let go off and do it themselves and so we just things that i knew to how to teach them and you know this was thanks to a made and things always perfect. But it's better to have people doing eighty percents of you rather than to do absolutely everything because you never be out of scale and you won't be able to

Youtube British Jackson Cheang Laguna Hills America Conrad Long Beach MTV Bali Lauren Southern California England LA Sony Paul
"chief business officer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"A total tragedy. But we, as leaders in the state of Texas must seize upon the strategy to make sure this never happens again. Governor Greg Abbott, saying the city and state are investigating that flushing and disinfecting the water supply with a boil water notice in place until the process is complete. Lisa Jeff, the CDC says. This type of amoeba is commonly found and warm, fresh water and soil. The cases of infection are very rare. America is listening to box. NewsRadio Kale, BJ on Patrick Osborne. This news has brought you by Sinus and snoring specialists from pre K to high school. The Austin School district is seeing a drop in enrollment nearly across the board. Chief business officer Larry Throwem says That drop includes both virtual learners and students who would be returning to campus, whereas last year we had 80,261 students this year. We have 75,143 total loss has been 5119 kids throbs as each student represents about $10,040 in state funding, And if this decline continues, eyes D could lose almost $49 million. The Texas Education Agency, Meantime, says fewer than 1% of students and staff who have already returned to school campuses in the state have tested positive for covert 19. Mark Wiggins, with the Association of Texas Professional Educator says, still tough to draw any solid conclusions just yet. I think we'll all be interested as Mohr. Students come back to the classroom, and more personnel are back in the school building Those numbers Austin ized returns next week in the Travis County Health Authority has said there is no indication Cove in 19 has been spreading inside of any local cloud. Rooms. It's been a tough year for Austin's hotel sector. A recent report from analytic firm str said the occupancy rate is still less than 30%. But still no via whole rap with Austin's Economic Development Department says things are looking better in terms of tax revenue will actually received more hotel occupancy tax, then projected, although we will still end up in the negative or the here, although that uptick has been fairly minimal, she says the city was on pace to lose out on more than a million dollars in hotel tax. Now the new projections, but that number closer to $813,000. It's definitely been a bit cooler out there today. Let's find out if that'll continue with your news radio Kaylie J. Radar weather watch Mostly sunny skies this afternoon with a high of 83 Tonight clear with a low 50 to plenty of sunshine for tomorrow with a high of 88 from the weather Center..

Austin Austin School district Governor Greg Abbott Texas Austin ized Texas Education Agency NewsRadio Kale Chief business officer Lisa Jeff weather Center CDC Mark Wiggins Patrick Osborne America Travis County Health Authority Larry Throwem Mohr Association of Texas Economic Development Departmen
"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Climbed since announcing it plans to buy GrubHub in an all stock deal for seven point three billion dollars bringing the European food delivery company into the brutally competitive U. S. market uber had been in talks to buy ground but it didn't happen over shareholder and former chief business officer email Michael says we were made a massive strategic failure in not trying to own U. S. food delivery earlier he joins us now in an exclusive interview meal how badly do you think will bring needed this and what position is over and now that they didn't get it well needed it because what they they missed really badly I am just letting go of their league position in food delivery in two thousand eighteen and nineteen when when we left when I left to bring two thousand seventeen who was firmly in the lead ahead of gord ash and everyone else delivery and that lead was was lost in two thousand eighteen nineteen with to where they were today which meant they needed potentially the GrubHub asset to regain that we so when they lost that too just seats yesterday that meant that move toward us really double grows market share increases market share in the US and now grown love being an asset because seats that became for problematic here more interviews like this one on Bloomberg television streaming live on Bloomberg dot com and on the Bloomberg mobile app or check your local cable listings markets headlines and breaking news twenty four hours a day at Bloomberg dot com the Bloomberg business this is a Bloomberg business slash Moscow U. S. stock index futures are tumbling this morning treasuries rallying on sunset a second wave of the pandemic is emerging we check the markets every fifteen minutes throughout the trading day on Bloomberg S. and P. futures down sixty one points Dow futures down six hundred six nasdaq futures down one hundred sixteen the Jackson Germany's down.

