18 Burst results for "Chez Panisse"

"chez panisse" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

04:37 min | Last month

"chez panisse" Discussed on Good Life Project

"You've might have not necessarily say that. And develop or absorb this theory of cooking, which is not here's a recipe followed here's a recipe follow it. But really understand the elements, like these four powerful elements and once you do that, everything becomes possible. Yeah, I mean, for me, a big part of that was the fact that chez panisse really cross trains its cooks. And so these people who I was learning from and watching, I was in such awe that I would come in, and they were thrown every day what seemed to be curve balls. Like, the menus were written and they changed every single day. And they had to do with the chef's whims and the seasons and what was available, and there was no obvious method to the magic. Certainly not to somebody who didn't understand anything. And so, you know, one day we would make, I don't know, French onion soup. The next day we would make lasagna, the next day we were making couscous the next day we were making clams from Barcelona or whatever. It was just, I was like, how do they know how to make everything? It's not like they read one cookbook and memorize the recipes. It's not even like they read 30 cookbooks, memorize the recipes. They can do anything. And we would sit in these meetings that were more poetry and lyricism than they were like instruction, and their chef might say like, and then I just want it to feel a little bit like this, or be a little bit like this, or look a little bit like this. And then these cooks would just get up and go do it. And by it, I mean, make dinner for a hundred people in three hours perfectly. You know, we would have the menu meeting was done at two 30, and dinner started at 5 30. So they literally had three hours to make lasagna from scratch, like butcher entire animals, and get them on a spit and get them cooking. Braised stuff, like make stocks, and that is a remarkable achievement. It really is. You have to be calm, but you have to be fast. And they, I couldn't believe that there was never any doubt, or never appeared to be any doubt about what to do. And so I just didn't understand. It took me a long time to understand that beef burgundy and braised chicken and pork shoulder that gets turned into pulled pork or all the same recipe. They just change a little bit of the liquid and the cut of meat, but what's in the pot is doing the same thing. And so over time I noticed that we were always sort of coming back to these four things to salt fat acid and heat that we always salted or meat in advance. For especially for braised or roasted dishes. To give the salt time to penetrate the meat and season it from within. And on any occasion that people forgot to do that, you could taste it. It wasn't like there was some someone had decreed long ago do it this way. There was a reason which was taste. Tastes dictated all of our choices. Really. And we would come together to taste every dish and often the thing was, oh, this needs a little bit more salt. And this needs a little bit more acid, a little bit of lemon, or, you know, before starting to saute onions, people would ask, do you want me to cook that in butter or an oil? And I always was like, oh, that's like the chef just being like, you know, why would they have an opinion about that? And then later you learn, well, if you're making something from southern Italy, they don't use butter there. So if you start with butter, your dish will never taste truly southern Italian. And if you're making, I don't know, Indian food don't use olive oil. They don't olive trees there. So you figure out, oh, the fat matters. And the temperature of the fat matters because the pastry cooks were obsessed with cold butter, and on the savory side, we always wanted to like weird soft warm butter. Yeah, an acid was always this like tweak often at the end. Or the fact that always braises needed wine. And I was like, why does there have to be wine in it? And I came from a family that didn't drink wine, so I felt weird, like if I wanted to make something at home, adding wine, so I was like, well, maybe if I do a little bit of extra tomato, that acidity helps. And if I didn't do wine, I could taste that it tasted totally different than the one at work. And heat for me was kind of the biggest lightbulb in a lot of ways because there were so many ways that I didn't understand how the cooks knew how to crank the stove or how to crank the oven and things just came out well. And so the whereas I was like, well, does it be three 25 or three 50? Should it be 18 minutes or 22 minutes? And over time I realized, well, for one thing in a restaurant, people are always opening and closing the ovens to get stuff in and out. So the temperature is never what it says it is anyway..

chez panisse Barcelona southern Italy
"chez panisse" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

07:09 min | Last month

"chez panisse" Discussed on Good Life Project

"And then when I was in college, I moved to Berkeley where chez panisse restaurant, Alice waters restaurant had been opened in 1971, and I remember which for those who don't know, by the way, is this legendary legendary place as is Alice or so. Yeah, it's an American institution. I mean, she is a visionary who has changed the way this country has access to fresh ingredients and she's changed the way that chefs think and work and sort of made it standard for sort of baseline for people to have seasonal, local, organic ingredients on their menus. And so it was revolutionary at the time. And now a kind of, it's kind of a thing where the great chefs, they start there. And then they go from there. And it's amazing. It's amazing. And she is amazing. And but this was 97. I moved to college in a tubercle in 97. So it was just the beginning of the Internet. I think I got my first email address in 95 or something. And so there was not really celebrity chef culture in the same way. There was not food blogging or food. Food Network was maybe just a couple of years ago. Food Network existed. There was it's not what it was now. You know? But it was not at all what it later became. And I had, again, a very mild interest in watching that kind of foodstuff. And I loved cooking shows as a kid, but not more than I loved other shows. You know? And so my first week, you know, they give you a college orientation. And somebody was like, oh, there's this famous restaurant in town, and to me, I was like, what's a famous restaurant? And I was like, oh, that's where white people's parents take them, you know, when they come visit. But my parents weren't going to take me there. My parents were not going to spend a $100. And dinner, they were going to take me to some Persian restaurant, or Mexican food, or our family friends house to eat. And we just didn't eat in fancy restaurants. I didn't even understand what was the point of a fancy restaurant. And so I sort of went in one year and out the other. And then the next year I fell in love. And my boyfriend was from San Francisco. And we spent so much of our time eating together and learning about food together. Because I've always loved to eat. That's never been a question, you know? And he showed me, you know, his favorite Mexican place his favorite ice cream place, his favorite pizza place, and he had always wanted to eat at chez panisse. And so it became this idea for us to save our money, in a shoe box, and go there once we had saved up like $220. So that took 7 months and we made a reservation and we went there and the restaurant divided into upstairs is more informal cafe where you can order all the cart and downstairs is like a more formal dining room with a fixed menu. So we were like, okay, we're only going once. We're going to go downstairs. So we went downstairs and it really was, I don't even know that I fully understood my body fully understood what I was entering. You know, when I walked in, but it's a temple to the senses. The place is so beautiful, but in the most understated way and it feels very warm and at the time I had no way of knowing all of the hand made Ness of the place, but it's so handmade in the most thoughtful and intentional way. And the art on the walls and the flower arrangements and the displays of fruit and vegetables, and everything about it is so extraordinary, but again, really, really, really subtle and understated. And so I think it probably hit me on some level, but I had no idea. You know, I was the child of immigrants, FedEx were not a priority for my family. You know, getting us in and out of school, getting us fed, getting us, you know, to be respected by our community. Those were the things that mattered. And so I just maybe absorbed it on some cellular level. And I was so inspired by this meal where I felt so taken care of by the staff that I wrote a letter and I asked for a job. I always worked throughout college. And so they hired me pretty much on the spot, I think, in retrospect that they were probably pretty, as a person who's now run a lot of restaurants. I think she was desperate and she needed someone because she was like, can you start tomorrow? And I did. Which is interesting too, 'cause when you wrote that letter, did you even know what job you wanted or you just knew you wanted to be by then by then I understood that some college students were busing tables there? Okay. And so I was like, oh, maybe I can do that. And even in the letter I said, I've never worked in a restaurant. I don't have any food experience, but I can learn anything. And we saved up for this dinner, and it was so extraordinary and magical. Please, like, give me this opportunity. In your mind, is this just a an interesting job at a cool place? And but you're still on path to being like a writer in pursuit you're doing. I was still in school. I was no, I was two indoctrinated as an immigrant kid to ever let go of your education. It was just a job, at least I get to earn some money on this in a cool place. Yeah, totally. And like beautiful food, which to me, I'm like, I just want to eat good stuff all the time. So yeah, I didn't ever occur to me that I wasn't. This is my future. No, not at all. I mean, I had a work study job before that where I basically filed papers in an office. So to me, this was a step up from that, 'cause I got to be in a beautiful social environment. And so with good food, and so I started and almost immediately, you know, my very first job, my very first day, my first task was they walked me through the kitchen, which is just so beautiful and warm and quiet and running at such a sort of slow, perfect hum, or maybe fast, perfect, hum. It's like a ballet, like everybody knows how to move in that kitchen. And the walls are actually a lot of them are lined with copper, so the way that the light reflects the wall on the walls is this beautiful warm light, and the chefs are all wearing these gleaming white chef coats. And there's, again, beautiful produce displays everywhere, and it just, it seemed like a movie set or something. And I walked through the kitchen into the dining room, and they had me vacuum the floor. Even the vacuum was magical, it was like a central vacuum, which I had never seen before, just this like 40 foot hose that you plug in the ground and it starts sucking. And I was like, even the vacuum here is amazing. And I just, by then, I sort of had some concept of what this place meant in the world. And I was like, I just can't believe they're letting me vacuum the floors. It felt really like an honor. And I held on to that feeling the whole time I worked there because I saw a lot of other people grow jaded over time, and you start to take it for granted because it becomes your normal. And I sort of told myself that I would leave before that happened to me. I wouldn't let that happen. The day I didn't feel privileged to walk up that ramp, and come to work at this place, I didn't want to work there anymore. So what was it that was happening internally with you? That lets you stay there. Work really, really, really, really hard. Sometimes the most basic entry level jobs,.

