35 Burst results for "Chess"

Phil Schiller Moving on to Become 'Apple Fellow'

The CultCast - Cult of Mac

02:53 min | 2 d ago

Phil Schiller Moving on to Become 'Apple Fellow'

"Talk about retired Phil he's just he's got a glow about him. Phil Schiller has decided to call it quits at apple and I can't say that I'm surprised he hasn't really been front and center for a while and seeing how they had steve jobs transition and Johnny. I have now transitioned out of their roles. This seems to be the game plan. You just stop showing up on stage appearing in the. People kind of forget about you but you're still there you still doing your job they quietly transition you out of your role, and then they quietly announced that they're leaving and they become an apple fellow, which is what happened to Phil. Schiller. He's now an apple fellow you WanNa take this story here. Lewis, I'm not like sure when the whole thing. Yeah. Sure. Yeah. So he a fill is going to continue to report directly to apple CEO Tim Cook in the new position as apple fellow, and he's going to continue leading the APP store and Apple Events Greg Jaaz Joswiak is fronts Joswiak I like that name as Joswiak Josh. It's actually very bizarre. Isn't it? That would go from Wozniak Joswiak? It's almost like a a word jumble. Quite odd. Anyway, Jaaz is going to take over a shortage previous role over the years. You know he's had a lot to do it apple and he's been there for like you think what? You say eighty seven he's like he's been there since eighty seven checkout this quotes. been a dream come true for me to work apple and so many products I love all these great friends, Steve? Tim. and Sony More I. I started Apple when I was twenty seven. Wow this year I turned sixty. That's a long time to be at the same. So, what is I? Guess that's thirty three years I. Guess It is Chess Wild. Yeah. And what did he say? He said I'll keep working here as long as they will have me I bleed six colors but I also want to make some time in the years ahead from my family friends and a few personal projects I care deeply about. Some people were saying that last statement personal projects. I. Care Deeply about. It's an interesting time to say that because right after he said that. John Processors Youtube Account was hacked. Right. I'm sure that a coincidence. Alert. Blocked John Browser on twitter and finally he's likes. Just a project in mind crack. And he just started typing loudly with two. He only uses two fingers. It's two index fingers, right? Because he's owed sees old school. But he was sitting there looking down to this keyboard looking back up at the screen and he just John Prosser got what was coming coming to him. Took a write down what a bitcoin scam.

Apple Greg Jaaz Joswiak Phil Schiller Wozniak Joswiak Joswiak Josh Lewis John Prosser Tim Cook Johnny Twitter CEO Steve Sony Tim.
How To Build Wealth and Personal Freedom Fast with Andrew "Cobra" Tate

Radical Personal Finance

05:37 min | 4 d ago

How To Build Wealth and Personal Freedom Fast with Andrew "Cobra" Tate

"To my understanding that you come from across the continents you're born in the United States grew up in England. You've been involved in chess from an early age, your world champion, kickboxer, and an entrepreneur in a number of very businesses. Do I have most of that? Pretty well, right. That's yeah. That's pretty much. Exactly correct. Yeah. Very businesses this and that, but they're all doing. Okay. So love to know a little bit more about your personal background I've invited you on the show to talk about wealth building and the tagline of radical personal finances that dual fold mandate of living well today while also building applying for financial freedom and I've observed that you seem to do both those things fairly well, you have a lifestyle that's intensely focused on freedom, but you've also done a pretty good job of living well today I see posts all over social media view supercars and and your girlfriends and. Traveling around the world with your boys. So how did you wind up? Where did you start and how did you wind up today? Tell us a little bit about your journey with wealth. Yes. So I am one of those people who always really wanted to be rich and I didn't want to be rich because of material things I've always been one of the people who didn't like listening to the rules I was always attracted to freedom and I learned at early age that freedom usually comes with money I mean shirl there's some rich people who are constrained by their money but if you do things right, you get the freedom. Money can certainly by a degree of freedom. So I was not raised in a rich family. My family was actually much more on the poor rent. So when they got the forest and social housing in the UK, my father was a professional chess player which doesn't pay much money at all. So I'm not from any kind of financial. Hereditary. There's no I didn't get any Any money within the family members died I wasn't taught anything about money from a young age. I was just always attracted to freedom. Delta's very attracted to for a long time. So I always wanted to be rich for as long as I can remember even though even though like most poor kids kind of sit and think all I want to be rich, I'll never be able to or whatever. I was one of those poor kids now goes okay. There's there's obviously a way to do it, and that's how I get a life full of freedom. So I'm going to find a way to do it so I was always motivated to have it. And that's it. Yeah and then I, I was fighting for a long time that never paid the bills. So I mean it paid the bills but never made me rich. So I had to start thinking of other things and you know one thing leads to another beer I am. So trace the journey with regard to wealth over with regard to your career your business. From my research sounds like you've been involved in a number of different things but your parents divorced when you were young moved into social housing with your mother and your siblings but then something happened whereas now you're traveling the world driving supercars living in a mansion in Romania Cetera. What was that pass through business for you? Okay. So by my financial story is quite short, really I went to. I. I was unhappy with school and the reason for this is pretty simple when I was growing up in America my parents are still together because I moving when they divorced when I was growing up in America, I was moved up three grades and I was playing a lot of my father was a chess grandmaster. I was on track to be chess grandmaster. I was playing chess scholastically with. The schools and I was Indiana state chess champ h five and doing chess. So when they split up my mother who's originally originally English, want to go back to her family in England I came to England and there was no chess in the schools. The British system is less ruthless than the American system. They don't like moving people upgrades they don't like you know really segment people by. It's far more of socialist. I guess you know we're all the same and I found school I found very, very boring. So I didn't try very hard. So by the time I graduated from school is sixteen my attendance rate had dropped to twenty, twenty, five percent average and the reason for that was simple. If I saw someone up to the gas station and Lamborghini. I didn't sit there and think he worked really hard school. I sat there and call he is either a drug dealer or he's broken the rules or there's some hack here he's pack the Matrix everyone goes to school has a Lamborghini. So to me school was absolutely a waste of time. That's what I believe to be. So I stopped going basically. I passed all my. Season B.'s even though I only twenty five percent attendance and my father were very mad and and even my teachers like you're capable of so much more you could have easily gone a but because you didn't come get it up. So I decided to go to college and try really hard to prove a point. So I went to college afterwards I studied business I studied. The four hardest a-levels is called New Kias physics math. Political. Science and. Business degree. I start studying them all and I did so well, it all of them that even though there was eight exams by my sixth exam by the time, it was over I already had as inevitable subject. So then they gave me some other advanced testing which I did very well, and and I offered a scholarship to university university in England. Much chimerical cost money if think big loan, etc etc.. So I was offered the scholarship to a business university and I came home told my mother and then tomorrow wasn't though So she she went crazy. She was like what? This is one hundred, thousand euros a free education. What are you going to do? What do you mean? You'RE NOT GONNA. Go you already messed up school and now you did so well in college and you're GonNa go what you do instead and I said I'm going to become a kickboxing world champion.