GrubHub Michael gord ash US treasuries Germany chief business officer Bloomberg
"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:35 min | 3 years ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is the business of sports from Bloomberg radio with Scott Sasha, Michael Barr, and Evan Novi William. Thank you very much. Joining us. We are here each and every week for you at the same time talking to the biggest names in sports today. Michael evident, I are talking with the CEO of the LA Rams Kevin demo. Well, you know, Kevin you have Todd Gurley. He can be in line for the Super Bowl MVP. What do you think about that? I think one of the great things about our team has a lot of players MVP. And when you look at the season, whether it's Aaron Donald who depends player of the year. Todd Gurley was luckily touchdowns back to back years Jared Goff. About two years. You look at someone like Brandin cooks who had game against the saints last week and playing his former team the patriots, Robin woods has been steady for us. But then you look at the chiefs game yesterday like Samson Bukom who has a two touchdowns the first player, I think in thirty years. Touch defensive touchdowns in the same game. You know? So there are a lot of potential stars left out. Greg kicked longest field goal and out of mystery defense team to the Super Bowl. So all of those things this has always been a team effort across the board. And it'll be great to see. Hopefully, one of our players will step up in the stadium yesterday. And we shot the MVP. We just hope it's one of our guys in not one of the players. Staying the game is we are chatting with Kevin off the COO of the rand and Kevin we had Brian roll up on the show about a week ago. He's chief business officer at the NFL, of course. And we asked him about stadiums in general. And I said if you were building a stadium today. What would it look like this is what he had to say? I don't know the exact number, but I would probably say fewer than I would have had ten years ago. And I just think anyone in this business needs to create an amazing experience for people to come and spend their money and spend their time. And I think if I had a dollar to spend on an extra seat versus a dollar to spend on making the seats. I have better and more interesting in a better experience. That's where I'm going to put my all, right? So you're building seventy plus thousand seats that sort of the trends away from what people are doing. Now the more intimate. What? What's the thought process? And when it's humming along what kind of cash register will the stadium bid. I agree with everything Brian said, and most importantly, I think he does as well. I think he does let's do both. What's put? And let's put dollars into making those seats just as great. And I think in our stadium at seventy thousand capacity, you get up to one hundred thousand that's really market specific. And the one thing I would add to what Brian said, which I thought was spot on with everybody should build the best stadium for their market in Los Angeles. When you're going to host Super Bowls in college, football pilots were fortunate enough to host the opening and closing ceremonies for the twenty twenty eight hundred cops for all of those major events you want the capacity to get up to seventy eighty ninety hundred thousand for those truly super events. But you also want every seat in the building an amazing technological experience. That's why you know, we're hanging the world's largest eight eight K scoreboard and take that Jerry Jones a tie sorry. Eight millimeter four K eight millimeter who knows by by twenty twenty eight K, but it is your triple the size of basically any boringly two sided everything in the building is digital. And I think when stand envisioned coming back Angela's his. His biggest message always to everybody working on this project. Is you can't undershoot Los Angeles. Is that really the driving force of the stadium? An entire children ninety eight acre campus which features hotels restaurants shops offices. This is truly a three hundred sixty five day year destination. I also think that's the next wave of stadiums. Where they're really multipurpose not just in terms of how you use events in there. But what's done around? Now one last question. I always ask people when they're building new stadiums cost overruns where do you stand on budget, and particularly the prices steel right now, we talked to Tim Leiweke, and he said because of what's going on geopolitically the cost of the you've innovation to keyarena was skyrocketing. Simply from the price of steel. How about you guys? We had some of the same challenges on steel. And I think one of the things that construction walking away is so hot, you know, over the past three four years the project, you're competing with have driven up the price of the contract. And we've certainly add cost overrun when you look at this project that I think the greatest credit sustain is no matter the cost runs. He's wanted to make sure we deliver the vision, we always show to the city of Los Angeles to a fancy NFL to our partners in so no. Although those costs of have cropped up, certainly, you know, our focus is on making sure the stadium is perfect. But we remodeled the kitchen it was four hundred square feet two years ago. And I think it was thirty percent of budget two months behind schedule on a three million square foot stadium. I don't think that's surprising up next Scott. I continue our conversation with the CEO of the Los Angeles Rams, Kevin demo without stadium coughs and seating the purse square foot cough. Two stadiums is going to go up as you try to keep fans in their seats. And make them entertained in technologically involved in how the best tells coronary in the best of technology is about to entertain the only way to deliver. That is a higher per square foot cost per seat causing that's one of the reasons everybody's gonna say, well, maybe you should try to cap it. It fifty five sixty thousand some of those elements. You're listening to Bloomberg business of sports from Bloomberg radio.

Kevin Los Angeles MVP Bloomberg Brian Todd Gurley CEO Scott Sasha Michael Barr Los Angeles Rams chiefs NFL Aaron Donald Jerry Jones chief business officer Tim Leiweke Robin woods Jared Goff
"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:35 min | 3 years ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is the business of sports from Bloomberg radio with Scott Sasha, neck, Michael Barr, and Evan Novi William. Thank you very much. Joining us. We are here each and every week for you at the same time talking to the biggest names in sports today. Michael evidence, I are talking with the CEO of the LA Rams Kevin demo of Kevin you have Todd Gurley. He can be in live or the Super Bowl MVP. What do you think about that? I think one of the great things about our team. We have a lot of players could be in line for MVP. And when you look at the season, whether it's Aaron Donald who depends player of the year Todd Gurley was likely can touchdowns and back to back years Jared Goff who's been a Pro Bowl at about two years. You look at someone like Brandon Cox who had one hundred yard game against the saints last week and playing his former team the patriots rob awards has been steady for us. You know? But then you look at the chiefs game you have someone like Samson Bukom who has a two touchdowns the first player. I think in thirty years to have to touch touch touchdown in the same game. You know? So there are a lot of potential stars talk. Greg. Hit the longest field goal in playoff history. The Super Bowl. So all those things this has always been a team effort across the board. And it'll be great to see. Hopefully, one of our players will step up in the stadium yesterday. And we shopped the MVP what were we just hope? It's one of our guys in not one of the players staying of the game who it is. We are chatting with Kevin DEM off the CEO of the Rams and Kevin we had Brian roll up on the show about a week ago. He's chief business officer at the NFL, of course. And we asked him about stadiums in general. And I said if you were building a stadium today. What would it look like what he had to say? I don't know the exact number, but I would probably say fewer than I would have had ten years ago. Yeah. Think anyone in this business needs to create an amazing experience for people to come and spend their money and spend their time. And I think if I had a dollar to spend an extra seat versus a dollar to spend on making two seats. I have better and more interesting better experience. That's where I'm gonna put my all, right? So you are building seventy plus thousand seats that sort of trends away from what people are doing. Now the more intimate. What's the thought process? And when it's humming along what kind of cash register will the stadium bit. I agree with everything Brian said, and most importantly, I think Tim crocodiles as well. I think to let's do both. What's put? Put dollars into making those seats took his great stadium at seventy thousand with the capacity, you get up to one hundred thousand that's really market specific. And the one thing I would ask what blind check which I thought was spot on with everybody should build a stadium for their market in Los Angeles. When you're going to host Super Bowls in college. We're fortunate up to host the opening and closing ceremonies for twenty two thousand eight Olympics cops for all of those major events you want the capacity to get up to seventy eighty ninety hundred thousand for those truly super events. But you also want every seat in the building having amazing technological experience. That's why you know, we're hanging the world's largest eight eight K scoreboard and take that Jerry Jones start sorry. Eight millimeter four K eight millimeter who knows by by twenty twenty eight K. But you know, it is your triple the size of basically any Gordon only two sided everything in the building is digital. And I think when stand ambition coming back, Los Angeles, his his biggest message always to everybody working on this project is you can't undershoot. Los Angeles has really been the driving force of the stadium, which we believe will be the best football anytime a ninety eight acre campus, which Beatrice hotels restaurants shops offices. This is truly a three hundred sixty five day year definition, I also think. That's the next wave of stadiums. Where they're really multi-purpose not just in terms of how you use it in there. But what's done around? Now one last question. I always ask people when they're building new stadiums cost overruns, where do you stand on budget? And particularly the prices steel right now, we talked to quickey and he said because of what's going on geopolitically the cost of the renovation to keyarena was skyrocketing. Simply from the price of steel. How about you guys? We we had some of the same challenges on steel. And I think one of the things that construction work in LA is so hot, you know, over the past three four years the projects are competing with have driven up the price of the project, and we've certainly had had cost overrun when you look at this project. But I think the greatest credit sustain has no matter the cost overruns. He's wanted to make sure we deliver division. We always show to the city of Los Angeles to fancy NFL to our partners. And so no, although those costs of have cropped up, certainly, you know, our focus has been on making sure the stadium is perfect. But then again, I say we remodeled the kitchen it was four hundred square feet two years ago. And I think it was thirty percent of budget two months behind schedule. So a three million square foot stadium. I don't think that's coming up next. Scott Evan and I continue our conversation with the CEO of the Los Angeles Rams Kevin demo about stadium costs and seeding, the per-square stadiums is going to go way up as you try to keep fans in their seats. And make them entertained and technologically involved in how the best of coronary in the best of technology is about to be entertainment like the only way to deliver that as a higher per square foot cost per seat. 'cause I think that's one of the reasons everybody's going to say, well, maybe you should try to cap it fifty five sixty thousand some of those elements. You're listening to Bloomberg business of sports from Bloomberg radio around.

