22 Burst results for "Chicago Theatre"

"chicago theatre" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:47 min | 8 months ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"From the world of entertainment and pop culture at the top of every hour on my talk 1071 not tell us everything. Marvel Studios is honoring the late Chadwick Boseman with a very touching an emotional tribute video that they released on their social media accounts. Featuring many of his co stars from the Marvel cinematic universe. Lupita Nyongo, his costar in Black Panther, said Chadwick War the crown with dignity in that film, Michael B. Jordan, Angela Bassett, Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson and Robert Downey Jr are among those who have paid tribute to Bozeman's talent and legacy. Such a huge loss. I mean, just really sad and surprising. Yes, And the tributes continue to pour out as Elizabeth reset in our general update a 12 20 definitely take the time to read. Some of those tributes. Today They're very moving, and Sylvester Stallone is re releasing rocky four and putting together a director's cut of the film. Yeah, I said, I've never seen a rocky movie. What show? Did you make it to your childhood? Don't even get me started. How did you make it through the eighties? I don't know. It is a miracle that would be her childhood. Thank you. Is it true context? So if you have seen Rocky four, Sylvester Stallone well, he made the announcement on Instagram that Rocky four is getting a new director's cut by me. So far, it looks great Roberts know, however, I do have a beef with this director's cut because of the one fan asked if the re cut was going to explore the relationship between Polly and his robot, and Sylvester Stallone responded that the robot's going to the junk yard forever No more robot in this director's cut that is rude. You said words, and I believe in trust them. I don't understand. The sea in Rocky Force of Iraqi is like really rich and famous, and Polly, his friend. He buys him a robot for Christmas. And it said their first birthday and it says Happy birthday, Polly and it's It's a thing, but it's not gonna be in this cut anymore. Year was rocky for late eighties. Like maybe 86 87. What Rocky, would it have been around the time that dead men don't wear plaid came out because I remember being in a theater and walking into the wrong movie and seeing dead men don't wear plaid instead of the rocky movie. You're like, Where's the box with Steve Martin? Yeah. I think that would have been rocky. Three. Okay? And that one has Mr T in it, because I don't think I've seen Rocky my lawyer. Okay, That's the one with Dolph Lundgren. Yeah. Okay. James Brown living in America. Yeah. Okay. Elena has no good guys. Not finally, If you have about $400 to spend, might I interest you in buying a new rose, A champagne from Brad Pitt and his More evolved Chateau Winery. No, thank you said Rose Atia pain, so I don't think but this champagne is going to solve any of your rotation problems. I'm not even a doctor and I can speculate that that is accurate. However, he's been working on this for five years. So, you know, go and support Brad Pitt by spending almost $400 on no, no, no, In their right mind. No, no, but no $400 bottle of wine. What is that bottle of wine? Like three glasses of wine? Four. Technically, I think also, they usually just drank $400 for I'm never going to drink. It better be inside that bottle like I dream of Jeannie style. No, but I do love the image that comes out with it. It's very photoshopped. Anyways. That's all the dirt this hour for more check If I took one of 71 dot com or.

Sylvester Stallone Rocky director Polly Brad Pitt Chadwick Boseman Marvel Studios Dolph Lundgren Lupita Nyongo Robert Downey Jr Michael B. Jordan Scarlett Johansson Steve Martin Rose Atia Angela Bassett Bozeman Elizabeth Mr T
The Harlem Globetrotters

The Past and the Curious

09:20 min | 1 year ago

The Harlem Globetrotters

"The Savoie ballroom was a jewel of jazz age. Chicago theatre opened in the nineteen twenties just before people in the United States were hit by the Great Depression which left many Americans poor and hungry throughout the difficult time. The Savoie was a place to find joy on the south side of Chicago. The building was regularly filled with residents from the largely African American neighborhood. Who gathered to dance to some of the biggest stars of the day count basie Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong? Were just a few of the people who banged out. Tunes as people jibed across the giant DANCEFLOOR. Dancefloor was so big that it actually doubled as a basketball court for the Savoy. Big Five in the late. Nineteen twenty s the five-man team hosted games to fill the slow nights in the ballroom. A young man in cab. Calloway would sometimes seeing during halftime but back then basketball wasn't very popular people cared about contests like horse racing and boxing baseball. Not The five on five game that depended on getting a ball through a hoop. It was a long way from the sport. We know much slower and much lower scoring than today. This team from Chicago would eventually work to change that. But they're Savoie audience could never have guessed how at some point. There was a dispute among the players of the Savoie five and they broke up. Three of them led by Tommy. Brooklyn's start a new team and rename themselves. The globetrotters it was an era of barnstorming. And when not at the Savoy they set out from Chicago to tour the Mid West region of America there were no organized leagues of teams and players in the Nineteen Twenties and thirties. Instead semi professional teams would travel from town to town and earn money playing teams from whatever town they were in sometimes. Businesses might have a team of employees so a barnstorming team like the globetrotters might play against some guys who had spent the whole day assembling cars canning vegetables or even driving taxi caps. Other Times barnstorming might play a team made up of members of a religious group. The House of David. Those guys never shaved so they played basketball with beards down to their bellies. Making James Harden's beard look like a five o'clock shadow soon. A young Jewish immigrant named Abe Sapper. Steam entered the picture with the globetrotters. Abe was a terrible basketball player but his other skills were valuable. He knew a lot of people who did bookings and many of these towns and more importantly he had a car these five teammates and their manager. Abe would pile into his model t like sardines attend camp and hit those cold slick winter roads. It was the nineteen twenties and they understood that random people in random midwest towns might be surprised to find that all five members of the team coming to play their local guys were African Americans. There were very few professional sports comprised of African Americans at this point so they decided to alter their name to help people know what to expect at the time. The most notable and best all black basketball team was known as the Harlem rent which was short for the Harlem Renaissance in the Nineteen Twenties and early thirties. The New York neighborhood of Harlem was an epicenter of black culture and it was a time referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. People knew about these incredible artists and musicians. Who lived there along with the writers like Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston so the globetrotters who were very much from Chicago? Ask themselves how do we make ourselves sound dignified worldly and clearly a team of African Americans the Harlem Globetrotters? Will it matter that? We're not from Harlem that we've never tried it around the globe new super nope cool. Let's pile into a small unheeded car and go beat some people in basketball and they did just that it was remarkable. How good they are. They beat nearly every team from Wisconsin. Illinois Iowa anywhere else they went then they pile back into the car and head on down the road to the next game throughout the nineteen thirties. The team built up quite a reputation. They might have been the best basketball team in the world. No one agrees on how the famous tricks came into the game. A popular explanation is that they'd slip into the fun and flashy dribbles and drives after they safely put plenty of points on the board against their opponent. This did several things one it entertain the audience. Once the actual threat of competition was gone. No one wants to watch a blowout so a fun. Show of tricks kept the locals entertained but also no one wants to watch their local fellas get trounced a group from the city coming in and wiping the home team can really anger a local audience and the Harlem globetrotters new. This trick plays would thrill any crowd and win them over. The focus slowly became not about the final score but about how much fun it was to watch these incredible athletes and their astonishing an often humorous approach to the game. I we win. And then we cloud Abe Saperstein once said now most people agree that the real clowning didn't start until a man named goose. Tatum joined the team. Goose was an incredible athlete. Who could put the basket ball through the hoop with ease? But he also had a keen eye for comedy he found inspiration and funny movies and carefully watched the acts of clowns and other entertainers his favorite gags would show up on the basketball court. Sometimes goose would tiptoe over and pretend to spy on the opposing team's huddle all while making sure the audience in on the joke other times he'd hand the refs at trick ball after a timeout upon dribbling the ball. The referee grow angry because the ball never bounced back up. It just plopped devoid of air on the ground. Sometimes goose would disappear from the court altogether while the game continued only to be found in the audience eating popcorn. He even had a bit where he would pretend to be knocked unconscious on the court. The refs in his teammates would try everything to wake him up. But no amount of shaking or poking prodding would open his eyes. It was only the smell of his own Stinky Shoe. That would get him back up on his feet again. Much to the disgust delight of the audience in Nineteen forty-eight Abe Sapper Stein was with a friend who just so happened to own a basketball team called the Minnesota Lakers. The Lakers were the best team in the brand new professional basketball league which would soon become known as the NBA. The League did not allow black players on any of their teams regardless of League affiliation and regardless of the color of the player skin each man believed his team was the best in the world. They'd never meet in a league as it was so the natural solution was to stage an exhibition game between the Lakers and the globetrotters. It didn't seem so to the men at the time but game between an all white. Nba team and an all. Black semi pro team would prove monumental. Eighteen thousand people came out to watch which was easily twice. As many people as most professional basketball games would attract the time. And despite the fact that the Lakers star center who stood six speed and ten inches tall was seven inches taller than anyone else. On the court. The globetrotters one on a last second shot. It was a powerful moment. The next season those Lakers would go on to win the National Championship. But when they played the Harlem globetrotters a second time for a second exhibition between the two teams. The globetrotters came out on top yet again. The following year the NBA ended segregation and three of those same Laker Whooping Harlem globetrotters Chuck Cooper Nat Clifton and hang designee. Became three of the I four African Americans to join the League and play professional basketball. This was nineteen fifty three years. After Jackie Robinson had broken the color barrier in baseball the globetrotters still continue their entertaining shows today. Keeping the spirit of barnstorming alive. They get a lot of credit for how they support communities and bring joy to so many and educate kids about health. But it's easy to forget about how important they were in integrating professional basketball. They now tour and play with just one team often known as the Washington generals according to most sources the globetrotters have beaten the generals over sixteen thousand times. How many times have they lost though? That question is harder to answer. But it's just a few. The most recent globetrotter loss was way back in one thousand nine hundred seventy one when both teams lost track of the score when clock expired. The generals were ahead. That was not supposed to happen. And people expected the GLOBETROTTERS TO WIN. And it's usually agreed that they will today. It's all about the show the fun and the love of basketball not the competition. This is what made that loss. So shocking reports from nine hundred. Seventy one SE. The stands were filled with silent shocked faces and even a few crying children. Luckily it's been smiles for all since then

