23 Burst results for "Chief Architect"

The New Backend Engineering Lead at TextUs - Brittany Martin

Ruby on Rails Podcast

04:43 min | Last month

The New Backend Engineering Lead at TextUs - Brittany Martin

"By corner of the world is very different and so I think I've kind of alluded to it on some of the episodes we've recorded up to this one but nick, you are my very favorite co host. So of course, I waited until you were back on the podcast so that we could discuss all the changes but I have recently shifted roles. So I quietly changed my linked in quietly changed my twitter and my get hub but I am the new engineering lead for the back end at text us. Congratulations that is that is huge right I don't even know where to begin but. I guess the best place is at the beginning. So how long ago? Did you kind of find your way into the world of Texas yeah. So ask the listeners know I've been at the trust for about five years, which was fantastic because I leveled up. So much of the trust, a lot of my conference talks that I gave came from the work that. I was doing at the trust I loved those working at a nonprofit affecting the arts and the Pittsburgh community because when I came back from San Francisco, I really wanted to get re-involved with Pittsburgh and there was no better place to do it with the trust being a small nonprofit and you know there was only so many places that I could grow up words. I decided to start considering my options, and so I came across Texas and text. US. Basically is a business class text messaging software and they're built in rails, which of course, is very important to me as the host of this show to continue working on ruby on rails. So you know I have bet my career on it. And the Texas currently serves the ASS staffing recruiting industries mainly though they also serve a lot of different industries but it's a really interesting and complex code base and they use a lot of the dry principles, which is that I was somewhat familiar with, but I hadn't worked one on one with. So how about you neck? Have you used a lot of dry rb? So when you dry principles, do you mean like actually using like dry rb and the dry rb tooling and the ghost? Yes heavily on my goodness. So I have literally just wandered so far as hearing about it in a podcast or you know and I and I, think I follow the maintainers on twitter and reading about five never crossed that threshold to actually using it even in a in a toy up. So House have been. kind of seeing that world is imagine it's quite interesting. Yeah. I'm coming off of a code base where we used a lot of service objects. So in some ways, there are some principles there that are somewhat familiar where you don't stack all of your logic into your models and controllers, but dry principles. It's just it's very clean and I'll tell you that during the interview process with Texas, which first of all was a really fantastic. Interview Process and I hope a lot of companies have processes like this it my process probably took I would say about five weeks and that involved a lot of one on one in conversations with their product manager the CTO, their chief architect, my partner, who is the engineering lead for the front end and just really making sure that it was a good culture fit and then I ended up doing a pairing session with the chief architect and. What was neat about it is that we tackled some very rails lia problems, but then as towards the end of the interview. He gave me some examples of how my code could change to actually reflect those dry principles and how that is how they manage the code in code base and I left that interview just ceiling. So intrigued about how I feel that I knew ruby on rails fairly well, but just seeing it in that sense it got me really curious and I was like this is this is. going. To. Be Great for my career. It must be amazing to get another set of eyes because I have to commend you you know. There's A. Strong trend in tech where people you don't hear the five years that often anymore. I don't think you you see is short as eighteen months to I'd say, even three years I'd look at unlinked and say, wow, that was a while. So so it's definitely you know there's all the. Normal aspects of changing changing a job but I think from a code aspect just saying these different ideas you know and. It's like a super learning experience all over again if you're around a bunch of intelligent people working in this code base and and especially with tooling that you may not have used before so must be. An absolute thrill.

Texas United States Twitter Nick Pittsburgh Chief Architect San Francisco House Product Manager Partner CTO
Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