Los Angeles MVP Bloomberg CEO Kevin DEM Todd Gurley NFL Brian Los Angeles Rams Michael Barr Brandon Cox chiefs Scott Sasha Jerry Jones Evan Novi patriots chief business officer Scott Evan
"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:06 min | 3 years ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Federal government to briefly shutdown Newark, liberty international airport, flew within about thirty feet of jetliner triggering hours of delays pilot, honest, Southwest Airlines flight first reported the device as he was landing the plane accrue on a second flight operated by United Airlines made a similar report three minutes later. In two thousand seventeen just fifteen percent of all venture funding went to female founders. That's according to all raise a nonprofit organization dedicated to diversity and funders and founders their mission is to increase that number to twenty five percent while doubling the percentage of female partners in venture firms the next ten years. Bloomberg's Emily Chang sat down with founders Maha Ibrahim Kirstin green in eilly Leon studio. One point and asked about terrorists affecting the strategy. Facebook's leadership and regulation and technology. The tariffs that our government has put in place are in the long term. And maybe this is my communist background speaking a little bit more their ruinous for our economy are ruinous for the global economy. And even when I look at our micro little world in Silicon Valley when we think about prices going up both for direct goods and the supplied goods that the components effectively. It is just they are unnecessary price changes that the only beneficiary of that is frankly, nobody that needs to have that money. I do believe that the tariffs have been put in place are anti-capitalism. And will in the long term negatively affect GDP around the world. I wonder if some of these companies have also shot themselves in the foot. I mean, if you look at a company like Facebook is the damage self inflicted. I think the. Consumer response or sentiment around Facebook. I guess one opportunity is it creates a bit creates windows for new startups. Because if there's a start up that's going to promise certain things around privacy or your data, and you can share. And I think we've learned a lot about social media in the past five or ten years that this is part of the cycle of creation destruction are evolution in technology. Is that you learn from the predecessors and then people come up with new products. Mark Zuckerberg, and Sheryl Sandberg have been scrutinized for their leadership. Where do you think they went wrong? I mean, it's pursuing dollars at any cost at the end of the day. They were willing to whether it's them or whether it's people under them. I have no idea. Right. I mean, that's that's for you to pick out as journalists. But think they were willing to sacrifice a lot of their principles for the almighty dollar and share price. So. Sheryl Sandberg specifically has been heavily criticized for. Whatever shortcomings. She may have had do you think that criticism has been fair or do you think that criticism has been disproportionate? I think in many sectors of society where we are witnessing. How women are treated in view differently in the public media than they are and then men are treated, so you think she's getting criticized more because she's a woman, I think, obviously. It's not it's not binary. Right. Because she is the chief business officer of the company, and there are a lot of business issues that that are business decisions and policy decisions that are like that fall under her purview. But I think if you look at politics in particular right now when you look at how females in office are being viewed by the media, or by the by the public versus man, there's clearly a double standard. And I think the Trump is us where are the double standards, Elon Musk and talk to the New York Times and smoke during an interview. Can women do that. What do you think? Yeah. Hashtag funding secured. It's not okay. But I think like realistically we're on a continuum of kind of integrating women into different roles in different businesses. And like while we're on a path to carving that opportunity out. We have to we have we're held to a higher standard. And I wonder if we're doing this to our detriment society's detriment, the detriment of these companies like Mariah Meyer. Who was so picked to par. Where is she? Now there has to be an acknowledgement that we are not all uniform. Right. That one woman does not equal the next does not equal the right? Yeah. Very different investment styles are very different personalities are very different that doesn't mean that we can't come together and produce something that is excellent. And where we can six in fact, that means that we can come together and do great things and the other thing that I think has changed in the past year that I'm excited about us. I'm starting to see I think we're all saying more men stand up and call these things out. I think it's exciting to see more men willing to stand up and say what they think about these issues. I mean, there's talk of Amazon regulation like are you concerned about regulation for tax cut that hurt when I think about this perspective. And from a consumer perspective. I don't wanna live in a world where there's five choices for everything. Like, it's not enough. It's not going to be as interesting, and I don't think it's ultimately going to be good for us. And so if you go back to kind of like, why do the regulations exist? Why does the trust law exist? I mean as I understand it. It's to protect the consumer. Right. And so I think it's your definition of what's protecting the consumer. It's been about price and access. And so like, I think that's where it gets kind of. We're running into some interference around kind of how those companies if they interfere with that. But I think maybe that needs to be re-explore about kind of what are the standards that govern the way we think about when. Companies too big. Concerned that because of the macro economic slowdown that funding could dry up. I am concerned about that. I believe that is why a lot of companies raise the capital that they did in two thousand eighteen I think fear as opposed to greed was driving a lot of the large capital raises. And that people were feeling like this party has to end at some point in time. The problem is the benefit is, I don't really see the party ending. There is still a huge amount of cash in the system that is looking for returns, they're not getting on stock market. They're not getting it. It's a fun. It's a fun. It's a macro fund issue. It will go towards high beta high innovation high potential return, and that's venture. That was only Chang's interview with Maha Ebrahim general partner, I Canaan Kirstin green founding partner. Forerunner ventures and Eileen Lee, founder and partner at cowboy ventures. You can watch the full episode of Bloomberg studio one point oh tonight at nine thirty pm eastern, six thirty PM Pacific. That.

