37 Burst results for "Chicago Tribune"

The Birth Of The Greenback

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:56 min | Last week

The Birth Of The Greenback

"Stacey next. Jacob Feldstein. Planet money author of money the true story of amid up during a new book. Say I. brought props for us to do the indicator. I say. That's been months. It's been. That guy's been honking hall eight months. I have props came over so I could give you these troughs. Okay. Go ahead and look at them. All right. Okay. So, this is like a really high quality xerox of an old piece of money. THREE DOLLAR BILL RE dollar bill that's really a real thing. There's like a a lady standing next to in like a ball gown standing next to a cow to I chose a cow to pander to you I do love a cow keep going. Okay. The Orange Bank It's orange because this from the orange. Bank and this is a one dollar bill. So Stacey, these are reproductions of real paper money that was printed by private banks in the United States in the eighteen forties and fifties. This is one of the most interesting periods I found in the history of money when I was working on my book, it's this moment when the United States government did not print money, there was in fact, no single national paper currency but if you wanted to. Open Up Stacey's Bank of New York and print your own paper money. You could. I don't know if I would trust that dollar from that. Was a real problem that was a real problem we'll get to that. I. Mean they were just so many different kinds of money at one point the Chicago Tribune counted eight, thousand, three, hundred, and seventy different kinds of paper money in America. This sounds very confusing for everyone involved this indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and Jacob. Goldstein can we make eight, thousand, three, hundred and seventy, the indicator? Yes. Today on the show. How can you even have that many kinds of money and also just what does it tell us about money works? Let's just go. Let's just go a block away to get away from the horn. Yeah. Support for NPR and the following message come from fund. fundraise fund makes it easy for anyone to invest in high quality real estate by building you a portfolio with their more than one billion dollars in assets get started at fundraise dot com slash indicator to have your first ninety days of advisory fees. Waived. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Microsoft teams. Now, there are more ways to be a team with Microsoft teams bring everyone together in a virtual room collaborate live on the same page and see up to forty nine people onscreen learn more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams. So can we should set the scene here Jacob the nineteenth century America lots of is apparently also this was the era when gold and silver were money and Jacob say in the book that the government minted gold and silver coins, but it did not make paper money at that time. The exactly right. So the only paper money in America was printed by all of these different. Private banks people called paper money in fact banknotes, right. So they thought of it as like a piece of paper from a bank and they thought of paper money in particular as like a receipt or a coach ticket as as a thing that you could substitute for gold and silver, and in fact, if you look at at the bills I gave you all have this kind of. Writing like just grab a different one for fun. So we can say what it looks like. Okay. This is the stoning ten bank, a two dollar bill. There's a way. Moby Dick or something Wail Bell we've cow Bill Wail Bill So okay. So now look at the cursive writing see the cursive they're just blowers is stoning to. Two dollars to the bear on demand right and if you look all these different bills are different colors, they have different pictures on them, but they all say that will pay how ever many dollars to the on demand and so the second interest. Yeah it's an Iou because the interesting thing is it's telling you the paper money is not the real money. Right? They're saying we will give you two dollars in gold and silver for this paper money right? So the real money in this world is the underlying gold or silver the paper is just like. The Standard. So this is a time in history when there's not federal bank, there's not a national bank. There's like thousands of of little local banks and I guess all these banks can issue their own money. That's right and it's kind of evolving in this period at the beginning of this ehre the eighteen thirties. If you wanted to open a bank, typically you had to go to your state legislature and get special approval. Basically, they had to pass a special law that would let you open your bank and this was problematic because I was super corrupt essentially. Bank and print money. Then you're gonNA bribe whoever you have to. Say all the knee. All due respect to get them to let you open your bank. Right. So around eighteen forty, a little earlier, this new idea became popular. The new idea was called free banking. And the idea of free banking was anybody who is willing to follow a few basic rules could. Take and start printing money and literally start printing money and you know not surprisingly a lot of people wanted to print money. This is how we get eight thousand different kinds of money. Yes. How do you know if the bill that someone's handing you is real money or if it's literally just a piece of paper from the First Bank of Stacey Vanik Smith which might be real money. I wouldn't. Maybe. Add bribed senator so I love this so there arose in response to this problem these special periodicals Magazines that were privately published called banknote reporters. And what they were was these lists in tiny font of every kind of money. So I actually have a reproduction here another prop from a page. This one was called. Thomson's Bank note. Reporter. K.. So the people who subscribe to this merchants people who need to accept money. So so let's just say I'm running a bar and I got my thompsons bank note reporter and I come in I need a drink who thirsty I'm thirsty. So okay. So the page of the bank note reporter I printed out is for Orange Bank. Okay. Okay. So have that bill right here it is and it's a one dollar bill. So I find Orange Bank here in my Bengal reporter and it says Okay Orange Bank listed different bills and says ones and under wants it describes what the bill is supposed to look like says to horses check. Hey, Cart Jack Blacksmith shop male portrait Jack Girl. Check. So it's at least plausibly real. The reporter also tells me something else that's important and that explains a lot about how many works at this time. Typically would tell me whether I should accept that paper money at full face vowed I can buy my dollar whiskey with this whether you can get your dollar whiskey because remember what we care about is whether I can turn in that paper money for gold or silver, and so if the bank is shaky or even if it's just really far away. You know the reporter might say, just knock five cents off the dollar give Stacey Ninety five cents worth of whiskey instead of a dollar that took a really long time to buy that we ski. It does seem like it would have been absurdly inconvenient right and for a long time when people look back at this period, the basic story of free banking was just that was a horrible idea like that many kinds of money right but. Much, later, like in the nineteen seventies. This generation of economic historians started going back and looking more closely. At the banks and how money works in this period and what they saw when they really went through the numbers was basically like it wasn't that bad Bankston go bus that often people didn't usually lose much money when they used. We're you overall they would lose like a few percent which is. Kind of like what you pay today. So when you take money out of the weird off Brand ATM at. The corner store. which I always do. Yeah, I. Mean. That's basically like the the bartenders giving you ninety cents for your dollar when you do that, right? So. Obviously, we do not have eight thousand different kinds of money now this ended and it ended after the civil war. Yeah was the civil war. So during the civil war, that old American argument of can we have national banks or not came up again and Congress passed a few important banking laws. One of them basically taxed all those thousands of kind of state banknotes out of existence, and then the other one created these new national banks that printed much more reliable, much more uniform paper money. It's interesting because I mean, this was obviously after the civil war was the time when the United States went from like a collection of. To One Country, and it seems like the same thing happened with currency maybe not a coincidence. Your I mean, there is this idea at least in the modern world money is part of what makes a country a country and I think you do see that happening at this moment in the united. States when we go from thousands of kinds of money toward one uniform kind of paper money I'm just sad we lost the cow bills. Because you know Jacob I have a fever and the cure. This story in like a whole bunch of other like believable stories like this are in your new book money. The true story of a made up thing. This episode of the indicator was produced by Nick. Fountain fact check by Britney Cronin, the indicators edited by Patty hearst and is a production

Stacey Vanik Smith Jacob Feldstein Reporter Orange Bank Bank Of New York United States Okay Orange Bank America NPR Federal Bank Bill Wail Bill Microsoft First Bank Thompsons Bank Chicago Tribune Congress
Fresh update on "chicago tribune" discussed on Kim Komando

Kim Komando

00:07 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chicago tribune" discussed on Kim Komando

"Was all crazy over this one this past week. I don't if you heard this, but Chicago Tribune. They've laid off countless employees, right. They've denied raises and promotions that cut benefits and so in their infinite wisdom, they wanted to test out the cybersecurity. They sent an email telling all employees that they were getting a bonus up to $10,000 to quote Thank you for your ongoing commitment to excellence, but they would have to click to see kind of always they would get About when they click the lake. That's when they found out that they failed the test. It was no bonus. No such thing. It was a fishing test. Gosh, that is just cruel, isn't it? So everybody got ticked off said was mean. It wasn't fair was all over social media as I mentioned, I mean, what really would have been mean is if they put the link behind a pay wall, that really would have been something Eddie's A Ladies and gentlemen, just example of the fun that.

Chicago Tribune Eddie
New details emerge in killings of prominent Chicago-area attorney couple found stabbed in their home

Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

00:31 sec | Last week

New details emerge in killings of prominent Chicago-area attorney couple found stabbed in their home

"Have been released in the killings of two prominent Chicago area attorneys, Leslie Jones and her husband, Tom Johnson, were found stabbed to death in their Oak Park home in April. The front door to their home was unlocked. Autopsy results obtained by the Chicago Tribune reveal. Both were stabbed multiple times in the head and upper body home did not appear to be ransacked. But Johnson's wallet was scattered on the floor. Both were partners at a downtown law firm. Johnson also worked as a hearing officer for the Chicago Police Board.

Tom Johnson Chicago Tribune Chicago Police Board Chicago Leslie Jones Oak Park Officer
Fresh update on "chicago tribune" discussed on JRDN

JRDN

00:15 sec | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chicago tribune" discussed on JRDN

"135 kiss at them. And this is amazing to read. The Chicago Tribune is reporting that there are a lot of Chicago companies that are giving people more time off in order for them to go and vote makes you vote. Chicago. It is so important. Here's Lewis Capaldi, Phil about Louise. And look, everyone knew Luz. Already to are to are to Buddha. I was just kidding myself. Our every moment started replace, because now the gondola he will do with that are needed to say when you don't do things like.