chez panisse restaurant Alice waters restaurant chez panisse Berkeley Alice San Francisco FedEx
"chez panisse" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:50 min | 6 months ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on How I Built This

"Extract a lot from a mushroom. We both, you know, went to the library and found all the mycology books and becoming weeks where YouTube and every possible video on mushrooms and downloading every PDF we could find and Paul stamets like the mushroom guru who wrote the handbook on growing mushrooms. We got all his books. There's a whole documentary on this guy, Paul stammers. Amazing, brilliant. We called emailed him, and he got back to us within two hours of us cold email him. You cold emailed post damage. But for people to know, he's got his whole mushroom tea company, and he's got a ted-talks and mushrooms with the documentaries on him. He's like the mushroom kind of expert. What did you email him? Would you ask him? We were trying to grow mushrooms on coffee grounds. And we were asking about spawn. And I forget if we asked him directly Alex, we respond like the seed basically. Exactly. It's analogous to seed, so you need that to get started. So he donated our first spawn or seed that we needed to grow, which eventually we used for our first test buckets. By the way, you're in Berkeley and you needed to do this on coffee grounds to just like brew a bunch of coffee and use that. One local coffee shop and just said, hey, can we pick up your coffee waste? The first time we thought we were actually we were afraid we didn't know how it was going to work. You remember walking into the first cafe and asking for their coffee ground waste and thinking of this big deal and man, they were so happy to get it off their hands. You want to go to the back and pick up that trash bag, this messy and heavy and leaking, like sure, go ahead and I think we're like, oh, okay, there's definitely a lot of this back here and they don't want anything to do with it. All right, so you get some coffee grounds, Paul stamets, males you, some mushroom spawn, mushroom seeds, through my fraternity. Give it a turn house. And what did you get a bunch of like buckets? Just imagine white paint buckets. We had about ten of them. This is right before spring break. And I think finally both of us are like, all right, we just got to do this thing and got to try growing these things enough reading enough watching videos. And decided to plant them. So we went collected a bunch of coffee grounds, brought them back to his fraternity. Put this tarp down in this fraternity kitchen closet and we mix in the spawn into them, put a little top on them, poke some holes, trying to use all of our best research. You know that we had done and we leave for spring break and we're both gone for roughly ten days. And I will never forget this phone call because Alex gets back to his fraternity. And I get this call and he's just so excited kind of screaming. He's like, Nikhil, you gotta run up here. You gotta check this out. And I'm in this room with him. We look at these ten buckets and literally 9 of them are just contaminated, nothing growing, just looking really nasty. I'm just sitting for ten days with some old coffee ground. One of them had this beautiful crop of pearl oyster mushrooms growing out of them. And remember we're both standing around this bucket and just looking at it and we're Alex is like, you want to try those. I'm like, I'm not trying to be like, you want to try them? It's like, I'm not trying these either. We're both kind of, you know, just looking at this bucket of mushroom sitting in this dark closet. So did anybody wind up actually sampling mushrooms? It was actually funny. That's speaking of never really being chefs or foodies or Gourmet cooks or anything. Neither one of us was trying those mushrooms, but we were like, what's the best restaurant in town? And we both had heard about this restaurant called chez panisse by chef Alice waters who is just an absolute legend and one of the founders is entire natural organic food movement, whether restaurant right there in Berkeley. Yeah, we don't know any of that. We just knew it was this famous restaurant in Berkeley and we ended up literally walking over this paint buckets one paint bucket of mushrooms walked in over and she happened to be in the front of a restaurant. She was talking to somebody and we just walked right up to her and said, hey, Alice, I'm Nick hill, this is Alex. We're trying to go these mushrooms and coffee grounds. We just grew some would you want to try some. And, you know, she got super into it and she's like, that's really cool. And come to the back of me and she actually walked us to the back of the restaurant to the kitchen for her head chef this guy named Cal was and she's like, Kelly, you want to try some of these mushrooms. These boys are grown and he ends up plucking half of the mushrooms out of his bucket. And he chops them up, sautes them up in the back of a restaurant and she tries them each eye and we try and remember chef Alice waters is like, these are delicious. Wow. She was on the show a few years ago and so when you brought the bucket of mushrooms and she said, she kind of gave it her blessing. Did they say, yeah, we want to buy them? Or what was the how did you leave it? No. I mean, we thought that they were gonna taste like coffee waste. So we're like, they're not gonna like them. So it was almost like this, okay, this is further along than we thought we'd be. Where do you go from here? So after that, we were like, oh man, now we got, we got a product here. Let's just take it to whole foods and we took the same day that same bucket to the Berkeley whole food store. This was at the early days where whole foods you could do this all the time. You know, a lot of local growers would go to a whole food store and on the spot, whole foods would buy it from you. So you guys went to the whole foods in Berkeley. I know that whole foods on telegraph avenue. And you'd like walked in and who'd you ask for? First produce guy we saw his name was sesa. And then we just went right up to him and said, we're trying to go mushrooms on coffee grounds. And we just grew these check them out and just kind of told them what we were trying to do. And Alice waters loves them. Now you've got the Alice waters endorsement, even though it may not have been official, but you know, it's also good. And he got fired up about it. And he ended up bringing up he bought his produce manager. I think we had a store marketing lead about three or four people huddled around this little bucket of mushrooms and we were telling him what we're trying to do and got a bunch of interest and support and we got the contact info that day to Randy to comment who is a Norco produce coordinator for whole foods. And we end up getting a call scheduled with him. Alex must have been what a week or two later. And he said, hey, tell me about what you guys are doing. Randy's a character he's like boys. It was like a two minute phone call. Boys, I've seen all these emails and what is this? You guys are farming in it. We said, Randy, we're growing mushrooms on copies. He's like, you hear this pause, and he's like, okay. What were you farming before? Well, Randy, we're in college. Okay. All right, do you guys figure this out? And he's kind of laughing, how to grow mushrooms on coffee, and she's like, I'm gonna blow you up at Whole Foods. It's like, this is the coolest shit I've ever seen in produce. Take coffee with your mushrooms, boys. Figure this out, here's my personal cell phone number, so just call text me if you need anything else, and then he hangs up. That was it. That was it. And no discussion about a purchase order or pricing or anything. It was just like, this sounds cool, but when you figure it out, give me a call back. It was that, and I think at that point, we knew nothing about retail. After that phone call, we were now a couple weeks away from graduation and we were still meeting up all the time talking all the time. 200, what are we doing with this? And we heard about a business plan competition called bears breaking boundaries, big ideas. It was called at berklee. And somehow someone told us about this Alex. I think it was a night before the deadline because I remember it was an all nighter we were up to the end of the night submitting this thing right before the deadline. And.

Paul stamets Alex Paul stammers Berkeley chef Alice waters Nick hill Alice waters Nikhil chez panisse Berkeley whole food store YouTube Randy Alice Cal Kelly Norco Whole Foods berklee
"chez panisse" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

01:35 min | 11 months ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Hey bomb squad. You're listening to radio. Cherry bomb the show. That's all about women and food. I'm your host kerry diamond coming to you from newsstands studios and rockefeller center in the heart of new york city. Today's guests are the mother daughter duo alice. Waters and fanny singer. Alice is the forest behind the legendary. California restaurant chez panisse which turns fifty years old this year. And she's the founder of edible schoolyard the organization that advocates for free healthy lunches for schoolchildren. It's a goal that shouldn't be so radical but it is fanny is the author of always home. A wonderful memoir. I enjoyed immensely. And she just curated exclusive collection of limited edition prints for the home kitchen with absolute art. We'll be right back with both women after this word from our sponsor x rosa as some of you might know. I'm a major francophile. And in the summer nothing feels more french to me than sitting around with friends and enjoying a glass of rosa. Some excited to tell you more about today's sponsor x rosa that spelled a. x. xs produced by the maison saint ex winery founded one hundred forty years ago in the beautiful countryside of provence. The x. winemakers have been able to take advantage of the warm days and cool nights prevents along with the mineral.