Facebook Sheryl Sandberg Emily Chang Maha Ibrahim Kirstin green Federal government Southwest Airlines Silicon Valley United Airlines Bloomberg liberty international airport eilly Leon studio Mark Zuckerberg Bloomberg studio Elon Musk chief business officer New York Times
"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"For example, and the differences are massive. And you can see why if someone feels that way phone is better than an iphone. Why they're going to go for the wall way device. Absolutely. Okay. Mark Gherman for us. Thanks for your reporting. We'll continue to follow. Well, federal prosecutors are pursuing a criminal investigation against while way. According to sources earlier, the Wall Street Journal, the case involves alleged fact of trade secrets from US business partners, and includes technology for a robotic device t mobile us to test smartphones journal sources also quoted saying the inquiry is advanced and they could see an indictment soon. The Justice department has declined to comment. Meantime, shares of snap tumbled Wednesday on news of another high profile executive exiting the company staff drop by as much as thirteen percent. After the company revealed CFO, Tim stone has resigned after just eight months on the job stone is just the latest in a series of executive left snap in the last couple of years. In fact, they've been around twenty such departure since the company went public here. Tell us more Bloomberg tax Sarah Frier who covers snap. So what do we know about? Why Tim stone is leaving? I mean, this is just the latest series. Like, you said like a series of departures, and it's become increasingly difficult to find an executive who could really last reporting to Evan Spiegel. Now, the AK sad that there was no dispute with management. However, I'm hearing slightly differently from my own sources. And and this is something that they're going have to fix longer term. They're going to have to show that they can have a less volatile future in a more predictable executive. Team. So Evan Spiegel said Tim's transition is not related to any disagreement with us on any matter relating to our accounting strategy management et cetera. What are your sources say? Well, they're saying that there had been some disputes over what his role should be the in the the F T and cheddar have now reported that was over some dispute on the COO role where he wanted a promotion. So it's been a really interesting time for stat because there is so much tumult at the top. I reported earlier last year that in some cases have people hasn't handled this transition very well. There was one executive that he offered that chief business officer role to before rescinding that offering giving it to someone else a couple of days later that person has worked out. Well, but the way that was handled is this indicative of some immaturity. At the top of snap that I think is going to be a problem for the company long-term that analysts are speaking to you today is one of the reasons that they're concerned about south financial future chap chart here comparing the market cap of snap to Twitter, and it's just so fascinating because when snap on public. They really wanted to differentiate themselves from Twitter to disassociate themselves from Twitter, and if you look at the blue line, which is Twitter market cap. It's you know, it's gone up. Whereas snaps has gone down. Now Twitter is at twenty five billion dollar company. So seven billion dollar company. Which is just it's so hard to believe that, you know, given that it went public at like thirty billion dollars at first we were worried that maybe snap will be the next Twitter. Now Twitter has really figured out. How to grow in snap is is looking like, they would be lucky if they were considered the way Twitter is considered today, and maybe they'll recover from it. But if they can't understand. A way to to grow with their management being at all consistent here. It's going to be a very big challenge for them. Now quickly snap. Also in in revealing. This news said that earnings for the current quarter would be slightly favorable to the top end. But investors are going to be looking at us. Right. Investors are going to be looking at users because that is the thing that really drives the advertising revenue you need the amount of users to go up.