Chicago Chicago Tribune Lewis Capaldi LUZ Louise Phil
The NFL Is Ready To Dominate The Sports Landscape

DaveMan

00:16 sec | 2 weeks ago

The NFL Is Ready To Dominate The Sports Landscape

"Season opens tonight with defending champion Kansas City hosting Houston. The Browns Open Sunday at Baltimore. The Bangles against the Chargers. Cincinnati's captain's include former Buckeye safety Von Bell on rookie Q B and one time Buckeye, Jill Burrow. So what's your pride to Wayne Haskins name to captain. Washington Chicago Tribune

Washington Chicago Tribune Wayne Haskins Buckeye Jill Burrow Von Bell Browns Chargers Kansas Baltimore Cincinnati Houston
Film Academy Announces New Diversity Requirements For Best Picture Nominees

Steve Cochran

04:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Film Academy Announces New Diversity Requirements For Best Picture Nominees

"Hi. This is in the Chicago Tribune yesterday. In an historic move, the Oscars are raising the inclusion bar for best picture nominees, starting with the 96 Academy Awards. This is the one in 2024. Gives the motion picture industry time to do what they say you need to do if you want to be considered for the best picture to meet on screen representation, Standard of film must either have atleast one lead character or a significant supporting character be from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group. At least 30% of secondary roles must be from to underrepresented groups. Where the main storyline theme or narrative must be focused on an underrepresented group. Otherwise, the way I understand it If you're not including people who are under represented relative to gender orientation, race, ethnicity, even disability. If you don't do that, then you can't be the best picture. Michael Phillips. Film critic joins us on W G N Hi, Michael. Welcome to the show. Thank you, John. How are you doing? Really good. That's my understanding of it is that is that a right read on what they're going to do. It is it's although it's it's damn complicated, but, you know, really broken down beautifully with Steve Zai, Check my festival going, pal who's writes in The Washington Post that it's complicated, but you gotta get to Of the four elements right story. The film story, lead actor or ensemble have tto prominently feature unrepresented groups or, you know those working behind the scenes, Same thing, or the production includes paid internships and training for those who are under represented, or that always released team has to have multiple in how senior executives from underrepresented groups, so it's complicated. But you only gotta hit two of the four and I think that I think the telling point he makes is that out of the last 15 best picture Oscar winners last 15 years. 73% of would have been quite clear. No problem. I'm not just talking about what happened. Moonlight or parasite we have, you know, clearly like not the usual white wall of characters or treatment, but you know there's all kinds, so it's not really a cz. I don't want I don't want to. I don't wanna throw fuel on this fire. But it's not really to say it's not the same kind of You know, like under. What would you say affirmative action that a lot of the right is framing it as but you're also saying, I mean, so you see the glasses three quarters full, but I You could also see it is one quarter empty. That is one in four films would not that one. The best picture had met this criteria. Not usually, but I mean, if you just had hired, Let's say, Let's say you didn't even re cast that or rethink anything. It's on screen. Right in terms of the characters are the actors, If you just if those productions had, well, you know what Let's we're all we have is a bunch of white grips or we've never had a female, You know, director of photography or we've never had any any composer of color, you know, working out? Why not? Why not think twice about that? That's that's a less visible but equally important. Right. I think people will judge this though maybe by what they see on the screen on I'm thinking, okay. King speech won best picture that was populated Desire recalled by white people. However, that is about a disability if you will, so maybe that satisfies the requirements. I could just see there being lobbying for some of these criteria to Yeah. Yep. Yep, the ones that would have would have run into a problem. According to the Washington Post, uh, run down his argo, the artist, No country for old men. And the Departed would have had the toughest time as wass. But, you know, it was a little again with a little adjustment. I look, I'm not, You know, I'm not the guy who's gonna Say this is an outrage. I'm just not that guy. You know a TTE the same time, John. I know I'm a hypocrite. Because, you know, I'm one of a white wall of critics of Chicago trip, you know, so it's a sensitive topic. And this is all part of kind of what we're You know what? What Every person in this country is dealing with one way or the other, which is like you know what? How do we? What is this country? You know, what are we supposed to look like? How can we? How can we broaden our perspective of what we see and what we write and what we read.

Michael Phillips John The Washington Post Chicago Tribune Academy Awards Steve Zai Oscar Director Chicago King
Chicago police union endorses Trump

Steve Harvey

00:25 sec | 2 weeks ago

Chicago police union endorses Trump

"Police union endorsing Trump bid for reelection Chicago Tribune reports The union's board of directors voted unanimously last week to get behind the president. Union President John Cannon, Zara Since the board's endorsement largely were flushed. The views of its membership cannons are was among those who attended Trump's speech on the White House lawn where you accepted the Republican nomination for a second term.

Donald Trump President Trump Chicago Tribune John Cannon White House
The Decline of Local News is Solvable

Solvable

03:32 min | 3 weeks ago

The Decline of Local News is Solvable

"Margaret. Sullivan is the media columnist for the Washington Post and formerly the public editor of the new. York Times. Her new book is called ghosting the news local journalism and the Crisis of American democracy? I talked with her about the scale and seriousness the collapse of local news and what can be done to fix it. Or Margaret thanks for joining us on solvable and let's talk first about the dimensions of this problem. There's no question that we are losing local newspapers. I think something close to two thousand. If I read that right in your book have gone out of business in the past fifteen years and the ones that are remain aren't exactly thriving, and of course that matters a lot to us journalists says our friends that's the system we came up in. But why does this matter so much as you say in the title of your book to American Democracy. It matters because. While newspapers are certainly not the only way that people are informed about their communities in their public officials, they have been over time perhaps the key way that people get information about how their local governments are functioning and how communities have a base of. facts from which to operate they may disagree on the facts or what to do about them but they sort of have this shared substance that that makes sense to everybody. As that has dwindled away largely because of the dissolution of the underlying business model based on print advertising. Largely, people are are less informed people are less civically engaged and it. It hurts the underlying the underpinnings of of the way our society in our government is supposed to function. So it's primarily an accountability problem. Right if simply put if the press isn't watching government officials can get away with more corruption mismanagement. I think you said it exactly right Jacob. It is primarily an accountability problem but I I see another aspect to to which I just like to mention which is has nothing to do with really watchdog journalism or that accountability piece, which is that newspapers have traditionally been away that communities helped knit themselves together whether it's about coverage of concerts or restaurants or theater or interesting people or obituaries it's sort of village square for the community. That has nothing to do with whether the town council or the city council is mismanaging your tax dollars, but it does have to do with sort of cohesion within the community. So it's it's both of those things and probably a bunch of others to. But why is it important that it's news organizations versus you know bloggers or people posting smartphone videos tweeting about what's going on their town or community Weisensee. Citizen Journalism the replacement for all this. Citizen Journalism. If that's what we want to call it is is part of the solution. One of the things it can't do very well, though is publicized to the same degree that a front page headline or a big homepage treatment can from the Chicago Tribune or the Sun Times you know it's a lot easier to ignore a gadfly citizen as these folks might be seen rather than a big institution that's powerful.

Margaret. Sullivan York Times Public Editor Washington Post Margaret Chicago Tribune Jacob Sun Times
Chicago - Suburban Cook County Among 30 Illinois Counties at COVID-19 Warning Level

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

00:31 sec | Last month

Chicago - Suburban Cook County Among 30 Illinois Counties at COVID-19 Warning Level

"A grim milestone in Illinois's fight against Cove in 19 legions. Bob Kessler has details, the Illinois Department of Public Health announced Saturday. 1880 new confirmed covert cases and 11 deaths, bringing total deaths 8000 and eight However, that may not account for at least 1000 fatalities and potentially far more. That could be attributable to the pandemic, according to analysis of federal data by the Chicago Tribune and suburban Cook County. As of Friday, is one of 30 counties. The idea sounded the alarm about for a resurgence in Corona virus cases. Bob Kessler, WG and News.

Bob Kessler Illinois Department Of Public Chicago Tribune Illinois Cook County Cove
Chicago - Illinois Marijuana Sales Break Another Record, With $61 Million Sold In July

WBBM Evening News

00:33 sec | Last month

Chicago - Illinois Marijuana Sales Break Another Record, With $61 Million Sold In July

"No let up in sales of recreational marijuana in Illinois month to month since May, sales of recreational marijuana in Illinois had broken previous records since legal sales began January 1st. In March, when most retail stores were shut down to help stop the spread of covert 19 recreational cannabis stores were deemed essential and remained open. A record breaking sales month in June saw 13.4 million in sales, according to the Chicago Tribune. Now sales for July have shattered that record by nearly fivefold, with $61 million reported for the month. Brandon Ison NewsRadio 105.9 FM.