"chez panisse" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Everybody, you are back with you. Eating it up. I'm Cheryl Alters Jameson. Thanks for coming along with us today and we're talking food Adventures with Deborah Madison and her life in vegetables. Her new book is an onion in my pocket. It's a beautiful and charming and frank memoir, and you need it. Go get it, Find it and are collected Works or Garcia Street or order it from wherever you get books, But get it. It's something you should definitely read. And one of the things I want to get in. We're going to go back and talk a little bit more about, you know things like greens and shape a niece. But one of the real points of the book is nourishment. And I want to make sure we have time to talk about that a little bit. Because if he were saying when we're off air, nobody gets to that part because we all run out of time. So I wanted to start our segment. Our last segment with that idea. Can you talk to that a little bit, please for e. I want to try. I've always felt a little uncomfortable with the vegetarian label because I'm not a vegetarian unnecessarily. But I had to find out what really mattered this food and what mattered to me was how food was prepared or shared. And if it came with Plainness with generosity with care with attention. Then I remember those meals and it didn't matter at all. What was on the plane and so the last chapters about that kind of food, and and this just stories about menus and meals I've had Work that really stood out. Uh huh. And you know, I do like that in terms of the spirit of generosity about the food and that we remember moments. I mean, it's yes, it's important. What's on the plate and all of that, all of us who are, you know, so tied to the culinary universe. But it is that spirit and that generosity and all of that that I think, Yeah, that does matter s O much in the end, so I appreciate you. Getting that in in the book and in our talk about it, too. So, um, s o back. We're talking about greens on how you ended up being chef there because that was a project, I guess. Was that the Abbott or you're organizing Committee of the SIM Center. I don't know what they were called. Exactly that decided You should have a restaurant. The Zen center should have a restaurant who decided that there was no organizing committee. But there was a board. Okay. And, uh, I don't know how I'll happened. But I just found myself in that position and and and going to bed every night feeling like I had a mountain on my chest and waking up in the morning. It was still there. Well, not only was the restaurant new I mean and again, this is just so wild to think back at the time. But I mean Fort Mason. I mean, that had been a government entity and all the sudden it became, you know, an area right for private development. And just to put a restaurant in that space because we're talking, You know, they're with a stunning views out over the water and everything. I mean, this was so again visionary. At the time to, you know, put that there and to make a restaurant that was in this beautiful setting, And that was open to everybody to come. But that was being run by the Zen center. It was just really such a unusual idea and something that you know again. She was like, Oh, yeah, of course I would do something like that today, But we're talking, You know, a full generation ago, and it was unusual on s all of sudden. You found yourself. Without a huge having a big, big restaurant. And, uh, yeah, people paying to come this time It was crazy. It was really hard. I mean, I was stuck on the idea of maybe maybe a 10 seat restaurant, tiny little intimate thing. This was huge as you said, And you know the idea that we would chop garlic, you know, by hand or whatever it was Quickly, you know, gone. It wasn't like a 10 Person Cafe or even being in the they represent center with your folks coming in for dinner? No, we had 300. People at a time sometimes come in. In the very beginning. 250 people was usually what we served for lunch. Uh huh. And again, you're bringing in the general public, So I know it was a big concern to you to have, um, you know, something that felt like a satisfactory meal again something at the center of the plate. That was very I added cheese, all kinds of things where it didn't happen to be our wasn't needed, really. And since that I've taken it out, but because I was nervous. I didn't want people to go away hungry. And feeling that they hadn't been fed s. Oh, it was a little bit dicey. You know our first well, you did such a great job of it. And I just remember eating there at the time and just being, you know, blown away by the generosity of the food and the spirit of it and the Oh, the bread you did, like it wasn't the for gossip. Love. Yes. Yeah. And you pull it apart of the table, and, uh, yeah. Careful stuff. Yeah, it was from Yeah, we probably should at least give homage for your time at Chez Panisse. Since that is a legendary restaurant and Alice Waters, obviously a legendary figure in our culinary universe, and she had come to the garden originally, That's how you met her that I'm right. Yeah, she had come to gringo and the Abbot said, Why don't you show her and Lindsey shere around? But I did, And they were kind of mind. Especially Alice was iron. Let us and asking questions. And she was. She really wanted this food that we were growing from the restaurant. And then I started to ask them questions. And And this And finally she said, haven't you ever been, And I said no, I've never been. I never even heard of shape in these Really? I mean, I barely had heard of it. She said. Well, you must come bring a friend and come tomorrow night. So we did. We borrowed a car We went and it was this was the food that I always had wanted Teat. And cook, you know, and I recognized it immediately and and I went to work there. She she invited me to work there and I did for On and off for about 10 years. Oh, and it was again such a seminal time and Alice brought together such an amazing group of people yourself included, But Lindsay shares the pastry chef, and, oh, people that Santa fans know David Tanis and Mark Miller and forced through the kitchen at that time, folks, you just need to read the story..

Zen center Alice Cheryl Alters Jameson Deborah Madison Fort Mason SIM Center Alice Waters Teat Chez Panisse Lindsey shere Abbot Lindsay Santa Mark Miller David Tanis
"chez panisse" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Tom Douglas. And I'm Terry wrote your other chef in hat and chef. We've been eating this little bit of ham and between our segments. And it makes me think about good books and make me see a lot of Marcello has on and some of those famous Italian cookbooks that I've always loved because everything calls for like for sure this happens to be a Spanish Serrano ham, but everything calls for prosciutto or pursuit of lands. Harm Ryan's or, you know, and this just makes me lovely. Crazy from that we're going to move on to Laura Hamilton because Laura has the cookbook Stool store called the Larder in Fremont over there, and North Seattle and North of downtown Seattle and is going to tell us about some of her favorite fines for this holiday season. Maybe a good gift give or two I, Laura. Hello, Laura. Hello. Hello. Thank you for having me. How's your How's your your Your house? Here in this lovely time Has my house your house? You should put murder book lighter. I was gonna say I haven't seen much of my house. Um, but but look lighter. I'm seeing plenty of, um Yeah. No. You know, we're hanging in there. We're getting, um ah, lot of support from our community, which I'm extraordinarily grateful for. Um It's very interesting to now basically be running an online shop. We are We are open for appointment browsing, but otherwise placing Ah lot more fulfilling a lot more online orders than we used to, Um, which is wonderful, but it's but it's also an adjustment, so we're just glad to still be here. So what? What do you find heading out the door the most. Oh, my goodness. There are so many great books, um this fall, and I'm really finding that people are I think because we've all been grounded and housebound this year. People are looking to sort of escape through their cookbook. So earlier in the year we saw a lot of people making sour dough looking for good books about like fermentation and home cooking as a sort of hunker down and now I'm seeing a lot of people. One thing book from sort of other cuisines and cultures and the books that really sort of immerse you in a different location. So I think people are getting antsy and are ready to, um They're eating their travel like that now, and we're ready to start doing it again. Yeah, I would think that would be a good time to buy a cookbook and spend time Using it, as opposed to just put it on the shelf. Absolutely absolutely. And you? Are you the perfect resource for that? Thank you so much. I appreciate that. That means a lot coming from you, especially on Really find something that they might not have other otherwise uncovered on really sort of pursue their interests in the kitchen. You know, we always refer you need to meet monger on the wind monger and the fishmonger. You're funny. The book Munger. It's always a great idea to walk into a store and go Hey, what's using? I don't know about one of our doctors here at the hot stove is Xiao Ching Chau. And she's got a new book coming out. Have you seen other advanced copy of that? I have not yet. It's coming out in January, and, um, I can't wait to see it. I am just been living through. I think she's been posting on her social media that she's been testing and so I am really excited to see it. Her first book, Chinese Soul Food, I still think is a great one, because I think it kind of demystifies Asian cooking a bit little Chinese cooking. I'm looking forward to that part of her new book on Vegetables. Absolutely, And I think, you know. Chinese cooking lends itself so welcome vegetables and vegetarian cooking. And so I'm just really, really excited to see what she does, and I'm sure she's going to come to the larder and sign a bunch of people can preorder from you. She is, yes. Absolutely. They can preorder that from our website right now. And as soon as we have our copies She is going to come in and find them and personalize them and do all of those things so that we can ship them out as soon as the book is released, so yeah, absolutely. All right. Jump into your favorites. Yeah, You know, there are so many good ones, um, and just sort of following the theme of travel. There's a really lovely book that came out this fall called in Beedies Kitchen. That is by hollow Hassan, who actually used to live in Seattle. She is Brooklynite now, but she is she immigrated here from Somalia when she was seven, and the book really captures her. Rediscovery of cooking and food, and it has this sort of direct stories and recipes from grandmother's, which are called babies. Um And, uh, but they're sort of their stories and recipes from eight countries that border, the Indian Ocean and East Africa and so it is a really beautiful immersive. Well, Cory get to read these women's stories here about and learned their favorite recipes. And I think well, some people who are used to sort of Western cooking might be I don't know, maybe a little bit, but I don't know. Maybe think who is going to be African cooking? I'm not sure if I'll have the ingredients or I'll be able to do it. It is it is home cooked course, and it's a really, really delightful, beautifully photographed book. Enough in BBS kitchen. All right, cool. Look forward to that. What's that? Yeah, So for the baker, we have a really great book by Melissa Weller. It's called a good fake. And Melissa was a pastry chef in or is a pastry chef in New York at lots of really fantastic restaurants. And she also trained as a chemist when she was an undergraduate in college, and so this book is full of very detailed. Really incredibly written and researched baking recipes and covers a really broad range from bread to cookies to cake. The laminated does And so it could be a good introduction or a really good beat. Different for an experienced baker as well. And Yeah, that one is really great. Melissa Weller, a good bake Can't wait. Have you looked at The book called, Always Add Lemon. I have. Yes, it's delightful and we're actually going to do an online author talk with that offer Daniel Alvarez in January. I don't have a date right in front of me, which is not Not the best idea when you're gonna be on the radio, But But But But, yeah, it's a really delightful book. Danielle used to work at Chez Panisse and then moved to Australia. And this this book is just absolutely wonderful. We have time for one more. Okay, So the last one I will do that, because it's the two of you is the Julia Child Foundation. Put together this really lovely, very difficult book That is full of words of wisdom from Julia that comes People who love to eat are always the best people. It's just a wonderful book for anyone who loves Julia or who wants, you know, just sort of some encouragement and No nonsense words of wisdom, and, um, it's really great and the proceeds like I said, Go to the Julia Child Foundation, and so that support women in cooking and things like that. So it's a really It's a good book for a good cause. All right, if you want to learn more about the books of the season go to Laura Hamilton's website. That's L A R. I always get that confused. Www dot booked larder l A. R d e r dot com You know, one of the cool things about your shop. At least I have been in for a while. But when I wasn't before, when you do have authors come through. You haven't signed some back stock and so you can end up getting.