Twitter executive Tim stone Evan Spiegel Wall Street Journal US Mark Gherman Justice department Sarah Frier Bloomberg CFO COO chief business officer twenty five billion dollar thirty billion dollars seven billion dollar thirteen percent
"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:48 min | 3 years ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Palmer. This is Bloomberg. This is the business of sports from Bloomberg radio with scouts Michael Barr. And Evan Novi William. Thank you very much for joining us. We are here each and every week were you at the same time talking to the biggest names in sports today. We are joined by NFL chief business officer Ryan roll up. He's the man in charge of the National Football League, sponsorship and consumer products business. All right, Brian. Sure false, me know, Amazon did fifty million bucks. Now shows Thursday night football. I'm told Jeff Bezos was personally handling much of those negotiations with the league true. I mean, there were conversations I didn't have them personally. I think Roger spoke with him a few times, Robert Kraft. He's the chairman of our broadcast committee talked him a few times. So he he had those conversations happened. He's got a really great smart team. That also did a lot of the work. That partnership has been great. It's been really really interesting Brian seems like we've had a quick narrative shifts. It was headwinds head. Wins ratings down. If there was a hump are we passed? It seems like the NFL is the place to be I think so whatever metric you want to do. There is an obsession on the ratings and the viewership. I mean that became a huge story last year, and quite frankly, the press and the public fixated more on that metric than we ever. Do you know last year, we talked a lot about how ratings for the NFL over time they sort of head in the right direction, but they're often up and down week to week year to year. I read I read a Sports Illustrated article from nineteen Eighty-three where I think it was eighty three account. Remember where they were killing Pete Rozelle on the ratings and Pete Rozelle said things like well, look a lot of our star players are on the field. You know, the margin of victory of each contest is higher than it was before, you know, some of our big markets aren't performing and sure enough the next year came up. That's exactly what we were saying last year. You know, things things haven't really changed that much. How competitive is the football are the stars playing do the big market teams perform as far. Viewership and ratings because when that happens more people watch, and that's what you've seen this year. And it's not a surprise. We're up five percent because all those things are actually training in the right direction. So I think ratings of your ship is important metric, we pay attention to. But there's a lot of different things that denote the health of our business and our league and my pay. So let's talk about the other ones from a sponsorship standpoint from a licensing standpoint from a ticket sales for the other big revenue. Streams at the NFL has how are those doing in twenty nine thousand nine versus previous years. They're doing well. I mean, everything is up the structure of those businesses are all changing, and we work really hard to change with it. You know, there's probably other than media. There's probably not many other revenue. Streams in sports that have changed typically like tickets where technology any secondary markets, weather, stubhub, or TicketMaster. Whatever happens to do is changing. How tickets are distributed and people are buying it. No longer. Do you have to line up the box office in August? And hope you get a season ticket. You can wait up until ten fifteen. Eighteen minutes before said concert sporting event, or whatever it is and have transparent pricing and get it right to your phone. And that that's changing the dynamics of ticketing market that everyone who's in the event businesses facing, the we're happy. I mean, I think we were I think ninety eight percent sold out. I think for the most part across the league last year. But but it's much different. And you see the partnerships. We do with TicketMaster with up and others has changed that ship. The same thing we're way beyond the times where partners want to associate with a league and just give me your Mark and logo, and I can run a thirty second commercial television. And that's great. They're much more about digitally are much much more about activation on the ground. You see that what we do with draft where we have two hundred and fifty three hundred thousand people come through a draft, they can interact with our sponsors. Do you help them measure r y or do they have their own metrics? They they're all different. I mean, they're all different in what we always say to them is whatever your metrics are metrics. So how do we get on the same page? But you know, you're going to have Anheuser Busch have different metrics the success that maybe visa there's some commonality the commonality is that when they associated with the NFL brand, they get more brand awareness, and they actually speak to one hundred eighty million fans, and there's a higher propensity to buy that product when they socio with. The NFL. Now, we've got big time sports gambling. I mean, there's been huge in the news. The league is it embracing it more. Yeah. I look I think it's the new reality is the world we live in. I mean, you can choose to embrace it or not to abrasives. It's here. We've been consistent on sports betting that first and foremost, it's an integrity issue. We wanna make sure that as sports spending grows legally or illegally that we protect the integrity of game. That has always been the issue. That's a risk of sports league takes on it. It's not a risk of casino worry about that. It's not that is not a risk that the better worries about we have to worry about it. Because if any fan believes that what's going on on the field or a court where the ice is not legitimate. Sports competition. Then you don't have you don't have a sport. You don't have a business. So that for us. It's been our focus. We've been spending a lot of time on retraining with with our league officials with our rests with our players all of that to make sure is this world changes that everybody knows the rules. We've also been focused on consumer protection because you know, gambling is if done inappropriately like anything, you can can can be harmful if not done with restraint. And so we're focusing a lot on that. But we know the new reality. Here's it's only a handful of states. We think it's going to take a little bit of time to get to real big scale where it's gonna change significantly. But we're we're active in it. And I think you'll see us be more and more active in it up next the conversation with NFL chief media and business officer Brian role app continues right here on Bloomberg business of sports.