England Lamborghini United States America Kickboxing Indiana UK Delta Romania
Books Ive Loved  Neil Strauss

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:48 min | Last week

Books Ive Loved Neil Strauss

"Hello Boys and girls ladies and Germs Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another upset of the Tim Ferriss show where it is usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types, startup founders, investors, chess champions, Olympic, athletes you name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your own lives. This episode however is an experiment in part of short form series that I'm doing simply called books I've loved I've invited some amazing pass guests close. Friends and new faces to share their favorite books describe their favorite books, the books that have influenced them, change them, transform them for the better and I. Hope You pick up one or two mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life. I had a lot of fun putting this together inviting these people to participate and have learned so so much myself. I hope that is also the case for you. Please enjoy. Thanks for having me back to talk about some of my favorite books and I wanted to do something different today, which is I wanted to recommend some books that I've never recommended before on this podcast and that I haven't heard other people recommending things that people may not know about I wanNA turn people onto some new staff. That's like so central to me. So My Criteria were, what are the books where I've underlined the most amount of things some of these books that I'm going to recommend I literally have underlining or marks on every single page. A have kind of involved system. I use to mark books depending on the residents of the idea and different things going on in the book. The second thing is brought together these books sort of. Encompass like. The body of. What I think right now, the kinds of things that I write about and posted on instagram and teach in coach and have had so much value in my life and change them, and I'm going to walk you into them from. Let's say the simplest book to the most complex from one that's just so easy to read to one. It's almost like a textbook safer into these the beginning and see how far along you get I. Love All of these. They're really great on the path to understand yourself and who you are and the obstacles again, your way and where he's self sabotage in your relationships and. Real. Freedom. The first author is Sherry Huber and I wanted to tell you about her past but I looked it up online and I can't find anything there. So I don't know if it's public but as a child Sherry, probably faced one of the worst traumas a young person can ever. Go through and only survived it. She became a Buddhist monk. Ever met in my life I. Think She's one of the most. Centered. Wise. Powerful presences I've ever been around there's just something about her that. I can my I would like to get to one day. I really would she writes tons of books I'd love to read every one. And her books very simply written just still to pure wisdom almost like a wise mentor is giving you the advice. There aren't like supporting arguments and footnotes in research studies is just like the wisdom from high on the mountain. It's also unique font where part of the story and the power and the impact of the words is done through the font and style of writing changing as well. The illustrations by June shaver or could be shiver. The illustrator in the book so really. Looked through all her books read anything but I'll share with you the two that have had the biggest impact on me. Actually to read but I would want to read the rest. But I started with fear Book and fear book is so powerful because so many of us. Have a certain area where fear and doubt and uncertainty get in our way, and the book walks you through the of of of how to embrace them and move beyond them, and often it's very counterintuitive. But so true I highly recommend this for dealing with it and want to read you one quote from it. I WANNA read a couple of quotes from it. And her basic idea is that moving toward your fears and getting past them is the path to freedom and I love this part. And her books by the way very short hundred, fifty pages at most. She writes if you no longer believe what fear tells you you will live and it will not. That is a point on a spiritual journey that almost nobody gets past when the terror arises. When it gets backed into a corner and a matter of its survival years almost nobody has the required combination of courage desperation willingness to stand up to it.