Outcomes Rocket

05:12 min | 2 months ago

Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and today I. Have the privilege of hosting on a totally gave man. He is the CEO and Co founder of Care Avoidance, a healthcare sales enablement solution for life sciences that is doing extraordinary work for drawing out value propositions. Companies Looking to express that clearly anatoly came to work in healthcare early in his career, starting off as the lead engineer on one of the first hip compliant benefits, communication products for enterprises, he continued to work with large healthcare data sets and HR soft before. Before becoming the chief architect at Ambra. Health a cloud based medical imaging company. It was there at Ambra that Anatoly saw the need for high quality data to inform sales execution which germinated. The idea for care voyage were thrilled to have him on the podcast today, and it's such a unique platform that they're using to reach customers and for sales teams to reach their customers in a clear way Donatelli. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank Salty. Got Be. Yeah. Absolutely. So tons of great stuff being done by your company. And so before we dive into really the meat bones of what you guys do there, I love to first arc and find out more about you and one inspires your work in healthcare. I appreciate it, and so I started working in healthcare actually when I was still in high school. I just happened to luck out and find on an internship working on one of the first hickory maple insisting that for human resources management. So that really starting my love for working with large data sets and working with privileged data, like that I continue dot read some other gigs on signatory around Maple imaging on, and that's really where I started learning about. About, the difficulty that companies have selling in healthcare. So with my may imaging gig on I, I was the chief architect company called Ambra Health on big digital medic rummaging Bloomberg, and then I switched over to more of a developer evangelists than sales engineering role, and that's where I really started looking at how companies that produce the rate products go to market. And what inspires me a about healthier? Specifically, my little corner of healthcare is helping innovators, take their market big their products to market. I think there's a lot of great innovation that's happening right now. especially with digital innovation machine learning ai off care. But I think that the past to a successful product is still at I. It's still very hard to navigate. So that's what inspires me getting these products so. So, writer audience and getting patients right treatment at the right time, eventually through through the use of our product and obviously great innovation. Yeah. You know it's That's so great, and there's so many opportunities for companies and you know the people leading them, the teams that are representing the great work that you know I mean many of these companies we have on the podcast a totally you know the. Great Work and they have great products and services and the pathway to get there. The go to market strategy isn't always super clear, and then on top of that, it's not easy to sell inside of our healthcare system and it takes forever so. All of those things are true own. Yeah, and I think that there are a lot of products that end up failing because the products and successful and because the greater market strategy is maybe not very well informed their beats not very well executed, and so if I can do anything to help that and that was where I decided to spend, my time is opening entrepreneurs with way to go to market I. Think it's great and in our vertical or our economy or health care economy, it's so necessary. So tell us a little bit about what you guys are doing. Doing at care voyage to add value to the healthcare ecosystem of innovators. Yeah. -solutely. So you know I'll start with a problem I. think the really big problem right now, the REC- at least in our little corner of the healthcare economy is data symmetry It's you know everyone makes decisions or everyone strives to make decisions in a data driven way the acquisition of data to make those decisions, your go to market or even your your product strategy is still not democratized Jesus, sometimes available and very regularly available in. Thanks. It's not available at all on companies like care. Where we're trying to do. At least off the for. Right now, we're trying to do is we're trying to democratize access to this information whether it's you know information about who's doing, what types of services takes a physicians practicing the type of and your are devices best for or on that you're pharmaceutical product is best stations for it. I think a lot of like data's available, but traditionally, it's only been available to the wealthiest layers market and so our goal is to democratize access to that. So even startups that may not have the backing of the largest feet from on me, not how hundred million dollars in the bay and can't get access to it and really execute a great girl market.

Anatoly Ambra Chief Architect REC Sal Marquez Ceo And Co Ambra Health Lead Engineer Founder Writer Bloomberg Developer
Deal of the Century: Jason Greenblatt, the Heart of the Deal

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

03:33 min | 4 months ago

Deal of the Century: Jason Greenblatt, the Heart of the Deal

"Was one of the chief architects. I worked very closely with two good friends of mine. Jared Kushner president trump's son-in-law and senior adviser to president trump. As, well as our friend, ambassador David Friedman the US ambassador to Israel. And I would agree with you that it's an opportunity to the next generation, but I would say aides and opportunity for the next generation of everybody in the region, Israelis Palestinians and all of our countries that surround them. I think that people have come to the realization that the past peace efforts have failed. They are unlikely to succeed, and what we have presented is a very detailed very lengthy plan that could show everybody what the compromises are. That are necessary in order to achieve peace and I think that the younger generation in the region is ready for this I think that believe that the Palestinian people deserve something so much better than the half I think that if we succeed, if peace is achieved, everybody in the region can benefit from it tremendously now it's as if in anticipation of the Palestinian. Authority's rejection of the plan. You'd also consulted with Palestinian people on the ground. I guess ground groundswell is also the key to making peace. It's in the hearts of the people as well as the leadership. Absolutely first of all it was no secret test that the Palestinian Authority would likely reject the plan any plan frankly that we put out. When President Trump made his bold and courageous historic decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and several months later move the embassy, both in accordance with US law something that US law required since nineteen, ninety five. The Palestinian Authority cut ties to the administration. But they also began to trash. Talk the plan that they have not yet seen in in the months. Preceding the launch of the plan, they rejected the plan including using statements by their prime minister. Such as the plan should be born dead. It should be a stillborn something to that effect. That's not quite an exact quote, but that was the tone of the conversation about the plan, but what everybody should realizes it isn't just the leadership that is necessary to get on board. It is essential for people to get on board, and if the people are not with this plan whether Israeli or The plan has little chance to succeed. I also want to add. We have to remember that. Really are two leaderships for the Palestinians or at least one leadership in Ramallah and one so-called leadership in Gaza. Hamas, which was a terrorist organization funded by Iran, and that subjugates the nearly two million Palestinians that live in Gaza causes tremendous suffering to those Palestinians. is whether we like it or not. At some form of Palestinian leadership, so even if the leadership in Ramallah even if President Obama's were to engage the plant. One has to wonder and really talk about what happens to the Palestinians, in Gaza, our plan of course provides for that, but we can't get the people in Gaza in their their so called leadership on board than there is no effective way to implement the peace plan. Very few people talk about that. Make It seem as though it's simple. If president us, either condemns the plan or engages on the plan then. Then we know our next steps while that's a bit too simplistic. We must all figure out a way to handle and deal with the two million Palestinians who are suffering in Gaza.