National Football League Brian role Bloomberg TicketMaster NFL football Sports Illustrated Pete Rozelle chief business officer Amazon Evan Novi Jeff Bezos Michael Barr Palmer. Robert Kraft Anheuser Busch Ryan roll chairman
"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:36 min | 3 years ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Thank you very much for joining us today. We're speaking with NFL chief business officer Brian rollout. He's the man in charge of the National Football League sponsorship and consumer products business overseeing NFL network NFL films and NFL digital media, Brian. Thank you very much for coming in studio. Thanks for having me. I have a bone to pick with you already going to start with bones. Okay. We'll start with bones. You had to have a deal with fortnight. Didn't you? We did. We're why is that? Is that a bone because my nine year old found out about it? And you're costing me serious money. It brought my son and me together and do wanted the Detroit Lions born. And he got he worked Detroit up already record time. But. A no brainer. You bring a brand the NFL brand together with fortnight completes the mission of money generate bucks and to reach a different audience. I think you're hundred percent, right. I think for for us. It wasn't really about the money. Anyway, it was about in this day and age engaging youth engaging the youth demographic and this meeting environments really really difficult in the few things that we had seen that had done that like fortnight. I mean, the numbers were just extraordinarily. And they came to us with the idea and we loved it. We thought it was we thought it was a great idea instantly got me credibility with my eleven year old. They did not have cool. You're cool. But but now I wish it was a fun thing to do. Guys loved it. I think the fans loved it. You started seeing a lot of stuff show up on social and just sort of increased excitement engagement is great, you know, what the fishing boat, captain say, you know, what I say go to with Fisher Fisher, the Fisher. Yeah. That's what you're doing. You've found the where they are thought. They should get. I need a bigger boat. They say that too. I we're gonna need a big. Yeah. How different is it from how you know, you're you're older audience older demographics interact with NFL. Then you're you're millennials in your jen's, e or whatever they're going by these days in general. I think it's I think it's a lot different. The older people will you will see in really not that old by the way, you know, thirty five and older. Maybe. They tend to consume this is non game content from they tend to consume a lot of NFL the way, I think everyone in this room a lot of sports sportscenter NFL network a lot of television. I want to see where it is most of the younger people we see a ton of engagement on mobile devices, specifically, social, and so if you see a lot of our content distribution on Instagram Twitter, certainly during game windows and outside of the game windows. That's where they're getting their news. That's where a lot of their highlights. It's not the prepackaged highlight as much as you will see on linear television show. So they are engaging completely different. And they're not only doing that outside of the game. But we have a lot of data that says seven at every ten fans have a second screen open when they're watching the game. And they're doing a lot of different things. I mean, they're they're texting they're tweeting. They're probably playing fortnight. But they, but but that's kind of where the attention is and advertisers nervous. Are they paying attention to the ads? It's a good question. It's a really really good question. Nielsen will tell you an NFL. Football. I think it's something like ninety eight percent retention on an ad which means not flipping the channel. But they're not really measuring the people on the couch if they got their nose in the screen, or if it's in or the nose and their TV screen TV screener, they're watching their phone. So it's a really really good question. You'll see what we've done a lot of our telecasts that have been very very successful have been these doubled box execution. So all of our broadcast partners are doing it started little quietly last year. But you see a lot of them now where we will go to a break for thirty seconds. And they will keep on one side of the screen. You'll see the game whatever it's going on at the huddle. They're looking at their surface tablets on the silent. Whatever it is. And then there's another thirty second ad alongside it what we're finding out is that it's actually increasing the attention on the ad the initial thought was if you put it up they're just gonna look what's going over here. They're actually looking at the ad. And so we know we have we've done research where we actually track people's is what they're doing these labs. That's work. Really? Really? Well, so I think you will see with us. But. It also I think in sports and TV general you'll see a lot of experimentation those different types of ad units. Sponsor mentioned by the way. Did you see the way he just worked in? Was that an unintentional segue to something or we'll get there? But the way you did it and we had an award. It goes to the gangs about to slam me again because that's a lesson about the side by side racing. Did that for many star? Here we go. What happened to tell south sixty two. I see. There was no Talladega. Six. But that idea is it seems like not only the NFL, but other sports are following that as well. Yeah. I it's not a new concept. I don't wanna give oppression the NFL invented. It was using golf a lot too. But he didn't never never been in the in the NFL. And I think you see I think you see lava broadcast partners experience with other ad units. Twos. A FOX did. I don't know if you noticed, but this year, FOX did six second ads. They did it. I think around thanksgiving. I can't remember why second ads well, that's actually standard unit on YouTube and some other things where you're seen as really short units. And that's what people are being conditioned to. But you know, the reality is we live in a world where Netflix has no commercials and in their sixty second commercials on YouTube. It's just a different different world. And you're going to see that. I think you've seen that evolve significantly old geezers like me, I'm starting to feel now like the whole thing is passing me by we used to get the old rabbit ears and the tin foil on top of it. And that's how you followed everything. And I feel like. I'm being passed by. I'm curious actually when when you talk about the the way that younger people consume content differently, right? Instead of maybe watching it on sportscenter or a linear TV broadcast. They're consuming it on Twitter Facebook, you're looking at the bottom line how much harder or is it harder to monetize your fifteen to eighteen year old NFL fans versus your forty two to fifty year old NFL fans. Well, I think I sort of believe there's a fundamental rule in the media business where the monetization always follows the consumption. Right. It always sort of lags a bit. And how big is that lag? It depends. I mean, I I don't know. I don't know. But but I think it it. They bring that up to say, we focused first and foremost on consumption. We have always been this is back to Pete Roselle. We've always been a sport that's been based on reach. We want to be on the platform that reaches as many people for as long as we can. And that. Historically, been broadcast television. And we're still the only sport who has every single game on broadcast television, including the games on ESPN and NFL network. They'll still be on broadcast television the local market. And so we try to get the NFL network distributed for decade, and it would have been very easy to accelerate that distribution if we would have not put our games over the air in the local market to play the leverage game with the cable operation for our view. Was we want reach. So reach still matters. It's just more complicated in this day and age because new have digital people watching television last they're not having as much cable. So so we're we're really focused on reach and experimentation. We have the belief that as far as the money the money station, which is where I spent a lot of my time that will come as long as you maintain and grow the audience. Stay tuned for more of our conversation with NFL chief media and business officer Brian rolled up right here on Bloomberg business of.

NFL Brian rollout Detroit Detroit Lions chief business officer Fisher Fisher ESPN YouTube FOX Pete Roselle golf Netflix Twitter jen Football
"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is the business of sports from Bloomberg radio with Scott Sasha, neck, Michael Barr, and Evan Novi William. Thank you very much for joining us today. We're speaking with NFL chief business officer Brian rollout. He's the man in charge of the National Football League sponsorship and consumer products business overseeing NFL network NFL films and NFL digital media, Brian. Thank you very much for coming in studio. Thanks for having me. I have a bone to pick with you already to start with bones. Okay. We'll start with bones. You had to deal with fortnight. Didn't you? We did we're excited. Why is that a bone because my nine year old found out about it? And you're costing me serious money. It brought my son and me together band. Do you wanted to Detroit Lions born? And he got he worked Detroit up already record time. But. A no brainer to bring a brand the NFL brand together with fortnight completes the mission of one you generate bucks and to reach a different audience. Yeah. I think you're hundred percent, right. I think for for us. It wasn't really about the money. Anyway was about in this day and age engaging youth engaging a youth demographic. And this meeting environments really really difficult in the few things that we had seen that had done that like fortnight. I mean, the numbers were just extrordinary and. They came to us with the idea and we loved it. We thought it was we thought it was a great idea instantly got me credibility with my eleven year old. They did not have your cool. But. But now it was it was a fun thing to do. And I think the guys loved it. I think the fans loved it. You started seeing a lot of stuff show up on social, and it's just sort of increased excitement. Occasion is great. You know, what the fishing boat, captain say? Now, what did I say go to with Fisher Fisher, the Fisher? Yeah. That's what you're doing. You found them where they are thought. They said I need a bigger boat. They say that too. I we're gonna need it. How different is it from how, you know, you're you're older audience demographics interact with NFL, then you're you're millennials and your your jen's e or whatever they're going by these days in general. I think it's I think a lot different. The older people will you will see in really not that old by the way at thirty five and older, maybe they tend to consume this is non game content from they tend to consume a lot of NFL the way I think everyone in this room did a lot of sportscenter NFL network. A lot of television. I want to see where it is mostly younger people. We see a ton of engagement on T mobile devices, specifically, social, and so if you see a lot of our content distribution on Instagram or Twitter, certainly during game windows and outside of the game windows. That's where they're getting their news. That's getting a lot of their highlights. It's not the prepackaged highlight as much as you will see on linear television show. So they are engaging completely different. And they're not only doing that outside of the game. But we have a lot of data that seven editor ten fans have second screen open when they're watching a game. And they're doing a lot of different things. I mean, they're they're texting they're tweeting. They're probably playing fortnight. But they, but, but that's kind of where the attention is and advertisers nervous paying attention to the ads. It's a good question. It's a really really good question. You know Nielsen will tell you NFL football. I think it's something like ninety eight percent retention on an ad which means enough flipping the channel. But they're not really measuring the people on the couch if they got their nose in the screen, or if it's in the nose, and their TV screen TVs screener, they're watching their phone. So it's a really really good question. You'll see what we've done a lot of our telecasts that have been very very successful have been these doubled box execution. So our broadcast partners are doing it started little quietly last year. But you see a lot of them now where we will go to to a break for thirty seconds. And they will keep on one side of the screen. You'll see the game whatever it's going on. It's a huddle. They're looking at their circus tablets on the silent. Whatever it is. And then there's another thirty second ad alongside it what we're finding out is that it's actually increasing the attention on the ad the initial thought was if you put it up they're just gonna look what's going over here. They're actually looking at the ad. And so we know we have we've done. Research where we actually track people's eyes fear what they're doing these labs, and that's work. Really? Really? Well, so I think you will see with us. But also, I think in sports and TV general you'll see a lot of experimentation those different types ad units. Eight sponsor mentioned by the way. Did you see the way he just worked in? Was that an unintentional segue to something? Well, we'll get there. But the way you did it and we had an award. It goes to the gangs about to slam me again because that's a lesson about the side by side racing..