Marijuana Illinois Brandon Ison Chicago Tribune Cannabis
15 injured in Chicago drive-by shooting at funeral for man killed in drive-by shooting

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

15 injured in Chicago drive-by shooting at funeral for man killed in drive-by shooting

"Just two hours south of Milwaukee and Chicago. 14 people were hurt in a mass shooting that happened outside of a funeral home. CBS is Laura Podesta like a war zone. That's how neighbors described them shooting. It happened last night during a funeral for a man who fell victim to a shooting about a week ago. The service itself became the latest incident of gun violence in Chicago as a car sped by spraying bullets at Mourners hitting 14 people Time Chicago Tribune reports So far this year, homicides are up 51% at 414. Questioning one person, multiple suspects also being

Chicago Tribune Chicago Laura Podesta Milwaukee CBS Chicago.
Federal agents will deploy to Chicago as part of anti-violence effort

Pacifica Evening News

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Federal agents will deploy to Chicago as part of anti-violence effort

"The Chicago Tribune newspaper says it's learned that President Trump may send federal agents to Chicago as soon as this week, The Tribune says the Department of Home Security is crafting plans to deploy it on 150 federal agents. To work alongside Chicago police and other federal law enforcement. In quote crime fighting efforts. Trump pointed to rising gun violence in Chicago, the nation's third largest city. Where more than 63 people were shot 12 fatally. Over the

Chicago Chicago Tribune Donald Trump The Tribune Department Of Home Security President Trump
Trump signals he will send federal agents to major cities

Here & Now

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Trump signals he will send federal agents to major cities

"Federal agents two major U. S cities, including Philadelphia, Oakland and Detroit to clamp down on anti racism, protests and other violence. He makes that threat as the Chicago Tribune and The Associated Press reports. The administration already has plans in the works to send 150 law enforcement agents to Chicago. There's been growing national controversy over the use of federal force in US cities sparked by federal agents patrolling the streets of Portland, Oregon. Trump yesterday told this to reporters are going to do something that I can tell you because we're not going to New York and Chicago Detroit. And Baltimore on all of these Oakland is a mess. You let this happen all run by Liberal Democrats War federal law enforcement. We're

Chicago Detroit Chicago Tribune Oakland Baltimore Donald Trump Philadelphia United States Oregon Portland The Associated Press New York
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 2 months ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
Wrigleyville rooftops open for Chicago Cubs home games in 2020

WGN Nightside

00:26 sec | 3 months ago

Wrigleyville rooftops open for Chicago Cubs home games in 2020

"And sports Wrigleyville Rooftop owners say they will be allowed to have fans at games once the season starts later this month. The mayor says those venues, the rooftop that rooftops in Wrigleyville, we'll be treated like any other bar or restaurant and are subject to restrictions. Sources tell the Chicago Tribune that the White Sox field of Dreams game is still on for this summer in Iowa. But rather than playing the Yankees, they will play the ST Louis Cardinals

Wrigleyville Rooftop Chicago Tribune White Sox Yankees St Louis Cardinals Wrigleyville Iowa
Young Child, Woman Shot in Chicago's Englewood Neighborhood

The Beat

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

Young Child, Woman Shot in Chicago's Englewood Neighborhood

"One year old and a woman reportedly wounded by gunfire in Englewood and I've been in the neighborhood of sixty third parkway and Halsted police say a child and a woman were shot of that location the child according to a Chicago Tribune report it belongs to the woman they were inside a red Honda accord vehicle has at least four bullet holes in the passenger side as well as several bullets entering through the rear driver's side

Englewood Chicago Tribune
Chicago to Reopen Indoor Restaurants Friday

Roe Conn

00:37 sec | 3 months ago

Chicago to Reopen Indoor Restaurants Friday

"Illinois restaurants are set to reopen for indoor dining as soon as Friday Chicago Tribune restaurant critic Phil the telltale WGN's John Williams when he gets back to reviewing establishments will have to take into account changes they've had to make these are not the restaurants they were in most cases they're doing they've simplified the menu a little bit for efficiency sake and for the fact that the they can't always get their hands on the ingredients sort of a greenish they took for granted a year ago the city today announcing extended outdoor dining and several Chicago neighborhoods including Chinatown Andersonville Little Italy and Addison

Phil John Williams Addison Illinois Chicago Tribune Chicago Andersonville
Hotels Clean Up Their Acts to Win Guests' Confidence

Business Wars Daily

03:34 min | 3 months ago

Hotels Clean Up Their Acts to Win Guests' Confidence

"If we needed another reminder of how hard the hotel industry has been hit by Covid nineteen on Tuesday, Hilton Worldwide Holdings announced that it would cut two thousand one hundred corporate jobs across the US, roughly sixty percent of hotel rooms are empty, according to research firm SDR and that doesn't include the thousands of hotels it of closed for good since the beginning of the pandemic. But summer vacation season is upon us, and Hilton is trying to convince customers. It's safe to check in again to do so. They're coming clean about their virus. Safety measures and launching a new campaign called the clean stay program to WANNA. Be Vacationers out of their homes. Hilton has assembled a virus fighting a team that includes the maker of Lysol and the Mayo. Clinic's infection prevention and control team. Team goal is to enhance existing disinfecting and safety measures and ultimately to bolster travelers confidence. The hotel is looked at virtually every area. It's operations and found ways to reduce infection risk loyalty program members can use an APP for contactless check in each room is secured with a clean stay seal after cleaning to show. It's been disinfected with the hotels. New rigorous standards frequently touched areas like lights. Lights which is door handles. TV, remotes get extra cleaning, attention and disinfecting wipes are provided for gas use common areas like lobbies restaurants, fitness centers have been rearranged for social distancing and restaurants ditched buffets in favor of safer options like covered dishes and grab and go items not to be left in the dust. Marriott is also calling in the COVID nineteen reinforcements. The Hilton competitor created the Marriott Global. Global Cleanliness Council, recruiting infection, prevention and food safety experts from ECOLAB adventist health care and purdue and Cornell University's virus fighting upgrades include hospital grade disinfectant increased surface, cleaning, limited contact and additional training Marriott has also rolling out enhanced technologies, including electrostatic sprayers, which can quickly disinfect fitness, centers, pool, areas, and other spaces, and the companies, testing ultraviolet light technology to sanitize keys and devices shared by associates. But is an extreme safety makeover enough to coax customers out of their homes. It might be the pandemic has created pent up, demand for travel also called revenge spending a June survey by destination analysts family at one in five people are already traveling with no hesitation and seven ten have plans to do so by the end of the year. As these brands try to do each other's squeaky clean practices. Third Party experts are getting in the game to the global bio. Risk Advisory Council a division of the Cleaning Trade Association Issa. Now offers the Gbi A. C. Star certification, hotels, restaurants, and other venues can earn the distinction by having the proper chemicals, equipment and procedures in place to remove harmful pathogens. The program began accepting applications may seventh Marriott and Hilton. Competitor Hyatt is the first hotel brand to commit to getting. All of its property certified the Chicago Tribune reports. Of course such change requires big investments in products, technology and training at a time when revenue is down, but new virus hotspots are emerging, and a vaccine or cure is still on the relatively distant horizon, so hotel brands are doubling down on better hygiene to get nervous trawlers back on the road. Booking those empty hotel rooms.

Marriott Hilton Hilton Worldwide Holdings Marriott Global Covid Hyatt United States Chicago Tribune Cleaning Trade Association Iss Global Cleanliness Council SDR Mayo Advisory Council Ecolab Lysol
Journalists covering protests face assault and arrest

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

05:57 min | 4 months ago

Journalists covering protests face assault and arrest

"We have to talk first about what we've seen in the past forty eight hours. The appalling targeting of reporters who are trying to tell America's story there is so much that so wrong about this situation first and foremost the video seem around the world, the video of George Floyd's final minutes alive. It's so wrong that it's hard to see, but it is right that we look. It is right that we bear witness. And it is right to see protesters taking action as a result, but it is wrong to see reporters and photographers and news crews, being assaulted and arrested at these protests, police firing rubber bullets at reporters. When their pores are holding up press badges. That doesn't belong in America authorities handcuffed reporters is wrong. That's what happens in authoritarian regimes, not in America, but yet it happened again last night in Minneapolis and in New York. These threats against the press, not just coming from police. In recent days, protesters have ganged up on the press in trouble cities. We've seen a photo journalist attacked. We've seen on TV. News crew chased out of a park. That is wrong. Rioters destroying TV. News vehicles and stealing cameras is wrong. Almost everybody knows this, and it's right to call it out and say that America is better than this. Reporters don't want to be the story. They just WanNa, tell the stories of the protesters and the police and the residents of these communities that want to be able to feel safe. Some of the examples of what we see in in terms of reporters, seemingly being targeted this for example was on Friday and Louisville. is a local CBS reporter and her cameraman in Louisville, Kentucky apparently shot with pepper balls while live on the air Later, the police apologized to the station, but we've seen other reporters that here's Dallas for his other reporters being being hit by rubber bullets. Tear gas there. These situations we've seen in a number of different cities I'll read some other examples to you. A reporter in Columbia South Carolina was hit by a rock and had to be taken to the hospital. Here's a freelance photographer in Minneapolis. who was shot in the left eye while covering the protests? He says she's been blinded in. One of her is as a result in Chicago Chicago. Tribune, photographer. Photographer said looters shoved and stole her cameras in DC. This is in Washington and Lafayette Park a Fox. News crew was harassed and then chased out of the park by protesters who were cursing and screaming at Fox News and criticizing right wing media. This is deplorable behaviour by protesters. We've also seen in LAS. Vegas. The arrests of two photographers police took these photographers into custody. That is completely inappropriate Out The next morning, you know we need to follow up on these cases and make sure that people are held accountable when these incidents happen, reporters should not be the story in these cases, but it's happened again in the past few hours overnight here in New York City. A reporter for Huffpost was arrested while wearing police badge and covering the protests in Brooklyn in Minneapolis Angeles, Time staff writer had police firing tear-gas remember bullets at point, blank blank range at her into a crowd of protesters and journalists. We're going to talk to her and just a moment. Reuters cameraman also said He. He was hit by rubber bullets. Some reporters have had to seek medical attention. A news crew KCRW says. The LAPD shouted her rubber bullets as she was holding her press badge above her head, and at least one case as I mentioned. We've seen protesters being the aggressors. This is a photographer for K. D. K. in Pittsburgh. He says he was attacked by protesters downtown on Saturday quote they stomped and kicked me. He said in a tweet from the back of the ambulance I'm bruised and bloodied but alive. My camera was destroyed. Another group of protestors pulled me out and saved my life. Thank you. This is what's happening. Members of the media in cities across the country this weekend. It feels like targeting. It feels like an escalation. It is deeply disturbing. And, we're waiting for statements about it from the president and from other national leaders when about a dozen reporters were arrested in Ferguson in two thousand fourteen. President Obama spoke about that defended the rights of the press. We will see who defends the rights of the press this weekend and in the days to come. Let's talk to the reporters, so we're in the middle of this. I just showed you. One of them molly. Hennessy Fisk reporter for the Los Angeles Times, who's got some wounds on her leg. We'll talk to her in a moment and Omar Jimenez here from CNN of course, famously iconic arrested live on CNN on Friday morning I. Don't think we're ever GonNa forget that image Omar of you being taken into custody your hands behind your back There's been a lot of news sense. Then tell me about last night and what it was like when. The police officers were were moving toward your crew and you had to seek shelter on Saturday night. Well. I think Brian we expect some of that. When you come out to a protest like this, because part of trying to cover the clashes between law enforcement, and those that are coming out, is you you expect in some ways for for things to escalate just based on how previous stories like these have gone so our team actually had a plan to sort of watch. How this law enforcement team is advancing. Go back to our first safe spot. Then continue to retreat to our next safe spot, but that didn't stop. That stop us even though our camera was rolling from getting shot at Berlitz wise, my producer got hit in the back with Some rubber bullets. My talk got hitting his leg with bullets. Actually he says that he had a cellphone in his in his pocket there and he didn't get any bruising on his leg, and when he realized, or he realized the reason was because he put out his phone, he was completely shattered, and he still has that piece of that rubber. Bullet is well so so in some ways. It was the normal aspect of covering protests, but in many ways. This one felt just a little bit different. Sort of looks different same question to you, Molly. What happened to you last night? Is it right that your colleague? Photographer had to go to the hospital. That's that's correct. My colleague Caroline coal photographer. We were both standing right