Gaza President Trump United States Palestinian Authority Israel Ramallah Jared Kushner President Obama David Friedman Senior Adviser Prime Minister Hamas Jerusalem Iran
Trump reveals long anticipated 'Deal of the Century' between Israelis and Palestinians

BBC World Service

05:10 min | 9 months ago

Trump reveals long anticipated 'Deal of the Century' between Israelis and Palestinians

"President trump's newly unveiled Middle East peace plan he has hailed it as a win win for both Israelis and Palestinians he announced it in Washington with Israel's prime minister at his side Binyamin Netanyahu called the deal of the century the Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas said these people would never accept a state that didn't include Jerusalem needless to say he wasn't that in Washington let's say speak down to our correspondent in the region Tom Bateman at Tom the the pleasure of the Israeli delegation in Washington was remarkable to see did it come as a pleasant surprise but they must have known what was going on no I don't think this would have been a surprise the Mottola made the the plan has been in the offing for at least two years now the Americans wanted to release it well over a year ago it was delayed several times because of Israel's elections those inconclusive elections we now into the run up to a third election in the space of a year so I think it would be pretty clear as time went by to the Israelis what was going to be in this and it became abundantly clear really watching the way in which prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu was responding in the run up the hours running up to the announcement in Washington clearly very pleased about what was going to be in this plan and that was will confound the announcement last night between the two of the Americans say that this paves the way for a Palestinian state in the is a detailed plan however any objective look at it in comparison to previous peace initiatives it initiatives on to the international consensus up until this point shows that it is heavily tilted in favor of the Israelis some critics saying already is less of a peace plan in more of a a plan for annexation of Israeli settlements and the Jordan Valley in the west bank and I think that is what the Palestinians have said a thousand no use to to the plan itself and there is now debate I think among Israelis about how quickly they gonna try and onyx some of those areas of the west bank the work of some Arab representatives and buses of Gulf countries that in Washington as well as being background support we understand from Egypt and Saudi Arabia it now it in the past the Arab countries have been storms in their condemnation of Israel storms in the support of Palestine we sing what is this what does this mean for the future we seeing a shift change in the way that these issues are framed one of the chief architects of the plan was Jared Kushner who is president trump's son in law and a senior adviser now he's a close associates of haven't been tell mom the crown prince of Saudi Arabia and was clearly a lot of discussion diplomacy between the two about what would be in this plan and I think it would be key to them it's not to have a Saudi condemnation of of the proposes an egg they have not have that the Saudis have been fairly muted it seems in that response so far and it said that the you know welcome anything that they they look at the American plan and say that it's a a serious attempts at at a peace proposal so the whole thing there is to have condemned the plan the UAE has welcome days Jordan neighboring Jordan a crucial country strategically in terms of the geography here I have felt not welcome the plan said that they they don't welcome anything that doesn't go along with the nineteen sixty seven borders the previous international consensus but I think in terms of the the Gulf countries clearly a lot of work was done to get them on board and it looks as I find large they've done that does this however shift the way that we talk about the issues because very often they framed by the latest peace talks all the latest proposals is this basically the framework through which we gonna be talking about this in coming years it's really hard to answer that question because I think you have to look at the international consensus up until this point that is now deeply split we we've had some responses from European countries that have EM said that they for example the British won't bite size to negotiate an agreed settlement but you know they welcome Americans have said that peace proposals I think that what will change dot is if there is a unilateral action by these ready so if there is an attempt to annexation of parts of the west bank then I think that was will force the issue because of the in countries are going to have to then say whether or not they agree with that measure of course remember there is the issue of international law which prohibits the transfer of populations to territory taken during times of war territory taken by force so that's going to be a key factor too but on the ground you know I mean all of them with diplomatic proposals you don't see the huge car uprisings with tensions on the ground that are often triggered by physical changes on the ground they tend to be the things here in the region of the really cool is that really because confrontation and turbulence now that of course I think he's still in prospect right from Jerusalem correspondent Tom but

President Trump Middle East
Brexit party will not contest 317 Tory-won seats, Nigel Farage says

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Brexit party will not contest 317 Tory-won seats, Nigel Farage says

"So much is Remembrance Day in the United Kingdom and Mister Ferrari she will be remembered it to the prime minister this morning John this is huge news in moving this palm sterling as well cable of nine tenths of one percent sterling one dollar twenty eight eighty three nine two four oz regarded as one of the chief architects of brexit now the leader of the brexit party going into the election next month it was a risk that his party would take come conservative states perhaps conservative states with a marginal laid the if he contested them they would open the door to other parties yeah and in doing so Tom open the door to a second referendum Nigel for AJ acknowledging that wrist today standing down three hundred seventeen candidates clearing the path for the conservatives to making it very clear that we one but it's always in the next election we will fight like the candidates the why why you're seeing stunning stronger the belief that this helps the contract the potty get a majority is a relationship such that he could be in a new cabinet formed by the Conservative Party I buy things that was so incredibly unlikely Boris Johnson at this point is kept his distance from the leader of the brexit party I think though if the Conservative Party needed the additional seats to form a coalition then who knows but at this point the promises made it quite clear no no agreement will saliva with the brexit party going into the election next month is the idea here that certainty is the most important thing Boris Johnson seems to be solidifying the majorities of the seems to push forward the idea of a brexit plan show and solicitude risa play hand not just breaks of risk not the rest you get a different kind of vote no clarity and then we go forward for months years and perhaps a lot longer the risk that the labor party gets in Tom and Jerry called in with the socialist policies that he is presented proposes a whole new range of risks an outcome for investors in

