35 Burst results for "Chickenpox"

Dr. Ryan Cole on Monkeypox and What It Means for All of Us

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Dr. Ryan Cole on Monkeypox and What It Means for All of Us

"Doctor Cole tell us, what is monkeypox? What is the threat that it poses to most Americans? Monkeypox is a orthopoxvirus. It's in it's an epox family camelpox cowpox, monkey pox, smallpox is the one people think of. So again, this is a fear campaign trying to make everybody afraid. They modeled this at the nuclear threat initiative, which has founded and co owned by the cofounder of Facebook. Just like they projected COVID with event two O one, monkeypox is we've known about it since 1958. There's two strains West Africa strain and a Central African strain. The West Africa strain is what circulating right now. If you don't engage in homosexual sex, your risk of monkeypox is about zero. So it spread at a rave in the Canary Islands off Portugal and some big raves in Europe. It's really the gay bisexual population that it's sticking to. It is not very transmissible. It is very treatable. There was actually a patient in Dallas that had it last year. We get outbreaks of monkeypox around the world every year. They're just scare mongering with it. And it's really staying in that gay homosexual bisexual population. And it's not aerosolized virus. Is this strange slightly different from earlier strains, the 2018 strain that went around, Singapore, Israel, UK. It has about 50 mutations, which was highly unusual. We know Wuhan was actually synthesizing monkeypox so they could come up with a test for monkeypox, the lab in Wuhan, ironically. But monkeypox is low risk. And this is the West Africa strain. This is the less deadly strain. The irony too is that it looks a lot like chickenpox and shingles, which obviously there are a lot of people getting chickenpox and shingles because of their immune suppression from their COVID

Monkeypox Doctor Cole West Africa Smallpox Canary Islands Portugal Facebook Wuhan Europe Dallas Singapore Israel UK Chickenpox
Dr. Peter McCullough: The Consequences of New Technology, Pfizer Shot

The Dan Bongino Show

01:11 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Peter McCullough: The Consequences of New Technology, Pfizer Shot

"Does any other vaccine we're talking to doctor Peter McCullough Is any other vaccine do that lead to long-term chromosomal changes that you're aware of Or is this new technology the first one to your knowledge It's new technology and that's the consequences of using new technology in a widespread vaccine program is these things are not can not be assessed ahead of time in enough preclinical studies Now the respiratory illness itself has been shown and particularly in severe cases where there's prolonged exposure to have some reverse transcription We don't know what the implications are When you get a natural viral infection some of it can incorporate it in your own DNA It's called the Herve region And you may know this because if you get chickenpox the virus doesn't install and later on in life you can get shingles which is the varicella zoster virus coming back out the same thing is true with Epstein Barr virus You get a permanent install But with a vaccine there's just under no circumstances what we want to see evidence of a permanent install particularly on production of a protein which is

Peter Mccullough Epstein Barr
The COVID Vaccine Causes Division, Not Immunity

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:29 min | 6 months ago

The COVID Vaccine Causes Division, Not Immunity

"A guy wrote a comment, I know I read comments on articles that I read. It's an insight into people's thinking. So a man wrote ah yes, just another article attaching division and hatred to the vaccine. Well done tribune, pat yourself on the back. That is that true. Nobody spreads hate like the left. Among all the vaccines I have known in my life the theory of tetanus measles chickenpox hepatitis meningitis tuberculosis fluid pneumonia. I've never seen a vaccine that forced people to wear a mask and maintain their social distance even after being fully vaccinated. Good what? I'm not done. Among all the vaccines, okay, I have never witnessed the vaccine that spreads the virus, even after vaccination. Even after three shots, I've never seen widespread rewards and incentives to get vaccinated. I never saw a demonization and discrimination against those who didn't want a vaccine. I've never seen a vaccine that threatens relationships between family, colleagues and friends. I've never seen a vaccine used to threaten livelihoods or school. I've never seen a vaccine that would allow a child to override parental consent. The current vaccine does all these things. Except immunization.

Tetanus Measles Chickenpox Hep
The Argument All Parents Can Use When Questioned About Vaccinating Their Children

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:30 min | 6 months ago

The Argument All Parents Can Use When Questioned About Vaccinating Their Children

"Again, it's unity project online dot com. If you're a mom, you're a dad, you're a parent and you're concerned and you're like, what can I do about these vaccine mandates? Well, they have resources right here from scientific papers to data analysis to ethical legal and social issues, they have a toolbox, which is really great. I'm just slipping the website right now. And all about supporting science, the conversation, quick links, online petition, to downloadable letter to schools to the parent non consent form to the downloadable flyer. A lot of stuff you guys put a lot of work into this. Congratulations on that. All right. Thank you. So you are the general counsel of this effort. So parents will say, all right, I'm all on board, but then I think I have my mind changed because the argument they always use is, well, you gave your kids the measles mumps rubella vaccine, didn't you? Which is rather an insult to anyone's intelligence. Every vaccine that's currently mandated, for instance, in the state of California. And it's the same kind of throughout the nation. Has had a minimum of a decade of study. Most of them have had at least 15 years before they were mandated. And those vaccines actually eradicated the underlying viruses, like polio, like measles, like mom's rubella, which we can not say about the COVID-19 vaccine, can we? We all know that it will not prevent infection or transmission. To even call it a vaccine by that virtue is nearly a joke. In addition to that, those underlying viruses with the other vaccines had actual significant risks for the entire population, especially the pediatric population, for instance, I think there was a 30% mortality rate with measles. 10% with chickenpox. I can go on. But what's very important is the fact that those other vaccines didn't pose the severe risk that we are finding are not in fact rare. That this particular vaccine is causing in children. We are not seeing the death that we saw. In fact, there's a report from who that shows that all of the vaccines combined throughout history throughout the world. Over the last I think it's from 1968, 53 years have had a million less deaths than just this past year from the COVID-19 vaccine. That should be astounding in a scientific world where if you have 50 deaths from any particular medical treatment, that product is

Measles Mumps Rubella Rubella Polio California Chickenpox Measles Covid
Omicron Variant May End Up Saving Lives, According to WSJ

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:30 min | 6 months ago

Omicron Variant May End Up Saving Lives, According to WSJ

"And from The Wall Street Journal, I'm a crime variant may end up saving lives. He said, should I try to catch the Akron variant of COVID to advance the cause of herd immunity? He says, the prudent response to a Macron might be to encourage vaccinated people and even unvaccinated young adults to catch it, while protecting the at risk population. Many people with ample and antibodies are catching this variant, but importantly, it's seldom leads to hospitalization or death. A crime takes live, so does the flu. If antibodies to the Akron variant are even 50% effective in reducing the risk of death and more lethal variants, those antibodies could save far more lives than the virus costs. Now, let me just say, we got attacked from every direction. When in the march of 2020, we said what is now considered mainstream mainstream in The Wall Street Journal. Remember, we said that all the young people should just go get sick and then go back to work. We got attacked like you wouldn't believe. In fact, we had this idea that the cruise ship industry should have been used for young people that wanted to get sick and get their own natural vaccine card and just create these cruise ships as self contained areas where if you want to get it, you can get it naturally like a chickenpox party or a measles party. We were maligned mocked from every direction. Now that's considered to be very thoughtful. And very new thinking in The Wall Street

Akron The Wall Street Journal FLU
CDC Changes Definition of Vaccine

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:19 min | 6 months ago

CDC Changes Definition of Vaccine

"So here is from the Miami Herald. Why did the CBC change its definition of vaccine? Did you know that? Yeah. CDC is utterly corrupt utterly. There's no question that so it will be recorded historically. Social media is calling bluff on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. I can't believe this is in the Miami Herald to be honest. For modifying its definition of the words vaccine and vaccination on its website, before the change, the definition of vaccination read the act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease. Now the word immunity has been switched to protection. Get the switch. The term vaccine also got to make over the CDC's definition changed from a product that stimulates a person's immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, which is why I read to you. From the Internet to the current, a preparation that is used to stimulate the body's immune response against diseases. Stimulate the body. So it doesn't confer immunity. They've changed it, as I said. When you get vaccinated against smallpox, is it too minimize the effects of smallpox? You get a little smallpox, a little measles, a little chickenpox, a little polio. That was at the toll to us? Or will we protect it from it? Were we better excuse me? Immune to it. As I said at the beginning, on The Crown may be a godsend. Maybe, I don't know. I never make or rarely make predictions, but it may be, it may be a godsend. Because it's for the vast majority of people that is not serious. And yet it will confer on them natural immunity. And yet, the lockdowns around the world are continuing.

Miami Herald CDC CBC Smallpox Chickenpox Polio
Get The Shot (MM #3858)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 9 months ago

Get The Shot (MM #3858)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason, I find it interesting how simple words can get appropriated to something else. When I say the phrase get the shot, you know, I'm going to talk about COVID-19, right? In this case, wrong. I'm actually thinking about shingles. Reason being I've reached the age of past the age where I should have gotten the shingles vaccine. So I've been talking to my doctor, I've been talking to my pharmacist has been trying to find out, do I really need to get the shingles vaccine? I've been doing a lot of research online. You see the commercial shore, but because I once got chickenpox and by the way, I had a severe case of chickenpox at 12. I've still got the scars even on my forehead to this day. I wonder if I need to get the vaccine. Now of course I have a history in my family with shingles. My father got it bad about ten 15 years ago, and has periodic flare ups. So I fear, if I don't get the shot, what am I going to do? I think about it all the time, and I've talked to the doctor and I think want to finally get the shingles vaccine. Of course, it's not just one shot, has to be two, two to 5 months apart. When you tell people to get the shot, we're not just talking about COVID anymore, especially when you reach a certain age. That's the rough part.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Chickenpox Nasa
Get The Shot (MM #3858)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 9 months ago

Get The Shot (MM #3858)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason, I find it interesting how simple words can get appropriated to something else. When I say the phrase get the shot, you know, I'm going to talk about COVID-19, right? In this case, wrong. I'm actually thinking about shingles. Reason being I've reached the age of past the age where I should have gotten the shingles vaccine. So I've been talking to my doctor, I've been talking to my pharmacist has been trying to find out, do I really need to get the shingles vaccine? I've been doing a lot of research online. You see the commercial shore, but because I once got chickenpox and by the way, I had a severe case of chickenpox at 12. I've still got the scars even on my forehead to this day. I wonder if I need to get the vaccine. Now of course I have a history in my family with shingles. My father got it bad about ten 15 years ago, and has periodic flare ups. So I fear, if I don't get the shot, what am I going to do? I think about it all the time, and I've talked to the doctor and I think want to finally get the shingles vaccine. Of course, it's not just one shot, has to be two, two to 5 months apart. When you tell people to get the shot, we're not just talking about COVID anymore, especially when you reach a certain age. That's the rough part.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Chickenpox Nasa
CDC Says the Delta Variant Is as Contagious as Chickenpox