Sherry Huber Tim Ferriss
Unable To Travel To Mecca, Muslim Community Holds Drive-Thru Hajj

Morning Edition

02:26 min | Last week

Unable To Travel To Mecca, Muslim Community Holds Drive-Thru Hajj

"The hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia. It is, of course, a year like no other in Saudi Arabia is limiting the annual pilgrimage just to people living inside the kingdom. It's a disappointment for many American Muslims who are planning to go from our member station. W M. You Daniella chess low reports on a community in Maryland that held a drive thru hodge instead. Loudspeakers blast prayers on a hot afternoon as Mona El Dada watches her 77 year old father. He's copying a ritual known as Walking around an eight foot tall black cube. That's a replica of the Kaaba shrine in Mecca. El Data tells him he's doing it wrong. No, daddy. The idea is that the car is actually going to do the show off Dr Hardy Ra Nama relents. He's done the really pilgrimage to Mecca three times. He remembers a sea of Muslims from all over the world, all wearing the same white clothes. And so nobody knows, but they pulled the rich whatever equality 100% and that is the beauty of today, Hondas and Tesla's drive around the Kaaba. It's not a substitute for the haj, which all Muslims must try to make in their lifetime. Mona El Dada is creative director at the next Wave Muslim Initiative, a group in Montgomery County, Maryland. The pandemic ruined her pilgrimage plans. So she suggested to her colleagues. How about a local version of Hajj by car? I was telling them it's it's kind kind of of like like the the way way that that in in the the wintertime, wintertime, there's there's Christmas Christmas light light shows shows and and all all you're you're doing doing is is kind kind of of looking looking out. out. From From your your window window At At Sandy. Spring Friends School, L Dada greets drivers moving along a short track. At one station, A boy in a green shirt leans out of a white minivan to throw pebbles at a cardboard pillar. That's to evoke another hajj ritual casting stones to drive out the devil. The boy introduces himself as yes, scene Y Es e and asked me was conned by kind of forgot His dad, Faisal Khan says he's been avoiding mosques because of the pandemic. He still wanted to teach his two boys about the holiday. Definitely much more safe car, not close, Tio bunch of people, So it's really nice what they what they did. Levee

Mona El Dada Mecca Saudi Arabia Faisal Khan Maryland Hodge Dr Hardy Ra Nama L Dada Tesla Spring Friends School Montgomery County Director
How I Built Resilience: Taha Bawa of Goodwall