United Kingdom Mister Ferrari Prime Minister John TOM Nigel Boris Johnson Conservative Party Jerry Twenty Eight Eighty Three Nine One Percent One Dollar
"chief architect" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"chief architect" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Zuckerberg comes away mostly unscathed only having to personally certify the company's compliance programs the Dow is down one hundred thirty five points officials in Paris are worried a searing heat wave could be dead stating for what's left of Notre dom the cathedrals chief architect says the joints are masonry could come loose and because the vaulted ceiling to collapse it was ravaged by a massive fire in April the forecast calls for a record high of one hundred seven in Paris tomorrow this is CBS news did you know you can listen to CBS news radio twenty four hours a day seven days a week on radio dot com or the radio dot com app he should go goes all the seven and one oh five point nine FM and WBBM newsradio dot com WBBM news time eleven oh three on this beautiful Wednesday morning thanks for being with us I'm Cisco koto temperatures in Chicago land today very nice seventy five right now at o'hare we're heading to a high of eighty one no rain in the forecast at all today we'll tell you about the rest of the week and the weekend in your complete accu weather forecast coming up our top local story on news radio WBBM auroras Porter Rican community may have more to celebrate and its heritage this weekend if the governor of the U. S. territory resigns WBBM is burning to for your report governor Ricardo row sale took part in exchanges with aids that included jokes about hurricane Maria victims there have been protests for days calling for his resignation iris Miller president of the Aurora Porter Rican cultural council says that people will be ecstatic with the rose a resignation our hearts are are in pain right now with the in everything that is happening in our island by is it because I mean everybody came together as one Miller Coles Rosales comments frustrating embarrassing and disgusting Sunday is a roar as forty seven Daniel Porter Rican heritage parade and festival in Aurora Bernie to voice newsradio one of five point nine FM police in Lansing have yet to release additional details in the shooting yesterday evening that left a woman dead in a busy parking lot witnesses in the lot outside in LA fitness in one hundred seventy third in Torrance describe diving for cover from the gunfire reportedly involving a pickup truck in another vehicle there's no word yet on the name of the woman who was killed several Chicago alderman a renewing a push to get voters.

CBS LA Daniel Porter Miller Coles Rosales president iris Miller hurricane Maria Chicago Cisco Zuckerberg Torrance Lansing Aurora Bernie Aurora Porter Rican cultural c WBBM o'hare chief architect Paris twenty four hours seven days
 Voting closing in race to become UK's new prime minister

Morning Edition

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Voting closing in race to become UK's new prime minister

"Voting closes today in the race to succeed British prime minister Theresa may who is resigning NPR's Joanna could kisses reports from London the new prime minister must deal with brexit and a growing crisis with Iran members of Britain's ruling Tory party have until today to return their ballots selecting a new leader who will be prime minister the winner will be announced tomorrow in installed in office on Wednesday the favorite is Boris Johnson a former Foreign Secretary in London mayor he's seen as brash and unpredictable and as a chief architect of brexit he's vowed to get the U. K. out of the European Union by October thirty first no matter what Johnson is facing off against current foreign secretary Jeremy hunt who could delay breaks and if it means a better deal for the U. K. since Friday hot has been managing a growing crisis with Iran which sees the British flag oil tanker in the strait of Hormuz Joanna cake is ascend P. R. news

Prime Minister Theresa NPR London Britain Boris Johnson Secretary Chief Architect European Union Jeremy Hunt Iran Joanna
"chief architect" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"chief architect" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"On April fifteen you know, right now, small businesses across the world are depending on QuickBooks online being available. Always right. And so, you know, understanding the failure points of your software and planning contingencies, whether they'd be architectural, contingencies or Runtime, contingencies is something that we're constantly doing. And so we just have to evaluate like, what are the top things because we can't attack everything in for us. You know, multi cloud right now is is has not gone above that threshold that peak time, April fifteenth peak-time is how hard is that to architect for even in the cloud, like is it just a matter of, like, who is it really easy or are there still like little weird education that, that are kind of tricky to configure? Yeah. There's there's. Always cases I would say that the turbo tax team is amazing. I had the great privilege of being the chief architect of the consumer group for six years, which includes turbo tax. It's an amazing organization it's an operational machine in terms of getting ready for taxis in executing during tax season in the rigor around a how we create the content than how we secure the data on everything. It's a if mazing software operational machine. I think what we should write a book about it. But when you get into the nuances of hosting on the cloud, it's still complicated, right? Because you have to despite all the evasive amazing advancements that AWS GCP in others have made. They're still startup time. Right. They're still hardware involved. They're still the boot strapping time of systems coming up. And so, you know, being tweaking it the right way, so that you understand as the growth curve is coming out early. Do you scale up, how late do you scale down making sure that you've got all your balancing, you still have networks to deal with so load balancing continues to be one of the biggest things that we are constantly testing? We have. The right load balancing rules to have the right fail over rules. Do we have the right health checks in place? What are your third party dependencies like so you scale yourself up? But then you have these third party dependencies? Can they scale what are the right patterns that you have in place in terms of containing the blast radius should assume the software failure happens so that either a degraded performance or slightly degraded performance or no customer impact at all? But certainly not a complete outage in. So there's pretty well understood playbook on what to do, but it's still it's still a complicated science. Triple bite fast tracks your path to a great new career, take the triple bite quiz.