AP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

CDC Says the Delta Variant Is as Contagious as Chickenpox

CDC: Delta as Contagious as Chickenpox

WSB programming

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

CDC: Delta as Contagious as Chickenpox

"Very Can spread like chickenpox. WSB Sabrina Cupid new document from the CDC here in Atlanta shows those who get infected with the Delta variant are more likely to have a severe case. It also says fully vaccinated people can spread the virus faster than previously thought. In fact, it can spread as easily as chicken pox are the common cold, while people who are vaccinated can in some cases still get infected. The vaccine does help prevent hospitalization and death. The CDC director,

Sabrina Cupid Chickenpox CDC Atlanta
CDC Calls Delta Variant as Contagious as Chickenpox

Word on the Street

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

CDC Calls Delta Variant as Contagious as Chickenpox

"Says the new delta variant can be passed on a lot easier than you might think more now from WSB Sabrina Cupid, the Delta area can spread as easily as chickenpox, or the common cold by vaccinated and unvaccinated people that, according to the CDC, so the viral load and breakthrough cases those are people who have been vaccinated but still get infected. The viral load is just as high as those who are unvaccinated CDC says. Breakthrough cases are not the norm, but they do happen. And vaccines do help prevent hospitalization and death. Coronavirus cases

Chickenpox CDC
Seattle-Area Health Officer Warns of Highly Transmissible Delta Variant

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Seattle-Area Health Officer Warns of Highly Transmissible Delta Variant

"Changed the course of the pandemic. That's the word from the health officer in the state's largest county commas. Ryan Harris has an update. King County Health officer, Dr Jeff Duchin says the virus has thrown us a real curveball, in part because he says, the delta variant now more than 78% of cases, genotype is on par with chickenpox for contagiousness costs. People infected with the delta variant produced 1000. Times more virus. It's much more contagious than earlier variants, which means that people get infected easier and faster and are more likely to spread the virus to other student says that includes a rare amount to breakthrough cases, which he says usually result in milder symptoms but can still make you highly contagious. Duchin says. New Case numbers of quadrupled, But the hospitalization and death rates remain stable and that along with King County's high vaccination rate, or why he believes the recommendation to mask up indoors. I mean, we don't yet need to consider going. Back to stronger restrictions, but he says it requires all of us to cooperate.

Dr Jeff Duchin Ryan Harris King County Chickenpox Duchin
CDC Warns That 'War Has Changed' With Variant Now Infecting Vaccinated People

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

CDC Warns That 'War Has Changed' With Variant Now Infecting Vaccinated People

"Highly infectious is the answer in internal documents from the C D. C documents obtained by The Washington Post appear to be talking points for the CDC to use and explaining the variance. Danger, including the line acknowledge of the war has changed. Note. The delta variant causes infections more contagious than the flu, small parks and Ebola and as infectious as chickenpox, the documents say. Since January, people who were infected after vaccination had made up an increasing portion of hospitalizations and in hospital deaths among those with Covid 19. While emphasizing the vaccines are still highly effective, and that breakthrough infections are uncommon. Soccer Megane Washington and we'll talk more about this in

The Washington Post CDC Ebola Chickenpox Covid FLU Soccer Washington
US Health Officials to Release New COVID-19 Data

WGN Programming

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

US Health Officials to Release New COVID-19 Data

"New data today showing that the delta variant is a more contagious version of the virus. The Washington Post reports. An internal document from the city. See warns the variant causes more severe infection. And can spread as easily as chickenpox. The CDC will use the data to explain the decision to recommend that vaccinated people wear masks. In some situations, The document says. The CDC knows it must change. Its messaging, and experts say it's not

The Washington Post Chickenpox CDC
"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

Your Grandparents Did What?

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

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Moms are <Speech_Female> burnt armchair <Speech_Female> expert <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> fight <Speech_Music_Female> mom <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> like total <SpeakerChange> vindication <Speech_Female> the second <Speech_Female> diagnose <Speech_Female> it in person <Speech_Female> but she's diagnosed <Speech_Female> it across the <Speech_Female> over the phone. <Speech_Female> This not even iphone <Speech_Female> days <Speech_Female> probably <Speech_Female> early on pilot <Speech_Female> or something <Speech_Female> so it wasn't like sending <Speech_Female> a <SpeakerChange> picture <Speech_Female> what it was <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> yeah. The <Speech_Female> theater worked <Speech_Female> in theory super <Speech_Female> contact with people. <Speech_Female> Can't like <Speech_Female> miss something <Speech_Female> so i had to go round <Speech_Female> and literally was like <Speech_Female> if anybody has <Speech_Female> not had chicken pox. <Speech_Female> You have to <Speech_Female> stay away from <Speech_Female> me. We touch <Speech_Female> yet less because <Speech_Female> everybody had <Speech_Female> it and it was like <SpeakerChange> fine. <Speech_Female> And i just <Speech_Female> will. You should pregnant. <Speech_Female> People need to be <Speech_Female> aware because they're more <Speech_Female> not around any pregnant <Speech_Female> people they <Speech_Female> life while i'm saying <Speech_Female> general. That's <Speech_Female> like something pregnant. <Speech_Female> People they become <Speech_Female> sick with shingles <Speech_Female> ritz. <Speech_Female> Forget what researchers <Speech_Female> reading this week but <Speech_Female> there are cases <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> When you're pregnant <Speech_Female> if you become <Speech_Female> sick with it your <Speech_Female> baby can get <Speech_Female> very. You know it can <Speech_Female> cause especially my third <Speech_Female> trimester. You can have <Speech_Female> like late term <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> miscarriages <Speech_Female> misano <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> guys <SpeakerChange> bring it <Speech_Female> right down <Laughter> as i saw a <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> recovery. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So i'm the person who had <Speech_Female> the least intense <Speech_Female> version <Speech_Female> but also <Speech_Female> at twenty five <Silence> had shingles <Speech_Female> like <Speech_Female> old person <Speech_Female> so you're <SpeakerChange> saying <Speech_Female> the nursing home. <Speech_Music_Female> <Laughter> <Laughter> <Speech_Female> That's so cool. <Speech_Female> Yeah and i <Speech_Female> did ask my mom as she <Speech_Female> remembered and she <Speech_Female> should remember. <Speech_Female> She's one of seven kids <Speech_Female> so she shared <Speech_Female> with two of her sisters <Speech_Female> and she's like <SpeakerChange> we <Speech_Female> got it at the same time <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> we touch a little bit <Speech_Female> about vaccines and stuff. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> she <SpeakerChange> was saying <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> her uncle <Speech_Female> hairy. Who's <Speech_Female> of the picture <Speech_Female> by front door. Fame <Speech_Female> from bellevue <Speech_Female> hospital. <Speech_Female> Also stricter of that. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> He was there <Speech_Female> he basically he <Speech_Female> gives them all the vaccines. <Speech_Female> She hated <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> him. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Dr <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> would come around. <Speech_Music_Female> They would run them <Speech_Female> like this was <Speech_Female> just trying to <SpeakerChange> his <Speech_Female> love. His children <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And a great <Speech_Female> great uncle. <Laughter> But <SpeakerChange> you've mixing <Laughter> than they were like <Laughter> the devil. <Laughter> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I mean to be honest. <Speech_Female> I would have acted this <Laughter> way. I mean i'm <Speech_Female> like that's why the nurses <Speech_Female> give those shots now. <Speech_Female> Yeah so <Speech_Female> exactly <Speech_Female> okay. <SpeakerChange> Wow <Speech_Female> i know learn some <Speech_Female> new things about each other <Speech_Music_Female> today shared <Speech_Music_Female> in imagine <Speech_Female> that <Silence> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Back

"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

Your Grandparents Did What?

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

"Yeah yeah those. My life is my trauma. Sounds really bad. I was like that's so sad. Music yeah and you imagine that. I mean three and a half so it's hor is as hostile away from anybody. He knew and his sister were separated and he had to wait there until his took apostles literally like his whole life was changing and then they took him calm. That were finished but at least you still had a sister. And then they separated them and then he went to a hospital. Probably was like doesn't have any concept with actually knowing him. No god that sounds so sad but yeah that was pretty much experience Sorry john i know that always happy i asked him. I really was about to go off the phone. I was like wait till very much. So yeah okay. Tell me about yours so okay so what. I call my mom to make sure that. I remember it correctly. The story First thing she said to me was she's like you're not gonna call me out. Are you so when i got chickenpox. I got chickenpox from my friend my one wanna make good friends kia who had chickenpox everywhere. She had them in her mouth. Her eyelids every possible place. You could have a chicken pox. Mom's like i'm never seen. Anyone have worship now. She had so. When i got chickenpox i only. I had very very few compact now. My mom thought. I had spider bites and set me to school. There was some debate about this. Mom's like i was in the summer Sure you send me to school during this time. Mean whatever am i guess. It was like. Don't people in texas go to school it somewhere in the summertime rate We're a little reviewed. We start in august in usually end in you guys start like it's like september june. Yeah no we rose. I graduated like may thirty first shot. But so she's the vehicle that whole time and then like she noticed that. I had under my armpits i had some and then she was like m- is probably not so ninety percent of people radio around texas elementary. Everybody in kindergarten msrp zero at harvard elementary school. Sorry.

texas ninety percent may september june august First john harvard elementary school three and a half first shot zero elementary thirty
"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

Your Grandparents Did What?

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

"Afterwards so this actually feel so sad for my mom so it was nineteen ninety one. I was five. That means my younger brother was three. My older brother was nine in. She was nine. Yeah i guess not youngest. David wasn't going to leave. Oversleep sleepover roller skating. Rinks but so. It was the week that they were getting their kitchen renovated and she was so. My mom was like so excited because she was like yay. I'm getting a new kitchen. And then she was excited to out like a week. You know she'd like all restaurants plan and your poor mom literally net. We never went. I have no memory of eating in restaurants. I mean every now and again my grandparents would take like a chinese buffet but basically it we have. The spaghetti warehouse loved it so much. I got like cigarette. Third graders and we're going to plug forgetting her. My mom is so excited the first night that we you know. They started a gutted. The kitchens she took all the pizza hut. We're eating pizza. And i said to her. Mom i have like an itchy pimple mac and she said she lifted my hair and your listeners. My mom's nurse pediatric nurse at the time so as soon as she saw it she said of course they would break on chickenpox and day day one of the renovation after they've already got it the kitchen so she like can we put this on hold guide so she basically like packed up the pizza and laugh because she knew that i i'm guessing definitely other people. I m sure. Ninety percent ninety percent infective rates in. We're at a frigging pizza. Hut nights restaurant were not children are eating and she was basically you know we all got it. She said i was covered from head to toe like hundreds and hundreds. Actually you can see her own right on my leg. Yes itemize temporary hitter Continuation of your eyebrows. Who is like the only one and My mom said i'd like amazing self control. I wouldn't scratch separate clearly this one. And so i asked her. Did you guys do the chicken pox party into stays in the opening my research watch. There's a simpson's episode where maggie. The baby gets chicken pox and they do chicken pox. Party and homer never had chicken pox so he was like quarantined in the house. He couldn't go near the baby And of course he ends up getting chicken pox and of course it's funny but anyway i asked her i said..