Basketball Harlem Globetrotters Harlem Chicago Nineteen Twenties Minnesota Lakers Savoie Savoie Ballroom NBA Harlem Renaissance Chicago Theatre Abe Sapper Abe Saperstein ABE Ella Fitzgerald United States Baseball Abe Sapper Stein James Harden
A Quick Chat with Mandy Patinkin

Brian Noonan

04:19 min | 1 year ago

A Quick Chat with Mandy Patinkin

"On the phone with us Mandy Patinkin he's coming back to his hometown to play the Chicago theatre this coming Thursday if you're a fan of homeland he plays Saul Berenson and it is the final season of homeland now maybe I have to ask you a question about sol did they have a meeting to talk about if Saul should wear glasses we did discuss glasses I needed glasses let's see so the option of either contacts or glasses well when you're shooting fourteen to sixteen hours a day context dryad you gotta keep with the drops and then they can really be a pain in the **** and glasses haven't as far as I'm concerned and so we had a meeting and everybody first we had a meeting about the beard and the and Alex guns in our Gordon the creators I was doing a play in Chicago at the time we made the pilot and they wanted me to have a beard I didn't have a beard in the place I grew a beard or the pilot I'd go back and forth rehearsals during the play well I was shooting the pilot and then again the question of the glasses came up so we settled on the glasses we finish the pilot I shave the beard for the play they picked up the pilot when we went into series production and I grew the beard back and more the glasses that beard that was my next question that is the thickest beard I think I've ever seen on television well a little eastern European they're very I don't mind a little more to him than some of my answer well I have to ask you about that and I know what ing is that I'm coming to Chicago or any of that the thing with the beard is coming with Mandy Patinkin when he gets here on Thursday at the Chicago theatre in the holy land I always bring it up to my wife the walk your walk on the show is there something special or is that how you walk in real life because you're always walking with the purpose in you're moving your arms it's like your speed walking you know I'm smiling and shaking but if you ask me that question my kids the read me about my walk all the time they call it the dad walks yes it is I'm sorry to say your great artist and he did suggest I walked it's probably because my shoulders are tight and I just walked in can I take no responsibility for it but you should see both my children imitate their father and my children about thirty three and thirty seven and it's still one of my favorite things to watch that funny I love that your co star Claire Danes she couldn't as she is such a great actress you can cry at the drop of a hat I just don't understand it I mean she didn't turn it on in a second she's amazing I mean I felt so blessed to be able to be with her for the over eight years we were together prayer closer to ten years you know from soup to nuts and the pack with the talent or just that is is sexually searching Gracefield human being that teaches you how to be a better human being in in your life it's such a good show homeland on Showtime so and how many times a month there's someone come up to you and make you do the line from a princess bride Inigo Montoya I would say at least once a day without fail somebody brings it up or ask me to say the line to themselves no matter what generation they are their kid and and it is one of the fruits of my life you told me I was going to be a something at the moment we were making it the winds gonna end up to be kind of the wizard of oz of our generation I would have said you're not and yet that's what I got lucky to be a part of them every time even if you ask me that right now there's a piece of me that goes I can't believe I am the they're asking me and I'm the guy that that would be one of the guys and I mean how how how does that happen I made my son watch a princess bride in he fought me the entire time when we started watching it he absolutely loved it and I said Charlie I think I can deliver the line better than Mandy so so here you go let me do it first and then you can do it it's hi my name is Inigo Montoya you killed my father there to die well

Mandy Patinkin Saul Berenson Chicago
"chicago theatre" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

11:17 min | 1 year ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Long before. Chicago became the Mecca for improvisational performance and collaboration. The city was once viewed as a theater desert to the reality. That's hard to imagine now given the talent and productions bursting out of the city. Today in his recent book ensemble an Oral History of Chicago Theatre Mark Larsen traces the roots of Chicago's theater scene. And the city's Ensemble Ethos and he tells the story to the people who made it happen. The Chicago theatre expert and oral historian. Korean joins me now in studio discussed his book and more mark. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. So what led you to write this spot. I've always been fascinated by the story of Chicago Theater after I I grew up here. I was always interested in theater in the seventies. I wanted to be a part of it that that didn't work work out quite but I'd always been fascinated by one of the things that fascinated me was the fact that it went from as you said a theater desert. which was bob signatures line to what it is today and today we have over? We're two hundred and fifty theaters here. And so how did that happen is kind of the question that I had my mind over the course of my lifetime. Well you interviewed more than three three hundred actors directors other key people who played a part in Chicago's theater movement. Anytime you interview. I know from experience. It's really fascinating. assing draw stories out of people. But what was the process like for you. How did you ask the right questions? Well that's assuming I did at first it really really is very very exploratory. I have a distinct advantage over you in that. I didn't have a live audience at the time it was happening and I could spend an hour two hours talking to people finding out what what their story is and then out of that often went back for a second interview. s more pointed questions but really. It wasn't ex- exploration didn't go in with a lot of questions. I just was curious about what their story was. What do they wanNA share with me? And then we played it that way were there some themes that emerged as she were doing these conversations the gave you some sense of how Chicago grew into the theater. Cities how yeah. That's a great question As I worked in as a continued doing this over a course of four and a half years and themes started to emerge that then going back to your first question began to lead me to specific questions to check out if this is true. You know one of them was the idea that the the city works as a kind of ensemble sambol itself. It's not just a lot of ensembles and a lot of separate theater groups but what I kept hearing over and over and over again is that we we help each other. And we you know we operate like one large ensemble. Somebody said It's like one large repertory company you know so there's a lot of sharing sharing and there's a lot of helping the other thing. I found really interesting. That kept coming up was the way that the older ones the older artists would help the newer ones to the city. And that's part of the ethos of the place. I think. Here's a bit of actress Laurie. Metcalf talking about that ensemble. Nobody thought I'M GONNA use this as a platform for myself is about. How are we gonNA make the best thing possible? It was a collaborative from uh-huh That's interesting. Nobody thought of it as a platform for myself was at something you heard repeated. I did hear that a lot. It was Later on in that clip up. She says something about. It's about the work I said. So it's about Helping each other. She said it was about the work. That's where the focus was and that's the theme. I heard over and over and over over again. How do you think about Chicago? s compared to New York or La. How is it different? Qualify that by saying I've never lived either of those places but I've talked to people who have off and have worked there and one of the things I heard a lot was that it really is about. How do I get myself ahead here and here? There's a real commitment Mitt to both the work into the company that you're working with and I don't want over romanticized that I always run that danger but I think there's some very distinct truth in that. Recently I went to New York and did a talk for the students and the and the professors at Hunter College at the invitation. Greg Motor. who used to run the goodman years ago and he titled My Talk For me he said why audition when you can start your own darn company and he saw that as part of Chicago's ethos and a distinct difference and when I talked to the students and when I talked to the professors Sir there was that sense of thought of that we should say she said you don't WanNa over Romanticize The scene here but it has had its fair share friction to get where it is is right now. What were some of those moments of struggle or failure that Y- that emerged Through these conversations. There's a lot of it. Yeah Bernie Sahlins Who was one of the founders? Second City said something in his memoir about. This is the risk capital. This is the place where you can take risks and Fail I. I think there's some truth to that you don't want always be failing but with that comes some failures then some real busts. The Goodman Theatre was doing weeden Christmas Carol and they had great success with that and they decided to move it into the auditorium theater and that was going to be a great thing for two reasons could fill the place and the other thing was They could have another show running at the same time in at Christmas time. What ended up happening was it? This intimate showed that works so well on the Goodman stage was in this huge vast area and it just bombed. It was just terrible but it was an interesting in risk is worth taking well in your interview with actor director and screenwriter. Alan Arkin. He wonders if it would have been better if he stayed in Chicago. TATUM talking about that. I think about periodic. Is I think a lot of me. Maybe maybe would have been smarter. Had I stayed in Chicago because exactly what you're talking about. There was a sense of those against the world sense of family. That was really genuine. You and with me when I was second city and I've looked at my fly entire career and founded maybe six or eight times When I hear him say that it sounds like there is a community here that makes failure a little a little easier makes taking that risk a little easier because people are just kind of rooting for you? What did you make that? I think audiences are rooting for you. Kate Eckert at at Steep Theatre told me something once about Somebody came in in a patron came in and said I want to renew my subscription else. Wants you to know. I didn't like anything that you'd last year. But it's there's a sense of what's next. Yeah you know well. As as you mentioned that everybody has a romantic view of Chicago's ensemble ethos and here's a bit of theater. Director and stage actor. David Cromer Talk. That thing.

Chicago Chicago Theater New York Mark Larsen David Cromer Bernie Sahlins Alan Arkin Goodman Theatre Hunter College Kate Eckert Steep Theatre Goodman Metcalf Director Laurie Mitt director TATUM Greg Motor.
"chicago theatre" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

11:44 min | 1 year ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Coming. A new book looks at the history of the Chicago theater scene. And what makes it so special. It was about the work. That's where the focus was and that's a theme heard over and over and over again but first Jeff sessions and Hillary Clinton ten are about as far apart as you can get when it comes to politics. But they're both members of the United Methodist Church so using those two markers it's easy to see why the churches wrestled with issues like gay marriage and LGBT clergy for decades. Now it appears there will be a split. The more conservative faction will break away and the allocation of the church is considerable assets are being hashed out by lawyers. The only thing everyone is waiting on is an official vote. That'll be held in May in Minneapolis here with her thoughts on the schism schism is Hannah Carton. She's the pastor at the wicker park location of Urban Village Church a.