Reporter America New York City George Floyd Minneapolis Fox News Tribune Reuters Vegas Chicago Tv. News Molly Louisville Lafayette Park President Trump Caroline Coal Omar Jimenez DC
It's The End Of The World! (Again

Your Brain on Facts

09:21 min | 6 months ago

It's The End Of The World! (Again

"In the village of Giddy Shem Devon England in the eighteenth century lived a woman named Joanna. South caught southpaw became convinced that she had supernatural powers and began selling seals of the Lord essentially tickets to get into heaven which people bought. She declared that she was the woman of the apocalypse as foretold in the Bible and that she would give birth to the new Messiah on October nineteenth eighteen forty one despite the fact that she was sixty four years old. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We are living through a more uncertain than usual time right now. I wouldn't say it's the end of the world but others might and half history is rife with people who claim to have been told or to worked out when the end of days is coming. The list on Wikipedia is twenty four page downs. And that's really only focusing on Judeo Christian. Prophecies everyone from peasant girls two months to the mathematician who popularized the use of the decimal point. How Theory Cotton Mather? The influential Puritan Minister who played a decisive role in the Salem witch trials proclaimed in sixteen ninety one that Doomsday would occur in sixteen ninety seven basing the date on events that were current to him that he interpreted as fulfillment of Biblical prophecy when sixteen. Ninety-seven passed uneventfully. Mother changed his forecast. First to seventeen o six than seventeen sixteen and finally seventeen seventeen. Mother didn't make any more between seventeen seventeen and his death in seventeen twenty eight but he was still certain that the end was near Jonas Wendell along with other adventist preachers predicted. The Second Coming of Christ would occur between eighteen. Seventy three and eighteen seventy four after the prediction didn't bear out Nelson Bar. You're of follower of Wendell reinterpreted prediction to mean that. Jesus had returned in eighteen. Seventy four but he was invisible that does make it harder to disprove all grant you then. There was mother. Shipton the witch of York a fascinating blend of historical figure and embellished character. Born Ursula South the older and a thunderstorm in a cave in fourteen eighty eight to a teenage mother who refused to name. The father mother Shipton looked every bit like the iconic which would he skin hunched posture. Hooked nose the works. She made a number of predictions all of them in verse like Shakespeare's Weird Sisters in Macbeth. She said to have predicted Henry. The eighths disillusion of the monasteries the great fire of London the reign of Elizabeth I and even possibly the invention of airplanes on the telephone but the first written version of her predictions didn't come out until eighty years after her death and some of the authors have admitted to adding to what she supposedly said. So we're not one hundred percent certain if mother Shipton really said the world to an end shall come in eighteen hundred and eighty one but we can be fairly certain that it didn't the cave in which she was born is now a tourist attraction along with the nearby petrifying well items placed in the well are said to turn to stone. And that's more of a loose interpretation than an outright fable. The water in the well has a very high mineral content and those minerals will attach themselves to anything in the water making. It look like the object is turning to stone. Bona snacked the witches in Macbeth referred to usually as the weird sisters but were originally called the wayward sisters meaning. Good women who lost their way and been seduced by the allure of Magic Doomsday Predictions. Could come from the highest offices in the land. But that didn't make them anymore. True Pope Sylvester the second game pope in nine ninety nine seat with the auspicious-sounding date of the year one thousand looming so Vesta in a number of other Christian leaders foretold the coming of Jesus at the turn of the Millennium and many people believed it like really believed there were riots in the streets. Thousands of Christians fled to the holy city of Jerusalem and many attended what was expected to be particularly interesting midnight. Mass at Saint Peter's Basilica on New Year's Eve when the morning of January first on and it was clear the world had not ended semester and the other Christian leaders revised their predictions. Have you picked up on that trend yet? If Judgment Day hadn't kicked off on the anniversary of Jesus's Birth. It must do on the anniversary of his death. So so Lester. The second declared the world would end in ten thirty three but he was already fifty four years old and sure enough. Didn't have to hear any gainsaying when the apocalypse didn't come the second time because he'd been dead for thirty years a century later pope innocent. The third had a less obvious and markedly less nice reason for his end. Time Prophecy innocent blamed the Muslims Christians and Muslims have had kind of assorted past and innocent viewed Muslims as agents of Satan to his mind. The apocalypse would occur six hundred and sixty six years after the founding of Islam. Which would put it in the year. Twelve eighty four. He too died well before he could see how wrong he was predicting. The end of the world requires perseverance. If at first you don't succeed try try again. You've got to stick with it. Like the founder of the Worldwide Church of God Herbert Armstrong along with his sons Richard and Garner Armstrong picked up quite a following even before claiming that the world would end in nineteen thirty. Six and only members of his church would be saved the Great Depression and the dust bowl probably made it easy for people to believe that our collective ticket was about to get punched Armstrong then turned his sights to nineteen forty-three where the second war to end all wars lent credence to his doomsday claims when life settled into the post war normal Armstrong amended his prediction to Nineteen seventy-two a significant margin of error. People sold all of their possessions to pay for travel to Petra in Jordan. Which most of us know as the Resting Place of the holy grail from the third and Final Indiana Jones. Movie where they would be safe from Roy Moore three which Armstrong said would be all of Europe led by Germany against the US and the UK. World War three did not in fact begin. Nineteen seventy-two or the next mandate of Nineteen seventy-five in December nineteen fifty four Chicago Tribune headline read Dr Warrens of disasters in World Tuesday worst to come in one thousand nine fifty five. He declares the doctor was just passing along the predictions made by Dorothy Martin a fifty four year old housewife from Oak Park Illinois. Martin believed that aliens from the Planet Clarion had beamed messages into her brain informing her that a. Masoud flood would soon destroy the planet. Her prophecies attracted a small group of followers including the doctor who called themselves seekers. Many of the seekers quit. Their jobs. Sold their belongings and removed any medal from their bodies which Martin said would be essential for boarding the alien ship. That would take them away. They gathered at Martin's home on Christmas. Eve Nineteen fifty five sing carols while they waited to be beamed to safety. This wasn't the first time the group had gathered for their exodus. The aliens were supposed to come on December seventeenth but didn't then the eighteenth twenty first and finally the twenty fourth. As the night of Christmas Eve wore on Martin's followers became understandably inpatient finally at four forty five in the morning on Christmas Day Martin announced that God had been so impressed by their actions. He was no longer going to destroy the earth. Nice recovery. Though Martin had few followers their experience has left a lasting legacy. The group had been infiltrated if you will by a small group of psychologists and students from the University of Minnesota led by social psychologist. Leon festinger festinger wrote about the whole experience in when prophecies fail a social and psychological study of a modern group that predicted the destruction of the world. Kind of a lengthy title. But we'll go with it. It was in this book that he began to explore something. You've probably heard of cognitive dissonance. That's when two disparate ideas exist in your head at the same time and you feel uncomfortable until you can find a way to make them fit somehow. Festinger observed cognitive dissonance in the seekers. Who had to repeatedly convince themselves that Martin was right even after seeing with their own is that she wasn't

Dorothy Martin Shipton Jonas Wendell Leon Festinger Festinger Armstrong Macbeth Giddy Shem Devon England Jesus Pope Sylvester Salem Joanna Elizabeth I University Of Minnesota Herbert Armstrong Chicago Tribune Ursula South Nelson Bar
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"I am with the Chicago Tribune today thanks for having me going on to get your calls with the whole these new taxes that we're just going to be paying for you're gonna have to give up something I don't know what it is we're not as bad as California the other forty seven cents but were now in thirty eight so there you go build up your tank over the weekend I didn't it doubled to that's the other issue was nineteen cents the state portions so doubling is a pretty it's pretty serious and lot and keep in mind you are paying for transportation and the roads through your income taxes through the Illinois department transfer text transportation tollways when you when you ride the tollways and through your local property taxes wherever you live whatever suburb if you're in the city they also have a transportation department so it's not like we're not already paying on our freight for using roads but this is just going to add I'm waiting for them to tax the air I breathe just take it it's common take it all right this is really interesting I saw the story today and I wanted to have the fraternal order of police president Kevin Graham on some glad you're joining us Kevin because I saw this and I read this I thought wow what a deterrent for police officers to not want to get out of their vehicles and I'm not speaking for them but this is a story Chicago police officers required to notify the office of emergency management every time they point a firearm at someone this is part of new rules and it's not it was supposed to start today and it's not but you know Kevin thanks for joining us because a little excessive to me in my off mark here no you're not mark this is this is a dangerous practice we are we're very concerned about the safety of our officers when you get out of a car you certainly should have your especially when you are don't know who you're stopping you very well may determine that you need to have your your firearm not only at your side but pointed in front of you especially if you determine this is a felony stop.