NFL Brian rollout Fisher Fisher Detroit Detroit Lions chief business officer Bloomberg Scott Sasha Evan Novi Michael Barr editor jen Nielsen Instagram football Twitter
Sage Therapeutics pill improves postpartum depression in pivotal clinical trial

WBZ Afternoon News

00:36 sec | 3 years ago

Sage Therapeutics pill improves postpartum depression in pivotal clinical trial

"They have clinical results on a drug called sage two one seven and it shows very positive results for severe postpartum, depression and another major depressive disorder. They are excited about this. Chief business officer, Mike Lennon, telling busy this is coming on the heels of another treatment that isn't even on the market yet. We also do have a product called Zora. So that is in its styling stage with the FDA full postpartum, depression, and it gives us an opportunity to build a depression franchise on the backs of and. Stage. Two one seven Zule. Russell is expected to win FDA

FDA Depressive Disorder Depression Chief Business Officer Mike Lennon Russell
"chief business officer" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"If you say, I'm gonna lose fifty pounds and go to the gym every day this year, most likely you've already failed where have you said instead of eating the whole pizza? I'm gonna eat half the pizza and I'm taking the stairs up to the third floor. So the elevator you will start to see success. Those specific integrations thing you can build on. So what am I adding to my life? What thing gonna focus resolve by the way definition of resolve is to decide firm. Of course of action. The thing I decided to look at came after Don called me out on my road rage. We had fun on it on the air. But I thought about it and stumbled on a solution from a new book that I'm reading the former chief business officer of Google. His name is Mojo God God at wrote a book called sulphur happy last year. It's an engineer's approach to happiness. Enjoy a highly recommended especially for the simple technique. I'm about to share with you. He spends quite a bit of time exploring how our brains evolved and how our brains actually work. There's too much info to explain here. But the thing that helped me with my road rage is very simple mo- technique when your mind starts going down a rabbit hole like road rage to interrupt that moment and say to yourself brain bring me a better thought. It sounds simple naive, even but it's actually been working for me. I nearly got into a three car pile up with a semi on I five because of the horrible driving of someone changing lanes at highway speed without even looking my heart was racing. And I started to go into that. Familiar rage in many ways, I could justify my anger this driver's negligence new caused a huge potentially fatal car crash. But then I remembered mos- mantra, I interrupted my anger, and literally said out loud in the car brain bring you better thought, that's all it took a began to think of reasons why this person drove that way. Maybe they were distracted by a phone call. We've all done that. Maybe they were deep thought about a sick family member. Maybe they innocently didn't see me in their blind spot. It really didn't matter what the actual reason is simply by telling my brain to bring me a better thought, I was able to lower my blood pressure and not have this incident. Ruined my day. I've been using this even when I'm not driving when I catch myself spiraling into negative or critical self-talk I interrupted and say brain bring me a better thought that's my New Year's interruption. I love that. Does it have to be a better thought an okay thought an interesting thought, how do you guide the brain? Can you can you actually guide the brain to kinda thought it would be well, do whatever your thing is? So if you start to obsess about the past or obsess about the future if you interrupted and just say bring me a better thought, your brain can fill in the blanks with whatever. So if you're worried about the future, let's say what's going to help it happen with your your loved ones health, and they use obsessing on. And you can't get out of it brain bring you thought. Well, you can start thinking about a great memory that you had with them. You could think about a kind act that you could do now because you know, what you know, you can think about a service that you could give to your mom or a kind word to them. So your brain. Then we'll give provide with you better. Those are like four to ask myself brain bring you that our thoughts are you providing the thought though is is it brainpower. Did you brain just doing? I don't know if it matters. I mean, you could substitute this mantra or something else. That's just his mantra. And I worked at today. Someone another bad driving situation wouldn't turn left in the way. I thought they should turn left coming to work today. And said brain bring me a better thought would you come up with a to dislike that that guys? A very very safe driver almost two safe. But it was a better thought it's try try next time. You you're locked into a thought pattern brain bring you that.