Hannah Carton United Methodist Church Hillary Clinton Urban Village Church Chicago wicker park Minneapolis Jeff official
"chicago theatre" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on WGN Radio

"To get their data when they have no income I and my six year old and from during construction but he's like got to say you know and he's a lot of that's for rent yeah turn around but it's not cheap to live out in the gaffer get house I know but yeah now it's it's some of it is my wife makes it at a special day but you know in the end I feel like it's weird even being at that yeah me the reason the offer but I just want to mention that you just added a fifth show at the Chicago theatre and now it's a man that's crazy nobody just let X. I mean I and it's such a it's such a privilege to perform and that at at the Chicago theater and it's so fun and I mean whenever I perform in Chicago I always leave here with like five more minutes of material so selfishly I'm kind of looking forward to those shows to take it's going to go on sale Friday yes for the five for the fifth show which is October twentieth so will every two weeks we're gonna talk to you this is going to be on the here or in a hotel where you can openly talk about Larry and robin there you go the cash the tax Jim Gaffigan he was hilarious at the Chicago theatre always really funny too talk with them and look forward to more dramatic movies from him as well one of the other big A. listers that we caught up with this year who has not done a lot over the last several years recently hosted SNL recently had his own new movie which is hello areas called dolomite is my name Eddie Murphy telling the the real life story of blaxploitation star Rudy ray Moore and that we were on the red carpet talking with Eddie Murphy what did Rudy ray.

Chicago theatre Chicago Larry robin Jim Gaffigan SNL Eddie Murphy Rudy ray Moore Rudy ray
2 men arrested during ‘Joker’ screening at AMC theater in Chicago

Orlando's Morning News

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

2 men arrested during ‘Joker’ screening at AMC theater in Chicago

"In charges are pending against two men accused of causing a disturbance at a screening of the joker movie in in Chicago theatre police say the suspects were arrested last minute for smoking and causing a ruckus at the AMC river east no one was hurt Chicago police officers were deployed at the screenings of the controversial film throughout the weekend get don't be a **** at the joker movie I'm sorry just don't do it can I say that on the radio

Amc River Chicago
"chicago theatre" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"The Chicago theatre report on bishop Laney I'm gonna spend most of this week's report discussing my recent experiences at lifeline theaters whose body but I do have a few show announcements to make first of first of all Duncan McMillan's critically acclaimed every brilliant thing open this week at windy city play HealthSouth every billion thing is adapted from the H. B. O. and off Broadway hit starring British comedian Johnny Donahoe respect Rebecca Spencer stars in this one person interactive performance the show was playing through December eighth and for tickets and more information you can visit windy city play house dot com also the barber of Seville opens this weekend at the lyric opera I'm going to be attending opening night it will have a full report next week but I do encourage you to see about getting tickets for what promises to be an excellent production the show runs through October twenty seventh also coming up the lyric is Louise similar running October twelfth of the thirty first as well as dead man walking which was going to begin on November eleventh through the twenty second dead man walking of course is based on the story of sister Helen Zhan who works with death row inmates many years ago there was an excellent movie starring Susan Sarandon and Sean Penn I think this is going to be remarkable production which is of being stage for the first time in Chicago you can visit lyric opera dot org for tickets and information getting on to this week's show report I had a new experience this week when I went to see lifeline theaters whose body which is an adaptation of the Dorothy Sayers novel of the same name I have long been a fan of Dorothy Sayers and the. lord Peter Wimsey mysteries and whose body is the first novel that Sayers wrote about the gentleman detective I think it was probably over thirty years ago that I began reading these mysteries and I've been in love with them ever since in fact every few years I go back and re read the stories because he would know what even though I know how they end the writing is that good I also have a strong affection for lord Peter himself as well as the many other characters in the books so I was really excited when I read the announcement that whose body would be part of the two thousand nineteen two thousand twenty season at the lifeline and I had high hopes given the quality of the other play that I'd seen at this theater but I was also a bit trepidations and that's because I have not always agreed with the casting and other adaptations of these mysteries although I must later for thrilled to see that one of my favorite local actors William Anthony Sebastian rose the second would be taking on the role of the word Peter so even though I've been looking forward to the play for some time I was really shocked when I got under the theater and sat down I had all this tension in my body I realize that you know I know this story and I know these characters so well and I was confronted with the reality of losing control of the way that I portrayed them in my head when reading the books and this was actually costing me some distress so after the police started eight initially this tension did not clear as I had to adjust to some of the actors eventually though I was able to make that adjustment and enjoyed a remarkable production whose body introduces us to lord Peter a second son of a Duke who was none the less gifted with a keen intellect and a high income he has served as an officer during World. four one and he is now given to the judgment Lee pursuits of drinking brandy collecting old books and solving crime. Peter is ably assisted in all of these things by Mr bunder his valet and in a small way his mother the dowager Duchess of Denver having learned from the letter that a respectable architect has inexplicably found a corpse in his bath tub are interpreted aristocrat is off on a mission to discover not only the identity of the body but the person responsible for the death making matters more difficult is that there is also a missing persons case involving a high flying finance here in the city of London who has inexplicably gone missing and it appears as though this body may be connected to the disappearance as the play proceeds will learn more about lord Peter Wimsey a man who at first seems to embody his surname though as the story unfolds we learn that there is perhaps more to his identity than our prejudices will allow us to expect the script by Francis lime and chili is excellent and is by turns faithful to Dorothy Sayers original tale while also offering some gentle corrective that were only possible after the lessons taught to us by mid century events and personages Jess Hutchinson is the director of the super production I have seen her work before in lifelines excellent the man who was Thursday I believe that whose body may well exceed that play in quality I would also note that William Anthony Sebastian rose the second was the understudy for the role of Gabriel Simon the man who was Thursday and I was fortunate enough to see his performance director and actors clearly work well together and I must say that rose is now my very model of lord Peter at least in Wednesday's younger years still my experience at the play is taught me a bit of caution rose may well be my. a standard whimsy for years to come but I've also learnt now to be helpful one day perhaps another production of one of Lindsey's mysteries will lead me to find a new favorite and that holds a good thing because it reminds me that theater is a living art and is to be anticipated even when there is a risk of my own characterizations being disrupted I would also like to give credit to the stage designer stage managers sound because German lighting designers the staging in the production of this play was magnificent note that seven actors play a cast of that reaches into the teens probably somewhere around thirteen primary actors as well as some so called extras most of the time I was completely unaware of the dual roles until I thought about it later it was really quite remarkable so in any case whose body at the.

Peter Wimsey Dorothy Sayers Chicago director bishop Laney William Anthony Sebastian Mr bunder Jess Hutchinson Francis lime Denver Gabriel Simon London Lindsey twenty second thirty years one day
"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

Chicago Stories

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

"That I think is that unique to here. Don't find that New York City limits you mentioned earlier up tone. Yes, entertainment is reunited talked about. This a lot. We had you know, Hera Washington's cultural plan was the blueprint for the downtown theater scene. You have that somewhat in Lincoln park. Yes. But really indigenously happening in uptown duty other communities in Chicago that are creating that much critical mass from music to theater to restaurant the whole kind of cultural really want to say package, but you see that happening anywhere else. Not that up towns already happening unite. That's a whole 'nother show to talk about. Yeah. I think uptown the development of uptown has been one of the most exciting things the last couple of years, partly because. They there's a historic inventory of venues. And that's what other neighborhoods. Don't really have. There's nowhere else. Other than the loop way. You have quite that preponderance. Art, deco theaters within one hundred feet of exactly. And so that that sort of interesting, and I think the debate about uptown is interesting because the debate twenty years ago, and I started writing about it was that everyone said no one's going to go to town. No one's going to go to town from the suburbs. No one's going to go. Is you know, it's too difficult for people too far from downtown. And I think what you've seen now in the sort of renaissance of the city is that that argument. No one really makes any more they sort of go. Well, you know, this idea. I mean, you saw in the efforts in Lincoln yachts to build another. You know, the this idea, and I think developers have sort of figured out, and this is good and bad, but mostly good. I think they figured out the if you want to sell you condo. It's not about thing to have a theater underneath it. Because at that point, you say to people, look, you can have a city life. You want to partake of culture you want to enjoy all the city. This is why you're not living in the suburbs. You living in the city of Chicago. And I think that thinking you didn't see a decade ago. No. I got that at all a decade ago. Not at all, right. Been there's still some that. Don't don't know. I've used this before. And this will be another discussion that the role culture can play theater culture music when you look at like the old town school of folk music on Lincoln avenue up in the Lincoln square and ravens would community what that did to that community. That knew no other investment could have not a train stage could make that transition in flip the switch, and I think you're gonna see that in your Albany park around the theater there. You're seeing it in critical mass enough, Tom. Yeah. And that is what developers are now realizing the whole kind of feel of the city or the neighborhood, the culture brings something that. No. But nothing else can bring executive. So here's a lightning round. You ready for must know this ready from listening right thicker, thin pizza. Then. Sorry. It's okay. There's an even white source of cash short the end of the show. We don't feel you off the show. Okay. Cubs. Your socks? Oh, totally cubs. I live about it. I can I can't hear the cubs from my from my garage. Like I live right by Wrigley field. Sears or handcock Hancock. I think I. Yeah. Hancock. I think for the most part that's a tough one that one. Why is that? Well, maybe, you know, I don't know. I I have a lot of nostalgia for the ceus tend to find myself up. Hind got more, okay. Near the lake. I like being near the lake. Okay. Well, that leads to the next one Laker river. Well, you know, you're a river guy. Right. I mean you've. Last two questions around your Jones. We don't again, you only got one more question. So throw you out. I know you can you can go ahead and say what you want to say, I'll say this. I was at one of those river walk places. I guess it was city winery. And these boats are coming by. And and I'm thinking this is the river. I I was thinking it feels either like, and so you know, I've always been a late guy. But you know, I'm willing to give the river. Another look. Okay. We'll we'll take you down. Make and see it again. You're exactly what I'm trying to twelve inch or sixteen inch softball. Well. You know, my British heritage. Is there a different ball size for cricket? Have Chris theater critic and social critic at the Chicago Tribune. Thank you. Thanks for being here. Thank you. You've been listening to Chicago stories with mayor Rahm Emanuel. You can subscribe and leave a review on apple podcasts and tweet your guest ideas, using hashtag shy stories. Thanks for listening.