Um Laura Hamilton Melissa Weller Seattle Julia Child Foundation Tom Douglas Julia Marcello Terry Ryan Fremont murder North Seattle Xiao Ching Chau Daniel Alvarez Beedies Kitchen Indian Ocean Chez Panisse Somalia
"chez panisse" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"The South. Somewhere in the south, and it's cool deed free and it's covert free. We've got Daniel Alvarez on the line. She's the author of Always Add Lemon. And when I think about that I think it's a great lesson. You know, I think about my professional kitchens. It's a great lessons for cooks who are always adding salt to kind of back off and absolute lemon and breaking things up with lemon. So let's find out. Why Daniel named her book that why she loves lemon so much and what she has to offer here for your holiday. Seasonal cooking. Hi, Daniel. Hello. Hi. Thanks for having me. Take pleasure. Where are you in Australia. So I'm intrigued me go lovely. And I'm sure the weather is going to be lovely today as it is in Sydney every day. Oh, yeah, It's nice. And yes, the company reported pretty good. It's a good country to be in at the moment. So what do you mean, when you say your cook book title? Always add lemon? Uh, people I think Don't use lemon left. You obviously feel the same and What does it bring to the table? So I think, as you alluded to a lot of people tend to just throw salt. That's something that they think it's not delivering the flavor that they want. Or maybe they don't even go. But I think a little bit of lemon juice or some precious city At the end, it could be lying to beat the something that tends to be the kind of flavor that I really appreciate. Just wait things up. If you have something, reach your body, a little bit of acidity can cut through all that and make it He takes a little bit lighter. So that's kind of the book and not every recipe as lemon. It is, but it's just one of my life tricks to achieve a better flavor and that there What's your background and cooking? Daniel? I grew up in Miami, Florida, They Cuban family. So I think the love of food started their cooking with my mom and my grandmother, where my thing cook, But I am told in culinary school and moved to California and I started off my first restaurant job with that transponder is an intern. And from there, I reports around the Bay Area, And finally, my last Four years in California at Chez Panisse in Berkeley. Well, you know, I started at the starting at the top of movie moved to the top. I know it really was a very shocking entry into a hospitality, but it was excellent. I wouldn't trade it. And how'd you end up in Australia? When he just on book tour you visiting? Do you live there? What's going on? No, no, no, I actually um so all my family still in Miami. I was at the moment of my life where I didn't really know what to do. But I was ready to for a change to move and I can't hear her dictation and kind of Girl in love with the city. But I had no idea. I didn't really know anyone here in a couple of friends and not in the restaurant industry, and it was a friend of mine who's in the Australian guy that I worked with. That shaped me who somehow was contacted by restaurant group here, and they wanted to open a venue that was similar in style or at least philosophy to shake me. He asked me if I'd be interested and They threw me out and I got the job and moved back here six years ago. Good for you. You couldn't You couldn't find a spot further from Miami that that's seen the in literally the other side of the world. Yeah. So in your book always add lemon. You have some kind of delicious kitchen rules that you like to live by. Can you give us some hints on what they are? How do you think? I mean, I try not to call them too much of rules. But number one person for most is cooking seasonally. And I think you know you guys understand this, Um Probably better than I do either, but it it really makes food taste so much better just by choosing to cook for what is growing or what is intended to grow at the time of year that you're cooking. Secondly, I talked a lot about this is imminent. Underpins all of my philosophy. But, um, supporting your local farmers support your local community, and that is really important. I think for creating Other societies and the food will always take better on the local farmers with the people taking care of the soil, so, but with that one of us alone you're doing a lot of things. And inevitably when used by from a local farmer, you learn their story to you. Your food your dinner comes with a A real story. Yeah, absolutely. And you know, it'll it'll be ah, more thoughtful meal for sure if you've gone that way to try and find Product from your local farm. Um, it will taste better and it will be a better meal. I don't know. I say Keep your favorite wouldn't earn and keep it. I always in every kitchen that I have had my favorite wood and staying with me And I don't know why. Because I really associate my cooking and my feel what I'm cooking like my grandmother, and she always had a wood burning a half. I don't like the feel of it so everyone should have their own favorite one. Um and then. Yeah, can't pay state that every step of the way. So this is a big one for me. Don't just take things at the end patient kind of throughout the cooking process if you can, and definitely add seasoning as you go. Lastly, a little bit of every lemon will change everything. And I think we already talked about that one. Yeah, it's just bright is cherry. How do you feel? You know, one of the things I always tell my classes here at the hot stove is if you're going to use a lemon used both parts of the lemon right used, possessed and used the juice. No matter no matter what it's calling for, Although possessed, you can't use his much maybe as the juice because it will dominate now. But you know what? You know what I do in that case is like if I don't need enough lemon set, you know, So Lemony, obviously give me too much that overpower you fake invested into a little bit of all of oil, and I'll just kind of keep a lemon olive oil sort of already. Um, I could finish cold and it's really not Yeah. Oh, you can put it in sugar whenever lemon shoe. There you go. There you go. Yeah, Another question. Your book, often talks about projects Tell me about some of the projects and you because in this day up here where people are still in quarantine, the isolating and I know my wife has just fallen in love with her Sour dough starter and is doing that as a project every day, adding arrive Flower or Temp a flower or don't that doesn't sound like the right word. What's right flower? Yeah, but there's thean Jura Flower. Yeah. What's the name of that? And anyway, she's fallen in love with that project. Tell me about some projects in your book. Yes, Mrs Perfection in the back of the book that is more for people like your wife That really wants to go a little bit deeper and with the whole cookie I've allowed you to make it home. A lot of the things that you would normally just buy at the grocery store. So in the Red section, I could be a few simple bread's not sour dough bread, but Potato rolls and focaccia and Luca, which is a beautiful leaf shaped their low type of bread that are quite simple, but I think you would enjoy making in the dairy section. I teach you how to make yogurt and Ricardo and creme fresh, which I think it could basic staples of very that are quite simple to make it home, and they deliver so much.