six years chief architect
"chief architect" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"chief architect" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Software engineering daily. Alex blah's. You are the chief architect at into it. Welcome to software engineering daily. Thank you, Jeff. It's great to be here. I'm looking forward to talking through some of into its architecture. You've been there for, I think twenty years almost twenty years since nineteen ninety nine. Okay. So that is a long longtime and I'd like to start with some high level discussion of into its product line. Then we'll get into the engineering describe the different products that you help with the architecture of today. Yeah. Absolutely. So Intuit's mission, which was recently refreshed is to power prosperity around the world. And one of the cool things about that mission is that it's pretty open prosperity isn't necessarily something that you can measure concretely something more about how people feel they feel prosperous. And so our flagship products of turbo tax QuickBooks, in mint are, certainly a great start. So they are financial products that help our customers whether those customers are consumer Sumer, self employed or small business. Owner. Ours to feel more prosperous, but one of the really cool things that's going on at Intuit. Is that we're kind of growing out of our roots as a as a product company still remaining customer obsessed, but really becoming a platform data company. So as you think about into its product line, going forward, certainly, we will continue to maintain the, the amazing products..

Intuit Alex blah chief architect self employed Jeff twenty years
"chief architect" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Adams. You are the chief architect at slack. Welcome back to software engineering daily. Thank you so much great to be back. Yes. The last time we talked. We spoke mostly about the overall architecture. We talked about PHP we talked about your time at Facebook. It was a great overview today, I'd like to go deeper into the concept of messaging, and particularly how to scale a messaging system and how you've done this at at slack. If we started a high level, and we're looking at your time in the past couple years, what has stood out as the biggest challenge in adapting the architecture to the scale that you have reached at slack. That's a Greek western I'm going to weasel out of the initially and sort of say, it's been a million little things. But I think I have an insight into the shape of the million little things, and what thread unites them, but took me a while to form, but it's gonna take a little bit of background to kind of zoom in. So starting way out and sort of classical. Academic distributed systems. One of the first things that you wanna do when you string to computers together is builder liable messaging service between them right as soon as you've got a computer talking to some other computer with a wire between them you want them to share log rent, you realize right away that if I could just have a persistent log that they both could share and agree on the contents of I can do all kinds of things that could build a full tolerant database out of that. I could build products lockout of that. I could build a product bitcoin out of that. And it occurs to you. When you sit down and start coding and trying to make this happen. We find out pretty soon. The fact that these are physical objects in the physical world with failures and delays and possibly even mangled messages makes this really difficult. And so you you kind of bang your head against the wall for a while move onto something else. But early distributed systems academics realized pretty quickly that there was actually an impossibility result heading out in here. So around the same time as consensus for shown to be impossible. They also proved that the problem that slack is sort of approximating solution to which is called the Tomic broadcast is also impossible. So let me try and describe sort of in terms of slack user refund. Familiar the requirements of the channel, right? What's the channel supposed to do? Well, we have this understanding that when I send a message in a channel everybody's gonna eventually see that message who subscribed to the channel. Right. And we have this understanding to that they're on mobile devices, their laptops, their online they're offline, but we have a sense that eventually they'll get back online. And then they'll see all the messages that have been sent. And they'll see them in the same order. We also have an intuition that if I receive a message everybody else will eventually receive it as well. The channel sort of keeps the channel abstraction the basic product channels, traction guarantees the channel hallucinate messages or the only place the messages, come from the fact that people send them and finally we got a total order every agrees on the order of the messages arrived in and turns out those four things are actually the definition of atomic broadcast. So there's a very strong kind of. Impossibility result at the core of the kind of product that slack is trying to be that doesn't mean we lay down and die, of course. Right. Slack exists. It's useful. We strive to make it more useful. But it does mean that there are going to be some corner cases, and some federal cases and some contingencies. We'll have some hard decisions to make and those decisions are going to be informed. Partly by product choices rents to the way that you want to handle the fact that messages can get lost or reordered is going to be different when you're dealing with something like user presence aren't the little green dot next to names.