Cubs Chicago Laker river Lincoln park New York City Hera Washington Chicago Tribune Chris theater Lincoln yachts handcock Hancock softball Rahm Emanuel Albany park executive Wrigley field Tom Hind Sears Jones one hundred feet
"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

Chicago Stories

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

"Use this moment more than we got to talk. And I do think had they not come from Covington Kentucky, they would have gotten a break if they had come from LA, they come from a different city. We would assume d- different things about their background we imposed and transferred to them a set of of what we thought their background was because of the school type of faith where it was located, etc. And it turned out not right? Well, you know, and there's a question about is is their background, their, you know, the kids on his the background their responsibility. And you know, if you were I are grown up in commenting Kentucky with those parents and gone to those schools would we have been standing there know doing this. We like to think, maybe would you know? I I didn't think it was those kids finest hour at all like, I think there's enough evidence in that tape that says those kids, you know, if that was my kid, I kid about that age that would have been like that's not you can't do that. Right that smirk. You can't do that. You got to you. Come on. So I I'm not absolving them of all blame. But everything's complex in the world. Everything's complex and we've gotten to the point now where we just reducing everything. And that's the one of the dilemmas. Let me issue on the book. Yeah. Other plays that didn't make it in here that if you head if they gave you fifty more pages, your editor, the publisher, there's certain Elsie said, you know, I wish if I had more time this is what I would have included or here are the three key milestones. This narrative that takes over this Arca time. Well, that's an interesting question. I mean, there was a lot of other big productions and big musicals on Broadway. You know in in that period. Lotta great revivals by people like ought the Mila a lot of musicals like wicked that didn't make it in that. But I wanted to leave space also for a couple of the Chicago things and the one the one Chicago thing that I think people never fully got. That was really remarkable. It was a show here called metamorphosis, which is done here at looking less than and he played for years. What's now? Binny's beverage depot on the north side. It was the old Ivanhoe theater. And it's just a it's a show about changing shape, and how when we die. We don't really die. We just changed shape and that show was in rehearsal right after nine eleven in New York City, and it was the first show relate to sort of ope. It was really going on all those theaters shut down. You know, one of the things I wrote about in the book was how in New York. And this is really is. We're saying, you know, September the eleventh was a Tuesday and by September thirteenth, although state were up and running within Ford, and you think about what was going on in New York all the difficult is people had and they were determined. They know the city government was, you know, I think th the leaders in your figured out that the only way to get people, you know, thinking straight again was to at least let them be able to go to the theater all these people stuck in the city, and it was a show from Chicago, metamorphosis, which really articulated how people fell after nine eleven because it was about loss, you know, and. I just remember opening there. And I remember seeing people crying in the theater because it was like they the theatre had help them release all this cathodic. That's exactly it. And I think that was an example of how in Chicago when we've really focused on sort of the heart and the core of what we do and kept our eye on that it's often we've taught other cities how to do this. You had a journalist Becker. You had any background in academic journals? Yeah. Who helped you train your voice from academe Lia to critic or do you think they're the same? Well, I think two people one was Frank rich. Who is a critic I most of Maya because he always was about making connections from the theater to the rest of the will. He always said, you know, he always said, look, don't let don't let them marginalize. You don't let them just think that you're what you're doing insubstantial, not always speaking to society to theater. Yes. The it's just all I do every night is is discussed issues that same issues you deal with during the day. That just happened to be in a play. You know, they're all about the all the same things. It's no different. And that's what you want to write about. And that's what that's what's interesting for people. You you go crazy. If you just say this act is good. This actress bad the half disconnect. You know, you know, I mean like I was Saturday night. I was at a play down at court theater about it was about about the DNA. You know, that was a show on that topic allowed me to write about the search for DNA should fascinating. And so I think so I think Frank rich. And then also Chicago had a great credit. Call Richard Christensen still alive. Right. I live on the north side. What he did is he went into every little basement. So if you look at the Tribune in the forties in the fifties. This is the no this is not a flattering thing to say about my employer. But it's true that in the forties and fifties I have some things it's not about your employer. Now, we're going to the third part of my says podcast, but in the forties and fifties there with it is on the south side. The Tribune never never went. You can blind. You there were companies that existed for decades, and you can't find a review in the archives? Just come find. I think Richard Christensen in the sort of beginning in sort of a seventies began to say, look, you gotta you gotta be willing to go into the neighborhoods. You gotta company city going into the neighborhoods and. Going into the city itself getting away from the loop not forgetting the loop. But also going to neighborhoods. He said about this idea that here in Chicago, you can be in a little store from in a neighborhood and somebody'll pay attention. If it's good if it's good, and that's my create I guess, and that

Chicago New York City Frank rich Richard Christensen The Tribune Ivanhoe theater Kentucky Covington Kentucky LA Binny Lia Becker Elsie Ford editor publisher
"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

Chicago Stories

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

"Just gotta be true enough to yourself that it's worth what you're doing. I mean, can you do this for a lifetime? And I guess the other question why they have answer that. You get a second question. This is the job of a lifetime. It's not a job for lifetime. So so here's my thing. Is that I read I say that is was Kogyo served here. We are talking about the Chicago theater, the Chicago theater, scene, etc. What Chicago served when the theater community spoke up against Hetty Weiss at your know. I would say your counterpart your at a competitive paper. She's a critic too. And this is a critical moment. I think in the country. I was let me say this in the city, we need theater. Could we we need to cultural community that holds up a mirror and yet when somebody held up a mirror people? Right. So the theater can be wants to represent. I think properly the art community to get people who are been on the sidelines into the narrative discussion, except for the example of Hetty is only few grew us. Well, I I know you've written up out of the. Pitch publicly supported had a in the sense that she had the right to express that opinion on on. And I didn't think that that opinion was any was out of line with what I was thinking you took a different opinion of play itself. I had a different opinion your plan, but I respected her right to have a different opinion. And I I agree that ultimately this country needs to have conversation, and the theater is a place of conversation when bringing this back to that theme of generosity, the theater, the will teaches is theater is is only successful when he operates on the heart. And he's very very good at changing people's hearts about things. That's one of his great like all art. It's that's really where it operates on on those levels at doesn't mean, it can't discuss policy or equality or political ideas. Indeed, it should. But it also has to remember that it has to operate on people's hearts, and I think ultimately, it always has to be on the side of tolerance. And it has to be on the side of many points of view, and it has to meet people where they are not everyone is in the same place in Chicago or in America for that matter. And I think that the moment you start saying, well, we only one opinions that we agree with is a slippery slope. And so a I did not think that was the great I understood what was going on. I mean, I I it's not to say that I didn't understand, and there were many people I like and respect to have the opposite view, and who articulated that view, I thought in some circumstances. Very very well. And I think he goes to the debate among progressives or liberals at this moment about whether this is a moment for conversation, or whether it's a moment for resistance. And I think if you look beyond the theater among progressives that indeed in the mayoral campaign for that matter. I think that's the day. They know is this a time for conversation with everybody or do we say, you know, no, we can't have this conversation. Well, I think there's a good point because I this somewhat. Kids at depaul this, and I think it's worth wooded. You said no, well, here's a key was not about theater, but it was about the debate. I gotta ask a question. And I actually thought this was the theater for America at this moment. I thought it went too quickly because events when the kids on the mall from comington Duckie with a mega Hatsaw. Yeah. But also confronting an American Indian knowing you got a little more time in so all the perspective. But people basically all different Covington Kentucky and made a lot of assumptions in the truth is, and I said to the kids at depaul if the school was from Manhattan, would we have concluded what we concluded? We give it more time. Right. And the truth is lose a lot of profiling going on by a lot of people who hate profiling. Right. But you know, we reflective enough and self aware enough to do that. And I thought that the scene if you think about theater, and you think about moments that were American can come reflect on his health that went too quickly because I actually think we needed that moment. Collectively as a country. Why I think? It's an interesting things about that moment. One was you know, what was the beginning of the moment. So there was debate about, you know, not video I came out. Everyone was assuming that's the start of the moment. When in fact, it would later it was revealed that the actual moment began much sooner than that. I the play started earlier, you might say just so I thought that's right. I thought that was very sort of very telling you know, and also is a member of the media. You know, that wasn't the finest weekend for the media because I think in many ways, you know, the old way was until you have the full story, and you'd fully reported a major meteorology wouldn't go with the story that you'd be like, well, we don't know if this is the beginning of the Tate. We don't know who that guy is we don't know anyone is we need to way. But what's happened? You know, is that the pace of everything is sped up. You know, my bosses know, how many people click on everything I write that's pressure to get readers. And that's not unreasonable in the sense that these are all businesses, but there are moments in America when you go when people when when it just gets out of control on that was to me one of those moments. No, I just I think that we needed to actually use

Chicago America Hetty Weiss depaul Kogyo Covington Kentucky Manhattan
"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