Daniel Alvarez Miami Australia thean Jura Flower California Sydney Bay Area Mrs Perfection Florida intern Berkeley Luca Ricardo Lemony Chez Panisse
"chez panisse" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

08:56 min | 1 year ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Cheryl Alters Jameson. Thanks for spending part of your Saturday afternoon with us. And today the US includes Daniel Alvarez was a chef from here in the states. But she's in Australia these days, and she works for the restaurant called Friends. He's executive chef, and she has a brand new book. Always add lemon. Dan you Congratulations on the book. This is your first book, right? Yes, it is. It's so exciting. Thank you so much Great. Well, even before we get into the book, what led you into the world of food? You grew up in a food loving family. I mentioned. That's right. Yeah, you know, but no one working professionally in kitchen, So I think that was a bit of Ah. A jump for me. I think it was just one of those things that I was constantly thinking about. I had a desk job for a little while and I was constantly dreaming up what I was going to cook over the weekend or any time off on by that led me to Enroll myself in culinary school, which I did in Florida. And then from there, I moved to California. So I got an internship with the French laundry, which was super exciting. That was my dad's restaurant job, Terry. I mean the start. Yeah. French laundry, You know, travel, including at the top. Yeah, I think I was. I was really scared then, and I probably had every reason to be, and I didn't even know it. Um, And then, after that, I works at a few other, You know, really beautiful restaurants in San Francisco on then, ultimately, in the US that my last stop was shaping knees and I spent four years there and I just loved it. Well, I just can't do better than being in Berkeley at Chez Panisse, Alice Waters that seminal restaurant and and I did love that it was David Tanis, who was the chef at the time. The executive chef Of working for analysts at the time that you went to work there because he had a very storied career here in the Santa Fe area, and lots of people know his name from his time here before, you know, went on to say ponies and Paris and back and forth between those two on New York now, yes, right. And he writes his column for The New York Times. And Yes, so anyway, he's a good one to have had in the kitchen with you. You have a story about my only in your book that I thought was, Yeah. David That told you could you pass that on to people? Yeah, well, it was one of like the first house. Um, you know, too, that I had to make in the kitchen and everyone has kind of subtle, little different ways of how they make aioli. But David was really staunch that you know, I only is garlic, oil, salt and nothing else. So you know, you actually don't have a little bit of lemon into that. I mean, sometimes I do now. Don't tell him but he really wanted it to be just its purest form. And what you're using Good olive oil like we did in the restaurant. That was perfect. And it made me realize. Like you really don't need to add anything else s O. That was one of the first lessons that I learned from David. Keep it simple. Keep it simple. That's his mom's ever so, yeah, and foreign I only you want to use a really kind of a mellow olive oil. Not one it has. Yeah. You tell that she knows that Pip peppering nous, right? Nothing too peppery. Nothing that like hits you in the back of this throat too much, but something kind of fruity her milder around her. But it just makes the most delicious thing. And one of the things I love to do is in the summer time to make a really just gorgeous credit Tate parade with annihilate like that, And it's just stunning. That sounds so good. Yeah, I've already ready for summer to come back. It will be nice to have high. I know you didn't finish is something I know you're just going into it that so That's right about it. Being a completely different time Was it when you first moved to Australia to have things like you know, having you're not celebrating an American Thanksgiving in your restaurant? Probably. But you may still yourself with friends or something. But that and all that to be mid summer instead. Of winter. It's so weird. I think that's probably one of the things that makes live. I mean, I love living down here, but it's one of the things that really pulls at your heartstrings because they just giving is such a beautiful family event, you know, and everyone has their own traditions. And we always didn't really beautiful Thanksgiving and unfortunately here, it always falls on a Friday because it's Thursday in the U. S, and I usually don't celebrate it. On Christmas in the summertime is odd, although I did grow up in Florida, so it was always quite summary there. That is different. Yes. Where Palm trees and all of that for Christmas, right? You have some experience with that. All right, Well, OK, tell us about Fred's a little bit. Yes, So for we opened about four years ago, and I was brought over to run the kitchen there and design the restaurant, So we have this crazy kitchen that's literally in the middle of the dining room. Um, big, wood burning fireplace and a wood burning oven. So it's all very theatrical, but we're cooking really simple food. My goal was always to have Um, you know, break down the literal and figurative wall so that people could see the food as it was being made. We don't do anything too tricky and and this is Hopefully, the cooking that you'll see in the book as well. It's all straightforward, fresh flavors about heightening ingredients. We don't try to do anything. All that Known to the two ingredients. You know, we take a lot of care to source really beautiful ingredients from small local farms, not area, and we just want to prepare them simply and to make sure that you get That's something to this just on your plate. Lovely, like Sydney is such a great restaurant city. It's been some years since I've been over there. Now. I guess it's has probably been 15 years at this point time is flying. But oh my goodness. The restaurant business of the foods and the emphasis on seafood and only I love too and since right Strong Asian influence. And so much of the food. Oh, just so many interesting things about it loved eating through there. And, of course, then you have all that great wine that's coming from. Yeah. Lots of video, Barossa Valley and a lot of other places, you know? Yeah, it was a fun thing to visit. So what led you to decide to write a book? You young thing? My no. Well, you know, I think, um, I have so many lessons that I picked up along the way. And I think I wanted to find a space in the book for, um you know, the cook that was feeling like they were ready to do. A bit more in the kitchen, like there's super simple recipes in the book that are straightforward and easy to follow. And then there's also recipes that I think could really speak to people that love being in the kitchen. I really want to spend more time developing their skills a little bit, and perhaps trying something a little different on guys just wanted to share a few of those lessons, not least of all, which is to always add lemon, which is what one of my tips around just bringing for freshness. Food. Oh, well. I loved that that that is the title of the book, And it's subtitled Recipes. You want to cook and food You want Todt and really liked your your emphasis on? Yeah, these air simple things, but they they're for people who want to spend time in the kitchen and I get so sick and tired of so many books of act like We want to get you in and out of there as fast as possible. You know, we know that that Z It is incredibly enjoyable and it's tactical. That's sensible, and it's just downright fun. And I love people. Well, I 100% agree with that. So you get it all right, well, Daniel Alvarez is a chef who was born in Miami. She's my guest today as she is coming to us from Sydney, Australia, where she is the Chef executive chef of Fred's Restaurant. We're talking again about her new book, Her first book, It's a beauty called, Always Add Lemon. You can get it here in the States now and anywhere that fine books are sold. Anyway. We are, let's see, gonna be talking more about the recipes in here and what makes the book unique in just a second. You're listening to talk. 12 60. Katie RC. Where? Santa Fes news talk leader. He can always find us at 12 16 103.7 as well as podcast and live streamed at Santa calm..

executive Australia David That Daniel Alvarez US Florida Sydney David Cheryl Alters Jameson Fred's Restaurant Dan first house California Santa Fes San Francisco The New York Times Berkeley Terry
"chez panisse" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

"In me. It turned out to be a pivotal moment in my life, not because I took the pope because I didn't. And at that moment my worth was exactly the value I placed in myself. I guess what I'm saying is. Stand up for yourself. Stand up for others. Stand up before you know deep down is fair. So much success comes down to a sense of southwest. Cultivate that strength is best you can. Don't value yourself based upon the responses you get from other people some imagine perception of who you might be. And don't give yourself away to others. Hold on tight. This is your life and your experience. You might know Guy Rose's voice from how built this or the Ted Radio Hour I liked. The speech wasn't about blind optimism, but rather was about looking for opportunities in this time as difficult as things are right now, the world is full of opportunities. Things just waiting to be changed and after hearing his speech. Thank, you might agree. Nominee. Tell you something that may sound counterintuitive. Smile. Open, your eyes look out and understand this. You are leaping into what might be the greatest moment of possibility in modern human history. Now before I get too deep into this I. Want to explain what I mean by possibility. Isn't wild-eyed optimism or a belief that history is an inevitable march towards progress. That's rubbish. Possibility allows for a whole range of outcomes, massive failure regression loss. But. Possibility also allows for growth and resilience and recovery, and most importantly the possibility to dream, and then to realize a better way. Possibility. In May of two thousand twenty is an opportunity to re imagine, and then to remake the world. And to do this. You're going to have to take big swings swings for the fences swings that will occasionally be home runs, but most of the time we'll be strikeouts. But if you take those swings right now, not in five years or ten years, but right now you will start to remake are very very challenging world. Is Some of you may know of interviewed thousands of some of the most inspiring people on the planet, and some of them are swinging for the fences, but they need you to join them. Pat Brown he was a bow chemistry Professor Stanford. He understood that livestock production accounts for a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions, so he started impossible foods with the goal of figuring out how to make meet real meat that bleeds in sizzles from plant proteins. He's already succeeding, and if he finishes the job, it could cut carbon emissions by twenty to twenty five percent pat. Brown didn't wait for others to make a change he did. Jimmy Wales wanted everyone on earth have the same access to knowledge that he did, so he created wikipedia as an open source online encyclopedia that functions as a nonprofit available to anyone anywhere anytime. He never really made any money off Wikipedia, even though it's one of the most visited websites on the planet. Jimmy Wales didn't wait for others to make a change he did. Alice waters started a farm to table. Restaurant called Chez Panisse in the early nineteen seventies in Berkeley. But she soon started to see how industrial farming and agriculture were polluting rivers damaging the environment, so alice started a movement, called the edible schoolyard and today. Thousands of schools across America are growing their vegetables in harmony with nature. Now it's not gonNA change the entire world today, but it's start. Alice waters didn't wait for others to make a change. She did it herself. Alicia Garza Otamendi Patrisse cullors. They lived and breathed injustice. They didn't wait for permission. They inspired black lives matter. Toronto Burke knew intimately about the silence of sexual assault. She didn't wait for permission. She wrote two words that changed the world. Me To. Gratitude and Vanessa. Still kids ignited a movement of thousands of young people demanding climate justice. They didn't wait. They didn't ask for permission. Now if you walk around San Francisco today. You'll see ads for startups that will deliver cannabis to your home through a sophisticated APP. You'll see ads for better work productivity software. One startup even raised almost four hundred million dollars to build robots to make pizzas. We now have another new media company. This one raised more than a billion dollars all with the goal of creating ten minute video clips to keep you glued to your iphone while you wait in line at the grocery store. And look people will make money off of these ideas, and that's fine, but if you really want to take advantage of this incredible moment in history, no this you can make it happen by deciding to be more like Pat. Brown or Alice, waters or Toronto Burke or Gretchen Berg? Don't wait. Everything and anything possible coming out of this crisis. Can you use your energy your youth, your boldness to take a big swing for the fences to answer these questions. I. Think you know the answer. So we need you to spend the summer building a plan. You are the jet is we have been waiting for? We need you to take this mission. There may never be an opportunity like this one again in your lifetime, and it's okay to feel scared. This is a hard time. But I promise you, you have been given a gift. Now right now. It's your time to run the world. Care The keys. In. Don't look back and one more thing. May the force be with you. That's it for this week's math and magic. The speeches I drew from barely skim the surface from General Stanley McChrystal to Katie Corey Ryan. Seacrest to Hillary Clinton Halsey to Bill Melinda. We've got fifty plus inspiring commencement speeches waiting for you on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcast. Go check him out. That's commencement speeches for the class of twenty twenty until next time I'm Bob, Pittman and thanks for listening. That's it for today's episode. Thanks so much for listening to math and magic a production of IHEART radio. The show is hosted by Bob Pittman special thanks to sue Schillinger for booking. Wrangling are wonderful talent, which is no small feat Nikki tour for pulling research bill plaques and Michael as our for their recording. Help our editor at Ryan Murdoch, and of course Gale Raoul Eric Angel, Noel, mango, and everyone who helped. Bring this show to your ears until next.