David three hundreds five Ninety percent nine ninety percent nineteen ninety one simpson first night Hut nights chinese Third graders one
"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

Your Grandparents Did What?

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

"Smallest of the specs which are Women might fancy looked as though a child had been packed with a bill of chickens. Some people think it came from the word guiquan which is all word for old english word for itching okay. Another theory is that the blisters appeared. Looked liked chick peas or similar to the size of a chickpea seat aren't upc's they were ps lagoon legumes. This is not a food. I have no fucking glue and during the period the word pox meant curse people. Leave the chicken pox. Pox was curse but chicken. Pox was brought down on children with quote black magic. It's like a pox upon. You've ever heard like something like that. No shakespeare never like okay. Never read a shakespeare played. High-school probably was forced to busy like staring a boy or something writing. No just like just sort of like a bad thing happening to which was like why smallpox these diseases have that. It's this blade upon you. So then going into separating smallpox chickenpox we are not even getting there until the fifteen hundred really so the first inkling that smallpox and chicken pox were caused by completely different viruses. Came from the italian physician giovanni filippo zia garcia. Here's a little picture of him. No beard and he was aka the sicilian sicilian hippocrates. Like that me too. He's like eventually wrestling.

giovanni filippo zia garcia fifteen hundred sicilian english italian first inkling hippocrates ps lagoon
"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

Your Grandparents Did What?

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

"I'm like oh my driving too long fit melba steering wheel like to low and i was like i can't drive. Gotta go back home again today. I had like the senate of. I'm stuck in my car. Meanwhile the shingles max or them have. There's ellas over here in generation yet. Here's later surprise. Surprise me as yeah so shingles can occur at any age is usually like. It's usually a old people in like the stereotypical you know what people think but you can get it at any age. His most common people over sixty 'cause your immune system gets a little bit weekend and them. Yeah all those little sayings hiding in your body curse you can get shingles more than once that most people will get at once And there's not one million cases of shingles in the united states each year and there's a shingles vaccine yes. There is a shingles vaccine which didn't go into yet. Because it's not it's not people podcasts. Yeah i mean. I guess we will get that vaccine when we're sixty five plus isn't it just like no is there. An ammonia went to yet that nouveax. But that's what you get old people to. yeah trying to google. i am shingu. Rex is that this shingles next. That's that's what they called it. Oh i thought you just misspelled shingle. Who is in charge of nizhny bricks. Listen to people who come up with these names are is wild. So they could've done better. Yes sheen greeks he ain't gonna get shingles sounds like summa like a version of bedbugs. You would get in my house. Who escaped he has the s See i mean that's kind of like extremely bare bones of it. I didn't go really into much more detail. Because i really just wanna get to your part about it okay. So yeah that's kinda what chickenpox is. I am excited to learn now. What happened why. I in here in the first place. I'd do it.

today each year united states over sixty more than once google first place one million cases sixty five plus
"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

Your Grandparents Did What?

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

"I don't know. I mean if you traveled. I guess you gotta travel on the rotavirus that like weird green who causing drinking wa And there's inter nasal version of influence said like the flu mez. Yes they recommend like people who are immunocompromised. Not get that one Because that so here's a question you just have. Nineteen seventy five They came around in the early nineteen seventies. So that's when it was invented in japan. The chicken pox vaccine but there was not the chickenpox vaccine in the united states for twenty years Yes are you bet to tell you. I love it. So there was an american vaccine knowledge. Knowledge-based vaccine allergist say properly his name marris maurice helmet. He invented the chicken pox vaccine in the united states because he basically took this oak strain in compared to the strains that we're seeing here in the united states in created our own there acela chickenpox vaccine which became commercially available in the united states in nineteen eighty-four so a long time. I mean we but that wasn't available when we were kids now. As i was like why i wanted to know why it happened so i did go searching a little bit so i did find in new york times. Article called after long. Debate vaccine for chicken pox approved. This was in nineteen ninety-five yes. There was a big debate about it so it wasn't until nineteen ninety five that the american academy of pediatric said it would soon recommend the vaccine for all children and adolescence who have not had the disease so that such a crazy long gap yup and it wasn't until nineteen ninety-six that it became routine part of like the routine immunization You know part of the standard for children between twelve and eighteen months was the still we do today. in this in the recommendation was debated because of there was lots of controversy. Is like of course like with well. That's also the height that's like right when all of the antibac- stuff was really like yes. Very rabbit correct. Yes okay and the main focus was everybody's argument was will. Why should we prevent something. That is not that toxic. Like kids aren't dying from it. Like i got it..

twenty years japan new york early nineteen seventies united states today eighteen months nineteen eighty-four seventy five american nineteen ninety-six twelve one nineteen ninety-five Nineteen maurice nineteen ninety
"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

Your Grandparents Did What?

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on Your Grandparents Did What?

"What is valentine's.

"chickenpox" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"They're changing the definition and arguing that it never was like that before now. It says herd immunity also known as population immunity. Which for is a concept used for vaccination in which a population can be protected from certain virus f a threshold. Vaccinations reached now right even there. You could argue. Maybe they're still. They wanted to vaccination focused but no they had to go out and save point blank. Her new knees achieved by protecting people from virus. Not exposing them to it. That goes against everything we've ever known including by the way it's stated everywhere still. That's not the case. Here's something about chickenpox from med line plus is as very clearly from route chickenpox. You have immunity. If you've had chickenpox before or have had a chickenpox vaccine so is that fake news no it's because that is the facts that they are just trying to rewrite right now in real time if you have immunity it means you can't get chickenpox exactly which is exactly how i have got chicken pox again because i had it when i was a kid. Never got a vaccine for it. Never got it again despite being around kids the did because i have immunity to it. That's how it works. Here is an interesting article about just that point. Did you just admit that. He lied about her immunity to trick americans into vaccine now. The headline might be a little bit deceiving to some people. Because it's actually the opposite the way you think but doesn't change the fact that he lied about this. He lied because this is called lying for your truth. That is if you believe. He thinks he's being honest. Like if he like the point being that if his truth is actually something he believes is true or he's lying. Just lie right. The point the point the difference between just straight up lying and lying for your truth is that you believe you're doing a good thing by lying for your truth. You believe that that truth is actually what needs to happen. So lying forward is still a means to an end to do a good thing. That's just that's ridiculous argument. You're still being dishonest. You're still lying. That's what i argue. That happens with people that are in. You know one side of the two party illusion as they're willing to lie about it as long as they get you looking. What they think is true. That stupid so here is cheap doing just that whether he's just lying i drew. He's lying to you. It says an issue is the percentage of the population which must require resistance to the coronavirus through infection or vaccination in order for the disease to disappear now early into the pandemic. He repeatedly claimed sixty to seventy percent herd immunity which we all remember and now is required achieve herd immunity now beginning around a month ago. Vouch estimated started suddenly seventy seventy five percent more recently seventy eighty five percent now when asked about it voucher essentially said he lied for political purposes due to vaccine skeptics. He's that this is his statement in a telephone interview the next day. Dr fauci acknowledged that he had slowly but deliberately been moving the goalposts. He's doing so..

chickenpox Dr fauci
"chickenpox" Discussed on Beat Infertility

Beat Infertility

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on Beat Infertility

"Am so excited about yes. I mean it's fantastic and awesome. It's actually been a while since we recorded a Up so we did quite a few of them actually in the spring but do we know anything new how cove it might impact a pregnancy or a fetus. Has a really good questions so obviously we still have finding that. There is no evidence of birth defects which is fantastic. Has certainly we know other viruses being lazy. The when we think about. But you know there's verret sela chickenpox or rubella which is part of that.

chickenpox
Hope for Herpes Cure

The Naked Scientists

05:24 min | 2 years ago

Hope for Herpes Cure

"Nearly two thirds of us are infected with herpes simplex virus. So viruses, this week isn't an herpes causes cold sores causes genital disease, and it can also even occasionally caused Brian Infections. The virus is real headache to treat because the infection is lifelong. This is because it hides existing just as a piece of DNA inside nerve cells, it periodically reawakens to produce painful infectious skin blisters, nola drugs that can. Control these flare ups when they happen they can't remove the viral DNA. So the problem keeps on coming back now researchers in the US developed a pair of selective molecular scissors the contract down the rogue viral. DNA inside nerve cells and chop it up destroying the virus. So at least in experimental mice, it doesn't come back. Keith Jerem herpes is really sneaky that it actually established as a form of itself. That essentially goes into cells and then falls asleep and that virus lives in the neurons nerve cells in your body, and they can come once a year once a month once a week and cause lesions ulcers than anything else and all those strikes. We him don't do anything about that sleeping form of the virus. So effectively under the immune Radovan all the time it's dormant inside cells like that the immune system can't see it. So it just gets ignored. That's exactly right. The immune system controls at once it wakes up and starts making more copies of itself and they take care of those new copies but they even the noon system doesn't do anything about that long-term sleeping form of the virus said, what can you do about it? Well we've been using this really cool technology that's been around for over a decade. Now called gene editing despite has made a DNA just like our body is and that sleeping form is actually a little tiny circle of this DNA that lives in the nerve cells and what gene editing allows us to do is basically use I think of molecular scissors that can go into a cell and they can look through all. The DNA. In that cell and look for a very specific little stretch of the letters, and if they find those letters, they make a little cut and so what we do is designed very special scissors that ignore all of our own DNA, all the human DNA but they look really hard for herpes and if they find it, then it to little cuts and so it basically falls apart and makes it go away. And this works does it you can actually demonstrate that serve you chop up the virus then canola comeback yeah, exactly. So the study that we did was in mice mice get this sleeping form of the herpes just like we do and then we can go in and we use a a something. We call a vector, a different virus that carries these scissors to those same neurons and when it does that it starts cutting up the virus and then we can measure after. Our therapy how much of that sleeping form is actually left in the mice treated and what we saw as we eliminated well over ninety percent of that virus, and if we could translate that into human beings is likely to prevent lesions in Alzheimer's disease transmission to other people and all the things that we actually worry about how did you get the virus that was the Trojan horse that carried in the molecular scissors? How did you get that into the nerve cells in these animals? Well. That was a really important part of our study is understanding the best way to get the scissors where they need to be. We used another virus added. Associated Virus. Almost, all have it never causes any disease. We basically changed that to carry these scissors for us just injected into the bloodstream, and once it's in the blood, it actually goes in and actually find those nerve cells and introduces the scissors. It sounds like the woman who swallowed a fly and then swallowed spider to eat the flying, and we all know how that story ends because you're basically giving someone a virus to treat viruses this safe. This particular virus specter that was used called ADN. Associated Virus is probably the leading factor that's being used for many many types of gene therapy now, and there's several approved products out there in the EU and the United States that use adn associated virus or av to deliver different types of gene therapy, and so we're taking something that's quite proven to be safe modifying it slightly for our needs and then using it to try to cure an infection where we've simply not had any hope for cure in the past. You've been looking at herpes simplex virus. This causes cold sores and it also causes genital disease. But this is one member of a big family viruses that'll will work in a similar sort of way things like visa, the Vars, chickenpox and shingles in people unlucky enough to have that. Do you think you could prevent a person from succumbing to shingles by the same technique? The shingles virus actually goes into very similar nerve cells and acts a lot like herpes simplex, and so we can actually think about using the same therapy for that viruses. Well, we're also very actively looking at viruses that are similar but not herpes viruses in particular hepatitis B., and we have some really exciting results there where we can do very similar things. We're likely to see success there and maybe another viruses as well.