Chicago Stories

11:54 min | 2 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

"The are crap. Yes. This is the year of the Chicago theater. Yes. Long overdue. Yeah. We'll talk a little about that. But that said if you think of kind of the big five at least, and I don't know if you agree with this Steppenwolf Shakespeare Goodman looking glass court. Yes. In the city that that you say. Somebody's coming in from out of town. They said, look, I know I've read up on Chicago. I know about the storefront theater and the theater, I know about those gimme the next three storefronts. I gotta know before they become institutions. And I like I wanna know that artist. I want to know that writer, I want to note that theater, and you can do five doesn't have to be three. But if they call you and they happen to have your cell number because the mayor gives it out. That's a haircut. Chris jones. Go ahead. Personally besides show. Yeah. You mean companies companies that you say in ten years gonna be this. You're going to be reading about this company. Well, I think I don't know if you think they exist today, or is no, I think I think those companies exist. I mean this one for example on booing avenue called steep data. Right. Under the attracts on Boeing, you know, right now, they have a show that's very critical of Chicago theater actually written by Kulta, but is critical of the topic of the theatre community. It's really probing, for example, when an autism goes into a neighborhood and opens up a storefront theater, thus bringing about gentrification because the coffee shops just be right behind him. Do they really know the neighborhood that they're moving into? And in the question that this play is asking is called red. Rex very interesting play it. The question is asking is really who has the right to tell his story. And is of course, a huge issue in cultural sort of cultural ideas in the moment. So I think steep theater is very promising. I think timeline theatre which is moving. Into the the new uptown entertainment industry. Just got a new theater on Broadway on they're about to do that. I think time-line theaters very good. This is great little theatrical. Jack lope that is actually in the Edgewater armory, which has the single worst though. Single words. Was physical setup of any theater. You gotta walk through a gym. You gotta go up six flights of stairs. You gotta go. All the way in the back. You gotta go pasta circus trip. You wanna see? Can't believe you're paying money them. Get chicago. Would you find the theater in such a Saturday? And then when you get there often, gray, and you often go. Yeah. This is great work, and they focused on some of these great new riders. I mentioned I call to this woman called cloudy west who's been working in town. And these are all Rytas who, you know, people are sniffing around on the coast, but doing really great work here. So I think you know, those companies are really good. There's a company co broken nose. I like a lot. There are mostly sort of. I tin Arain company. They work at the, Dan. And they work on the north side. They take their name from that Nelson. Ogrin description of Chicago way, where Nelson Algren famously said it's like loving woman with a broken nose. Maybe lovely loveliest, but never a lovely so real. And I think that idea that Nelson all grenade image of Chicago, the idea that we might not be good luck in the idea that you know, if you're in LA, you can spot an act of five hundred paces away like so not to come in at me. Same in New York, Chicago, not so much that you just they just act as here just sort of meld into the community. And that's what they wanna do. I honestly think this is no no nonsense. I honestly thing is a crucial part of this city. And I think that without this resist. The city would be infinitely poor. It's what there's no other city in the world that has something quite light. What we don't find instant Lewis. You don't find it in Milwaukee, not to say, there aren't the it as that. But the the. Spirit here is just something to. Would I hate using this term because it's the doubting from the tech committee? But we do have slightly a perfect ecosystem or Goodacre perfect. You have major universities that have major major our departments. Yes, theater writing staging that every year there's like a fresh inflow of immigrants and make Chicago home and make Chicago theater scene. Their home that keeps it fresh young energetic. Second as your example, you know, you got a theater company set up in a Chicago park district facility the cost of doing business here versus a New York or L A T's those zero San Francisco gives you a way that you can do a storefront and have public facilities or other neighborhood facilities that are at a point. And then you have a theater going community, including the philanthropic, but a theater going to me that while I can't say keeps everybody live. There's enough energy to support, you know, north two hundred theaters across the city, and then I think that. I describe it. If I don't like using system, you just taking something from the business world into the theater world, which I wouldn't do. But those elements make it strong and great the other thing that goes on a lot here is material that's destined for Broadway trying out here. So if you look at say, the last twelve months in Chicago, we've had three major pre Broadway tryouts, we, you know, shows like Pretty Woman Tootsie, the chace show, these this show is sort of workout that kinks in Chicago. They come here. I and I find you know, that the readers of the Tribune, for example, no oldest. They know. That's what these shows do and they buy that ticket. And what they like to do is they like to show up they buy that ticket, then they like to have an opinion. And they liked to Email me go on Email somebody else, and they like to say, oh, they got to fix this. And they got to fix that. So we have this sense here. And yet there are also supportive because I think generally speaking the audience in Chicago is generous most Chicagoans a not so into polish, you know, they tend to look for the. Depth. I mean, I just think I know it's romantic, but it is no it is something about town. Funny story. So it had a major elected official come in. And they happen to take a cab ride, and they were driving. And they said they asked the cabbie about a building in. The cabbie starts telling him about all the architect who designed says, what are the city you have a cabdriver telling and I think our city cab doors will tell you about the building type people will tell you about the theater, and they're not critic, and they have a depth to it because they're around it a lot even if they don't go, right? The on their proud of it. I mean that proud of the part of the creativity. And then on I think there's a lot of would've been done the last few years to about opening up the theater these other fields to a more diverse set of Chicago. And so, you know, thirty forty years ago. It was not only talk to a participating one hundred percent. I want to get to that. Let me I'm going to skip them. Then come back as a critic. Do you? Welcome the internet or do you find it to mow meaning that people can access you? Yeah. They can do. Yeah. I thought. Well, okay, come here. Give you a hug if you want brother. Do you think was your writing you go to see a play in? You're thinking about writing does the internet and the audience and the reading your readership, and to your mind is you're writing in a way that starts to edit it in a way that ten fifteen years ago worst case it was a letter to the editor. Right. Are you worried about that? You think it's been helpful not helpful the internet, and the intimacy between you now in your readership. Well, I would imagine is this a parallel with your job in the sense that you have to anytime you wanna trade? After walk a fine line between doing what you believe to be the best thing saying what you believe on also being aware of being responsive to the people that are reading you all the people that you writing about on if you worry too much about that. Then you end up with no opinion at all. You just sit there with your emptied screen and go you're terrified to ride anything. And I I try not to do that. But I think that the idea that you can be a critic who makes pronouncements from on high, and then disappears into the cave, which is kind of the way the job was done in Chicago. Maybe fifty years ago, you can't do any more because people want to have a conversation with you. And if you don't they think, you're a stuck up elitist, and but that's not what they want. So you have to be, you know, you have to be willing to have a conversation on the other hand, you also, you know, you have to be fair. And what I mean by that is that it is a business. These theaters are competitive, and it's a business. And you have to treat everyone with equal Fantis. And so, you know, that's the that's where sometimes it has to be limits. Those conversations because I don't want to necessarily if somebody the theater thinks I'm the biggest jerk. Biggest hot don't know what I'm talking about in many cases. And I have to go out and review the show that they are in at Robin. Not know that I'd rather they they're entitled to think it, God bless them. I'd just rather not know it. So it doesn't cloud my take take. And what do you think about how do you do that? With this whole issue of like how much return on my iphone? So I can't even turn on my TV. I don't read social media. I do have people that tell me what's on it. But I don't read it because I actually don't want to be that much cut off. Right. We're sitting here at my conference table where we have a lot of inter department, whatever meetings. If I sat here and told you that we didn't play out how something I'm about to decide or whatever that won't be honest. My general rule about politics is that you have to be idealistic enough. To know why you're doing what you're doing. But tough enough and ruthless enough to get it done. So you can't. Be so intimidated that you don't do what you really find is right on the other hand you have to be aware. How what you're gonna do is going to be interpreted, and how different people are going to have different takes on it. So it shouldn't ever scare you off. I'm about I have made the decision yet. We're thinking about some policy thing that is going to be controversial can't say I've already put my thumb on the scale. We're going to do it. But if I had a bet we are, right. But I know ahead of time. It's going to be controversial. But doesn't stop you from noon. Nope. Not this one. I think when it comes to hall. Hall you? But I am gained playing it. Meaning what are the critics going to say how much problems is gonna be? I'm gaming it out for that, very reason. I think sometimes was hard to his critic, or is it in the is it you sort of you go. Well, okay. Like tonight. You know, it's fifty below zero. I'm going out to a show that still on tonight this opening tonight. Right. I'm you know, you're leaving your family. You're going down that you're doing your best to show. And then someone turns around on social media and says, you know, what a joke, you know, what did you? So I mean, that's how this the personal toll. Right. You know, you have it yet. No. Oh, yeah. You have to have a inner soul that what you have to think that the goal you're trying to get across is worth the enough to take that constant criticism at you have you ever been to the Lincoln museum down. Okay. You know that scene where you walk in Lincoln. And there's pictures of people yelling at him coming at them. Right. I think that's the one of the best things I've ever seen it, but presidential library one of the best because because that is everybody else's on this white. Theodore Roosevelt made the joke about the critic not the joke, but the state and the famous statement, I enjoy is no matter what you do is going to be. There's no one hundred percent here. There's fifty one forty nine all the time in that room captures would those of us that live in public life? And I would say the critic, and you Chris do is, you know, Lincoln's getting called gorilla an idiot a fool cave. He doesn't you know, he's not for abolition. Now, he's revolution. It's so he gets accused of being all for the war for free freedom of them black people, but African Americans that. He made fun of his a guerrilla. He's being seen as not being to do as ideals. I just finished this Frederick Elvis biography that he wasn't making the war about slavery. When he does make it about slavery. Here's witty and it's everything's yell. You're constantly in this echo chamber of screen from whatever side, and I think that room captures what happens in that chair. What happens at that screen? And you just

Chicago Chris jones Shakespeare Goodman Nelson Algren writer Tribune Theodore Roosevelt Milwaukee tech committee Arain company Rex New York Jack lope Lincoln museum Lincoln Dan Boeing Lewis
"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