How I Built This

18:03 min | Last week

How I Built Resilience: Taha Bawa of Goodwall

"Hey, everyone and welcome to how I built. This resilience edition on these episodes were talking with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're thinking creatively during such a disruptive time and today we're GonNa hear from Ta the CO founder of Good Wall Good Wall is a social network that connects high school and college graduates with jobs and scholarships. Today Good Wall has raised over sixteen million dollars with more than a million users on the platform I. Spoke with Taha, from his company headquarters in Switzerland where he gave me a rundown of goodwill's mission for people who've never heard of goodwill just tell us how how does it work? It's essentially a mobile platform that's designed for the next generation. We started off with high school students helping them build up their first profile showcase themselves in a way that I'm accentuates their extracurricular activities in particular, connect them to opportunities mostly scholarships in colleges and all. This happens within a positive and supportive community. Over time, we've grown with our members into the college and young professional space. Our whole goal is to level the playing field, maximize the potential of as many people as possible. So it's been compared to linked in is that a fair comparison I? Think there are similarities however, we're really focused on on our part, which is this next generation starting as early as sixty and guiding them through almost Sherpa in. Them through the future of earning learning and those opportunities. There are various features that we have that they don't, and we're really focus from a user experience perspective, and then from a community perspective, it's it's very different posts don't work here. You wouldn't find students talking about being on the chess team being on the robotics team being on etc etc on goodwill mean if you are, let's say eighteen years old and you're interested in applying to college. What does it look like you go to? While you create a profile for yourself and and then what you're going to goodwill, you help yourself our initial early adopters were mostly international school students who maybe didn't have as much guidance as others or since the US who maybe didn't have as much guidance from their parents from college counselors it come on. Here's he would other people are doing they'd be matched with colleges and universities and. Also. With scholarships based on their data on their profiles and then they'd be able to connect with like minded youth. So we had this girl based out of Jordan who was really into robotics science and unfortunately no one really around her who had that those similar interests and she was able to find others like her in the US connected Internet. NASA did incredible things afterwards actually many of our students have gone bound exclusive opportunities at. Like Oxford and others that we've partnered with an. Super fulfilling perspective. Yeah. It's really caused US checking it out last night and it's it's a little bit like if you didn't have a mentor or a guidance counselor like here you go. Yeah definitely I think a lot of early adopters were privileged in the sense that they had a lot of ambition and maybe they went to good schools. But over time we've especially with last year we've really. Put a lot of effort and a lot of energy towards helping youth who are maybe a little under privileged that privilege is actually not necessarily one hundred percent linked to financial situation but it can be for example, we're doing now with UNICEF death and other organizations in Africa for example, is running programs they are and were really helping you bring out their ideas, build up their confidence show who they. are in connect opportunities and it's been really really fulfilling and we expect to do more underrepresented communities in the US. For example, we're doing more and more there. That's where the biggest room impact is. At the end of the day, we are a social enterprise and it's very fulfilling to help youth who go to elite schools and connect them to lead universities and colleges, but it's even more fulfilling. Even more important for us to step in where the impact Delta's the biggest for, for example, youth in Africa who insert African countries that just don't have any exposure don't have opportunity. Don't have the guidance but do have access to a phone and can has result go through. So we're really trying to do more there in particular and are you started this company in two thousand fourteen with your brother? Where did the idea come from? So my it was my brothers idea both of us were born in Switzerland we lived in Iran the US came back to Switzerland. Our parents used to work in the humanitarian sector. My father worked for or Serb refugees around thirty years, and we experienced a lot growing up. We was like quite a contradiction going skiing on the weekend in in a very affluent privileged, no bubble in Switzerland whereas at the same time, we'd go in summer vacation and give candy out to refugee kids who are age your ten eleven and that that really did shake US quite a bit in throughout our upbringing we realized that we are. We are I'm here not because I'm smart but because I was lucky osborne that could have been born two doors down in that, my life would have been very different and I'm confident because of the experiences I had rather than because I'm innately able to do so and that's really what pushed us to say we were lucky in this sense what would happen if we were able to give those opportunities in terms of particularly experiences. So education is one thing traditional education is one thing but particularly experiences to millions of youth around the world what would happen how can we change things and that's where we thought it has to be mobile first it has. To be a digital solution and it has to be able to tackle millions and we wanted to go a step further. We said it's good to maximize one's potential but hopefully, we can do that in a win. We're very idealistic in that sense in a way that it maximizes or improved society as well or impacts society positively, which is our mission statement that if we have enough people that are exposed to not only improving themselves but as so often it's a form of education knowing what's out there if I hadn't gone to refugee camps or if I didn't have the background where my parents are Richard from Sri Lanka, would I really be so inclined to How this positive impact who knows I did have that chance I view that as an opportunity to give those opportunities in showcase through volunteering through being aware through connecting to people from different backgrounds. Hopefully, we can move the world forward I. Think it's needed now more than ever, right? Yeah. For Sure Tyler, the business for a second I think you've got around fifty employees the world you've got offices in Switzerland, the US Germany Serbia the Philippines mean you're growing you've got presumably some cash runway but these are tough economic times. I mean Lincoln just laid off a thousand people, their record numbers of people in the US for unemployment. So first of all. How is your revenue been in your business been impacted by the global economic slowdown? Yeah. I mean when it happens I think the first week where we started notice he was getting really serious I. Remember it. The first thing we did was we we had a board meeting and we talked about, okay what's our cash situation and let's make sure we get through this are along a be while maintaining the team for two reasons. One is like you don't want. Downward debt spiral. But also because we have the opportunity to have real impacting this time if we make the changes in adapt effectively, but we won't be able to do so if we don't have the team to do it so we've actually hired over the past few months and we've actually grown over the past few months and we've adapted to do. So the first week was really about scenario planning getting through that after that, we assume the worst but we. Ourselves decided. Well, there's definitely GONNA be less demand for recruitment is definitely less hires which hurts us which hurts our users or are members and we said, okay how can we can we help because if they come on in the no jobs? Well, it's a very bad experience, but it's also it's hurting us. So what we did was we put we put together this program better together and other challenges where youth can develop work experience at the end of it. They get certificates that show that they've accomplished these different challenges participated in it, and at the end, it can be used as work experience towards all of our partner companies. So it's actually giving them something to do some hope, and at the same time, this is generating revenue for us as one example of revenue for us. Another example is just before the crisis a part of our model is we work with large partners and a couple of these large partnership so. Leading recruitment than leading education routes, stunts or came to a halt. And then I don't know if this is despite coverted or because of covid other opportunities came about we've now partnered over the course of Kobe with market leaders in markets that we are not present in or were very marginally presents and he's actually allowing us to take up extra market share and grow in more significant way to timber onwards. Let. Let me ask you about the demographic that you target. Right I mean and I'm Gonna I'M GONNA use this term Gen Z.. Always cringe when I say because I remember like when I was in my twenties and people talked about Gen-x and their slackers and I would just cringe and you're older people talk about Gen xers and I was like, what are you talking about but just just to make this kind of simple we'll we'll just say Gen Z.. So if you're Gen Z. I'm sorry it's annoying I know. This is a really challenging economic moment if you are in high school now and you're