Chicago Tribune California president Illinois Kevin Graham Chicago
"chicago tribune" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Actor jussie smollet in a sixteen count indictment that alleges that he lied to Chicago police about being the victim of the phony attack. The former empire's star had been initially charged last month by prosecutors on one felony count. The filing a false report. The incident sparked breathless international media coverage in Ted social media, speculation accelerated by the political implications of an openly gay black man's alleged assault by attackers who put a noose around his neck. He claimed that they yelled maga- tried to bring Trump and Trump supporters that oh my God. The Trump racist white supremacist. Mega loving Trump loving attackers. They hit him because he was gay because he was black. And of course, it was a complete like a complete fabrication. Chicago police had worked around the clock on the case for three weeks, I to investigate an alleged hate crime. And then to completely dismantle smaller story this data what I'm reading is coming from the Chicago Tribune. So this is a Chicago Tribune report. And then on February twenty first the day that was charge. Chicago police superintendent Eddie Johnson blasted this guy for dragging Chicago's reputation through the mud. So the breaking news is that jussie smollet has been indicted on sixteen counts. Dumb ass. But I'd check. Yes. Dope. Yes. Unbelievable. That he would even think that he can get away with this. You know, the the story from Chicago Tribune said former empire star, I know that they they cut them from the last two episodes, but I had not seen sewer. They fired him completely. So. Yeah. I I had not seen if he had been fired completely. I don't know. Could you could you look up the the Chicago Tribune story? I just ran it seems then the k they call them the former empire star format seems to suggest that he was fine. I still remember that. But what a what a moron. They ought to throw the book at him, and he should be prosecuted to the full Senate the law. He on a have to reimburse you he wanted more money. He thought I guess he was making one hundred thousand dollars an episode. He wanted more money. So he can cockpit the scheme I by sending that that letter with the Canucks fake cut out letters, you know, trying to signify a ransom note was cutting letters out of a magazine and this threat against his life with a noose hanging around a stick figure with a gun to his head or something to that effect. And then he's going to die and this and there was white powder in the envelope. And it was mailed to the production office for the TV show shot in Chicago, and that didn't draw enough attention that wasn't good enough. He was disappointed in the response. So he concocted the attack on the street. How people think they're gonna get away with this nonsense that it's not going to collapse that it's not gonna fall apart. That to me is just. Incredible. Just amazing. I've got a question for you in the final minutes of the show here. So can can I see my call screen here. Please. Can you move over? The I want to see the cost. Thank I wanna try. And if you're going to open up a few lines here. I wanna know what you think what you the Schnitt listener thinks. Here's the story. I want to know what the reward money should be what he thinks fair. There's a crazy story. So a guy came forward this week yesterday. As a matter of fact, a gut. Oh, okay. Thank a little little late. But better late never the name of the hardware store where the the rope was purchased was called crafty beaver crafty beaver. Yeah. Not to be confused with beaver liquors, which is a fine wine and spirits establishment in Avon, Colorado. Which I been to beaver liquors many times over the years. Yeah. I'm not making enough. There's an actual there's a folks those that are listed in Colorado. You know, all about this or those in the Vale area in Avon..

Chicago Tribune Chicago Trump jussie smollet Avon Colorado assault maga Senate superintendent Eddie Johnson one hundred thousand dollars three weeks
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Of the Chicago Tribune. A lot of time before the news but burning question, Ben who has been producing all afternoon and says to me, hey, we're getting a lot of calls about this were a lot of people want to know. I didn't even know this was a possibility, but I guess calm. You mentioned your lovely girlfriend yesterday in her questionable Christmas gift. You guys have been together for I don't know how long but the question that everybody wants to know is did KARN. Pop. The question now is this is this something you would like to share now that you're on the hook. Did you? In fact, pop the question, the answer is no I have not I do appreciate the interest. I think people have heard all your dating tales of woe for all these many years. So it's it's only, you know, if you're going to live that part of your life here. I want to hear the happy stuff too. I would call him dating tales of amazement. But okay, what was probably more accurate. Work. We're progressing nicely. Brian. We've been we've been together for it'll be two years in March for you. I think that's a nice timeframe. There's no Russian. Yeah. Don't let people pressure, right? If the time is right. The time is right between you two. And you got a little piece of advice from guys been married for a while. You wanna make sure she's going to say, yes. Because I don't know if I know you come you bounce back from a no, frankly, no would be tough there. There's no doubt about it. Mccaw Mark Carmen can can write out. Well, hopefully won't come to that. I'm sure it won't. That's what I'm saying. You just gotta be sure. Right. Right. Right. Well, you know, and I I'm trying to figure out how these people do these things like they get the the roses at the dinner, and the this and the that don't do it in public. That's my that would be my suggestion. Empire in private really because people like they love to walk by the bean and take pictures and all that stuff in the end. It's between you and her. Yes. I mean, I do I gotta get a canoe kayak down. There. Would you do? Why would if you tip over the ring falls out, what are you going to wear to white Steed and right up. Like, all of a sudden, you're sir galahad, you're, you know, maybe you're on the tennis court you lobby tour. You just hit the box over the nets. If she catches it. Yeah. That that see tennis. That'd be beautiful tennis thing right now, you just opened up a possibility there talk to one of my friends recently. I did it in the kitchen. I don't know about doing the whole kitchen Harry did it in the kitchen the kitchen, they were making a chicken make it a chicken. And here's the ring ex not a euphemism either. They were actually cooking cooking waterfowl. Tickets not waterfall. So they work. Yeah. Does anything? I did it. I did it in the in my living room the old living remove well, sure. She drove up I had a sign on my balcony, and she came in and I had the roses and the ring and the whole deal and just it was very nice where their cookies there. I don't remember being cookies, I know that we did it. And then I had to go do a show. So. Like come on you coming to the club with me. But yeah, it was. It's it's you know, you can do it any way you want. And here's the thing. However, you do it is going to be perfect. Okay. Because she's gonna she's gonna love it. You're going to remember it so decided, yeah. You can't go right? You're asking the big question, you know, as long as the rock is there and not Dwayne Johnson. But as long as the jewelry is there, and it's looking good, you're fine. Yeah. But I got to think about a radio bit too. I got to think about it. You know, you know, you Jones. Some things private. Frankly, the Radio Big could go away tomorrow for all of us. That's true. To kim. Just stared me down. No, you don't keep it private. I think that's more of a you can always tell the story that helped plan several of these just do something. Nice. Don't cook. Do something. Nice something nice. That doesn't mean do something over the top. Silly. That doesn't mean you skydive in the two of you. That's all that matters. Right. Don't put it in food where she's gonna choke on it. Don't put it on the scoreboard at have your many sporting events. And would be I mean northwestern is playing Columbia coming up here. That's a big game right on the kiss Cam. Make it into a hot take your proposal into a heartache. The best thing that's ever happened to you. That's a great what seventy two hundred would would you marry me? If you it if you would how would you want to be proposed? These are these are options. Sure, go with it. Now, we do a whole lot of stuff. All right. We we have to go with now we have to go with this break. And then we have to go with news. But we'll we'll put this on the hopper. We'll revisit at some point. Celebrate.

tennis Jones Ben Chicago Tribune white Steed Dwayne Johnson Mark Carmen nets Brian Harry Columbia kim two years
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Giveaway. Courtesy of the Chicago Tribune. Got economy. Maggie. Hi, how are you? This is gonna be fun. I don't have prejudice nothing about chain Heckman. That's okay. Well, we'll make it easy on you. Either way you're a winner. So it's all good. Well, I have a good story for you. When you finish. Okay. All right. We'll start ready. Okay. I he was considered to play the part of Hannibal Lecter in silence of the labs is that real? Or is that ridiculous echo here that is that is that because maybe Peggy's radios up high or something like that. Or is that something? He probably would've could've played the part. All right, Carl. What do you think? Hannibal lector. He was considered to play the part of Hannibal Lecter and silence of the labs say ridiculous. Well, Peggy you are absolutely right. It is real. No more than you think. Or number two when he was sixteen years old. He lied about his age in order to join the marines is that really ridiculous. Peggy. Wait a second. I got that one wrong, right? But this is all about Peggy. I have no idea. But Teaneck when is the kind of guy. No. I don't think he did it. You're gonna say ridiculous. All right, Carl. I say ridiculous. It is real. Absolutely. Carl you're doing great at least you have literally stink at this. All right last. But not least he was the first choice to play character. Mike Brady on the Brady bunch. Is that real or is that ridiculous? I think it's ridiculous. That's ridiculous is real that is absolutely meal. You got hitting me. I'm not kidding. You. Those are. Carl you got zero out of three Peggy you got one right? And because of that you have won a little on that his gift certificate. Limo matters is.