Herpes Genital Disease United States Brian Infections Keith Jerem Alzheimer's Disease EU Vars
U.S. plans massive coronavirus vaccine testing effort to meet year-end deadline

Science Vs

11:15 min | 2 years ago

U.S. plans massive coronavirus vaccine testing effort to meet year-end deadline

"Tastes have been on the hunt for something that could shut this virus down and give us our lives back. A vaccine. A few months ago, there was a lot of excitement. As the very first clinical trials for the coronavirus began, it was in time. The search for coronavirus vaccine has become one of the fastest moving in history. That scenes usually take years not months to produce. This is happening warp speed. Never before hundreds of scientists are over the world and focused on the same thing at the same time creating a vaccine for covid nineteen. And more and more vaccine candidates are entering the fray. Were at the point, where around a dozen clinical trials are on the go. Hundreds of people volunteered for jab in the arm to test old kinds of different vaccines. As part of this scientists are taking some be gambles. The vaccine were looking at is incredibly modern type vaccine. It's not the traditional way building a vaccine, so we're going as fast as humanly possible. Many of them are not traditionally vaccine companies. They are using novel ideas from oncology things. They've learned treating cancer. It's never been used in a vaccine before. And if one of these gambles payoff, it could be huge, we could get a vaccine soon. The US government says that the goal is to get a vaccine to Americans by January twenty twenty one. They're calling this nation warp speed. And if it could be done, this would be unprecedented. So could we really be celebrating twenty one with Champagne and shot in the arm to fight the coronavirus? And? What would it take to make that happen? That's Today on the show. Because when it comes to getting a vaccine, it feels like this is happening at warp speed, but then there's. Science. Scientist is when on Earth Are we getting? This vaccine is coming up to stop to the break. This episode of science versus is sponsored by Phillips Sonacare the electric toothbrush that combines decades of science and engineering to master the art of brushing with sixty two thousand brushstrokes minute you've got a month's worth of brushing in just two minutes for better checkups, guaranteed or your money back visit Phillips. Dot Com slash sonacare. This episode of science versus is brought to you by AFLAC. That lovable duct does more than just say. AFLAC access a safety net when the unexpected happens by helping with the expenses. That health insurance doesn't cover. Get to know them at half dot com. Welcome back. So back in January. We had from people like Anthony Fauci that we could get a vaccine in twelve to eighteen months. That could mean early next year. And in the land of vaccines, these would be record breaking. It often takes something like ten years for a vaccine to from the lab to the doctor's office. So can we really do it? Get Out of this pandemic by January, before Santa even catches these brands. Well to get them labs. All around the world s around experimenting with different kinds of vaccines. But they all have the same goal to train our immune system to recognize and killed this coronavirus. And to do that, many vaccine developers have homed in on one thing. Progress. And northwestern told us all about it. If you think about the picture that you've seen corona virus like everywhere, and it looks like a ball with little points coming out. Those points the spike. Spike protein you know it, I, know it. It's the most famous spikes in Spike Lee and the most famous protein since. College Eddie right. This spike is so important because it's a major thing that tells our body weight this virus. It doesn't belong here. That actually is what argue system fees most readily. It sees the spike. After our meeting system sees the spike. It lends to recognize quickly. Respond to it by creating things like antibodies to fight it, and then some of those antibodies hang around so that if the virus shows up, then the virus will just be cleared away by our immune system. So that the next time we see that disease, we don't get sick in the first place, so if you making Exane, how do you get your immune system to quickly recognized this spike? Well, one way is that scientists can take rhinovirus and then make less dangerous. Say They Kill the virus most comedy vaccines are made by growing up the virus. And inactivating that virus sometimes with the chemical, sometimes the heat, and then that is then injected. An otherwise scientists can do this version of the virus. That's too weak to make you sick. And this is how we make a lot of vaccines familiar with things like the measles and chickenpox and flu vaccines. It's tried and tested. We know it can work and some companies are going this way to try to make Alka, rhinovirus vaccine. But other groups at. This meat and potatoes vaccine method they using new attack more experimental ways of building vaccine. And these experimental methods getting a ton of attention and funding right now, because governments and big. Pharma hoping they'll deliver the goods pasta. So for they use instead of giving you a whole coronavirus, these vaccines, basically using genetic material from the coronavirus, and then they're plopping that into your body. And scientists have chosen a very particular piece of genetic material spike. It's the recipe for the spike, protein. And this can come in a couple of forms. One is called. Our body will see that as a normal M Arnie and just translate into a pro team. Wow, so this. If this vaccine works, it would encourage your body to make little corona virus proteins. Yes that's that's the idea. Wow, that seems so futuristic. As as is, that's really cool right, so you're getting the body degenerate that protein for you yet, so these spike proteins that your body has made will then be floating around and the idea. Is that your immune system? We'll see it. Make antibodies send Ta. You'll have immunity. And many of the vaccines in this race, delivering this genetic material to us in different ways, so some shopping Marin into a ball of fat, so that your cells will slip up while other groups trying to smuggle in that code using get this a totally different virus one. That weren't hurt you. Is it fantasy that they've taken a different virus? And then they're like like Halloween the dressing at all like the corona virus, yes. Say. So this all sounds a little bunk is mad. The question is will it really work that is. Will these vaccines protectiveness if we get exposed to the coronavirus? Because if they don't. Like on a useless. My boss is to stay if it's just dishwater that you're not gonNA get anywhere. This is Katie Stevenson. She's a doctor working on vaccine development at Harvard and she says that one of the key ways will know if a vaccine is working is if it makes you produce antibodies. And she's looking for not just any antibodies. But neutralizing antibodies, what what is a neutralizing antibodies? So a neutralizing antibody is an antibody that binds to virus and neutralizes it. This is the dream right? Yeah, exactly right inches binds to the virus and prevent it from entering a cell. So the body sees that and just thrown in the garbage to this is what Katie is going to be looking for. In the results of all these clinical trials, and if she doesn't see these neutralizing antibodies, shelby thinking well, that was kind of done. And Katie says I dealing see a lot of these. So! What's a lot? Well you measure milk leases. Okay so I've measure milk. And you can measure antibodies titus. So one study, which looked at people who had been infected with this virus, and then recovered found the antibody. Titus tended to be at least one hundred. And when Katie's colleague vaccinated monkeys with an experimental vaccine, they found that having similar antibody Tom of one hundred protected them from getting infected. So while we're still learning a lot, he all I have been kind of looking for one one hundred. Okay, that's it's nice, poetic, great one hundred yeah! We have a handful of results that companies have released from different clinical trials, but just one paper that's published in a peer review gentle. It was from a Chinese local company who injected more than one hundred people with one of those new fandango vaccines and it was back in March. They tested three different doses. And Katie says they didn't get. This antibody tighter. Like at the highest dose averaged around Bootie for you know I was a little bit disappointed, so a little bit reserved I'm happy that it elicited an immune response because that's not a given. Sometimes, it's just zero zero zero but I would've liked to see something closer to like one hundred another company. Medina injected forty five people back in March with the vaccine, and they said that eight people had good levels of neutralizing antibodies. But they didn't tell us about the opposite in the trial. When we asked dinner about this, we didn't hear back to Katie is holding out for more info. Yeah, I just wanted to see the rest because it is immune. A- promising I'd put promising right on there. But I do not know which one of these is GonNa work if any, and that that is the actual fact truth so I try not to stray from that, and there are other FAC truths to nail down him. Even if these vaccines do make you produce produces, antibodies will still have to make absolutely short that you'll protected from the corona virus. If you do get exposed, and then if you protected, we'll have to work out how long four so you might need. More than one shot of the vaccine say a booster shot in a or so.

Katie Stevenson Scientist Spike Lee Aflac United States Anthony Fauci Phillips Sonacare Marin Champagne Chickenpox Santa Alka Medina Phillips Exane Arnie
Coronavirus can live in air for 3 hours, study finds

Sean Hannity

01:48 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus can live in air for 3 hours, study finds

"About the latest information that's out there about how long the corona virus stays alive and I quoted that number of three hours airboard and I want to supplement that comment that was the result of the study that was done by Princeton University and UCLA and posted by the national institutes for health not everyone believes that that is correct and that is not a peer reviewed study I have right now on the side of marketwatch dot com is the coronavirus airborne like measles the answer now that they're getting is the jury is out as of Thursday today it did not appear to be an airborne virus like say measles or chickenpox and according here Luiz S. drops the professor and vice chairman of internal medicine at McGovern medical school in Houston Texas it's a virus that travels in droplets this is very good news with an airborne virus one person can infect the whole room now for the bad news airborne transmission is plausible according to a study and that's the one that's been out there for several days posted that this week from scientists at Princeton University the university of California Los Angeles the LA and the national institutes of health and with the idea to put this on its website this is what led people to believe that it is their board that research concluded the virus could remain airborne for up to three hours post Ariel as they should so in other words I don't think we know for certain although many people believe that it's droplets only meeting that there has to be an actual physical form of the virus out there dropping in landing on something others are saying that it is plausible that it could be airport in terms of the high rate of infection it clearly is one that is rather easily

Princeton University Ucla Luiz S. Professor Vice Chairman Mcgovern Medical School Texas Ariel Houston University Of California Los A LA
Donald Trump: New York Times, El Paso Times article on Clint facility 'big media con job'