Alice waters Pat Brown Bob Pittman Jimmy Wales Toronto Burke wikipedia Alicia Garza Otamendi Patrisse Stanley McChrystal Guy Rose Chez Panisse cannabis Berkeley America bow chemistry Professor Stanfo Vanessa Michael assault
"chez panisse" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

"It turned out to be a pivotal moment in my life, not because I took the pope because I didn't. And at that moment, my worth was exactly the value I placed in myself. I. Guess what I'm saying. His stand up for yourself stand up father's. Stand up before you know. Deep Down is fair. So. Much success comes down to a sense of southwest. Cultivate that strength is best you can. Don't value yourself based upon the responses you get from other people, some imagined perception of who you might be. and. Don't give yourself away to others. Hold on tight. This is your life and your experience. You might know Guy Rose's voice from how built this or the Ted Radio Hour? I liked the speech wasn't about blind optimism, but rather was about looking for opportunities in this time as difficult as things are right now, the world is full of opportunities. Things just waiting to be changed and after hearing his speech. Thank, you might agree. Not GonNa. Tell you something that may sound counterintuitive. Smile. Open your eyes look out and understand this. You are leaping into what might be the greatest moment of possibility in modern human history. Now before I get too deep into this I. Want to explain what I mean by possibility, possibility isn't wild-eyed, optimism or a belief that history is an inevitable march towards progress. That's rubbish. Possibility allows for a whole range of outcomes, massive failure regression loss. But possibility also allows for growth and resilience and recovery, and most importantly the possibility to dream, and then to realize a better way. Possibility in May of two thousand twenty is an opportunity to re imagine, and then to remake the world. And to do this, you're going to have to take big swings swings for the fences swings that will occasionally be home runs, but most of the time we'll be strikeouts. But, if you take those swings right now, not in five years or ten years, but right now you will start to remake are very very challenging world. Is Some of you may know of interviewed thousands of some of the most inspiring people on the planet, and some of them are swinging for the fences, but they need you to join them. Pat Brown. He was a bow, chemistry Professor Stanford. He understood that livestock production accounts for a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions, so he started impossible foods with the goal of figuring out how to make meet real meat that bleeds in sizzles from plant proteins. He's already succeeding, and if he finishes the job, it could cut carbon emissions by twenty to twenty five percent pat. Brown didn't wait for others to make a change he did. Jimmy Wales wanted everyone on earth have the same access to knowledge that he did, so he created wikipedia as an open source online encyclopedia that functions as a nonprofit of able to anyone anywhere anytime. He never really made any money off Wikipedia, even though it's one of the most visited websites on the planet. Jimmy Wales didn't wait for others to make a change he did. Alice waters started a farm to table. Restaurant called Chez Panisse in the early nineteen seventies in Berkeley. But she soon started to see how industrial farming and agriculture were polluting rivers, damaging the environment, so alice started a movement, called the edible schoolyard and today thousands of schools across America. are growing their vegetables in harmony with nature. Now it's not gonNA change the entire world today, but it's start. Alice waters didn't wait for others to make a change. She did it herself. Alicia Garza Otamendi Patrisse cullors they lived and breathed injustice. They didn't wait for permission. They inspired black lives matter. Toronto Burke knew intimately about the silence of sexual assault. She didn't wait for permission. She wrote two words that changed the world. Me To. Gratitude, Berg and Ben isn't Coty. Still kids ignited a movement of thousands of young people demanding climate justice. They didn't wait. They didn't ask for permission. Now if you walk around, San Francisco today. You'll see ads for startups that will deliver cannabis to your home through a sophisticated APP. You'll see ads for better work productivity software. One startup even raised almost four hundred million dollars to build robots to make pizzas. We now have another new media company. This one raised more than a billion dollars all with the goal of creating ten minute video clips to keep you glued to your iphone while you wait in line at the grocery store. And Look, people will make money off of these ideas, and that's fine, but if you really want to take advantage of this incredible moment in history, no this you can make it happen by deciding to be more like Pat Brown or Alice waters or Toronto Burke or Gretchen Berg. Don't wait. Everything and anything possible coming out of this crisis. Can you use your energy? Your youth, your boldness to take a big swing for the fences to answer these questions. I think you know the answer. So. We need you to spend the summer building a plan. You are the jet is we have been waiting for? We need you to take this mission. There may never be an opportunity like this one again in your lifetime, and it's okay to feel scared. This is a hard time. But I promise you. You have been given a gift. Now right now it's your time to run the world. Care The keys. In don't look back and one more thing. May the force be with you. That's it for this week's math and magic the speeches. I drew from barely skim the surface from General Stanley McChrystal to Katie Corey. Ryan seacrest to Hillary Clinton Halsey to Bill Melinda. We've got fifty plus inspiring commencement speeches waiting for you on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcast. Go check him out. That's commencement speeches for the class of twenty twenty until next time I'm Bob Pittman and thanks for listening. That's it for today's episode. Thanks so much for listening to math and magic a production of IHEART radio. The show is hosted by Bob Pittman special. Thanks to sue Schillinger for booking wrangling are wonderful talent, which is no small feat Nikki tour for pulling research bill plaques and Michael as our for their recording, help our editor at Ryan, Murdoch and of course Gale Raoul Eric Angel, Noel, mango and everyone who helped. Bring this show to your ears until next.