going into college or if you're in college, there's a pretty good chance. You'RE GONNA GRADUATE INTO A world with very few jobs. You know a world that we haven't seen certainly since two, thousand, eight, nine and ten but maybe far far more challenging than that. What's your sense I mean? What do you think I mean do do you think that's that's actually true that that is likely to be the case for the next three, four, five years or more. Yeah, I think whether or not we go through a deep recession with mass unemployment particularly for the Youth USA next three four five years very probable that US at least in the short run or to suffer they're normally the last to be hired the first to be fired and that's justified for various reasons including ethical. Oh, they have less commitments than, for example, someone with kids, but it is incredibly difficult and the mental toil of, let's say an eighteen year old doesn't know what's coming up next we need to be able to be resilient and we need to be able to learn how to learn and adapt because we just don't know what's going to happen. So they could be a second. Downturn there could be a third downturn. It could be sustained downturns and US like across society but in particular for the youth they we have an opportunity they have an opportunity to take this and say, okay, it doesn't kill me. It might make me stronger and I can learn from this develop that resilience that five, six, ten years from now I'm able to deal with the next crisis in a more in a stronger way because I'm going to have to do that and some of the skills that need to be developed in my in my opinion or entrepreneurial thinking that ability to be flexible and resilient we we need to do more though the on just the the these massive stimulus packages and. Is trying to do whatever they can for sure this generation needs the government needs to intervene to be able to organizations needs to be able to intervene to support them to the best of their abilities in terms of developing skills and able to resilient. When we come back in just a moment, I'll talk with Taha about college graduates who will probably face a shrinking job market over the next few years stay with us. I'm Guy Roz and you're listening to how I built this resilience edition from NPR. For this podcast and the following message come from the American Jewish World Service working together for more than thirty years to build a more just and equitable world learn more at age aws dot org. Hey welcome back to how I built this resilience edition despite the economic slowdown tie and his company good wall have been able to grow their team and stay afloat. But as jobs are drying up across the globe. Many college graduates are looking for opportunities and can't find any if you're like in your early twenties now and you're looking for an opportunity and you can't find one. What would you recommend a young person? Do Who's who's graduating college is just entering the workforce and is kind of trying out different potential career pass. Is it a good time to just steer clear of the workforce for a while and get some more education which in the US means more debts? What do you think? Yeah, I think. Definitely, trying is important, but this might just be an opportunity to start your own thing. You know a lot of great companies came out of the last crisis because they just couldn't find jobs or that opportunity just wasn't there for your. So maybe start one's own thing. It's never been easier to start a business. It's never been easier to try something new. So if even. If it doesn't work. That's incredible work experience. You know when we talk to HR owes of some of the leading companies in the world, what are they looking for or what were they looking for before the crisis indefinitely after is that ability to be entrepreneurial even if you're working for fortune five hundred, so it can't hurt best case scenario you build something. Amazing. Worst case scenario. Fail and you take those skills and you leverage those skills and you keep your mind active. It's so important from a mental health perspective, keep your mind active and then apply them when the market comes back, which will at one point another opportunity. If if maybe starting yourself isn't it join some friends or join or reach out to small startups definitely volunteer is an opportunity. There are a lot of NGOs are nonprofits that need help or need support right now, build up your work experience gained some experience concrete tangible work experience that differentiates further rather than just having eight twelve months in your resume which are empty. Unfortunately, it might not help financial side and that's where that's where one has to be creative and it's it's just really tough and that's What does the government intervention on that front need to be because there's some that just can't afford to do what I just said, which is volunteer or build your own company because they don't have that safety net that don't have that opportunity in and unfortunately there in we're almost out of ideas because he go back to college, you just talked about extra debt but for some unfortunately are going to have to do it, and that leads to more a more philosophical discussion on what is there so much debt attached to a college education where you know in Switzerland, for example, I paid for my undergraduate I paid around a thousand dollars a year it's a leading edge I mean it's like A. Top universities and so that's a that's another discussion. Yeah. I agree with you I think that this is a moment to be entrepreneurial and it's challenging because you're you're right. I mean not everybody can do that from an employer's perspective you mentioned human resource officers, and by the way you're right I mean a human resource officer is very attracted to an applicant who started a business or try to start up in it failed. Because as you say, that's incredible life and work experience. What are some of the characteristics and sort of ways that quote Unquote Jersey works that might be different from previous generations maybe what their expectations for example? Yeah. It's something that comes up quite often the expectations are are huge I think even if we look at the generation before part of it is there needs to be in there. Always has been this need for grits for determination. I think post Covid, we're going to have very likely incredibly resilient and determined generation I. Think it's it's really great for I mean it's it's very tough. Love going to suffer and I hope I hope it will be as as few as possible but coming out of this generally on the whole, there's good reason to believe that this generation. is going to be really conscious a bit like after World War Two really conscious of financials very conscious sauce how lucky they are how privileged quickly things can change how precarious the society within which we live is actually it's a disease that, yes, it's it's it's it's serious, but it could have been a lot worse. It could have been worse could be one hundred exists and it's brought. Our global economy to its knees and you know we feel like we're often the masters of the universe and that's not just Jeb across demographics and we clearly aren't on I. think a little bit of humidity goes a long way. I love the energy of younger people coming in because their ideas are just so radically different from the way people in my business have have seen their profession What is your advice for employers looking to harness the intellectual power of Gen Z.? Yeah. No, it's a really good question. There basics of management that have been the same for every demographic every every niche within that demographic. It's look at maximizing the potential of the particular individual to different people react differently to different forms of management. Within this can talk about trends, but the ability to give them that chance to express themselves. The need for trust is always been there now definitely, so I mean even more so because they know what they're capable, but then also must not forget they are still with very few years of experience and being able to be there to give feedback to to tell them what they're doing. Right. Tell them what they're doing. Wrong. Both sides is critical. So just leaving someone out there in the world is not going to necessarily need to great results either but giving that safe-space giving that trust and creating an environment of being game your to maximize your potential and the. Direct, order may have worked. They may have been able to get away with it in the past, but some people might be okay with it but generally speaking that's that's especially for for you a lot of potential that's just not conducive for maximizing the potential where do you see your your business and what you're doing in five years from now what do you want it to look like I think for us it's always been about really helping as many youth as possible be as inclusive as we. And so we're ready serving youth in one hundred, fifty countries would like to go deeper in certain areas through our partnerships or load serve more youth in a more significant way. Provide more opportunities just re the best experience. That's probably what's most important. I think that's where we can have where we can make our contribution towards society. That's what we're good at, and now it's just about going to the next level. Yes. It's a challenging period, but we're going to be okay. WE'RE GONNA get out of this, and then it's about really taking this opportunity and doing the best we can because we are in a privileged situation if we were if we were unlucky which is the case for many other start ups I, friends who had term sheets for massive rounds of financing evaporates we hear the stories and then know they're just unlucky. So we're in this lucky position to be able to operate and to be able to do what we're doing. Let's. Make, the most out of it and I think that's our that's kind of our duty and I think that's yeah. TOBBACO