Anderson Cooper 360

03:40 min | 3 years ago

Donald Trump: New York Times, El Paso Times article on Clint facility 'big media con job'

"The president's claim of the migrants in custody on the border quote living far better now than where they came from he said that despite reporting including by the department of homeland security's own inspector general about how awful those conditions have been now in the face of new reporting by the new york times in el paso times on the clinton facility near el paso texas he's tweeting again and i'm quoting now the fake news media media in particular the failing new york times is writing phony and exaggerated exaggerated accounts at the border detention centers first of all people should not be entering our country illegally only for us to then have to care for them you continues we shouldn't be allowed to focus on united states citizens first border patrol and others law enforcement i'm doing a great job now in a moment from the top administration officials those conditions have greatly improved in just the last few weeks but keep in mind if the president he's not saying that he says he cancer phony or exaggerated given all the reporting on clinton other detention centers it's hard to see how that could be so the times is reporting is based on accounts of current and former border agents and supervisors and include sworn statements by those who spent time at clint quoting now outbreaks some scabies shingles and chickenpox were spreading among the hundreds of children were being held in cramped cells agents said the stench the children's derby clothing were so strong it spreads and he agents own clothing people in town would scrunched their noses when they left work goes on the top of the time saying the children cried constantly one girl seemed likely enough to try to kill herself agents made her sleep on a cod in front of them so they could watcher as they were processing new arrivals there ford alleges a customs and border protection leadership quote new four months that some children had no beds just sleep on clean themselves and sometimes when hungry and if clint where they only facility in question it would be troubling enough but according to a new report in this one from the department of homeland security's securities inspector general it's not and i'm quoting from the inspector general's report most single adults had not had a shower in see bp custody despite several being held for as long as they month at some facilities border patrol is giving detainees wet wipes to maintain personal hygiene again the president's saying this is fake news or exaggerated to their credit his senior officials are not they're not saying that exactly without explicitly confirming the cancer now saying that there were problems challenges they call them but they're now in the past is he acting dhs secretary over the weekend on june first minute twentyfive hunter children in our custody twelve hundred had been with us over three days now we have the supplemental from congress hhs has additional beds we only have three hundred and fifty as of yesterday afternoon's report and only twenty of those children had been with us more than three days of short as it should be pointing out these facilities were never intended for children in the first place in any number of for any length of time that's where the numbers themselves we can only take they acting secretary on faith and giving all the reporting over the last several months from so many different sources including the government itself it's a heavy lift especially given the win seen as nick valencia was allowed into the clinton facility late last month it was a sham cbp official first hand knowledge telling cnn and i'm quoting the agency prep for you guys adding quote it's a never ending cat and mouse game even all that the burden of proof what seemed to be on the administration but so far they've chosen to make it as difficult as possible to get a look at what really happening inside these facilities respecting now from kansas which nellie the new acting director of usa citizenship and immigration services i spoke to him earlier this evening acting director could you wanna talk about these facilities that we've been hearing so much about if did operators at the clinton facility the new york times

President Trump Three Days Four Months
"chickenpox" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Is exactly what they are. They are concentration camps. If that doesn't bother you. I don't. I like we can have whatever I'm gonna come to the people that are concerned enough with humanity to say that we should not that never again something. So she basically, is doubling down because she received a lot of flak for her comments. But she made sure that she made that little video, and she's all casual and she's, you know, every other word is, like, which I do too. But the problem is that when you use these terms that are synonymous with Nazi Germany, the concentration the holocaust. Yes, people are concerned about the conditions at these camps, but using this terminology to describe what's going on right now. They're not trying to Aratu Kate the Central American immigrants. They're not trying to route. We're not trying to Aratu Kate. This is not genocide that we're trying to commit here in the United States. That's the difference between concentration camp on what's going on here. Now are these camps? Just I'm eat, frankly. I think that they're pretty awful. But let's, let's be realistic here. Let's not try to use something coop. Something that she knows we'll get attention just because of the fact, if you believe that is such a salient thing, many people if you believe that they are correct in seeking asylum, then you would refer to it as a refugee camp as exists all over the world. Of course you have the children being pulled away from their parents. That whole aspect of it, which is, you know, puts the whole it's just a migrant waiting area into a whole different class. It's a story doesn't quantify it as a concentrate. Ration- camp. A concentration camp is where they deprive you of food of medicine of water where for instance, we have what about thirteen thousand now who detained at the border five thousand two hundred who have been diagnosed as having mumps, chicken pox, allowing them to die from chickenpox. No with treating them they have exercise recreation. They have good food. Is that concentration? It's not a summer camp as the Trump administration, which kids being sound, exactly. No, it's not. And let's, let's be realistic about that. But there are you can see what he's doing when he says that if he's playing off the people who think that these people are just they're nothing. They made the choice themselves to put them in the situation to put their children in this situation, which is arguably. True. But why are they escaping what they're escaping? And do we have humanity? Do we have? Incineration in central Italy call, what we're doing to those who coming into the country illegally seeking asylum. A concentration. There are some Jewish groups, actually, some liberal, Jewish groups that say and some of her supporters that say, look, you're distracting from these clear facts with manufactured outrage subverting, Jewish history, wasn't even the Germans, who created concentration camps. The British Winston Churchill, you'll beloved Churchill in the ball war in South Africa, who rounded up the women, the men, the children, separated them, and deprive them of food, water and medical care. And those are the first ever concentration camps. You're British you beloved British, yes. So Winston Churchill and the.

Aratu Kate Winston Churchill Germany United States Italy mumps South Africa
"chickenpox" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

11:08 min | 3 years ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"On the JV program. Thirty four after the hour. I'm Steffan general horns, lovable, Terry. Keelan lovable care she'll in lovable, and I know all the people who are hanging around with this just as loveable so thanks for being here. Paying attention to what Victoria has undermined moment. Billy Bush is in the news. This is the first time in three years that he's actually been in the news for a good reason he has gotten hired and he will now host. This is first job since the whole scandal on the access Hollywood bus. Yeah. Which a lot of people said that the access Hollywood BUSTER over right over Billy Trump, obviously. But you know, Billy Bush lost his entire Kibo. Who did a lot of things worse than him that survive from it? I never did quite understand that old. Banning. So so three years later second. I wanna make sure that we acknowledged CARA has told us that so far today we started about three stories and we've never finish them. We have a new start every minute is a new start. Right. So anyway, so Billy Bush knew gig will be as the host of extra extra. It is an updated version of the current syndicated entertainment show extra which is hosted by Mario Lopez. Now, the rumors are that that Mario Lopez will be moving to access Hollywood to replace Natalie Morales. That's not official yet. But that is what that's that's been the rumor for a while produced by the same outfitters, the different all Warner Brothers. So I would say yes about I think they're so many. I don't know. I don't watch any of them. But they're you know, if you're in a doctorate. They all act like they're best buddies with whoever their interview. Oh, it's so lovely. Even know who those people are. Well, Mario Lopez. Yeah. Lopez is around what are you doing here Kim Kardashian? Why should I be? Oh, yeah. Woman. What's your problem? Right. So Billy Bush is he's forty seven in the last three years. He has had a lot of obviously had his career ended pretty much, and then his wife filed for divorce, and so he's had a lot of people in his personal life as well. So extra extra will take in-depth looks at topics ranging from pop culture to politics and. This. In the summer. Why is wife divorce him? I have a job. I'm sure it's a lot more complicated than that. I don't know they have three daughters together. So I don't know. Turgeau into a party. Hollywood directors walked in with him. I didn't never seen it before. And we sorta stuck together with the whole night. And we went over to the bar, and he said you wanna drink. I said, no, thanks. But then he started making he was a bartender at some point in his life. And he was buying the bar. Everybody walked up to him and acknowledged to ABC makes me this Millie. And he's in the nephew of George W how is he related to the Bush family is he a cousin of George W he's in. Few. But I think it's a couple away from George W is it, okay? Speaking of stars in the political families of the world. There was a pretty uncomfortable interview between Seth Meyers who can't seem to get out of. He's was to be just like Stephen Colbert when he grows up apparently can't seem to stay away from the dump Trump stuff and he interviewed Megan McCain when they were talking about what's her. I can never pronounce Omar wasn't first name Ilan. Omarosa. No. Alon, Omar, right. Exactly, she slammed her pretty hard and Myers slammed. Her pretty are. They were both pretty uncomfortable stuff, which I don't think is the main reason, but seems to me that she didn't know they were going to talk about politics. And then Seth Meyers brought it up. And so then she slammed in. Yeah. It was kind of I don't know comfortable stuff. Yeah. This. Late night comedy comics are now doing politics. That's Stephen Colbert is like the whistles on people's presidential tours. It's it's not it's not the days of Johnny Carson. That's for sure. No, isn't voided politics at all cost. Right. Yeah. No matter what the feds apparently had a big day in the cocaine world to see this, Victoria. They've been trying for a year big bus somewhere in was it, New York or jersey knows in New York. Yeah. Three million dollars worth of cocaine nineteen people arrested cocaine is back in a big way. It's it's all over nightclubs. Again. It's like the eighties all over in in LA in New York. It's kind of crazy not never was my seen ever. But it's crazy that it's it's back. And it's and it's a it's a very like young kid like college and early twenties is this stuff expensive money. Money. No idea how much cocaine. I have no idea. You wonder about how expensive it is? Probably expensive people have jobs or. Ellen's known as a rich kid drug. Yeah. I think so. Yeah. Yeah. I would say my son would tend to that a lot of people that he treated as a drug counselor were addicted to cocaine I started off with the stuff that's lighter and more easily found and then graduate speaking, here's a Kentucky teenager named Jerome Kunkle made headlines suing the health department of his town over there vaccination policy, and it seems that he's now come down with chicken pox. I don't know. I'm laughing. Dive into chickenpox for the most not in our country, but he has deeply held religious beliefs. He says and from the family's perspective they recognize that they ran the risk of getting sick. And they were okay. Matter-of-fact concl- sued the northern Kentucky health department after it ruled at all students who had been in his school Edmund vaccinated against chicken pox, couldn't come to class unless they got the shots. But there were thirty two confirmed cases of it at the time. And anyway, Mr. cocoa said he didn't believe that that vaccine was the only one they were trying to push as so the judge. They went to court the judge ruled against the family favor of the health department. And so they're in the midst of appealing it. Meanwhile, the kid gets chickenpox. That's if I were to ask Dr Ken about that he'd say, well, you know, it's better to get the vaccine once you have the chickenpox though, you don't get like the get it again. Chicken box. Yeah. Yeah. Because the first time that I had it was was very mild. And then a couple years later, I got it again. And the second time was bad. I've never heard of anybody. I had it's it's a branch of Epstein Barr mono and all that other stuff comes from shingles. It's all the same thing. And I had it once in. Well, actually now, you think that you made me think about this. I got Epstein Barr and mono in nineteen eighty eight. And then I got the shingles about twelve years later. Of the fun way. I did not. In fact, I got I got being very sick on a on a trip that I lead of Americans classical music tour that I took and I was no it was not it was a great the kissing on a classical music tour. I did. The person that I was kissing didn't have it didn't come from her until you came along. All right enough that kissing department is see the let's go to Los Angeles for the seizure of those guns. Jennifer that and all that s- amunition. Yeah. Guns in this guy's garage. What? And the and what's really weird is that just happened this week? And then last week in Burbank, which is where all the studios are. It's a pretty nice area. It is found in a million. I think the home was million five, you know, expensive, home or two five. Five. Yeah. Yeah. I cannot let forge eleven Burbank. You can't even get a two bedroom for less than eight hundred thousand it's ridiculous. But anyway. So Burg was the scene of a huge drug bust. There was a report of someone leaving their door open and the dog like their dog ran out and says someone in the neighborhood called the police the police showed up and they couldn't find anybody at home. And when they went through the house, they found it was his huge grow operation for illegal marijuana. They were also making oils and stuff like that hemp oil. So they shut that down. So to like one every week of these big huge scale busts for weapons and drugs and all sorts of stuff going on around five rifles to this day. See the pictures. Yeah. Never know who's living next door to even when in Beverly Hills of all the other side of it is how does one person get all these guns? You can't buy them legally. You can't. Yeah. They're legally selling them to. Yeah. And that's apparently the neighbors. I guess tipped off the cops saying that they were that the person who owns the house. It's a woman she and there were three SUV's in the driveway that are registered to her. But they haven't seen her in years. So I don't know what's going on there. So we don't know if someone was squatting in the house, or if they were just renting the house, but it's it's a lot of weapons that TV show Ellen barkin is in. She's a murdering robbing mother sends her kids out to do jobs that set show call someone cable. Sure carries founded by now if she hasn't show find it by the time we come back fifteen before the hour. Blue star Medicated ointment gets five star reviews from our loyal users for fast relief of the pain of almost any skin irritation. Insect bites and fungal infections. Works on the summer. Rashes? I get every year. Psoriasis on my elbows. Blue star worked wonders amazing stuff. Mirror on and the H is gone. Look for the white box with the blue star in the first aid section feel blue star work fast or your money back as we walked garden, gnome, Catholic Catholic.