Pat Brown Alice waters Jimmy Wales Toronto Burke Bob Pittman Gretchen Berg wikipedia Ryan seacrest Alicia Garza Otamendi Patrisse Stanley McChrystal Guy Rose chemistry Professor Stanford Chez Panisse cannabis Berkeley sue Schillinger assault
How I Built Resilience

How I Built This

07:15 min | 2 years ago

How I Built Resilience

"Hey welcome back to how. I built this resilience edition so we just heard from some industrial. Who actually started her. Culinary career at Chez Panisse in Berkeley and. Her Mentor was none other than Alice. Waters Alice daughter Fanny Singer. Join me to talk about how shape unease is doing during the crisis and how we can keep local farmers and business by buying straight from the source Finney. I know that you are sheltering place that your mom right now in Berkeley of all. How are you guys doing? How are you holding up? It's it's sort of strange very surreal. Moment I live in San Francisco and I do still have apartment there. But you know it's a one bedroom apartment and my partner and I are together. We both were working at home. And there's no outdoor space than being in Berkeley was not just to be with my mom who I obviously concerned about to. Just because I wanted to fee `sort sort of insane person about disinfecting nail and all the things in a little bit more German centric than my mother so these things were these work concerns of mine but also I mean to be Berkeley in a place that has really rich outdoor environmental NGO to walk through one hundred thirty seven pad this in the hills of the Berkeley into just feel to walk for ten. Miles is like the only thing I think kind of keeping me from total insanity. Alice tell us a little bit about. What's going on with Chez Panisse right now? Obviously you've been closed for five. Maybe six weeks. What's going on with the staff right now. We really paid the step their time off so that when it comes time to reopen that they would be there and available we had the good luck to get a kind of bridge loan from some wonderful friends of the restaurant that are helping us get to the point where money comes from the government to pay people. Some are on unemployment and some are being paid a portion of their salaries. But it's really important to me that people are paid at this time. If I have to ask my friends I have my friends Alice. One of the things I read about which is super cool. is that Obviously you work with a lot of small farmers all over California and a lot of these farmers presumably. I mean they supply restaurants so first of all from your conversations with with farmers that you work with you supply your restaurant and other restaurants. I mean what is their situation like I mean? How long can they go like this without having restaurants to supply? It's very serious. What's going on with our whole organic farm community because they really have a only the farmers markets to bring food to and the number of people that are going to farmers markets is not what it usually is so. We're trying to figure out how to buy that food from the farmers and we have a project in Stockton California The mayor of Stockton is very enthusiastic about getting or Ganic Food in the public school system and serve at this moment in time. He asked if we could help buy food from the farmers said that he can give an stockton and I thought that that would be a perfect way for us to begin building that network that we're going to need for the public schools and were putting little recipes into the box so that people know how to make very simple dishes and may given at least four thousand pounds of food away in Stockton Alice. I I mean you've talked about this for years that when you were a little girl. Your parents had a victory garden at home in New Jersey and that you really are encouraging people to plant their own. Things actually inspired me so much. I've got some ceilings. Here can you see some big lettuce there? You go and I'M GONNA hopefully. That'll be lettuce in a couple of months. I mean I don't have a big backyard. I have a small space and got a planter but for people who don't have a backyard who might live in an apartment I mean what are some ways that people can think about growing their own food that keeps looking at Brown Finley and he started by chanting food out in front of his house? In that little parkway between the sidewalk and the street and it caused a lot of controversy and he actually cited for violating. Some ordinance got any went to court. He wanted his case and he actually has planted that whole strip of land. So sort of thinking about him. I did the same thing I cup. That little plop right in front of my Bad I think you can plant like you have done and planter boxes on a balcony. I hope that the community gardens began to surge research and unite. My mom planted the little section. That's just in front of our house because even though we do have a garden in the back she wanted people to think about this victory garden moment and the potential for even the most throwaway pieces of land. It's now planted with a few different edible things and she's already gotten notes through our mailbox thanking her for taking this kind of actions embolic being encouraging people. And you've just seen this proliferation of gardens now in people's sort of little forgotten front yards and people sowing seeds all around the neighborhood now and way. It's really incredible. I've just never seen anything like it before you know. One of the things that you've talked about is the idea of buying local produce supporting local farmers wherever you are in the country around the world and you know one of the questions that that we're getting from folks on facebook Tuesday from Bell Zelezny also which what are ways that we can help. Small farmers are other ways of their places where we can go buy things from them especially farmers who are used to providing restaurants. I if you are at a loss for who you're farmers are do. The work researching call the pharmacy. Are you having trouble? Are you imperilled? Is there a way that I can help? You facilitate a network of deliveries. Can I help you deliver? But also it might be a question of just helping them figure out logistics or even knowing who they are. Where their farms are I mean? I have friends in. La The lines were so long that they weren't able to get any food so they just started figuring out who the farms were that they could drive out to so they could still got great produce. And I mean it's been a little bit more problem solving and resourceful and also knowing that the farmers are maybe really good at growing vegetables. That don't necessarily know how to work. A whole distribution network. And if that's something that you have extra time for facility with like make the effort because they do need us

Berkeley Alice Chez Panisse Stockton Alice Stockton Fanny Singer Finney San Francisco Ganic Food Partner New Jersey Miles Facebook California Brown Finley Bell Zelezny
"chez panisse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Much thank you and stay safe and don't go nuts I'll try not to think so I have a and now the game where people who have nothing better to do join us for a moment to do nothing better it's called not my job if you're wondering what you're gonna do with the sixteen cans of Pinto beans in your pantry that somebody told you to buy when all this started well I guess Siminoff threat is here to help she's a well known cooking teacher the author of the cookbook salt fat acid heat and host of the Netflix special the same name she has a new podcast called home cooking seminars right welcome to wait wait thank you for having me I'm so excited well we're very excited to have you I was amazed to find this out but you did not you were not one of those people who grew up cooking and wanting to be a chef or cookbook person at all right no not at all I grew up eating well yes well that is the practice I always loved to eat and that was definitely my entry into the kitchen well I do too except I don't have a Netflix special about international cuisine and and I was told that your your your life was changed by a single meal yeah when I moved to Berkeley to attend college my boyfriend and I saved our money for seven months to eat at chez Panisse the historic restaurant in Berkeley and really that meal changed my life the dessert was chocolate souffle and I'd never had that before in the server came up to me and she said how is it and I said oh it's really good but it would be so much better if I had a glass of cold milk and I was nineteen years old at the time I didn't really know you know that that's the like totally rude to tell someone in a restaurant how to make your dish better so she kind of laughed and she brought me a glass of milk and then she also brought.

Netflix Berkeley Siminoff chez Panisse
"chez panisse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stay safe and don't go nuts right now thanks also and now the game where people who have nothing better to do join us for a moment to do nothing better it's called not my job if you're wondering what you're gonna do with the sixteen cans of Pinto beans in your pantry that somebody told you to buy when all this started well I guess the Simien nas right is here to help she's a well known cooking teacher the author of the cookbook salt fat acid heat and host of the Netflix special the same name she has a new podcast called home cooking seminars rat welcome to wait wait thank you for having me I'm excited we're very excited to have you I was amazed to find this out but you did not you were not one of those people who grew up cooking and wanted to be a chef or cookbook person at all right no not at all I grew up eating well yes that is right this I always loved to eat and that was definitely my entry into the kitchen well I do too except I don't have a Netflix special about international cuisine and and I was told that your your your life was changed by a single meal yeah when I moved to Berkeley to attend college my boyfriend and I saved our money for seven months to eat at chez Panisse the historic restaurant in Berkeley and really that meal changed my life the dessert was chocolate souffle and I'd never had that before in the server came up to me and she said how is it and I said oh it's really good but it would be so much better if I had a glass of cold milk and I was nineteen years old at the time I didn't really know you know that that's the like totally rude to tell someone in a restaurant how to make your dish better so she kind of laughed and she brought me a glass of milk and then she also brought.

Netflix Berkeley chez Panisse
"chez panisse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Stay safe and don't go nuts I'll try not to think so and now the game where people who have nothing better to do join us for a moment to do nothing better it's called not my job if you're wondering what you're gonna do with those sixteen cans of Pinto beans in your pantry that somebody told you to buy when all this started well I guess the Simien nas rat is here to help she's a well known cooking teacher the author of the cookbook salt fat acid heat and host of the Netflix special the same name she has a new podcast called home cooking seminars rat welcome to wait wait thank you for having me I was so excited well we're very excited to have you I was amazed to find this out but you did not you were not one of those people who grew up cooking and wanting to be a chef or cookbook person at all right no not at all I grew up eating well yes that is the practice I read I always loved to eat and that was definitely my entry into the kitchen well I do too except I don't have a Netflix special about international cuisine and and I was told that your your your life was changed by a single meal yeah when I moved to Berkeley to attend college my boyfriend and I saved our money for seven months to eat at chez Panisse the historic restaurant in Berkeley and really that meal changed my life the dessert was chocolate souffle and I'd never had that before in the server came up to me and she said how is it and I said oh it's really good but it would be so much better if I had a glass of cold milk and I was nineteen years old at the time I didn't really know you know that that's the like totally rude to tell someone in a restaurant how to make your dish better so she kind of laughed and she brought me a glass of milk and then she also brought.