Peggy Hannibal Lecter Carl Hannibal lector Chicago Tribune Heckman Maggie Teaneck Mike Brady sixteen years
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:41 min | 1 year ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The Chicago Tribune. Yes. Twenty WGN on the road live here the AllState skyline studio it's hard to think. Right. We are just a. A handful of short shopping days from that holiday time from Christmas. And so people are making their choices here. And I know that a lot of people are thinking of themselves when it comes to great grilling gifts for that special someone what are you gonna get? Right. You could head into now. And in almost any store people have it you don't necessarily have to have to find a specific barbecue. So of course, we recommend the backyard barbecue star where you've got everything plus the expertise to go along with it. We have one of the experts in studio with us the one and only max good from amazing ribs dot com. I think on the product side, here's what it is. That you guys do at had knows this in a big shout out to him as he's he's heading off to the theater, right? Correct. Me does not define him. Right. Grilling barbecue expert, and he's gonna take in some Shakespeare today. You know, I think Shakespeare. When he was done doing all the theater stuff. It would it would grill a little bit, right? He would barbecue somewhat. Well, all around the world, there's different traditions of cooking outdoor over live fire, and I'm certain Shakespeare took advantage of it in his day with are there any now, I have no have all my Shakespeare place in front of me. But are there any scenes where there is maybe a conversation over let's say a grill. I I love Shakespeare, and I have memorized a few passages. But I don't recall anything specifically along those lines. Okay. Well, maybe we'll look into it. The the the lesser known was maybe we'll emerge at some point. So think about this you guys when it comes to the list. It's basically the Shakespeare of information when it comes to greet products on the grill side, and you do the grills the smokers, and that kind of end of things and people think, oh, well, jeez. How many can there possibly be max? Right. There's so many out there now. It's incredible. Well, you know, the the desire to cook out. Adores is escalating worldwide American style barbecue is catching on all over the place, particularly in Europe, Australia, some other areas. But yeah, I mean, I I try very hard. But I can't keep up with all the products that are out there. They're coming at me, a mild mannered Dane well in. You think about the popularity of it, and you talked a little bit about so sort of that global reach. I was just down the Jack, and they have international competition. There were people that were doing some really amazing stuff. I mean, so that learning curve and our good friend, mutual friend. Really happy Dr barbecues over there at grill stock all the time. And he said initially when they first started there. It was crazy. They didn't necessarily like understand the whole concept of American barbecue. And what to do and how to do it? There are certainly creative. Right. And there's some great minds, and they had some decent equipment. But now, I mean, it's only taken a handful of years, I think because of the internet because places like amazing ribs dot com. Right. We're all information is out there. And I think the the playing field is getting kind of level where people are are. Are you a more people are grilling and enjoying grilling all around the world. And it is a good business. I think it is one of those businesses. I mean, I don't know if you've studied the trends or whatever, but as far as being able to make something and do it at a very high level in your own home. I mean, grilling is one of those things. Absolutely. I think cooking in general. You know, you have the all the food shows on TV and on the internet. People like to cook. Just a wonderful thing. You know, you really get a reward every night after you've cooked something, hopefully, you get a reward. If. Awarded shows true. That's true. But you know, I it's it's it can be a social activity particularly with barbecue. I mean, what RBQ is social at you? You wanna be outside? You want to have a beverage in your hand, you want to be gabbing away with your friends and family. We we're going to be pushing. I think it's going to be forty fifty degrees today maybe tomorrow too. And so you don't have to brave the elements in order to do it. But Chicago is one of those places as I have talked to grilling enthusiasts. It's one of those places where we don't let the weather stand in the way of what it is that we want to do whereas in other places in the country. It is more seasonal, right? You know, it's it's in the summer in the backyard, kind of thing, certainly we do all of that. But but here I think in Chicago and give me your thoughts as far as maybe some of the feedback because amazing ribs dot com, you have fans subscribers people that come to the site from all over the place. But but Chicago, I mean, do we grill more than maybe other places in the country? I don't have statistics on it. But I would say that there is a trend as people. Become more and more interested in cooking and more interested now door cooking. There are leading weather stop them. Whether it's rain or snow, or whatever, you know. And we hear from a lot of folks that say they, you know, I don't care if it's snowing. They send us pictures of them shoveling their grill off they're out there grilling away. It's the whole grilling and meet and we've talked about famous Dave always says that there's something you know, as Steven Reich. Glenn always talks about it as well. Right. As something sort of almost from the caveman times that we're like it's in our DNA as humans to be able to to have meat and cook it over a fire and all those kind of things, but the equipment has changed. You think it's been around forever? And obviously it has with the the whole caveman thing, but the, but the grilling side of it is when was the one was the first grill made was was it like a Weber kettle grill. I mean, and I don't want to go all the way back to you know, what we're in the ruins of Pompeii kind of finding something that could be, but but as far as like the modern girl as we know it well. However was one of the first that really made a splash, and they're right here in the Chicago area, by the way, as you probably know from but there were other girls banging around at the same time portable kitchen PK. They came out the very same years Weber introduced their famous cattle nine hundred fifty two. People were I'm sure there was stuff floating around out there. But I mean, Henry Ford famously tried to promote barbecue with the model t he had these wacky little kits. Because the idea was I got to get people to buy these cars. So I have to give them a reason to buy them. Well, you can go drive countryside grill. Get a car, I think he hit me with it in a bag of charcoal. And here's a funny story, people don't know this. He actually started the Kingsford charcoal company. Really? Yes. He was may he had all these wouldn't parts from making the model t's they were a little odds and ends. And he said what can I do with them? I I don't wanna waste them. So that he made charcoal out of them and one of his daughters. I believe married a guy whose last name was Kingsford. And he ended up taking it over. I did not know that. So one of our kind of a conic adventures was also there is one of the founding fathers of the charcoal briquettes. Absolutely true. Yes. Wow. Okay. So all right. So let's talk a little bit about what what we have here today. So now you've got Weber. It is one of those as simple as it may have been in the fifties. It is it's basically unchanged. But it's still, you know, it's not broke don't fix it. Right. It's the same one. Now. I know they've done some adjustments and certainly some bells and whistles, but they're still making the same basic thing. If you go to their facility in Palatine, Illinois, right outside of Chicago. They have a small museum that has the older and they have one of the original kettles. Here's something else that you probably knew this. We're looking out of the beautiful. Lakeside here from your from your studio. Weber was actually a company that made booties that were used out on the lake and on bodies water, and that round bottom George Stevens was working for Weber as I recall and making these bullies. And he just chopped the top of one off and put a lid on it. And that's how the kettle started. He put dampers in events and on put it on legs. So he got the name somehow. I guess I don't know all the details on that. But Webber grill was actually the bottom of a buoy. And if you if you see the original ones you go. Yeah. But it's funny. I've grilled on them for so long to open at litter. This whole thing it looks like it came from Pompeii, and he opened up the lead. You look at the bottom, and it looks almost exactly like they look. Wow. You got think? Right. It's it's a very simple concept, and this kind of thing that's been sort of copied in different ways. But Weber is the one that has really kind of staked told that that market share right in and you look back yards here in the Chicago area. Anyway, around the country, you know, you're gonna see a Webber grill back there. And so are they still as guy who's used consistently testing things out there is it the mousetrap thing? I mean is it still for what it is you to put some charcoal in and and light it up and make some make some things right? Whether it's hot dogs hamburgers, or even maybe some more complicated. So is the Webber grill. Still the way to go from a product perspective a full-size Weber kettle you can make anything on it. You can make pizza. You can make cakes. You know, you can make ribs you can make steak you name it. You can cook out on a as long as you know, what you're doing. And if all you want to do is, burgers and hotdogs, you can do that too. You know? Yeah. For the money. You can't go wrong. You know, if that's severe on the desert island scenario. What are you going to bring with you? Charcoal on your island might as well go with a kennel, and for those people out there that are considering thanks and we've got a text from the six three zero. Do you have to get you know, there's other markets that make or other places where you can get basically a kettle kettle type grill. It may not be the brand name of Weber because Weber's is kind of. I think it's maybe at a premium, right? It's it's a little bit of expensive for what it is. Are they all the same? Or is there something magical about is it the metal or the way that they're doing it? Or is it just better as far as quality of construction? There are some other good brands that make charcoal grows and are not all kettles either. But yeah, there's a lot of knockoffs out there. Weber does a lot of things right though. Some of it's on the marketing and sales side, but also customer service. They have the best customer service in the business. I don't want to sound like I'm doing a commercial here. But they do I've been at their factory, and they're very proud of their processes, and they have a reason to the they're consistent. They're good. They're not very generally a little more expensive, particularly when you get into the gas grill. You. But once you have elaborate a lot of people don't switch. They just depend on the kind of thing, and that's part of the sales. Of course, you've got to make sure that we mentioned we're talking with max. Good from amazing ribs.

Weber Chicago Shakespeare marketing and sales Chicago Tribune WGN Kingsford charcoal company AllState skyline Europe Henry Ford Dane Steven Reich RBQ Kingsford Palatine Illinois Glenn Pompeii Dave
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Giveaway. Courtesy of the Chicago Tribune. Earlier this week, we checked in with Chicago Tribune columnist Rex hooky as I absolutely loved the food drive that he was doing in the name of love and also maybe a little bit of hate hate wrecks. How are you doing tonight? Betty. How's it going? Really? Well, everyone by the way, you're listening to WGN radio. I'm your host Patti Vasquez. Rex just let you know his studio we have Dave Lundy and Mike lever and Eric elk. They're part of my freak out Friday panel. Because I I can't I can't cover the big headlines every single day, and we do it on Fridays. And sometimes we forget, but some of that. Right. Well, some of the people who read your column freak out because they hate what you're right. Yes. Accurate. Yes. Tells a little bit about the campaign, and then how this has turned out today because it culminated in today's results. So let tell us about it. Oh, yeah. It's it's a very exciting. Exciting thing as I did. But the about two weeks ago, I started this thing called the insult a columnist holiday food drive, which was intended as a way for people who don't like Collins to sort of quantify their dislike of me by donating money to the greater straggled food depository. And of course, I also allowed people who do whatever whatever is reason like my college, you know, they also donate and there were two teams. Rick stinks and Rex rocks. And you know, I just sorta left it to the to the to the market let the market decide. Whether I am good or bad. Iraq. Do you think Iraq? I gotta know turns.