slack Facebook chief architect Adams.
"chief architect" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"What's what's a cell phone there's a story there i will go and i'd actually my phone i have my my serious i have not have i do not have a smart siri so i don't have a smart series yeah on the other day broke down and i realized i rely on i am on exactly lots of cool things that we could do on that front we had a chief architect at the time and a what you had a chief architect they're skipping steps there was the chief architect was a part of that meeting sweet original people that came together and i got a call from his dad said hey i want you to come out here and listen to this idea oh come out so we went out and sat down and josh kind of went through what it was that he got the how he got the idea what he thought should it should work and mike that's a great idea because there isn't anything like that and even at the core it's grown since the original idea as all things do but even the cord didn't exist just being able to find something for a college student to do that was that didn't create a problem for them because there's a lot of apps out there and a lot of things that will hook you up with some kind of temporary worker something but they usually want to ten ninety nine you in these college students are coming out and they get ten ninety nine and they don't know what to do with them so now they're file taxes and they're not paying taxes and they're getting in trouble it's the gig economy honestly is that the biggest problem what's going on with it so but i'm just trying to get at joshua's process here so.

chief architect joshua josh mike
"chief architect" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Every time welcome to barnacles did you expect particles all right so i would be in a little silly today barrio riley he's here he's the founder of black tulip technology and creator of antifraud joel system design he has held chief architect roles at microsoft's western europe consultancy practice and design he's been microsoft's not tap leader for western europe and worldwide lead for microsoft solution architecture community his also been a startup cto and was founder of sweden's as your user group welcome berry how's it going sorry we're being a little wacky today but you know we thought that was a good opener any comments anything we've talked about so far no i'm just thinking about the the center name i just been looking into buying a camera for fishing the attached to your fishing line and you know as you're driving your in you can watch when you're what's happening underwater so cool owner if microsoft are going to use those things to to monitor the sensor don't be cool you know they had a webcam you could just go watch you know see the eels swim up and what you said swim away there absolutely was picture clearly taken from an on the bottom of the bay that it's in there don't they should make it a webcam but i don't know that they have but there was some camera down there after they set it down just to make sure things were good keep an eye on your server there you go.

founder microsoft europe cto sweden chief architect
"chief architect" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Every time welcome to barnacles did you expect particles all right so i would be in a little silly today barrio riley he's here he's the founder of black tulip technology and creator of antifraud joel system design he has held chief architect roles at microsoft's western europe consultancy practice and design he's been microsoft's not tap leader for western europe and worldwide lead for microsoft solution architecture community his also been a startup cto and was founder of sweden's as your user group welcome berry how's it going sorry we're being a little wacky today but you know we thought that was a good opener any comments anything we've talked about so far no i'm just thinking about the the center name i just been looking into buying a camera for fishing the attached to your fishing line and you know as you're driving your in you can watch when you're what's happening underwater so cool owner if microsoft are going to use those things to to monitor the sensor don't be cool you know they had a webcam you could just go watch you know see the eels swim up and what you said swim away there absolutely was picture clearly taken from an on the bottom of the bay that it's in there don't they should make it a webcam but i don't know that they have but there was some camera down there after they set it down just to make sure things were good keep an eye on your server there you go.

founder microsoft europe cto sweden chief architect
"chief architect" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on KOMO

"Visualize i mean this is incredible and you feel as if you were standing in the kitchen you can do an overview a look down you can pivot all the way around you can go is if you've walked out the back door walked out a side door into the dining room it's just an extraordinary program but we use others as well chief our architect there's sometimes that we use revenue i mean we use a lot of things even google sketch up comes up here and there may ask why you're curious oh i just went out and licensed and bonded and i mean i can go in somewhere and visualize what i'm gonna put in what we're talking about but i i need something for the homeowner they're able to visualize what we're doing well i will tell you that twenty twenty it's the gold standard in my industry and and there's a good reason why it does take a level of skill training and seriously i feel like the people who've been working with twenty twenty after about a decade they feel like they're confident enough to call themselves you know really to where they can put pretty much anything in it it takes a long time it has a huge learning curve it's not something that's just easy for somebody to pick it up and use it chief architect also as its benefits but they all do different things something that's easy i don't know we don't do anything in my office that easy but we've been doing it a long long time so as far as those things i would just look at you know perhaps even having someone drafted out for you which might be an idea so that you can show your clients better because it is really a steep learning curve on the software programs and so that's one of the things that i sometimes think people fail to realize it is what we do is very complex for the layout the three d impression that you see the lighting the tile the flooring the flow through the experience of your kitchen it's it's pretty dynamic and so it's just not something that i think people can throw together i'm very proud of the fact that we are capable but it still is it's a it's a difficult one it's not an easy one hi carolyn how you.

chief architect carolyn google twenty twenty
"chief architect" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on WTMA