United States Switzerland Africa Good Wall Good Wall Taha Nasa TA American Jewish World Service Co Founder Oxford Youth Usa Jordan Osborne Richard Partner NPR Lincoln Officer
"chess" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

07:09 min | Last week

"chess" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"It won't even necessarily be fancy. You know they might say something like. Really. That's what you're going to play. Gio. Nothing. Big Hunting fancy. But it'll be in your brain somewhere at a plant that earworm right and start over and over somebody like Ralph mouth would always say, no matter what the situation that's what she said. Every. Single time that's when she said now. I'm wiping your ass that's what she said like whatever whatever it was. That was always his line. Then, you guys would quote Shakespeare like Vinnie livermore was played by Laurence. Fishburne in Josh Wade Skins movie about Josh weights can searching for Fisher. And Benny AB quoting Shakespeare, the whole time is. Now you know you gotTa Know Shakespeare to quote Shakespeare and. This Guy Shakespeare. So that was another way or there'll be people who stayed very Barry Let's call it sexual and the conversation like graphic, and now is now really off because Chesapeake would morph into sort of like no sex toys. In the description I, what? Did I cover your head do could you please play chess but that's where the conversation would go and. And Anything they were doing you know like the is petty trained against. The rear like what's Your position. Really. Okay. Go with that. So everything anything can come at you depending on who it was that you were talking to it. Also, of course, you also have colorful language and you could avoid that either. So yeah, trash-talking really. I would say it's not so much a generic art form with various schools and so much more. So the person expressing themselves at the board in a way that allows for them to feel like they're inflow and potentially disturbs your equanimity and that's happens in. You're done. I saw people who are better chessplayers. Just, lose their cool at the board because the other guy just kept talking and the worst thing to do to attract something to stop talking. And now you're not. Really okay. I'm going to stop talking to you know I'll start talking to I, want to respect you. So I'M GONNA stop talking right now I mean really you're better player. So let me stop saying anything and disrespecting you by talking that's what's going to happen is this going to be unending stream and you're never gonNA get past? So the best thing to do is to keep cool and for me that was real really good training are in not being distracted. No matter what was happening around did any of those players in the Black Bear School of Chess? Blacker school. Go on to play elsewhere. And where did you go in terms of evolution from that point? Absolutely the ended up becoming master players. legit chess masters. Not as far as grandmasters international masters, which is the highest levels of chess grandmaster being the highest Saudi you can have. But. This was strong players now the problem for the black we're school As I was coming up I, recognize that it was a bit too much infighting players wanted to beat each other. So you had the best players like William Morrison who we called the exterminator or George Golden, the fire breather and then you guys like Ronald Simpson. As I mentioned Willie Johnson Ernest Kolding Mark Mir's Chris. Welcome these guys were serious high level talents. But? Their best wish was to destroy each other that day and for me coming up as a as a young Clara's in my teens. I didn't see the value beating them because people I was reading about in the books were Ram masters, famous players, and I wanted to be like people in the books I want to play at that level. and. The only way you could do that if I left the group or didn't stay just inside the group and played in the clubs in New York and I was very fortunate because New York is a hotbed chess activity and some of the strongest players in the country were living in New York. So I saw going to the Manhattan Chess Club Marshall. Chess Club those are the two venerable clubs and clang against the grandmasters. And that. My game to another level, and it eventually allowed me in fact to come back to the black bears. and become the president as we call it. I've started dominating those guys because I wasn't just about playing inside does one group did you decide to the clubs? Did someone else suggested? I did once I found out that clubs were there I wanted to find out you know who play their where? Can you find the best players and so? I went. A friend of Mine Sam Sing and I. We hung out he he had a beat up car, but it was good enough. We would drive to the city regularly play tournament chess play against all the masters in International. Masters and grandmasters of the club, and that's that really game to another level. What is the atmosphere in the? Venerable Chess Club. What does that look like? What does it feel like? As. You would expect it was. Not Brooklyn I can tell you that now Brownsville, it was different. It was definitely different. You have people who were coming out at work businessmen in suits they didn't. Quite, know what to do with a young. Black from Brooklyn. and. So it was it was definitely a different vibe to what I was normally experiencing but. Chess chess and once you see good moves. You understand you're planning against player. So I wanted to be that player whenever I played against those guys and you know that's what it was like so it was It was definitely a much more formal affair by was long as it was about chests than I, didn't. I. Want you to correct me if I'm getting this wrong. But I read about a moment when things seem to have crystallized for you in a way that was tiger woods in nineteen, ninety seven was that an important. Moment for you. Absolutely absolutely. Your fast forwarding big time. Those I'm way out of my teens I'm now are than that time I'm thirty one years old. So we're doubling Bass I had gone through many experiences before then but I'd might quest to become a grandmaster was seemingly stymied by then I had a daughter. I work for a living I was teaching chess actually primarily but also just commentary and the like as I was fully involved in in sort of fatherhood and and making money. And my dream was to become a grandmaster. So by the time, we get to the Tiger in ninety seventy was at the masters. And he.