Billy Bush cocaine Hollywood Mario Lopez chickenpox Stephen Colbert Epstein Barr Ellen barkin George W Seth Meyers Kentucky Burbank Billy Trump Victoria CARA Terry Warner Brothers New York Omar
"chickenpox" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"The family's lawyer Christopher Weiss told him B C news from their perspective. They always recognize they were running the risk of getting it. And they row k with students Kentucky legally allowed the skip vaccines on religious grounds that they provide a sworn statement as this guy did last year. However, when the chicken pox outbreak began his school Sacred Heart declared, those children did not have a right to be on public grounds. You can still not have the vaccine, but you can't be here. So there you go. The northern Kentucky health department said all students who were not vaccinated or not allowed to attend school until twenty one days after the onset of of Arash for the latest ill students or staff members and he hit back with a lawsuit. He said the fact that I can't finish my senior year of basketball like our last couple of games is pretty devastating. I mean, you go through four years of high school playing basketball. But you look forward to your senior year chickenpox highly infectious with those who have the vaccine are immunized against it. Well, that's what they say. And that's what I want to stand. Well, I've had some health experts. Tell me, well, you're not always immune from it UC, and that you can get it. But I mean for the most part if you've got the vaccine, you're not gonna get chicken bucks. What's the problem in that whole idea you get a vaccination? So that if you come into contact with somebody with chicken, but you don't get it or am I missing the point of a vaccine? So once the harm of having to do their who's vaccinated does have chicken pox. You're vaccinated that was the whole idea. Wasn't it? I think I missing part of this puzzle here because I don't quite understand. Well, some people. Yes, what is not one hundred percents? Well, grace, well, then when somebody gets chickenpox in them home, I guess they would say well that's too late at that point. You've already been exposed to them. This is a this is a struggle a fight that's going to go back and forth, and what's going to happen. And I don't say that I agree with this is gonna be federal laws mandating vaccines, and then you are going to get people in you know, in a commune. What are they going to sequester themselves interest of by the way? Do the Amish believe in vaccines that would be an interest? I if I had the guest now, I don't want to put anything on the Amish. But I would suspect that they don't. But I don't know the best true. But of course, they're just among amongst the Amish. But they do go into town. Don't they? So what if they come into contact with somebody? And then they bring it back to the colony there, you know, back to the hive, I don't know. And I'm just, you know, I'm speaking out attorney because I don't know whether the Amish assumed they don't drive cars, I like the minute their Amish with cars, you know. We. We had a a minute. I crew. Well, we were doing the cabin. They did the the foundation for the cabin. That was the, you know, the floor joist all that kind of stuff. They did all that. And they were great, folks. I mean hard working people there on time worked for reasonable price. It was really cool, but they could drive go get them. I guess they can't even ride in the car of your Amish Ganyu what we blindfold you. What have we knock you out? And then you just have to show up the job site. That'd be okay. Well, as long as I don't know what is it about an automobile in the Amish Yale, the Amish and the death or the only people I can get away with the finning on the radio and not even the Amish..

Arash basketball Christopher Weiss Kentucky Sacred Heart northern Kentucky health depar attorney twenty one days four years
"chickenpox" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on KTRH

"Yup. It's really happening. The antibac- Sers all the kids together, exposing them purposely to chicken box. I think our next guest. I think I heard you if I heard you correctly Ellison, my negate, you kind of referred to purposely, exposing your kids to chicken boxes tantamount to child abuse. Is that accurate? Arguably candy considered child abuse because we have a very safe and effective vaccine that prevents chickenpox and we've had it for about twenty five years. By the way, you should mention that Allison is the CEO of the immunization partnership. It also there president. Okay. So I had chicken pox as a kid. Just got a naturally was long before you had a vaccine what what is the dangers of not doing that? Well, the chicken pox is candy deadly. And even if it's not deadly children can suffer very serious health complications that could land him in the hospital. For example, the blisters on the skin can develop bacterial skin infection. Also children can contract Monja. They can get encephalitis, which is inflammation of the brain hemorrhaging bloodstream, infections and dehydration. And so the four of Accion was introduced in nineteen ninety nine nineteen eighty five hundreds of children's Dyson chickenpox, but tens of thousands more had to be hospitalized because of a chicken pox. And so we've seen those numbers decreased dramatically since then. And so that's why it's so important to get your children in the United States chickenpox because there's no reason to damn with your child's life. Have you ever talked to antibac-, sir? Ellison and tried to convince them again. The vaccine is a good idea. Well, I would actually say there's a couple of categories. So there are anti vaccines that are completely opposed to back, but they're a larger group that are the vaccine hesitate where they really they wanna make the best choices for their children and their family, and they really just need more information into talk about some of their fears. The problem is is that the misinformation really gets out there on the internet and it spreads with conspiracy theories. And but the science shows that vaccines are safe and effective and one of the great things about the chickenpox vaccine is it not only does it prevent against chickenpox which is dangerous. But a recent study just found that children who develop immunity through the chicken pox, vaccine are seventy nine percent less likely to suffer from painful shingle as an adult compared to children who caught chicken pox, just. Naturally on their own without getting the vaccine and shingle is extremely painful and dangerous in its own. Right. It can cause painter weeks or years. It too has brain information or liver information and even can cause blindness. So when you're getting the chicken pox vaccine for your child, you're protecting against chickenpox and most likely protecting them well into their adult life so shingles as well. All right. Thanks for joining us. Appreciate the immunization partnership. That's president and CEO Ellison Winneke here. Newsradio seven forty KTAR h seven fifty two time to get to the drive..

Ellison Winneke president and CEO antibac- Sers encephalitis president CEO United States Accion antibac Allison Monja seventy nine percent twenty five years
"chickenpox" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