Netflix Berkeley chez Panisse
"chez panisse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh AIR let's get back to the interview I recorded in February with Michael Pollan about his new audiobook caffeine you put out the coffee is bound up with the sins of slavery and imperialism yeah I mean look there's a really ugly history behind both of them you know the early coffee plantations in Brazil were all the workers were slaves but even later when you have post slavery Central America the these were brutal places to work the thing about growing coffee and tea is you need a lot of labor because it at any of the the shrubs have to be pruned picking them I went coffee picking in Colombia and it's it's really hard work and it's kind of a spiky plant and grows on such a steep hillside you can't get your footing and it took you know I mean basically there is a I'm right now I'm reading this history of coffee plantations in them you know Salvador and to produce all the wage labor they needed to to take care of the coffee the essentially had to starve the Indians that lived on this very fertile land and we're eating from the land without a lot of trouble and they ripped out all the edible plants so the Indians were forced to work on the on the plantations it's it's a very dark history and like a lot of things you know we're we're we're we're we're participating in these commodity chains we have no idea what's behind it I mean who among us has seen a coffee planter T. plant acceptance you know photography but at the other end of this food chains it has often been quite a bit of brutality and of course coffee and tea drove demand for sugar and and sugar was at the very heart of the slave trade in the in the Caribbean and then you have another moral stain with I don't mean to **** people out while they're drinking their coffee tea but the T. you know when the English are started importing tea from China in the seventeen hundreds it became very popular in fact it is hard to imagine industrial revolution without tedious support at to keep all those workers going but the Chinese that they don't have any goods they wanted to buy from England so the English had to pay in silver and sterling and it led to this enormous balance of trade deficit so what did the English do they came up with this very clever idea they have this colony in India and they started growing tea in India and they also started growing opium and they've essentially force the opium into the Chinese market addicted tens of millions of Chinese undermine that great civilization also they could improve their balance of payments problems with the Chinese and trade opium for tea so is the goal just to improve the balance of trade that payments was ago on economic one or did they intend to actually inject people in China I don't know it was their intention to addict but that was certainly the effect yeah they just needed a product to sell in China and even though the Chinese for beta they they just smuggled in and then fought a war open up ports so they can continue to dump opium on the Chinese so you know I mean the irony is that the Chinese mind had to be dulled so the English mind could be sharpened with caffeine as you point out there was a time when most Americans drank coffee that came in a in a cam or instant coffee that came in a jar which seldom tasted anything like coffee that's for sure so how did we get from you know ground coffee in a can to the kind of deluxe coffee that so many people by now I don't remember when I was growing up having that option they're too big strains of coffee coffee plants one is reduced as its name suggests is very robust easier to grow less touchy as a plant but it produces very bitter coffee and high caffeine but bitter coffee and that was kind of the mainstay that's what you got out of those cans of coffee Maxwell house or hills brothers or whatever it was and that was what went into instant coffee there is a kind of coffee revolution that begins in the sixties and it begins right here in Berkeley where I am at Pete's Peter is now a big chain all over the country and Alfred Peet was a Dutchman who was living in California and decried the quality of coffee to have better coffee at home and his father in fact have been coffee roaster so he starts importing a replica beans the higher quality more difficult to grow beans and he also starts roasting them very carefully slowly and long creating something that's much more delicious than the way most coffee was roasted before and Pete was and you know one of these obsessives for for you know the quality of what he was doing and he had a a shop right near chez Panisse around the corner on them walnut street vine and this became a real destination and he became known as the great coffee roaster and he was very generous about his knowledge so he trained in fact the people who started Starbucks and a great many other you know artisanal coffee places and it really all grows from you know the work of that man in that shop he taught us really how to appreciate better coffee and he got us used to you know spending a few dollars for cop instead of twenty five cents to fifty cents for you know that the normal diner coffees together so there's been a real upgrade in the quality of coffee in our town time and we seem comfortable spending you know five dollars for an espresso drink it's quite remarkable we're listening back to the interview with Michael Pollan that we recorded last month there's no audio book is called caffeine as we take a short break we'll talk about how the caffeine affected his mind and body when he started drinking coffee again after having given it up.

Michael Pollan caffeine
"chez panisse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That kind of restaurant that takes reservations six months out the kind of place that is give centrally impossible to get into these are considered to be the most innovative and inspiring palaces of food in the world but one restaurant perhaps one of the most famous in America that does not appear on Michelin's list is located in a converted old house in Berkeley California it's called chez Panisse and today it's the kind of place well to do Berkeley parents might take their children during a visit or the kind of restaurant food tourists will seek out mainly because of its contribution to modern cooking Japanese is a great restaurant but you're not gonna find safe frozen or observe aged balsamic vinegar suspended and use of Chile on your plate what you will get is extremely fresh extremely a local farm to table food perfectly ripe peach with a scoop of creme fraiche short a roasted quail with some blackberry jam made with just picked blackberries grown a few miles away and the person behind that restaurant Alice waters isn't just notable for cooking but actually she's probably much better now the impact she's had on American cuisine because Alice waters was really one of the first American chefs to promote the idea that food should be local fresh and seasonal today almost every good restaurant in America pays homage to the farm to table cooking they tell you the name of the farm where the chicken came from and sometimes even the farmer who grew the crops and Alice waters is largely the reason why but when she opened chez Panisse in nineteen seventy one in that old run down Berkeley house she wasn't necessarily trying to start a movement she really just wanted a nice cozy place where she could invite friends to share a meal I was didn't actually grow up intending to be a chef in fact is a kid in New Jersey she ate a pretty typical American diet of that era her mom wasn't exactly the greatest cook and she focused instead on efficiency she wanted something healthy for us but she didn't know how to do that she knew who.

America Michelin California chez Panisse Chile Alice waters New Jersey Berkeley
"chez panisse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A few miles away and the person behind that restaurant Alice waters isn't just notable for cooking but actually she's probably much better known for the impact she's had on American cuisine because Alice waters was really one of the first American chefs to promote the idea that food should be local fresh and seasonal today almost every good restaurant in America pays homage to the farm to table cooking they tell you the name of the farm where the chicken came from and sometimes even the farmer who grew the crops and Alice waters is largely the reason why but when she opened chez Panisse in nineteen seventy one in that old run down Berkeley house she wasn't necessarily trying to start a movement she really just wanted a nice cozy place where she could invite friends to share a meal I was didn't actually grow up intending to be a chef in fact is a kid in New Jersey she ate a pretty typical American diet of that era her mom wasn't exactly the greatest cook and she focused instead on efficiency she wanted something healthy for us but she didn't know how to do that she knew it was you know meat potatoes vegetables salad fruit Cup for dessert but most of it was from a can or frozen she wanted brown bread I didn't like very much I was a very picky eater so you I guess by the time you hit your teens you M. the family moved up that right you to the Midwest and then to California was this for your dad's job yes your boss he was transferred to Chicago and then he was further transferred to Los Angeles she went to see you decided when you graduate high school you went to the university of California in Santa Barbara and this is in the early sixties and what I'm what was your impression of the place well that was party place that right by the water on the beach and I decided to transfer to UC Berkeley in the fall of nineteen sixty four so the fall of nineteen sixty four you end up at UC Berkeley a junior in college or a sophomore.

Alice waters America chez Panisse New Jersey Midwest California Chicago Los Angeles Santa Barbara UC Berkeley Berkeley university of California
"chez panisse" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"chez panisse" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Producing plants family which still not played of Iraq definitely not to have service Alexi was the quiz yeah yeah I give over you know let's see I could have said that too but I just decided not to go that long hello all right **** like see we like to go next I would love to already your first question which of the following barbecue regions is home to the famous white barbecue sauce Georgia St Louis Alabama California it is a C. Lewis because of the furthest north well the answer is the Alabama second choice three our motion number to feel pumpkin pie is a popular thanksgiving dessert to where do most pumpkins grow Illinois or Ohio Illinois yep chef Lexi identify the only non mother sauce on this list valley today freight sauce brown sauce or classic tomato sauce Alfredo does a real hard one for okay in nineteen seventy eight to pharmacists Charles hires a Philadelphia began marketing a popular drink is the healthy alternative to alcoholic beverages did he call it ginger beer or root beer I would say root beer yep well there's all those raisin roots and I write three out of four yeah three out of four correct what's the oldest brewery in the United States is it Sam Adams Pabst Blue Ribbon or yelling laying Yang lain is that the answer Tom sure we'll go that pronounce gene wing sure let's say yes okay that's right I don't know because you'll need to get every answer all right in order to win this quiz you ready for it I feel like I'm gonna get crushed today five for both you pretty good nicely done y'all I mean it's not perfect but it's real close close close all right your first question job done though engine belie a both originated in Louisiana what is the biggest difference between gumbo and jambalaya jambalaya is cooked in a space to park called Jumblatt whereas gumbo can be cooked in any pot that's your first option your section second option is this July is cooked in the same pot as the race while gumbo is served with rice on the site yes number two that's correct he said if you're afraid of butter you scream it's gonna be Julia could also said she loves to cook with wine and sometimes she puts it in her food good character that one okay question number three if you order biscuits in an American diner what what you get when you get around a baked sweets or yeast free bread in American diner what you get little cheese free their baking powder biscuits generally is that what you're saying the you're a sick there he's free yes that's got to be straight yes okay three for three boys yes down to the wire Kansas city style barbecue sauce is always what tomato based media see if my prediction comes through we did Alice waters restaurant chez Panisse open nine seventy one my drop Tom Douglas.

Iraq Alexi