Rex hooky Chicago Tribune Iraq WGN Patti Vasquez Betty Dave Lundy Collins Eric elk Mike lever Rick two weeks
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Of the Chicago Tribune. Twenty five we continue our awesome conversation with the great duty pilot from our WGN newsroom. You also you've heard her talk about her opioid series. That's airing this week and tomorrow and Thursday as well on WGN radio. You can get you down wgnradiOcom duties also are goodbye, girl, and people are texting Judy. We're gonna miss you. We love Judy, and we're gonna miss Judy from the seven seven three I'll screen out screen shot for you. I love our listeners. I know I will miss them. But but you will be around you'll be around. His goodbye goodbye, girl. So and you have some holiday all the parties are about to start. Now this weekend. Yes. So an extra tomorrow, I'll be going out to sell my good bike. But I'll I'll let you in secret ahead of time and tell you what I'll be doing. Okay, cool. So yeah, it's all about gifts. Of course, you know. Standard. You don't want to spend the money, and I am all about recycling and up cycling, even if you have the money, you spend a lot of it. It's ridiculous. So go to goodwill. Let's say you have a reader in your life, and you want to get them something. Goodwill now has Oprah books an Amazon books, so it's so great and they're all in one section. So they're easy to fight. I would maybe get a sketch of books or five books and then put a big ribbon around tied up. And there's sure great holiday gift, you can give someone or say you have maybe cooking your life. You know, go to goodwill. Find a big patched up pack cookbook in there. Maybe a couple of spatulas maybe get oven mitts, some kitchen towels great gift for someone who likes to cook. I would think is giving you that Andrea? But okay, let me just tell you maybe a couple books. Wait, can I tell you? I actually got you a cookbook last night. Jason Belan was in from the golden girls pop up and he brought a couple of cookbooks. I save you one which I'm going to put in your drawer. You're gonna like the. No. But we do have to tell I have to tell I made the chicken potpie tonight, by the way and thought of you really you don't get mad. I want you to hang on for one more segment. I know it's late. But again, you can you can come in late tomorrow. But I wanna talk to you about more. Goodwill stuff and tell the until the recipe story. Okay. All right. Hold on this duty pilot. We'll be back with more after this on seven twenty WGN..

WGN Judy Chicago Tribune Andrea Jason Belan Amazon Oprah
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Courtesy of the Chicago Tribune. Regain people. Mike. And shannon. I get my brain. I play my money. My way. Bye. I am fine museum. The music is so gay and that body dances. When they play. Air my. New. All the children. Hear me play. Hello. Doc. All right. It's that time of.

Chicago Tribune shannon Mike
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Courtesy of the Chicago Tribune, Johnny causes the musical director the program your thoughts on the Woodstock Madrigal singers. It's the best I have ever heard in my tire liner tremendous. The boss is in here, sir. My name is Brian. I'm the teacher and director school since we last saw you you were removed. I was not removed. You gotta plug. I do this group that you've heard this morning is one of six choirs at Woodstock high school and is one of two out of six choirs. Yeah. Does anybody go to class radio just get together to sing? I mean, it's not that. It's a bad thing. They actually do go to class. A lot of these students are in AP classes, honors classes, really involved, and they managed many of these students have zero hour, which means they're rehearsing every day from seven twenty two eight ten and this morning. They had kind of double zero hour because we were on the six o'clock train into the city. So it was it was a shake that effort by the early morning. Well, so where can we say we're going to see them? Yeah. Definitely. So today, actually, we're going to be around the city will be at one north LaSalle singing at a five headquarters, which is a marketing company that promotes Woodstock and promotes local businesses at Woodstock. So we'll be singing it their venue. One north LaSalle will be at the Chris kindle market from one thirty two. Thirty singing at their performance venue. And then in the future, we have the magical dinner, which the students were traditional renaissance and Elizabethan costumes, which is a treat for for them. And for the audience, and that is December.

Woodstock high school director Chicago Tribune LaSalle Brian Johnny AP Chris zero hour
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The Chicago Tribune. This is wondering if our guests like here this time in the middle of the summer. Not yet. Tuesday. Talking to Brooklyn fired and Graham, they are it. Why don't even actually know which characters you are are you the leaves in nutcracker. I do heater which is the nutcracker himself, which is kind of fun. I save Marie from the evil mouse king in the battle scene, and we journey to the world's fair in the second act together. So it's a it's a really fun role to portray a lot of acting which is fun tons of dancing. So, you know, very happy with that. And we all too many different roles. I mean, the great thing about what it does is that they don't try to just burn someone out on one role for the twenty nine shows. I mean, that's just a lot. And so they there's different casts every night. I mean, we can go see two shows in the same year, and it'll feel it's the same story. Same choreography? But however, one interprets it is very different, and it's cool to see the differences. Sometimes. And having done this real before. Brooke? What do you bring like how do, you know gear up for something like this? When there's a different carnation of it. You know, when when you have to sort of bring Christopher's version of it to life. Well, Chris was I was there when it was made. So it's very helpful. 'cause crispy so much information and cues about our characters and background information. So I do a variety of roles throughout this run. I am like a mom in the party scene. And I am in the snow scene and visited the fair also a wild west woman, which is so each character each scene, you know, you have to take your different person. You know, you can't go through the whole to our show like like smile and sparkle it's like you really want to we all try to embody these different roles. You know, like, what does it mean to be this worker woman who's now like celebrating Christmas with her friends and family, and then in the snow seemed like, you know, you're something other world year snowflake has its own challenge. And delight it seems like I mean, obviously, it's very physically demanding the roles and being a dancer. So what do you do? I know you don't get. A lot of free time especially in December. But when you're not performing to kind of unwind and escape the physical demands of dancing. There's a lot of things that you can do. I mean, mostly just you know, breasting is tastes great salt bath, but just icing and making sure that you continue to do your physical therapy every day. It's it's a it's a constant work just to maintain your body, and your physique we take ballet class every day. And it's it's never done practicing. You never done working, and honing your skill and all of that just contributes to how you have to take care of yourself because it's really easy to kind of like burn out, and that that's not fun. And so I sing and going to see physical therapists getting massages also cross is really important to you know, going to the gym doing some yoga doing. Different things because you, you know, you wanna be as well rounded as possible because the dance world nowadays is has a lot of classical stuff. But we do a lot of very contemporary stuff in the spring. We do a hip hop piece. And so it's a lot of different styles of movement. And there's not one perfect way to do anything. And so having a well rounded like physique and body structure, really lends yourself to being able to do wide variety of things that law where are you from originally Brooke I'm from Utah from Utah? So the cold weather doesn't necessarily hit you too hard. Every say, it's harsher. Yeah. Meaner? Does it feel more personal here is that what it is? Attacked by the air joined that where are you from Graham? I'm from San Francisco. Well, I've been here for ten years. Now eleven years and seasons is like a new thing for me never really had that. So I have to say that first couple snowfalls is so magical for me. But then you know, January comes. I'd say grace. Does it is it leaving three lights are down. Yeah. And it's also kinda hard. I have to say sometimes performing when it's when it's cold out because it's like, we'll have like a matinee show, and then in the evening show, and in between, you know, you want to go get a Cup of coffee a bite to eat then. So you have to have really bundle up outside get your food, really quick. And then come back in and then like warm up again. Yeah. You don't wanna you know, pull something. So I was wondering that you have to stay warm. That's that's the name of the game. Yeah. Well, I was delightful talking to both of you. You're so charming, and I can't.

Graham Brooke Chicago Tribune Marie Brooklyn Christopher Chris Utah San Francisco eleven years ten years
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Giveaway. Courtesy of the Chicago Tribune. All right. Let's get a little ridiculous. We have Gary on the phone. Hey, jerry. We have. Great. How are you? I'm a cold. I know that feeling I'm called to bad. It's nice and warm here in the studio and a warm you up with real a ridiculous. You're ready to play album, ridiculously ridiculously ready. We're going to have a group play here. We've got Roger and Ashley. So it's going to be a group game tonight. We're going to see how that goes isn't might playing. Oh, am I. How quickly we forget. We forget our cobras. All right. This is Jack Nicholson the first fun fact, you let me know if this is really ridiculous, Jack Nicholson says one flew over the cuckoo's nest is one of his favourite performances. Gary is that real a ridiculous? I would say that it can be real to be real. All right. Roger I'll go with real. Ashley. Oh, real real. I'm gonna go with ridiculous. Oh, mike. That's not real. I mean, that's not right. It is real. Right. It's real Mike. Just doesn't like to go with the crowd. Okay. Bye. Not what we're doing. Well, number two. You get a gold star. We're maybe you'll get three that Jack Nicholson was asked to play Michael Corleone in the godfather is that really ridiculous. Gary Rogers shopping in bed. Turn turn. Archer? He's excited. I am. I'm gonna say, let's see. Hold was he I'll say that's true. That's real. Okay. Roger. Yeah. I'm gonna go with real. All right. Ashley. Yeah. I could see it. Okay. I'm still gonna go ridiculous. Well, maybe you should go with the crowd next time. So he learned something you guys are doing great. Not so good. Don't worry about it. Ouch. Okay. Gary number three, Jack Nicholson delivered singing telegrams as a teen. Is that really ridiculous? Oh boy. That's a trick question. I'll say singing toilet. Ramsey's teen us. That is ridiculous ridiculous. Roger I'm going with real. All right. This is getting exciting now. Ashley, I think ridiculous. Okay. I'm going for three goose eggs here. I'm going to say, it's. Real. Mike. I'm so sorry, you need lessons. It's ridiculous. He did not I made that up. But you know, what you got to write. Didn't you get to write Mike? Three. Yeah. What was that answer? Your you said, you got them. All right dead. Right. Yeah. You got that trip me up? Right. You get three gold stars. And even better than gold stars..