Don Google chief business officer engineer fifty pounds
"chief business officer" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"chief business officer" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"So I wanna talk to you about moon shots and operationalizing moon shots, which seems like such a contradiction in terms, and you're the perfect person to talk to for this. Because you were the chief business officer at Google x now just ex you also lost your own start up with a very odd ASICs kind of moonshot type goal. So just attacking this idea moon shots from a big company and from a start up. I think is super intriguing and thanks so much for talking about this. If we can start with Google. Yeah. So the concept of a moonshot is truly at the heart of Google. It's why I love Google. And you know, it's why joined Google the idea of moonshot requires that you bet on the problem you tell yourself there is a big problem affects humanity and it needs to be solved. And so if it has. Been solved so far. That's probably because all of the legacy solutions are not really good enough to solve it. And so you have to stay away from incremental innovation and go for a radical form of innovation which sometimes sounds like science fiction. And this is why I think Google X became what it is. Because we wouldn't settle for a ten percent twenty percent one hundred percent improvement on something, but we would shoot for a ten x improvement. I'm fascinated by this because it seems like you're in a little different universe. Like if you are chief business officer at Google acce. How is your job different from being chief business officer at some other places at the same job, but you make decisions differently or do you actually do the job differently? It's not the job at all. It's not a joke on it. Sounds like a great one hundred on in the wrong side of this. When you wake up in the morning, and you really feel that you can change the world, and you're working with some of the smartest human beings. Live, and you can actually see that you're making a difference. It's not a job at all. And actually, I think until today of the hundreds maybe thousands of brilliant people I worked with at that place who absolutely changed our world, as we know it, even even if you may never know their names because they invented a tiny little thing on search that change your life forever of all of those people. None of them actually worked for the job. They just had the passion to do something amazing. And I would tell everyone in this room that if you're not doing that quit. And I mean that totally from my heart. Don't don't quit tomorrow. That would be stupid. Okay. But but take a ticket six months plan, an eleven months planner, sixteen months plan, even if it three it requires you to learn new skills, but don't spend your life doing something that annoys you everyday..

Google chief business officer one hundred percent sixteen months twenty percent eleven months ten percent six months
Snap CEO Picked a New Business Chief, Then Changed His Mind

BTV Simulcast

00:24 sec | 3 years ago

Snap CEO Picked a New Business Chief, Then Changed His Mind

"Chats parents humbled on reports that a new chief business officer was hired on Friday, then replace on Sunday sources say CEO oven Spiegel promoted Cristiano O'Hara, but they didn't change his mind rescinded the offer and picked former Amazon sales chief Jeremy Gorman instead Hera has already left snap telling colleagues. She's going as part of changes to their team structure.

Chief Business Officer Cristiano O'hara Hera Jeremy Gorman Spiegel Amazon CEO
Making Technology Accessible to People Who Otherwise Would be Left Behind

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

06:32 min | 4 years ago

Making Technology Accessible to People Who Otherwise Would be Left Behind

"I want you to think about technology and how it can make a difference. And also maybe just maybe see the world in a slightly different line. For example, everyone listening gain western Europe and the US ROY. Now, many people will be getting excited about the holiday season and picking up the latest smartphone over thousand dollars, but for billions of people all over the world, they're still off the grid with no access to a Bank account and no access to a small firm. So the next time you're complaining about the cost of your smartphone, contract spirit thought for those earning ten dollars a day on where a smartphone could quite easily 'cause half of them income, but a company called page. ROY is helping to change all and they're working with some sewn to bring phones all over the world. Those who call. Afford it or don't have credit is a fantastic story. And I want to hear about the big difference that they'd be making games, Latin America, India, and Africa, and indeed all over the world. So book look hold on time. So I can be meal is all the way to the bay area so we can speak with Canaan, full page, ROY. So a massive warm, welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners about who you are and what you do share? My name is Mark Hainan. I'm chief business officer and co, founder of page on mainly lead international growth and partnerships for page. So for anyone listening just learning about page Pedro for the very first time. Can you tell me what page always who your customers, but also what kind of problems you're solving? Sure. Page way is really solving to fundamental problems. One problem we're solving is an affordability problem when it comes to smartphones, the average selling price of a smartphone has been going up and it's getting to the point where a lot of people emerging markets simply will not be able to afford the smartphones that are being marketed to them. The second problem we're solving is a credit problem. The reason why people in emerging markets Canada. Ford is Mark homes is because they don't follow fi for months. Payment plans, the same Monday payment plans that you or I are most people in western Europe and the developed world have a lot of experience with and take for granted frankly, when it comes to buying smartphones. And so we really want to enable those monthly payment plans for the next billion for the next. Wave of people in emerging markets who definitely want a smartphone. They're quite aware of the fact that smartphones exist. They may even have bought the one hundred dollars smartphone that's been marketed to them. And most people in that world are not happy with an. It's been a lot of I'm working on emerging market smartphones, and we know very well that people are generally eager to upgrade their phone. And so we really allow those people to purchase a modern smartphone using Monday him plans by approving the vast majority of people for Monday van plans and using our lock, our proprietary, locking technology to cloud as the phone and using unique proprietary underwriting tools to underwrite people who don't have the typical credit scores that folks are used to. And so between that mobile underwriting and the lock, we feel we can enable folks worldwide to get a monthly payment plans and internationally. We work with partners. To effectively roll out those pin plans in their markets. Also, let recently that you fairly early in Latin America like you tell me a little bit about that and your experiences there. Actually, we initially launched in the US and it became quite clear that the product market fit in emerging markets is likely going to be very strong just because we were getting strong demand from the under banked in the US. And so very early on in our history action before you've been raised our series a financing, we actually expanded into Mexico and started working with telltale distributors in Mexico, you know, providing monthly payment plans in this household distributors and word really spread like wildfire. Among these tells AL distributors there a fairly small number of them, and they all talk to each other and they have not been used to seeing affordable monthly payment plans, especially ones where. Over eighty percent of people get approved in Mexico. We're basically just requiring government ID Facebook account and a phone number to qualify and over. Eighty percent of people were getting approved and that got these folks really interested and excited, and we then expanded across Mexico through them and also tell sales competitors. Telephone can eighteen t, you know, heard about this and got on board Drake, weekly, and I think what's exciting about that is that it grew very quickly. And also we learned that this is a product that really works for emerging markets.

ROY Mexico Europe Latin America Pedro United States Mark Hainan AL Facebook Canada Canaan Africa India Drake Chief Business Officer Ford Mark Homes Founder