10:32 min | 3 years ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Back next week does the name dripping springs. Do Austin's neighboring hill. Capri city does this get this. There's at least one coalition of residents and business owners in that area. And then think so as was announced yesterday some dripping springs residents would rather call home pound town after one of the earliest resident Dr Joseph m. Pound. They want to change the name of dripping springs to pound town. According to the rename coalitions. Go fund me page, which has raised almost one hundred seventy dollars. Of the eighteen hundred goal. Donations will be used to fund a campaign that may or may not result in the ballot initiative pound town as you head head west out of Austin going out to pound town. Hey, let's go to pound town everybody. So your thoughts of that. If you're driving home to old dripping springs, would you be in favor of it called pound town, Johnny? I bet you don't know what Austin's first name was do which could happen. It could change. Johny Waterloo, Waterloo. You got that? Right. It's Waterloo and the way our city's going with the school board and the city council it may have to go to water Lucas. I'm sure Stephen F Austin was in there is a bad guy somehow. So it could be going back to water you can have Waterloo, and you could have pound town. Let's go to pound town. Oh, boy, we've been talking about chickenpox. The governor of Kentucky exposed I guess he has eleven kids eleven or nine much like Jeff Ward, exposing the chicken box instead of getting a vaccination. Thought this was a strange story, but the more I read people have chicken pox parties. But medical officials today on TV say not such a good idea. Also, we're talking about what's going on in New Zealand new New Zealand, president said, they're banning all assault rifles military style, semi automatic rifles and high capacity magazines. I made the comment earlier. I would have no problem with the banning of high capacity magazines is why do you need? Why do you need a thirty round magazine and get some blowback on them? Let's get to the phone lines. Let's call talk to James James wants to talk about this chicken pox deal. Hey, James, welcome. You're on KABC radio. I don't think anyone is talked about adult complications of having chicken pox. You're on a heavy had chicken pox virus lives in personal nerve endings forever. And one of the complications seeing later in life is shingles. And. I don't know what you know about shingles. No fun. I've had shingles before it's no fun. If they're recognized diagnosis and treatment treatment is began early enough. And then it can be successfully treated, but it can it can be avoided if you if you've been back to me, and again, I I want people to know these mothers that are not vaccinating their children. The parents are going to be at risk for for singles because they had they had the chicken pox is a child. That's that is no fun. No fun. Dr. Thanks so much for calling. We appreciate that very much. Let's go to to who's next on the hit parade. Let's go to is that you. Julia. Yes. Welcome to KLBJ. How are you? Julia. You're doing a fine job of the one man show will thank you so much. We had Melinda on son. Ben will be here a little bit later. But I I enjoy I enjoy doing the show by myself. Awesome. Awesome. I just wanted to say, I don't know why I understand why vaccinating these children, and they're still getting what we're back Sinead Ingham for my daughter got chicken pox twice but twice and that was in the year two thousand dollars should have been a very good. Bye. Action nation. I would think. I was a single parent. I had to get off four twice. Where'd you get that vaccination at WalMart or? Are they still getting get that WalMart? Where'd you? Get you vaccination. Golly. That's terrible. I know right. Yeah. Well, hopefully that will not occur anymore. Julia were kids get chickenpox after the vaccination. I guess it's not unheard of at all. So she may not get it. But I'm I'm scared out about the shingles things since you already got the chicken bog, it could be well, do you agree with people who say, I want to expose my kids chickenpox or they can already get it. Do you think that's a good move? I don't believe that's a big move to me. That's just exposing and suffering that they don't need. I mean, she had I didn't know what it was. They took her into the doctor, and they told me she had a mild case of the chicken pox. And then she got it again. At least it was a mild case. But she's still got it. Okay. Joe you thanks for the call very much for forty on kale. BJ radio. We've been talking about what's happened in New Zealand or they acted quickly after the tragedy last week fifty people dead after this madman went into the mosque and started shooting people. They have banned all assault rifles, all military style semiautomatic rifles and high capacity, MAGS magazines. Let's go to Bob Bob wants to talk about the MAGS a thirty round magazine. You say we need him. Why do we need them, Bob? Well, if you think that the second amendment exempts for us to shoot feral hogs. You don't understand why it's not there? So we can shoot feral hogs. It's just a fun thing to do. We need to have the same weapons as the government. That is not let me just say, sir. That's absurd. Do you wanna do you wanna bazooka never won a nuclear weapon? Never taken the gun. The guns and killed massive amounts of people. That's never have. They're not taking they're not taking a gun. They're taking a thirty round magazine. New zealand. They want it. They want to legislate against ammo as well. So it's not gonna matter. How big a magazine you have the who wants to who is who is they who is they they are the government is trying to propose what government what government hours? No, sir. There's a there's a small minority. There's a small minority of people doing that, sir. Okay. It's never gonna happen. You don't understand the second amendment? Of course, I understand the second amendment. There was also another congresswoman out today or maybe been yesterday that said she doesn't understand why when there's tragedies like this gun sales in America, go up. She doesn't understand the fact that a bunch of unarmed people got murdered and people want to go get gun. So they don't become an unarmed victim, I believe people in defending themselves her, but that is patently ludicrous. Patently ludicrous Serta think we've got to keep up with the government arsenal. Good lord. I know. That's probably you're right. Sure. That's probably what the founding fathers believe that. You didn't want to if if the government whack you wanna be able to keep up with their arms, sir. That ship has sailed at ship has sailed bazooka tank. Her. That's. Extremely narrow minded say we need we he wants you want your thirty mad. You think you're thirty MAC and go up against that bazooka thirty MAC and go up that surface to air missile come on. That is that is an old old thing that my really, you know, people who don't want to give up anything. I don't want to give up guns. Don't get me wrong. I don't wanna give up God's. But I think we should be reasonable and to me that's reasonable the high capacity magazines. I think the ship has sailed in the United States. It will it won't make a hill of beans. If the government said today, bring in all your assault rifles, bringing all your military style semiautomatic rifles. You know, what the bad guys got him the cartels guide them, you can get him on the black market. It wouldn't it would not affect gun violence in the United States. It would hurt people like our last caller who are dedicated hunters. And sportsmen about the ship has already sailed on the the military style semiautomatic rifles and the assault rifles in this country. That's that's all gone because we have so many out there. And if this is a voluntary deal, many people, I don't know many people say, okay, here you go. But don't use that lame excuse, oh, we got to keep up with arsenal of the the military. Are you sure go down to Fort Hood, just taking a look see what they got go. Look at some of the videos, we blast the ISIS s obese. Think we match those? We can't we can't let's go to John John is calling on kale BJ. John welcome. You're on the air. I'm doing good, John. How are you doing? I'm excellent. How comment about? Yes, sir. Towards anything. Whether it be far vaccine doesn't make a difference. About a law to guide or limit your ability as a law-abiding citizen. Criminal. Any law. Agreed. Agreed. Yes, sir. If we wish to address criminal behavior. The criminal biker novel all by your daily did the right thing, but they refused. The dangerous guy or short guy keeping person a novice one thing that the mass killers. They all seem to be a fire. Somebody else already Doug. Yeah. Donahue on hero..

New Zealand Julia Waterloo Austin WalMart Dr Joseph m. Pound dripping springs John John James James Bob Bob Johny Waterloo Stephen F Austin Capri city United States government Johnny Kentucky Sinead Ingham
"chickenpox" Discussed on X96

X96

07:37 min | 3 years ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on X96

"And that is brought to you in part by a glass of milk that went with my tuna fish sandwich. Basketball fans gracie's has all the college tournament games in high def watch the game tonight, a gray Caesar enjoy dinner and a show featuring the moves collective from six to nine followed by Thursday night chill with the DJ chew from ten to close Boehner. Candidate number one. We got lots of Delos lots of hits is a popular YouTube channel and till. Well, they discovered that this woman who had the YouTube channel and with her adopted kids that she was abusing them treating very poorly pepper, spraying them starving them. They've shut everything down taking the kids. And there there will be consequences that was Boehner candidate number one Boehner candidate number two. Oh my God. The governor of Kentucky. Nine children. He has didn't get him vaccinated, the expose them to chicken pox. There were fine suffered a little bit. But Nell ain't gonna get chicken pox and Boehner candidate number three. And they should be shamed. People who dry their clothing on the back of airline seats while they travel really not a good idea. Please people Marquette once and tickets to see real big fish, and I believe bowling for soup. The depot and the winner very close between number one and number two. But the winter Boehner candidate number two the governor of Kentucky. Winner of round two. It goes forward. It might be Boehner of the day it has to defeat the winner of round ones voting. We'll put them both into Boehner fight at nine twenty. That is when you will vote and decide donor of the day. So the radio from hell film festival. It's next Wednesday the twenty seven yeah. The twenty seventh and of now we haven't I haven't seen the move. I haven't they all like to see him ahead of time. They gave us access to look at them. But I like to see him for the first time at the festival there are fourteen five minute films. There's a there are comedies and Ramos. Apparently, and I get and I guess they're pretty good trend Harris is one of the judges. And he said I've looked at the comedy so far. And I think the judge is supposed to be done by today. I said some of the comedies were pretty good. And that's what John was saying. And he just said, there's an animated film. That's that. He liked a lot. So. We're not the judges. We get outside film folk to judge it we got Shawn and his wife Shawn's wife, Leslie, by the way, also a film person. She also went to school for film studies and she works for. The the film. I can't ever remember these there the film people upstairs in our building here, the other filled there there are two that that stems are similar so probably better to not Tori Baker. The who runs the Salt Lake film society. She's one of the judges miles Romney who is head of the mass program with the Salt Lake film society and Trent Harris. Who, you know, as a director of films lake film centers all film central. Thank you. And and then. Yeah. Trent miles, Sean, and Leslie and Tory. Yeah. Five john? Yeah. Everything's been submitted already. So you can't submit any more films, and they should be all done with judging today. And then they're the all the judging is going to Nick, our promotions director, and there'll tabulate all the scores. And we'll have a winner in comedy section winner in drama section. And then I guess an overall winner one overall winner, I don't know. I wouldn't speculate. If I buy tickets ten dollars is all they cost and you get food from the the slightly perturbed Carino. It's the angry. Let's see. So this is all happening at the tower theatre Wednesday, March twenty seven th and tickets are on sale now it will sell out because there's limited space available. And I know Nick was saying they were selling pretty well already. You can get tickets by going to x ninety six dot com. You will be able to buy them at the door, but they will be more expensive. And there's no guarantee they'll be any left will be their doors are open at six movies will start at seven and the food that the angry Korean is bringing. It's just it's first-come-first-served. It's not guarantee everyone gets food. So make sure you come early for them. Also commercially for free, by the way. DJ Iraq ellipse will be spending some tunes from six to seven. And we have we have a giveaway actually, there's gonna be a VIP balcony. And the only way you can get in there is by winning tickets. How do you win tickets? I'm going to give you a key word. You gotta be twenty one and older. Yes. To be in the VIP. So if you're twenty one and older and want to win tickets to the VIP area of the radio from hell international film festival. Text the word party P A R T Y party, two three three nine eight six. We say the international film festival one of the film's as in French not. No is it really is. Absolutely, one of the film's is in is in French. I believe with subtitles so truly an international film festival. Okay. I look forward to that. And somebody along the way decided that we needed to make this a legitimate film festival. So that means we're going to get probably some good films. Jeez. Good films. Harry likes the dome film like this dumb ones that were made just for us. But it's going to be interesting to see what they how it's changed. The, you know, the tenor of the whole thing what it's going to be like, I'm anxious to see them these films could go onto other. Reclaim and they could say my first win was at the you bet. You know? Someone was asking me as a kid who's under eighteen. Okay. If they come, and I said, well, the movies are rated I have no idea what's in there and keep in mind that films in the past that we've had for the no. Similar was asking me. This is I have a kid who's under eighteen. Okay. If they come, and I said, well, the movies are rated I have no idea what's in there and keep in mind that films in the past that we've had for the film festival of had swears and a lot of violence. I think it'll be okay. No nudity yet. Right. Bye. I'm hoping for. So as far as I remember for the film festival. Butts. Maybe I would say we don't we don't say one way or the other. So it's up to you. You're the parents the the food say I like to come but Korean oh, let that scary. Oh, it's delicious. It's not. It's not anything scary. It's not complicated. It's it's meet it's noodles. Yeah. It's it's it's it's all the things that you love. It's delicious. Yeah. Absolutely. All right. But is the traffic delicious? That's the question. You're asking yourself right now while I refresh the dot website. Oh. Musical interlude Q still that major slow edge. Northbound I fifteen from point of the mountain all the way through Draper, but I'm not seeing any other accidents. And nobody has sent me a text alerting me to any. So hopefully. Winding down these two thousand.