Jack Nicholson Roger I Ashley Mike Gary Rogers Archer Chicago Tribune Ramsey jerry Michael Corleone
"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on WGN Radio

"At O'Hare now fifty five at midway fifty-six along the lake I'm Dave one and the WGN radio newsroom. And this is the stuff that matters on Chicago's very own seven twenty WGN now back to the Tribune's with Pearson. Pizza Sunday, spin on seven hundred twenty WGN. Warning. Recuse Chicago Tribune. This is a little bit of organizational matters here. But. Donald Trump appeared before the United Nations last week among all the things going on. And speaking to the United Nations, he touted the accomplishments of his administration, which drew curious response from the delegates at the one year ago. I stood before you for the first time in this grand hall. I addressed the threats facing our world and I presented a vision to achieve a brighter future for all of your manager. Today. I stand before the United Nations General assembly to share the extraordinary progress we've made. In less than two years. My administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country. America's so true..

WGN United Nations United Nations General assembl Donald Trump Chicago Tribune Tribune Chicago Dave one America two years one year
"chicago tribune" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"My name is Tig Notaro from premium blend. Are you from premium Lund eighteen years ago I ever saw that which is nights honestly, such a shame for me, it's it's some of the best comedy. Yup, still hold up. Yeah. Remember the best. Yeah, you're. In accomplish, stand up comic something. Uh-huh. Uh-huh. You're also family and Mississippi started a an an Email chain. Pretty recently with just utter excitement about how I have a Wikipedia page. That's how -ccomplish I am and I'm CC'd on the chain and listening or reading my family, and this isn't me making a statement about, oh, my crazy, backwoods, Mississippi relatives. It's just interesting. What in their mind is like a big deal. Yeah, an wicked pedia page. Blew their mind. Can you think of other markers of success that they have been able to respond to. No. I really feel like that was kind of the biggest thing. Yeah. I mean, I think. I don't know. It seems like that that they're proud of me and they think other things are cool. But for some reason, having a Wikipedia page. And a lot of the the comments for like, don't forget the little people. Don't forget where you came like teasing me, but they but they had a genuine. Yeah, you know, weight behind Wikipedia. My my family gets really excited if I'm in the Chicago Tribune is like that's the paper that they've had delivered their whole lives and and my nice to read it before she passed away like every single day. So yes, sometimes I am in the Chicago Tribune and nothing will ever thank you so much for seeing me. I wonder if I've ever been in the Chicago Tribune. Sure. You have. Yeah, sure. You have my friend. Yeah. Yeah. So, yeah, accomplish to some accomplished stand up. I'm also like an actor now and writer in how does that feel around actor? It feels like there's been a terrible mistake. I don't know if you set out to act or no, certainly not. Nor did I ever think anybody would be like that face? That's the face. We gotta put that on a big, how big can we get the screen? What on a big screen, put it up there. Yeah, I didn't think they would be like that haircut. We got a haircut pretty recently. Have you seen it? It's short. I have a bulk up on right now, but I'll take it was going to ask you, but we got caught up in a different conversation and but it seems to stop. Yeah, it's I don't have. I don't have your. You'd see what look check it out. How long has it been since I've seen you we a minute. I'm a whole new guy I have like this. like this. This is. This, I don't know your ago. Myth. With fully acting in like impressive things. Yeah, you're making a movie right now where you just made a movie right now with I've Jennifer Aniston. No, no, no, that's not happening note. Is that happened yet? I've made other movies yet a movie with. Octavia Spencer and Mark Wahlberg and rose Byrne who are legitimate actors. And I feel like I've seen and I'm like, hey, I got hired to be in this two mine if I hang out. But that was fun. I just did a movie with Natalie Portman and some other namedrop people, and it's it's fun. My wife makes fun of me because I show up..

Tig Notaro Chicago Tribune Mississippi Lund Natalie Portman Octavia Spencer Jennifer Aniston writer rose Byrne Mark Wahlberg eighteen years
"chicago tribune" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"That any more than one is usually a good idea definitely, so other comments or questions For our panel Several of you spoke about intimidation, that reporters receive and I've gone to several panels this week where this has come up again and again and hearing the other night from NBC news and obviously an, organization, like Bloomberg the the, New York Times they have a structure in place of support for their journalists and. For their reporters when these issues of intimidation come about specifically the other day that the woman from the New York Times who was one of the reporters who broke the Weinstein case spoke that had she. Worked somewhere else she might not have had that support from editors for the months and months took her to pull that story together when he was actively. Intimidating many reporters I'm wondering what advice would you give to people at, smaller news organizations medium or small sized that perhaps wouldn't have all have that reputational, support behind them institutional support behind them No question that that makes a big difference as someone who's worked, for like a little paper in Alabama where you'd have like sheriffs and even smaller, counties like intimidating people Versus working at the Chicago Tribune or Bloomberg Well known charities we did investigative work with against when I. Was at the, Chicago Tribune and big threats but you know when, you're chairman CEO's a former Wall Street banker and you have a, lot of, lawyers, and people are very season they're like okay don't worry about it And you have not only that financial and. Establishment power behind, you but the depth of experience up and down, the line to kind of gauge things it makes things a lot, easier the, only, thing I can say Is you have to instill in, here journalists that people will try to intimidate you I mean the people still constantly. Try to intimidate me and my. At our reporters in small ways Little there's constant little friction with the White House with the State Department where they're trying to. Claim you know that we shouldn't be doing something and, it's really to try to intimidate us and. A lot, of journalism in small ways and large will be people trying to charm you intimidate you And you just have to get people, used to thinking about that but I do think it I now that I'm on the other side and an editor going over to. The dark side I am highlighting the positives of that it really helps to even in the small paper hopefully have, that, wise editor who can can. Can reassure you or say you, know we need to listen to that other side? Sometimes and it's a difficult thing as a reporter and editor to say okay they are raising a point they are trying to intimidate me but to what degree. Is this a valid point I need to listen to that and it helps if you can discuss that with someone else And and the I personally think it helps to bring both experienced to it and fresh People are unjaded and on. Unexperienced and don't have that narrowness that you get with experience over time And that's that's the main thing I would.

reporter editor Bloomberg New York Times Chicago Tribune NBC Weinstein State Department Alabama White House chairman CEO
"chicago tribune" Discussed on No Huddle

No Huddle

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on No Huddle

"Okay bears of bread big from the chicago tribune when likely gets cut to what do you think the marketplace looks like for him to see go back to being a backup quarterback elsewhere well yeah i mean that's the best case scenario form right now right i mean nobody's have decided to start uh could he potentially resurfaced with the buckum years maybe and they had what they had uh since magic there this year i got two jamus so uh he's coming out of contract so the bucks will be in the markets were backed up maybe tampa emerges as an option but yeah i am away fifth might if things go mike glennon's way perhaps you the chance to continue in the league for awhile is a backup which can be uh pretty good work if you can find it and keep it right yeah i mean it that sounds good when you look at this football team i know he said some really good things about richer too risky him in from a positive standpoint in and that's always good because that's what you like to build around but when you look at this team i mean there is no more matt forte in that system to where he was every bit of sixty to seventy made eighty percent of the offense who now do you think you have in and of course arshad jeffries goes in go the philadelphia gets a super bowl but who do you see comes into this offense to help out a mitch trubisky to where he could continue to not turn a football over to where you know maybe if he start pressing being young you may star seemed to me to turnovers.

chicago tribune tampa matt forte philadelphia mitch trubisky football mike glennon arshad jeffries eighty percent
"chicago tribune" Discussed on No Huddle

No Huddle

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on No Huddle

"You are listening to the nfl on two men facing no huddle withdrawing in the weber banned kordell stewart let's focus on chicago with brad bigs covers the bear for the chicago tribune brad thanks for taking the time bears have been looking for franchise quarterback since jim mcmahon our good friend cordell is on that list of quarterbacks who came and went when it comes to a short stint at chicago beyond the stats l forty mitchell trubisky come in his rookie season well i think if you're going to talk about mitch trubisky who who got twelve starts as a rookie this past season for the bears i think the conversation probably needs to begin with the fact that he didn't look overwhelming to him during his rookie season and i think we we've all seen a lot of young quarterbacks in eating quarterbacks that have been around for a while uh struggle because it looks like it's just too big for them and in that certainly wasn't the case for trubisky five this that are uh very glamorous but one thing does jump out at you he did a really nice job protecting the football which is you guys know can be another paul for for young quarterbacks in the national football league that can uh get in the bad turnover habits the put the team in really difficult sparked so so those are the two big things for me when you're talking about history susan number one it it didn't look too big forum and number two he showed uh a real ability to to to be careful with the people.

nfl weber kordell stewart chicago brad bigs cordell mitch trubisky football paul chicago tribune jim mcmahon
"chicago tribune" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"chicago tribune" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"A uh uh when he was elected to congress he showed up in washington and refused to play by their rules he was on a mission to hold the governments accountable unspeak for the people who elected it it's such a good job the democrats redrew his district the spend millions of dollars to defeat him but down piece left washington and his team he's joe walsh and this is the joe walsh radio program friday then we are not going to show there was a headline in the chicago tribune this morning that bothered me i'd like to start with this there was a headline in this morning's chicago tribune a headline i saw on lie not in the newspaper any more that a headline that i saw online at the chicago tribune that bothered me and the headline read illegal guns are killing innocent people that was the chicago tribune headline in an an op ed this morning illegal guns are killing innocent people.

congress washington joe walsh chicago tribune