Chess Club Shakespeare Black Bear School of Chess Manhattan Chess Club Marshall Chess New York Ralph Brooklyn Blacker school Josh Wade Barry Benny AB Tiger president Fishburne Chesapeake Clara William Morrison Fisher Willie Johnson
interview with Maurice Ashley

The Tim Ferriss Show

05:19 min | Last week

interview with Maurice Ashley

"Hello Boys and girls, ladies and germs. This is Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another episode of the Tim Ferriss Show where it is my job as always to deconstruct world class performers to tease out the habits routines, influences, favorite books, and so on. The you can apply to your own life. My guest today is a friend Maurice Ashley. Maurice Ashley is incredibly impressive human being on so many levels and we get to really dig into a number of facets of his life story and lessons learned Maurice Ashley is the first African American international grandmaster in the annals of the game of chess, and he is translated his love to others as a three time national championship coach published author Espn commentator iphone APP designer puzzle inventor, and Motivational Speaker in recognition for his immense contribution to the Game Maurice was inducted into the US chess hall of fame in. Two. Thousand Sixteen his book chess for success subtitle using an old game to build new strengths in children and teens shows the many benefits of chess particularly for at. Risk youth his tax talk working backward to solve problems has more than a million views. He's also appeared with me in the Brazilian Jujitsu episode, which has some chests of the Tim Ferriss Experiment TV series way back in the day joined by our mutual friend, Josh Wade Skin Maurice is very well known for providing dynamic live tournament coverage of world class chess competitions, and matches his high energy unapologetic and irreverent commentary combines Brooklyn Street smarts, which we talk about quite a bit with professional espn style sports analysis his covered every class of elite event including the World Chess. Championships the US chess championship, the grand chess tour and the legendary man versus machine matches between Garry Kasparov whereas Kasparov. and IBM's deep blue traveling the world as a spokesperson for the many character-building effects of chess where he's consulted with universities schools chess clubs executive in celebrities on chest principles and strategies can be applied to improve business practices and accelerate personal growth. You can find him online Maurice, Ashley Dot Com on twitter at Ashley and on Facebook Grandmaster Maurice. On instagram Maurice, Ashley Chess Without further ADO. Please enjoy this wide-ranging conversation with none other than Maurice Ashley. Maurice Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me I've been looking forward to this and hoping to have you on the show for so many years now, and we've had many different points of connection. But of course, it began with our mutual friend and also popular PODCAST Gas Josh. Wait, skin who is known you for a very long time. Indeed, he has a quote in fact that is Impreza praise of your book chess for success and it goes as follows Maurice Ashley. Has Been like a brother to me since I was twelve years old I know the man I know the competitor I know the artist no, the teacher there's a lot of train for us to cover a lot of Nixon crannies to explore but I thought we would begin with Maurice the Jamaican and I was hoping you could describe for us your beginnings and we could start with the with the genesis while yes I was born in Jamaica. Island. Not the area of Quaid's and I grew up there. I was there until I was twelve years old before I came to this country. But probably, the most significantly got happened for me in. Jamaica. Was the fact that my mother left Jamaica to come to the United. States, when I was two years old, my brother was ten. My sister was seven months old and. Opportunity to come to the US, she couldn't bring all of us at the same time. Cheech only bring herself. And her leaving was really quite an event in our lives. My father wasn't with us but living with us at the time. So we grew with our grandmother. and My mother would send. down. Stuff supplies to Jamaica Whether v Foodstuffs Flour and rice she sent him in a barrel and she said, well, she said notebooks in armor sending like a softball and a glove, and of course Jamaica. Nobody played softball baseball nothing. So I threw the glove to the site, not knowing what to do with it and use the softball as a soccer ball. Got Pretty warned down already quickly a really turn into a softball very quickly to that. But. We just being raised by my grandmother she was a teacher by training. And so she would teach us so much as young people. So we were really well prepared educationally because of my grandmother and she was sixty four years old at the time of my mother left the imagined a sixty, four year old having had seven children for own. Now suddenly taking on the care of her daughter's children at that age when thinking about maybe slowing down and retiring enjoying herself. But for the next year, she took care of us and I was really a hugely significant part of growing up living there. Until finally my mother got the resources in the paperwork through green and finally bring us to the United States.

Maurice Ashley Grandmaster Maurice Jamaica Chess Maurice Welcome United States Tim Ferriss Softball World Chess Garry Kasparov Quaid Espn Facebook IBM Motivational Speaker Josh Wade
Authorship Attribution of Lennon McCartney Songs

Data Skeptic

06:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Authorship Attribution of Lennon McCartney Songs