"Late nineties and it fell apart things are much more solid here because what's really different now is that launch costs coming down that wasn't happening in the nineties so even a little burp here and there in the business model for the satellites won't kill them because cost is still gonna come down and so we're going to see big big things going on the air force said wakes up it realizes it can do things faster and cheaper bob should i be enlivened by these reports at the air force is reorganizing its purchasing power no not at all what you what the force announced this week at a space conference there are a lot of now i've got another one from the fcc ties into this next john but the air force announced it's going to reorganize it stays operations in that talking about how they want to have a more unified operation systems that will work horizontally from design to production they want to eliminate quote stovepipe so i loved that bureaucratic word and the way they're gonna do it they're going to create two new offices and have a chief architect organiz things in other words they're rearranging the deck chairs on a sinking ship no actually what i say behind the blacks is even better they're buying deckchairs for sinking ship they're gonna bill that bureaucracy up and add more layers to it in order to streamline their operations this is typical of bureaucracies this is why i'm always sceptical when they do this when they say they're organizing because almost invariably they add layers they don't cut anything and so even though they are clearly trying to switch from big homemade humongous ly over expensive satellite they decades to launch to going to commercial law satellites that are small and quick the launch and you can launch a lot of them to get redundancy they are moving that way but it doesn't seem to appear to me that they're doing anything to save tax payer money in the process.

fcc chief architect
"chief architect" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That specific case was shut down in two thousand fifteen but what we didn't do until recently and what we're doing now is just take a broader view looking to be more restrictive in ways data could be misused we also didn't build our operations fast enough and that's on me we had ten thousand people working in security at the beginning of the year at the end of this year alone we will more than double to twenty thousand we are massively investing in smart technology and we're doing all of this to make sure that we get to a place where we can proactively protect people's data facebook has constructed a business model that leverages personal data that users share with facebook and you are the chief architect of that assuming the business model will evolve as a result of all these changes how will that impact the bottom line how will that impact profitability we've never run this company for short term gains and we've never run this company to maximize profits we run this company for the long term health at our community and business we announced two quarters ago in earnings that these investments are big and they will impact profitability and that's okay with us because it's the right thing to do we want to make these investments will update at the next quarter so talk a little bit about you mentioned that a few advertisers have paused their spending as a result of this how big is that pause can you give us any color it's a few advertisers but what matters is not how big it is what matters is the questions they're asking so advertisers are people there people who use facebook so our investors and everyone wants to know the same thing which is argue protecting people's data i think the advertisers n people who use facebook also want to know that the good things will continue and those are really important as well with all that we know.

facebook chief architect two quarters
"chief architect" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That's specific case was shut down in two thousand fifteen but what we didn't do until recently and what we're doing now is just take a broader view looking to be more restrictive in ways data could be misused we also didn't build our operations fast enough and that's on me we had ten thousand people working in security at the beginning of the year at the end of this year alone we will more than double to twenty thousand we are massively investing in smart technology and we're doing all of this to make sure that we get to a place where we can proactively protect people's data facebook has constructed a business model that leverages personal data that users share with facebook and you are the chief architect of that assuming the business model will evolve as a result of all these changes how will that impact the bottom line how will that impact profitability we've never run this company for short term gains and we've never run this company to maximize profits we run this company for the long term health that are immunity and business we announced two quarters ago in earnings that these investments are big and they will impact profitability and that's okay with us because it's the right thing to do we want to make these investments will update at the next quarter so talk a little bit about you mentioned that a few advertisers have paused their spending as a result of this how big is that pause can you give us any color it's a few advertisers but what matters is not how big it is what matters is the questions they're asking so advertisers are people there people who use facebook so our investors and everyone wants to know the same thing which is argue protecting people's data i think the advertisers n people who use facebook also want to know that the good things will continue and those are really important as well with all that we know.

facebook chief architect two quarters
"chief architect" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That's specific case was shut down in two thousand fifteen but we didn't do until recently and what we're doing now is just take a broader view looking to be more restrictive in ways data could be misused we also didn't build our operations fast enough and that's on me we had ten thousand people working in security at the beginning of the year at the end of this year alone we will more than double to twenty thousand we are massively investing in smart technology and we're doing all of this to make sure that we get to a place where we can proactively protect people's data facebook has constructed a business model that leverages personal data that users share with facebook and you are the chief architect of that assuming the business model will evolve as a result of all these changes how will that impact the bottom line how will that impact profitability we've never run this company for short term gains and we've never run this company to maximize profits we run this company for the long term health are community and business we announced two quarters ago in that these investments are big and they will impact profitability and that's okay with us because it's the right thing to do we want to make these investments will update at the next quarter so talk a little bit about you mentioned that a few advertisers have paused their spending as a result of this how big is that pause can you give us any color it's a few advertisers but what matters is not how big it is what matters is the questions they're asking so advertisers are people there people who use facebook so our investors and everyone wants to know the same thing which is argue protecting people's data i think the advertisers n people who use facebook also want to know that the good things will continue and those are really important as well with all that we know.