Chicago Stories

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

"Them where they are and include them in the same story that they were telling one of the things that Bush forty one in the, you know, it was a good, president, etc. He looked like he was could not do that. He only had a sliver when you look at what Mitt Romney versus President Obama in two thousand twelve Mitt Romney did not look like he was in touch and understood all of America, but his background only gave him cast in his language reflected where he came from Anhui wasn't didn't have a wide lens. You said generous. I'm thinking I'm saying it also multi-lingual, which is I mean, Bill Clinton could go into a black church and be up in a boardroom two hours later and not miss a beat. Can you learn that skill or are you just born with us go if you have or do I would say, I think you can I think I mean, I think I have some capacity, but I don't think I had it around people. But the real the people that are at that extra level. They have a six cents for it. Yeah. They can hone it over practice, but they have a six cents in embedded. It's part of who they are take Barack for a second President Obama. I mean, he represented the south side. Chicago's a state Senator wasn't Senator the whole state long enough that you could the campaign gives me and then he's president of the United States. You said I think it propia by that people greet or not was generous in his spirit representing the whole country. Yes, his background doesn't say that. That's what he would have been. Right. So that tells you something I think real illustrates it. Well, the thing about anything in the offices of voluntary act. So in the woods, let's say you wanna make political change through something in the arts. I think you have. Two people have to want to go and see it will have to want to buy a ticket. So you might want to change the world, but it's good play into an empty house on. It's no good plan to six people you agree with when we say Chicago theater. What do you think that conjures up in your mind, and is thing called Chicago theater? And why did Chicago get the storefront? Like, no other city has in the sense of the storefront theatre. I've lived in this city for close to thirty years, and I've devoted most of my professional life to the Chicago theatre, I enjoy Broadway. And I go to New York, and I like all that. But you know, the bulk of my work has been here. I'm watching these great theaters here. And I think that Chicagoans a very proud of the theater, I sort of laugh sometimes because people will be proud of it who never go. You'll meet somebody in that goal. Yeah. We got great theater here. I'm like you see in the show now. But hey, we got great. So after twenty years, you've got the Chicago. So people here are actually proud of it, even though they don't guy. So I think that's great. You know, you run into people in Basel say that. So I I think that's great. I mean, obviously, it's a big city. So I think that's been part of why this is happening here. Obviously, we have great universities, many of which have great osbour- grams, and many of the people who graduated from those programs have stuck around. So I think that's part of it too. And obviously, you know, we have certain real estate's a little easier here than in New York City, and it's always been the scene here as always been yo- young. I've, you know, it's almost like a big grad school for autistic and Deva, and that's aggressive more pushing. Yes. All right. So it tends to deposit with in a positive way for the most part. Anyway, I mean, not entirely, but for the most part, and so I think that's all true. And then there has been an aesthetic that grew up here. And I think we have to thank people like Steppenwolf for that and certain individuals and Billy Peterson people like that which is an aesthetic of just not messing around that actually telling the truth, and there has been true. Additionally here a bit of isolation from the business. So that you're not gonna have, you know, people like your brother, for example, and not knocking around on every street corner in Chicago in the way that they may be in L A, New York. So it always has to be about the work here. There's no agents thorough agents nuts, but they're not. You're not immediately gonna be grabbed and sort of snapped away. Not fast enough that that's what motivates so you can build something. Yeah. And I think you also Steppenwolf was a storefront that now is stepping more right now about to announce a big new expansion a now become a major cultural institution. But I think that famo- Chicago artists, it has to be about the work because the rewards a simply not that great the other rewards, and you know, there's a downside to that. Because you do have people struggling along. And we do sometimes struggle to retain people, you know, that that's true of Chicago in Oldfield's. Right. This always these attractions on the coasts. And I think that is an issue in Chicago. But the. I always come back. Yeah. You know, if you ask them where they're from. Yes. Those artists that move on. They'll always say, I'm from Chicago. They never now kind of put their John in the New York or LA, at least I have found that I think the bona fide the bona fides a here, they believe in is here. They also find that the work. They do he if you look at a lot of the older actors you become famous they were happy here when they were twenty five Wook for not much money in some storefront, you know, taking the train and drinking afterwards and living the dream. That was when they were happy then they move on. They find themselves stuck in the business. They don't get to do what they wanna do. They have all this pressure. They have all these fancy people around them to become big celebrities, and then never as happy, and I think we represent you know, you can own they were most creative. And also was the

Chicago New York City President Obama Mitt Romney president Bill Clinton Bush Anhui Barack Basel America United States Wook Billy Peterson Senator John New York LA Oldfield
"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

Chicago Stories

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on Chicago Stories

"You're listening to Chicago stories a podcast from city hall, featuring the stories of everyday Chicagoans and special guests as told to mayor Rahm Emanuel. This is mayor Rahm Emanuel Chicago stories were here with Chris. Joe's theater critic, his new book rise up Broadway and the American society from angels in America at the Hamilton. How's it going? It's going. All right. It's pretty well. Yeah. I am happy with it. Yeah. I think the idea for it came when I was I was watching the Tony awards in two thousand sixteen that was the day of the shootings at the pulse nightclub in Florida. Remember and during the day, there'd been a lot of discussion over whether they would even be Tony was because so many people had died. It was Latino night at that nightclub. And so it was lots of just a lot of people who the theater held very close to his heart who died that very day. And then so that was the Tony was and then I remember seeing President Obama and the first lady essentially introducing them. Well Miranda on the Tony awards. And I thought to myself has there ever been another sitting president it any award show? Oscar. Ami's tone is thing. Who's actually introduced a guy? You know, who who done a what was after all a commercial show, and I thought to myself. Okay. That means that Hamilton is crossed into the political consciousness like no other show before. And I thought that's a moment that really needed to be chronicle. So I thought what I would do is look at how we got to that moment. How did the theater figure out how to manage that? What was it was it just his genius? Or was it like, you know, other lessons in that for? Shinnecock has touched. I mean, I've seen it twice. Once a New York wants here like daughter who's now a sophomore she's seen it four times. Why not just about the Hamilton? I know there's a larger context, which is the way theaters gotten into the DNA of our society, and the way it's all the other thing. It's kind of embedded now. I think is that true. I think the sold them before. Yes. I think so I think Hamilton that's not a separate question from the Hamilton question. I I think that Hamilton essentially physically it's about the founding of this nation. So therefore, it interests people at you inherently because it it sort of politicians went people in government. When treasury secretaries went presidents went mas- when people were just interested in. So I think that was part of it. And I think the message there is that when autism deal with issues of substance, then you know, that that's a good thing. So I think partly it was to do with them Bishen. I think the second thing was that made this point. Of having a diverse cast. So in other words, the diversity of the show. And in fact, that we'll recognize these founding fathers, as we think of them as old white guys in our wallets, you know, on a ten dollar Bill and in fight this show said these were young vibrant people. And I think the idea of having that reflected in the show is another thing. And then the other thing about it. And this is the more subtle thing. Maybe it's an inclusive show. So it doesn't matter if you're white or black or if you're young or old or whether you like hip hop. What you think you hate hip on the show is generous that I'm what I mean by generous is it it gets people where they are. It's sort of like, a great politician rally or a grey or a great governmental leader understands like I mean, I think President Obama had many of these same qualities. He so rarely used language of division when he was president. And he always spoke as if he was the president of all Americans funds as I just came from lunch. I was talking to somebody who's asked me question. I said a very. Successful president is multi-lingual. How'd you may multi-lingual President Obama President Clinton? I would say this is also true actually about George Bush forty three wherever and not true forty one in this case is they can go to a boardroom, and they can go to church, and they wouldn't miss a beat right? So they could speak to different audiences understand them

President Obama president Hamilton Obama President Clinton Tony Rahm Emanuel Chicago Rahm Emanuel Chicago city hall Miranda Joe George Bush America Chris Shinnecock Ami Oscar Bishen treasury
"chicago theatre" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on WGN Radio

"On the WGN TV morning news. I will be recapping the Golden Globe awards if you don't watch the award show tonight. I'll have all the winners. All the losers all highlight moments all the funny moments Aukin capsulated in summarized for you tomorrow morning. Chicago's number one morning news, the WGN TV morning news show on channel nine Deb. Clap is here executive director league of Chicago theaters. Very interesting. We got a text from the six zero eight area code asking. What is a storefront theater? And this is kind of part of our normal language every day. But you know, I guess to the average person and we hear us talking about storefront theaters. Maybe that's not so clear. What what that is? Don't you? Explain so interesting. What a great question. Yeah. A storefront theater is something that it's really start front theaters are kind of the lifeblood of Chicago theater, and they are generally small theaters. That have moved into what was once a storefront? And so that's the case in in many cases. But in some cases, it's also it might be a church basement or a some other kind of previously community kind of a space. So when you hear about sort of the legend of Steppenwolf, they started in a in a church basement. And a lot of other theaters have started out sort of in the storefront model. Steppenwolf going from a church basement to a literal storefront to a literal star on Halstead before they went into their beautiful theater. Chicago Shakespeare theater started at in the sort of a over a bar, right? And many other theaters have sort of started out as small storefront theaters and many still operate as small storefront theaters. But I I mentioned earlier steep theater is operating in a star front. So that's that's what we mean by storefront. I don't think that there's anything, you know, there's no number of seats or anything like that. But they are generally very small under one hundred seats, and but doing work that is so amazingly innovative and entirely professional really sort of describes that sort of if I guess what Chicago theater. I mean, that's. I wish I could go to more storefront theater than I'm able to do personally because it's my favorite. It's so creative and the the actors the people in production, and so forth are so dedicated to putting on amazing shows and often you're you're right in the action because the theater spaces are rather small. You are literally right in the in the middle of it all the red orchid theater. In old town is a pretty small theatre. It's right on Wall Street, storefront and. They do lots of great productions there, but frequently Michael, Shannon, who's part of their their company performed there. And when you two feet away from Michael, Shannon, and he's doing a dramatic performance. You feel that performance to the core of your soul. So these little storefront theaters and performances are often just really quite amazing and many of these storefront theaters part of Chicago theatre week. Explain what this is. That's correct Chicago theatre week is a celebration of Chicago theatre taking place from February seventh through the seventeenth and tickets for all shows are thirty dollars fifteen dollars or less. So it's a way to make that investment. Maybe in a theater that you've been wanting to go to, but you weren't sure. Or maybe you thought that ticket was too expensive. It's generally a way in for a lot of people. People and what are some of the highlights? Do you think? Oh, there's so many highlights. I mean, you mentioned storefront theater, you mentioned a red orchid. They're doing a really wonderful show called fulfillment center, which is sort of has a double meaning fulfilment. Fulfillment center is a place where you know, where sort of these big box stores keep other stuff to send to you. And then but us how there's the idea of personal fulfilment. So I'm really looking forward to that one straw dog is doing the realistic Joneses. Which is a show that had a Broadway run recently. And is I think there also in a new space small storefront theater? They're going to be doing a really great job with the show. I think there's. At. Court theater. They're going to be doing a show called photograph fifty one which is about British chemist Rosalyn Franklin who made a significant contribution to the discovery of DNA, and whose accomplishments have been overlooked. I'm really looking forward to that. What you forward to? Northlake theater. Nina Simone for women. Yeah. Portraying the various aspects of her life. That's going to be a stunning show to see an also an example of. Theater? That's in the suburban area. These illegal Chicago theatres also includes some of the Chicago suburban theaters also like the paramount theatre Aurora their next big production. There is the producers maybe one of my favorite musicals -solutely. Yeah. No doubt. Great show. So that's included in this. I noticed that Steppenwolf is going to be doing a adult adults house partout. That's right. A pretty stunning to be able to see that on stage, the writers theater marinas black bottom. Some classic shows are produced and put on. Yeah. Absolutely. It's going to be an amazing Chicago theatre weakened. There's over. I think it's more than a hundred shows are participating now. So it's really I o improv Olympic. They're going to be participating for the first time. So we're really thrilled with that. And it's gonna be everyone to get out and see a show. Yeah. Not just one show. See a couple of shows in this will actually begin on February seventh and run until the seventeenth. But tickets are going to go on sale for all of these shows through Chicago theater week this coming Tuesday stack. Right. And what's the what's the best way to avail yourself of tickets for that? So the best way to do that is Chicago theatre week dot com. And get those tickets online Chicago theatre week dot com. Can can you go directly to the box offices also of the individual theaters or do you need to go through Chicago theater weaken in order to get the discounts. I'm you can go directly to the box office and mentioned Chicago theatre week..