Boehner Kentucky Trent Harris YouTube John Salt Lake Basketball Delos Nell Nick Trent miles gracie Marquette Ramos Tori Baker Shawn dot director Leslie Draper
"chickenpox" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:50 min | 3 years ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're DNA data will be shed with third parties for medical research or even for solving crime. That's unless you specifically asked the company not to do. So the point was brought home late last month when it emerged that the popular genetic genealogy company family tree DNA is working with the FBI test DNA samples provided by law enforcement in order to help identify perpetrators of violent crime. Meanwhile, another DNA testing company twenty three and me assigned a three hundred million dollar deal with the pharmaceutical giant GS K to help it develop new drugs. So are twenty three and me customers aware that this is happening that third party is mining their DNA data for medical research. A question for Kathy Hibs Twenty-three meets chief legal officer. And chief regulatory officer. We do. And one thing I would point you to is are very explicit consent document. So they I are asked you they wanna bio back their sample, then they're asked if they want to consent to research at all. And then there's a third asked do you want to consent to research where that information might be actually shared with any third parties, and that's a separate consent. Is there a lot of small print? Oh. Really not. And it's extremely obvious what you're consenting to. But the really important thing is how our research is done that it relies on our individuals to answer survey questions, and then we're able to do these really large research studies where maybe ten thousand people have said, I have psoriatic arthritis or something like that. And then we can look in that group of ten thousand people. Do we see genetic signature their genetic information? If they don't provide the survey information, if they don't answer this questions is really not interesting to us. And so not only did they knowingly consent. They have to affirmatively participate in these studies in an ideal world, wouldn't it be better? If the kind of research that you are doing if it was carried out entirely by the public sector, what is it that you as a private organization can achieve that the public sector count, the private sector is the developer and deliver. Of most drug and medical device innovations. It costs billions of dollars to develop new therapies and most are not successful. So I don't think it's financially feasible for the public sector to do it on its own and beyond that, I think the reason that we've been so successful is that people are actually probably more comfortable at least in this country giving their information not to the government. And I suspect that people would be much more concerned about privacy, where they are giving it to the government that does have the law enforcement arm that is the taxing authority and all of those other things so with GSK taking the stake in twenty three and me is the focus of your business. Now changing is it becoming monetize ING that database. No, I would really say not the way we look at our business is as a virtuous circle. We have. Consumers who are interested in motivated around their own health. Howard genetics might influence our risk for certain conditions. So for example, there are couple of genes that are various with the increased risk of blood clots. And once you know, that there are some simple things that you can do to avoid getting them. So our whole concept has been we can make discoveries and then we can give you more information. And we do that if you're a customer of twenty three and me over the course of your life. You've got not just what you originally got for mass. But you've got multiple new reports. And that really has always been the purpose of the research the end of the day this agreement you have with GSK is exclusive it gives them exclusive access to what is a very valuable genetic database, and isn't that where the core problem might be that? In fact, this should be open for everyone's been able to access to develop the medicines people need. So it's a very limited period of exclusivity. It's a four year agreement and we still have the ability to do work with academics. And with others. It's just that. If it could afflicts with something GS K wants to do we do have to get their consent in certain circumstances. Okay. But when an academic institution or public institution wants to access your database, do you charge them a we don't generally charge academics? And with some public institutions. We do these things at highly discounted rates. You know, the more people part of our motivation for entering the deal with GS as we've only got seventy employees working in our therapeutic scrape, we can do a lot more if we can bring the tens of thousands of GS K, researchers brain power to it. And that same thing is true with academics and others around the world, Kathy Hibs chief legal officer of twenty three and me. But there are plenty of countries that are developing public DNA databases as opposed. To the sort of private ones owned and managed by twenty three and me in the UK. For example. It's being done by genomics England, accompany set up and owned by the government's department of health and social care it runs. The one hundred thousand genomes project which aims to sequence genomes from patients with a rare disease and their families as patients with cancer. All the patients are with the UK's public health service, the NHS and the projects focus is about improving treatment rather than developing profitable new drugs. Professor Mark Caufield is the project's chief scientists I asked him to give me an example of who benefited so far. There was a young girl who was aged ten was admitted to intensive care with severe recurrent chickenpox. We've found a change in our DNA, which altered her immune system. This allowed us to select a bone marrow transplant which is curator of her condition. And this is not only transformation for that individual. But it's also a huge. Savor of funds for the chess because she was recurrently being admitted to having intensive cast. So this is the opportunity from this type of technology where is this leading? So I think we will have genetics alongside other measurements of a similar type body fluids metabolism proteins, and we'll build up a much more integrated detailed picture of a person's life course. And that may allow us to begin to say who is risk of disease. So for example, in cancer, very exciting. New biomarker is to measure, the of this shed into the blood and the DNA sequence that leaks into the bloodstream and that could be used potentially for early detection of cancer or detection of recurrence whose data. Do you collect? And how do you obtain consent to collect that data? So everybody in the program joins under the basis of informed. Consent informed. Consent involves written materials the usually read by the participant before they come to health professionals. And then they have an opportunity to meet with a health care professional will run through those materials, and they mouse any questions do you cooperate with any other countries and with private sector firms in terms of having access to other DNA databases. So we will work with other countries. We most notably have a strong partnership with France who are having a similar initiative in red disease. The maybe only one family in Britain with that disease. If I am to get line of sight on an answer for someone without disease. I may need to shadow later with other people in other countries to get on Sunday. And the second thing is you asked about industry, we do with about one hundred companies those interactions will be bound inventing medicines and understanding the safety of those medicines many of us possess the risk of an adverse reaction because of our genetic makeup. And as eighty percent of medicines failing filament actually using the genome to try and get safer medicines. First time could reduce the cost of those medicines. When they come forward into the health system. So the agendas are quite different in different the seeking to invent something that will provide a new opportunity for healthcare. But obviously, they will recover the cost of that. From the hill service in our case with funded to transform the hallway a health system works. But the point is than the private companies are much more narrowly focus, so no university in the land can really afford to develop a drug it's a huge amount of money usually one two billion dollars to develop a single medicine. And so we need to have an ecosystem in which we have companies will invest that will take the risks. So I'll give you a really simple in the mid two thousands. A discovery was made of a gene causes familial high cholesterol now people with familial high. Classroom are one in two hundred and fifty six people in Britain. What this means is they further up their arteries much more quickly and usually have coronary disease because of the ferry high levels of cholesterol and a much earlier age, and sadly often die. So the finding was taken forward to produce a medicine could be injected once every two weeks by a company called down. Jen. Gen estimate that the work in genetics shorten the development of that medicine and its entry to patient benefit in trials by three years. So if I could bring something live that would avoid death or home to somebody much faster through this public industry partnership. Then I think that is a greater good for society. Professor Markku field of genomics England, it's worth noting that the one hundred thousand genomes project has sequence exactly that one hundred thousand genomes compare that to the four million customers who've consented to be part of Twenty-three in me's DNA research database. And the fact that private companies dominate DNA databases, worry some like Kate specter back. Daddy assistant professor at the university of Michigan's medical school. There's potential for data monopolies and also private industry acting in ways that might exclude public databanks. The classic US-based example is Mary genomics near AG Nomex had a patent on the B R C A mutation that's associated with an increased risk and breast and ovarian cancer for decades starting in the ninety s and eventually the US supreme court said, in fact, people can't patent naturally occurring genetic variation into that patent was invalid, however, they had had a monopoly for years and years and therefore the day after the supreme court case came out, even though they no longer had the patent. They had the best data set to compare people's variance to. So they were still the best place to take the test. Even though other people could offer it for different costs and said they were not making that available to any other parties. Correct. So actually what third parties now have done is they've begun to work together to share their own data. So that they can compete with a gigantic Maria data set. So what your example that shows I suppose is that the prophet motive can skew research. Right. So if you think about these companies like twenty three and me their valuation, isn't based on the ability to sell two hundred dollars test kits. Their evaluation is based on their ability to collect and sell data. And so that data becomes one of their greatest business assets. And that asset is protected as any other asset would be. So what is the thing that worries you the most certainly one concern that I think it's talked about a lot is that people don't realize what they're signing up for all of the information to be fair. With some of the better companies is explicitly disclosed in their terms and conditions and privacy policies. However, people don't read them, but actually my biggest concern is the kinds of people who can afford to buy these private diagnostic tests. Look similar in lots of ways, they're often very well educated. They're often Caucasian there often wealthy they often have insurance to begin with..

Kathy Hibs chief legal officer GS K GSK UK genomics England Britain FBI psoriatic arthritis officer Professor Mark Caufield developer Howard US supreme court NHS
"chickenpox" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"chickenpox" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Number to call the night. Triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred that's triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred. Early. We're talking about I after Jake reactions from medications that of course, adverse reactions toback scene, and how it is dampened the public trust in allopathic medicines and vaccines, and this is raising a huge amount of controversy. It's more and more people are divided on whether or not vaccines are needed for every bug in every ailment. World Health Organization. Put out a statement that I was very curious about yesterday. In a survey from may twenty eighteen they found that support for vaccinations. Among Americans has fallen ten percent in the last ten years about seventy percent said common vaccine such as for polio and measles are very important found the pull from research America in American society for microbiology were saying that was down from the original eighty percent who gave the same answer in November two thousand eight according to the CDC and the World Health Organization, we're looking at more than ninety percent of children under the age of three have been vaccinated for polio. Measles, mumps rubella hepatitis b chickenpox and more than eighty percent had received. Hey, influenza diphtheria tetanus pertussis and pneumococcal infection vaccine as well. However, there has been mounting distrust that has led some parents to not immunize their children. So when we have outbreaks in diseases, we have not seen in years such as measles. Whooping cough. Mumps? There are a lot of people that are now getting angry at those reviews to immunize and the world held organization is now declaring that antibac- Sers are one of the top threats to global help in two thousand nineteen. So antibac- Sers are now on the list of threats along with air pollution climate change HIV and a worldwide influenza pandemic. And then you should hear what a lot of people recommend. We do with anti Baxter's jailed them, that's one of the ideas. Certainly they compare them to those who are anti science bring those who do not support global warming and flatters. So, but I I was trying to in the last hour get a handle on something beyond. The typical reasons why people don't trust vaccines right now. And the CDC is given their reasons the World Health Organization, given their reasons as to why I have a problem not just with. A few things I've read by the problem with the idea that anymore a vaccine, especially for the flu is being marketed. Like a burger at Burger King is being marketed like laundry detergent, or you go in and you you you go to a store, and if you get a flu vaccine they hand you late twenty five or thirty dollars in groceries just forgetting one, they're bribing you and you get one and not only that. But can you tell me why last year but thousand people died of the flu, and they told you that the flu vaccine was ineffective or ten percent effective. They still urge you to get a flu shot. That's where the mistrust comes in for me. I mean, I look at that. And saying, you know, they'll still pimp these vaccines and they'll hand him out like their Halloween candy poison Halloween candy. It's it's exactly how I see it. So tonight, I wanted to invite someone to come on a comment about this Ashleigh Everley, she studied at the university of California Davis earning her bachelor's degree in environmental toxicology, her focus for the past eight years has been investigating the scientific research.

flu World Health Organization flu vaccine CDC antibac- Sers polio Ashleigh Everley Jake pertussis pneumococcal infection university of California Davis Baxter America eighty percent ten percent seventy percent