facebook chief architect two quarters
"chief architect" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Million i feel deeply personally responsible because there are real mistakes that we made in that i made and i think when you take a step back and you think about what's happened here for a long time we were really focused on building social experiences and a lot of good happened because of those and when we found problems we would shut down that problem so the specific case of the friends offend sharing that happened with cambridge analytica that's specific case was shut down in two thousand fifteen but what we didn't do until recently and what we're doing now is just take a broader view looking to be more restrictive in ways data could be misused we also didn't build our operations fast enough and that's on me we had ten thousand people working in security at the beginning of the year at the end of this year alone we will more than double to twenty thousand we are massively investing in smart technology and we're doing all of this to make sure that we get get to a place where we can proactively protect people's data facebook has constructed a business model that leverages personal data that users share with facebook and you are the chief architect of that assuming the business model will evolve as a result of all these changes how will that impact the bottom line how will that impact profitability we've never run this company for short term gains and we've never run this company to maximize profits we run this company for the long term health of our community and business we announced two quarters ago in earnings that these investments are big and they will impact profitability and that's okay with us because it's the right thing to do we want to make these investments will update at the next quarter so talk a little bit about you mentioned that a few advertisers have paused their spending as a result of this how big is that pause can you give us any color it's a few advertisers but what matters is not how big is what matters is the questions they're asking so advertisers are people there people who.

facebook chief architect two quarters
"chief architect" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"This for the very long run marcus personally taken responsibility he said we didn't take a broader view of what our responsibility is that was a huge mistake was my mistake how much you feel personally responsible i feel deeply personally responsible because there are real mistakes that we made in that i made and i think when you take a step back and you think about what's happened here for a long time we were really focused on building social experiences and a lot of good happened because of those and when we found problems we would shut down that problem so the specific case of the friends offend sharing that happened with cambridge analytica that's specific case was shut down in two thousand fifteen but we didn't do until recently and what we're doing now is just take a broader view looking to be more restrictive in ways data could be used we also didn't build our operations fast enough and that's on me we had ten thousand people working in security at the beginning of the year at the end of this year alone we will more than double to twenty thousand we are massively investing in smart technology and we're doing all of this to make sure that we get to a place where we can proactively protect people's data facebook has constructed a business models that leverages personal data that users share with facebook and you are the chief architect of that assuming the business model will evolve as a result of all these changes how will that impact the bottom line how will that impact profitability we've never run this company for short term gains and we've never run this company to maximize profits run.

marcus facebook chief architect
"chief architect" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on WLOB

"And then trump has the nerve to say today that he was outraged that they didn't fund dacca i is everything upside down he's upset not that it was so such a big bill he's upset that they didn't give it i'm the lead to the illegal alien children what is going on here i woke up like i feel like i'm i'm in bribing dang it's like who's in the white house who's actually sitting there who's running the country this is the same administration that just put a warmonger into the national security adviser position the walrus mustache job a man who gave us the iraq war john bolt bolt the bush era war hawk who lied about what weapons of mass destruction is now the national security adviser how could this be trump ran on many many campaign promises one of which will not get involved in foreign wars do you remember that do you remember i was on here and i said i don't wanna see anymore die overseas i don't want to see the good men of america have to leave their families behind to go fight foreign wars and trump is not an interventionist he's a nationalist well now he's an interventionist they just hired the chief architect of intervention the walrus when i first met trump back at mar a lago there was bolton in the back circles circling around remember the ice cream summit that was at when he called me over the first time.

trump america chief architect lago iraq
"chief architect" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on The Changelog

"Two the restore have this conversation takes us because wanted sicle subject in your story is super coal but on the flip side give up his worst everything in through his journey in a you've got to love love your math skills mix in new friends bilisam cone attack it intially even say it's bleeding edge tack uh in in a lot of ways innovate but then you've also got in the meet people from the oculus team and i believe it is um admitted i says name from the oculus team asthma been instock yeah from oculus chief architect the chief architect demeaned that's a that's title and that person said hey a nice to meet a cool thing you should opensource it can he can a wind that out into the real start what was that like how did you get it how dare in fact the the real story is a bit more complicated guy always says so the real surrey is that i became obsessed with democratising vr and i was wondering what is the best way to do that and one of the things uh i toll was to create ethics carter and sitting of a company and i was like so i am sixteen i have no idea of oh lynch company so i cold emailed uh who summa amal which she is the cofounder of the feminazi which is a in investments showrooms in iraq which she's the eruption cuba and all white communitle and i just send the made saying hey i'm sixty in i've built my own giard at set with my best friends at my math teacher uh can we minutes.

chief architect carter cuba iraq
"chief architect" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"chief architect" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Nina caps the might even start to believe that this is up but it's not this is an apple facts first cnn okay so so cnn this is a really effective add just not for you i mean when you are the chief who is the chief architect of the banana factory uk say you're four apples there you're the one now let me just shell you immediately the parities were out because everybody thought the same thing so now there's an ad that looks just like the apple add if you will for cnn accepted just has the bathroom a you know international symbol of a man and this is what it says this is a man and some people might try to tell you it's a woman they might scream woman woman woman over and over and over again they might put woman in all caps they might even start to believe that this is a woman but it's not this is a man i do hello this thing is going to come and just pull it sounded like a black hole it's just going to collapse on itself and the gravity is just cut as suck everything down with it because.

Nina apple chief architect black hole cnn