Chicago theater Chicago Chicago Shakespeare theater red orchid theater Northlake theater WGN Golden Globe awards executive director Rosalyn Franklin Deb Nina Simone Joneses Halstead Michael Aurora Shannon fifteen dollars thirty dollars two feet
"chicago theatre" Discussed on Monday Morning Podcast

Monday Morning Podcast

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on Monday Morning Podcast

"Just checking in on you. How are you? How are you everybody? Oh my goodness. I am down to my last couple gigs of the year other than a couple of benefits or whatever. The last couple of gigs of the air got Madison Square Garden coming up on November seventh and the eighth ninth and tenth I'm going to be at. At the Chicago theatre. And then that's it. Oh, freckles is done for the year other than thousand other fuck in local bullshit things that I'm doing. Yes. So November seventh they'll at Madison Square Garden, but I'm going to be doing it tuneup show, wink, wink, nudge, nudge at a comedy club somewhere in Manhattan on November fifth. Comedy club that might be on the west side. It might be a comedy club. A west side comedy club, November fifth. I don't know might be running. My our who knows I might be there. I'm going to be there on November fifth, and I love that place. A lot of the people that run it. I'm going to be there. I'm gonna be bouncing around all of Manhattan, having a great time. Getting ready to do that show. And I'm gonna do MSG with version and Joe Bartik I'm going to record that night this time, we're going to get it. Right. And I really really really really looking forward to that. What else? What else did I have to announce here before the throwback? There will be a teaser of the the first uninformed patriot episode patriot goes live Novem lie November fifth next Monday at WWW dot patriots dot com slash Bor..

Madison Square Garden Manhattan Chicago theatre Joe Bartik
"chicago theatre" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Cross from the iconic Chicago theatre cog ozone Jonathan hood on ESPN one thousand and the ESPN app MVP. Because. Renison symptomatic tonight. It's been anti Donna AJ green. Now once but twice Bengals the first quarter about to take over possession up fourteen nothing on the Baltimore Ravens Spurs Bengals TD coming after. Joe flacco interception. Second touchdown pass. Don degreen went for thirty two yards. Ravens PJ Moseley was taken to the locker room on a cart with an injury. He is questionable fury. Turn bills gave up forty seven points to the ravens in the season opener last Sunday. Buffalo will go with rookie Josh quarterback. This Sunday at home against the chargers. Bills running back with Shawn. Mccoy earlier today quarterback who got a role I'm confident in Josh. Is very talented. Extremely smart intelligent. So the move. Mates minds. You got to move on this type of business. It is. Up next on our post chargers today. Really now Joey Bosa for Sunday's game against the bills Bosa continues to deal with a bone bruise to his left foot. He first injured the foot during training camp. According to ESPN, Adam Schefter, Michael Kendrick signing a one year deal with the Seahawks. He visited with the team today expected to play Monday night against the Chicago Bears. Final from Winston Salem college. Football just wrapping up on ESPN TV Boston College now three. Now, they knock off Wake Forest forty one thirty four baseball dodgers up eighty two on the cardinals in Saint Louis. Clayton Kershaw seven strikeouts. Over four plus innings. Red Sox at benway leaving the Blue Jays three to one JD Martinez. A home run is forty first on the season. Which team that everybody thought was going to make the playoffs. The falcons the saints. The Texas end up owing to act this week that more.

ESPN Josh quarterback Joey Bosa Ravens PJ Moseley Chicago Bears Baltimore Ravens Bengals Joe flacco Donna AJ Jonathan hood Chicago Clayton Kershaw Michael Kendrick JD Martinez Red Sox Winston Salem college MVP Don degreen
Dionne Warwick Franklin, Detroit and Franklin discussed on Nick Digilio

Nick Digilio

05:27 min | 2 years ago

Dionne Warwick Franklin, Detroit and Franklin discussed on Nick Digilio

"The Queen of soul has passed away. At seventy six she died yesterday She was. A once in a generation singer, it says here which is absolutely true she was the Queen. Of soul. But also ventured into and mastered virtually every style of music, from jazz to classical and rhythm and blues she passed away at her home in Detroit from pancreatic cancer according to the late singer's publicist, the singer was in and out of ill health for. Years last summer In Detroit she asked an audience to keep me in your prayers she. Had to take several breaks, during the show and appeared frail earlier. In the year she announced that she. Would cut back on her schedule two thousand ten she underwent surgery to remove. A tumor and cancelled six months of tour dates. Yet last year before performance of the Chicago theatre she told the Tribune I'm not quitting. And she, said she. Was working on new music with Stevie Wonder. Her musical contributions, were diverse ranging in. Tone from spiritual to gaudy her, singing style came from single source she practically grew up in the church and the emotional intensity and personal. Connection she nurtured there and the music never left her it. Informs her virtually every one of, her top seventy seven one hundred songs including Twenty-one number one Rb hits The thing many people don't understand about this change in my. Career is that I, never, left, the, church, Franklin, once told author David Ritz about, her transition, to secular music, in her late teens the church stays with me wherever I go wherever I sing critic Anthony halibut who has. Written extensively about Franklin's life and career over the decades. Has called the singer a pivotal figure in the way women and African Americans were perceived. In popular culture Franklin's role was such that such that a history of. Black America could well be divided into pre and post Aretha she won eighteen Grammy awards and was the first female artist inducted, into the rock and. Roll Hall of fame and that was in nineteen eighty-seven not only was her multi. Active measures soprano an instrument, of stunning beauty range in power but. Her piano playing often encounter points to. Her singing was Justice accomplish she influenced countless singers Whitney Houston Adele Patti LaBelle. Natalie Cole shock on Mariah Carey Luther Vandross Jennifer. Hudson Fantasia but her legend was forged not just on her ability to hit all the. Notes and, embellish them With establishing technical flourishes but also to convey emotion Nuance and deep feeling Her fame seemed destined she grew up in the household, of, the famed, preacher c l Franklin and was mentored by his friends who included gospel greats Mahalia Jackson Clara ward and Albertina Walker as a girl Franklin mesmerized congregations of her father's house of worship in Detroit. New Bethel Baptist church but her career. Was not without hardship Aretha Louise Franklin was. Born on March twenty fifth nineteen, forty. Two in Memphis Tennessee, second youngest of five children or family moved, to Buffalo New York and then to Detroit. Where her parents divorced her mother died when she was ten and. Because we're fathers travel she was primarily Ray reared by grandmother and has a teen Franklin was a soloist in her father's church and. Began recording gospel songs she dropped. Out of high school, she toured the gospel circuit singing in churches around the country was a hard life during which she learned firsthand about racism while traveling the back. Roads of the south the young singer also learned how to interact with an. Audience even at fourteen she was, in viewing the power, the power gospel song there is a fountain filled with blood with drama dread beyond her years in her Her late teens she, toured alongside the staple singers and Sammy Bryant was second Bill to her father the star preacher then much like the gospel circuit contemporaries such as. Sam Cooke David Ruffin and Dionne Warwick Franklin shifted to popular music with her. Father's blessing and moved to New, York at the age, of eighteen leaving her two young children in the care of her grandmother in Detroit She was wooed by Motown a small hometown. Label but it turned out but it certainly turned it down because it wasn't properly established yet and. Instead signed with. Columbia records there she was overseen by the legendary producer and talent scout John Hammond appears who saw her as an immense talent who shouldn't be wasted on pop triples trifles Hammond made a number of fine recordings with Franklin that bridge the world of gospel and jazz but Columbia grew impatient for hits in the. Orchestral embarrassments in choice of material that noise. Underlying strength her contract expired she moved. To Atlantic records and became under the Super Bowl supervision of Jerry Wexler who, admired, her, gospel recordings and. Wanted to update their field to a pop market Atlantic was an iron be juggernaut with a roster that included Wilson Pickett Otis Redding who was affiliated with Memphis based Stax label And. Wexler immediately paired Franklin with the muscle shoals rhythm section in Alabama a one night recording session in January of sixty seven yielded the landmark song I never loved a man the way I love you a smoldering performance that seemed to address Franklin's deteriorating relationship with her husband prevent husband Ted white Recording. In the south, during the height of the civil rights era proved overwhelming for Franklin however and she, left, the next. Day Wexler knocked out was knocked out by the performance came up with a, solution he would bring muscle shoals rhythm section to New York, where his price singer could be more comfortable. Another classic soon followed respect, a cover of reading song that Franklin transformed in, tandem with her sisters Carolyn and Erma the siblings call and response chemistry data to the, days

Dionne Warwick Franklin Detroit Franklin Chicago Allstate Memphis Jerry Wexler Nick Gilio New Bethel Baptist Church Stevie Wonder Aretha David Ritz Grammy New York Whitney Houston Natalie Cole James
Tom Cruise, Steve Stone and WGN discussed on Steve Cochran

Steve Cochran

08:18 min | 2 years ago

Tom Cruise, Steve Stone and WGN discussed on Steve Cochran

"At, ten on, WGN TV Moron entertainment as I recall this It's, not it doesn't feel the same Steve, out here for more on entertainment so we'll just introduce Dina's the. Moron. Quotient a little bit That's. Right to make up for, ever Steve right right Troy come on, Choi in a little bit I can do I can be Moron there's nothing. There's nothing new. But for this Let's talk mission impossible. Fall out the film the reviews they're coming in this is we're talking to Nick to Gilio yesterday about this is the only vehicle for Tom Cruise that. Makes money the the rest of Tom cruises career. At this point they're bomb, after bomb, after bomb they might be good. Movies but. They're they don't, do well too Jack Reacher and others have done, okay but nothing even remotely close, to now these. Six mission impossible, films that he that he's. Done that started back in. The year two thousand which is amazing that he's been doing this character and this franchise for nearly twenty years and there are no signs of slowing down. With this normally you get two or three films. In the franchise and it, begins to, fall apart no signs whatsoever This this film was about as strong and as exciting as. Any of them that have come along the premise. Is almost secondary to, everything that surrounds the premise which is some plutonium goes missing in the hands of, some bad guys they want to set. Off nuclear bombs around. The world to disrupt the world order and it's up to the impossible mission force should, they decide to accept the mission to find the plutonium and stop these, nuclear nuclear explosions that are going. To take place but this is done with with so much excitement it's like a Corey a daredevil choreography with this of one exciting stunt an action scene after the next he's not jumping out. Of a plane he's doing helicopter aerobics we talked about. The scene where he famously shattered his ankle real life, injury with this and he's the, the scene when When you all go to see the movie this weekend there's a scene, which he's running from rooftop-to-rooftop to rooftop to rooftop and jumping from. Rooftop to rooftop and there's. A point at which he instead of jumping from rooftop to rooftop he goes rooftop smashing into the side of the building and. Trailer yeah you look at it and go wow that's amazing, that stunt man really did a great job there is not a stunt. Man that was Tom Cruise and that was not planned he there was a misstep there in that that's the scene where he. Shatters ankle we talked about it yesterday they keeps going he's he's Scoglio keeps going until he told me that he knew that. They could only do this one time he knew. That something was very, wrong that he had broken something but still lifts himself up on the building as, you see in the movie and keeps. Running past the camera. And that's where he collapsed after he was out of the shot but that's that's Tom, Cruise it's one thing after another Let's bring in China why why do. You think that he didn't know that there's a there's a lot, volved with it but why does he want to do all of these elaborate scenes himself and risk himself to, the injuries he's a he's an action junkie I mean that's that's. What I think it is. He finds a tremendously exciting There are some, precautions that they take with harnesses and things I'm sure while he's doing all this building jumping you know. That there, are precautions so he. Doesn't seriously, hurt himself with any of this but. He just absolutely loves it I mean some people would say you know how how can hockey players get out on. The. Ice, and, go through the, physical abuse that they do but. I mean isn't that isn't that part of the adrenaline rush for asking I guess whether it's hockey or anything else where there's, a certain, amount of physical danger involved. Good hey dean during the break. Trae brought up a great question we couldn't think of another star, like Tom Cruise that you'll go see in the theater even. If you're not into the movie you know Tom, Cruise is a draw Justin brought up the rock rock can you give another star that, has power like that these days No That's a legitimate, questioning whether he's reading that movie star, gone where it's gonna, go, see Tom, Cruise Gina's movie. Star he not only is he the evil. Knievel of movies but he's he's a, really, good actor I'm in the scenes that don't, involve stunts, he is so, good at so motion. Empathetic in charismatic in. The roles that he does and this, this particular character, Ethan, hunt in particular There, there's just a draw to him and I think that you know part of the enjoyment of this movie is knowing that he's doing almost all the stunts that you. See there's, a helicopter scene toward the end of the movie it's. Him maneuvering. This helicopter and jumping out of airplanes in fact tell me about jumping out of airplanes last. Night on. The late late show. With James corden instead of a cruise just coming to, talk to him at the desk Tom Cruise may James corden jump out of an airplane with. Them that's great if you're watching the, show entertaining to, take a look at that James corden YouTube channel today it's fantastic we're short on time Michael. Boob Lay's wife gave birth to a baby girl but. And you can find that online but cool significant in, that this, is their third child now. By the wind blew blade family his oldest. Son Noah who's now five years old, style, with a very rare form of cancer two, years ago, so now they've, added to their family Noah by the way doing very. Very well good and apparently in remission He is the cutest. Kid, on the planet. To sure is this, hair he, is amazing. Hair oh there we go All right cool Here we go with. The, hair stuff again we've got the. Dupage county fair that's going on this weekend that you might want. To check out we've got the. Lake County fair that's going on this. Weekend as well taste of Margarita, festival at, navy pier stone's throw from the studio today could see. It from here I'm just saying the morning, show could, be you know all the salty around, the edges today but concerts Kenny Chesney is at Soldier, Field on Saturday, Chris Brown's Hollywood amphitheater in Tinley park. Also on, Saturday We've, got erasure when a little. Blast from the eighties, of Chicago theater Friday tonight and Saturday wiz Khalifa's intently, park at, Ravenna wing Chung. Flock of. Seagulls and naked is I'm pretty. Sure that's why Steve is taken off the last. Few days pre partying mullet wig out at for Ravenna and then of. Course foo fighters at Wrigley field Sunday. And, Monday that's an amazing weekend in. Chicago stuff yeah thanks gene guns have a good weekend every night. Go Dean Richards there you go. That was great great entertained more on. Entertainment see dean at Kenny Chesney, we're going, to go I hope I see him all right out. The heaven Thomas Rhett there it is all, right we'll, take a quick break here get the, news and then coming up Steve Stone we'll talk White, Sox baseball here, on seven twenty WGN stay with us Tonight After the all star break Finally back home on the south Country music times. They them the Toronto Blue Jays On. The pre game at six thirty The flash Twenty, WGN, hey folks Dirks. Bentley here if you see one of, my concerts, you know I'm all about energy, performing, recording traveling being a husband and..

Tom Cruise Steve Stone WGN Kenny Chesney Dean Richards Chicago Hockey James Corden Wrigley Field Nick Toronto Blue Jays Choi Dina Jack Reacher Gilio Ravenna Thomas Rhett Dupage County Corey
"chicago theatre" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

Bertcast's Podcast

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

"Kind of june chicago theater that show play put in my gender completely incorrect and then the next day we're at fox theater in detroit get your tickets those are all going to sell out okay so buffalo then chicago then detroit the twentyfirst twentysecond twentythird dvd comedy festival i'll be doing a live birth cast on the thirtieth i think i know how i'm going to do that i think i'm excited so get ready and then i'm taking some time off and i'm in cleveland on the nineteenth and twentieth of july due on the twenty first i wonder why i'm not doing a saturday houston improv the second on the twentyfirst oh sorry houston improv fucking your warragul supposed to read your mind umbro the bucket second third and fourth and then i'm doing my triathlon august secret date you are a nightmare that's fifteen minute intro and i'm not want to keep you here all day listen the intros today's wait who stays podcast oh is it really oh today's podcast they are the seminal podcast they are the one of the originators of the art form they've been here there oggi's in the game they were just on an episode of something's burning but more importantly in new york they are the goto podcast to do you got guys we fought to queens bodega boys and keith and the girl those are the the four by the way also like come town i like those kids i think last podcast on the left is out of new york i'm not certain that's a really good ball gas just listened to there's a lot of great podcasts in new york legion gangs oh my god i can hear lewis losing fucking mind right now legion escaping the sdr show the bomb fire nikki glazes got any shift there's a lot of great entertainment in new york but these guys are the ones that all my friends have done all my friends do and they are just an awesome podcast it's the podcast call keeping the girl ladies and gentlemen please welcome from keeping the girl keith and who i said it right.

chicago fox theater cleveland new york queens bodega lewis keith detroit houston oggi fifteen minute twentysecond
"chicago theatre" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Her heard the ads will join us after two o'clock one thirty nine now on wgn i was reading a review by chris johnson the chicago tribune no but a week ago then he reviewed earned the play the wolves which is showing at the good in theater and i don't know that that's something that i normally would think about going to it's about a fictional under seventeen girl soccer team and the interaction between these girls it said on a soccer field that they set up a little square it the goodman theatre but having read the review i thought oh i wanna see this he particularly cited the one woman who plays the soccermom meghan i think her name is garages her graca as caracas and he said that while she's on the stage for just a matter of minutes and is a veteran of the chicago theater seen her performance is devastating and based on that alone i thought i'll go to watch three minutes of this little on the whole other eighty seven and it's all just so good and he did not oversell her performance or the performance of the show it's called the wolves we invited a couple of the young ladies who were in the production into our studio erin o'shea us here and sarah price ladies welcome to the studio how're you hi thanks for having me agree with the introduction so far up yeah megan's forecast accoring and them we have a lot of funding the other eighty seven minutes as well you know what i liked about this show too is that so many of the ladies that are on the.

chris johnson chicago tribune caracas chicago theater megan soccer erin o'shea eighty seven minutes three minutes
"chicago theatre" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"chicago theatre" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Earth chicago theater week is going on right now can give you all the details on that coming up in just a bit chicago's very own seven twenty wgn chicago wgnradiocom for an amazon echo user just say play wgn radio on tune it also going to be talking with meteorologist mike hammer nick in a couple of minutes give you a latest on what's going on but up in the newsroom now with everything i mean everything there's not one thing going on in the world right i and a thing you want to know is included in our next report of wgn news here is dave sean will thank you so much good morning everyone light snow and twenty degrees at o'hare with another three to four inches on top of what we had friday chicago's had its full complement of plows and salt trucks working overnight and into the morning streets in san commissioner john tali told wgn dean richards about an hour ago they haven't forgotten the sidestreet slowing to be putting a fresh set of drivers if some drivers 15 hours so we're gonna put a fresh set of drivers and right after we do eta approximately between twelve and one o'clock we'll be moving to the residential street while the snow is ending a winter weather advisory is in effect until noon and we'll have the full forecast in a moment russia's state news agency tass says the passenger airliner that crashed outside moscow this morning had been flying since 2010 but had a two year break because of a shortage of parts it was headed for moscow to the city of wars which is about a thousand miles away and we now have late word from the russia's transportation a advisor and.

chicago dave sean o'hare john tali dean richards russia tass moscow advisor amazon wgn mike hammer commissioner twenty degrees four inches 15 hours two year