"Mark Glickman and I'm at Harvard University as a senior lecturer in statistics, statistics is a topic that the audience really loves hearing about before we get into the main topic. Can you give us a little bit of background on the areas of stats that you studied or maybe those that interest you the most? Yeah, well. What got me into statistics in the first place? Actually was my interest in the Game Chess I've always been interested in how chess players get rated when they play in tournaments in other. Other words when you go to a tournament, you get a numerical rating. Where if you have two players have ratings, you could actually determine the profitability that player defeats at other, and that was something that I was always interested in these chess rating systems, and I ended up getting really into statistics and the mathematical aspects of these kinds of systems and I developed a couple systems that are in use these days, especially in online gaming called the Licko system. So that's really got me into statistics in. In, the first place and I really have a passion for teaching, so that's a big part of my statistics life, and then much more recently got into the intersection between statistics and music, and this Beatles authorship attribution project is one of the bits of work also got involved with a student who is really the primary driver of this work on basically how to use statistically generates music that sounds like Corrales, and so we have a paper. That's GonNa, be coming very shortly in that area so. So, yes, a music's become a much bigger focus in my statistics like these days. Is there anything obviously interest could drive it but I'm curious if there's any computational component to it may be the availability of computers to run big simulations, and that sort of thing has that influenced the ability to ask interesting questions along these lines? Yeah, generally it helps I. mean I tend not to gravitate to problems which can only be solved by having the appropriate hardware to be able to crank through the data? Having access to good computing definitely makes a big difference I think we can take for granted that any listener must be aware of the Beatles and their influence on music. Regardless of what they like should they could a few, but tell us a little bit more background for those that don't know the discography. What were the types of problems you were looking to? To approach this whole project essentially started when I met my main collaborator for this project Jason Brown. When the two of US happened to be at this conference in Prince, Edward Island! We just happened to be talking. After I gave a talk some material. Actually that's related to rating systems for chess players, and we just happened to stumble on our mutual interest. Interest in music, and in the Beatles, and he was telling me that he had gained a little bit of infamy about fifteen years ago, where he used essentially a forty-eight analysis, decomposing the sounds from the starting court of a hard day's night to figure out the actual instrumentation of the cord, because that really been something that was in pretty serious dispute so. So he published a little article audit and got him some attention, and he was telling me since then one of the things that he was particularly interested in was being able to represent Sohn's particularly Beatles songs in particular format in his area of math, which is graph theories, essentially representing music in the form of essentially graphs or networks and he wanted to. Be Able to use it to be able to distinguish authorship of different Beatles songs like maybe there'd be stylistic differences that would be evident in these representations, anyone really making a lot of headway and whole problem of being able to sing wish authorship is something that's much more firmly in the wheelhouse of a statistician, so I told him it sounds like he probably something I would want to be heavily involved in and so we ended up starting this collaboration, and that was kind of started it all, so we tried lots of different sorts of things. Things to take the music and be able to figure out. How can you predict authorship from musical features, and that's essentially what led us down the path to the work that eventually got published so from my perspective, wearing my data scientist hat, I would say you have a fixed data set that is partially labeled. Does that feel like the right framing for you? The main question of interest really and just to take a step back is that there are a handful of songs by the Beatles and again there's nothing about this problem that has to. To be specific to be spent for our interests there handful songs by the Beatles that or of disputed authorship, and so the idea is that you start off with a data set where the labels which is to say the authorship of Lennon McCartney songs is known that's known because the Beatles Bayside interviews in various information that's been gathered over the years is of note authorship, so we have a data set where the labels are no, and then in addition to that we have for all of those songs. We have a whole bunch of features A. A whole bunch of information about various musical aspects of the songs and idea is to form a statistical model that uses those features to predict the labels, and then once you establish that relationship then you apply to the songs of disputed authorship to see the predictions going to be based on that relationship, so for non composers who might be listening? Perhaps they could be intimidated by this problem. Saying music is all about creativity and unpredictability in these sorts of things. Is this truly assault problem from that point of view well? Yes, solvable a loaded word. I mean we certainly made our best attempt by Best Ibiza? After making lots of attempts that were not terribly predictive, we finally stumbled on said features and a statistical approach that seems to do a pretty reasonable job. Making predictions, the simple answer I suppose is yes, it's possible at solvable in the sense that there is information that you can extract. That is predictive of other ships. I could be pretty. Pretty concrete about this one thing that we knew before going into this work, and this is something that has been well known by musicologists studying. Beatles, music, which is that Paul? McCartney songs in particular tend to have melodies that tend to move around a lot like Paul McCartney, had a musical vocal range, fairly wide and part of that tended to be reflected in his moving melody by contrast John Lennon. had a reasonable vocal range tended to write melodies that didn't move around very much like he used a lot of repeated notes, or the vocal movements would stay very close and pitch, and that's characteristic of a lot of John Lennon songs, and so we knew even going into the problem that you know. musicologists have identified differences in the way that each of these songwriters would write music, so we knew that there were features that could be quantified and picked up. Up and used as distinguish irs in these classification models.

Beatles Chess Paul Mccartney Harvard University Mark Glickman United States Senior Lecturer John Lennon Edward Island Mccartney Lennon Mccartney Jason Brown Sohn Corrales IRS Assault Scientist
"chess" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

05:32 min | Last month

"chess" Discussed on ESPN Daily

"I. How did you get on the chess? Beat in the first place? So I get really interested in these really need sports that. People are super invested in Ashwari. Kumar is an international features writer for Espn Lake if you're going to which. Of People Are Watching these chess tournaments that you wouldn't even know where that's happening in. Iceland. Or Finland, and so I had this curiosity so I was thinking so Bobby Fisher was such a huge part of chests in the US what Ron Labor is tennis. What Jack Nicklaus's to golf? That's what Bobby Fischer is to chess. Bobby Fisher of the United States will finally meet Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union in Belgrade Yugoslavia, but the chess championship of the world plus a purse of one, hundred, thirty, eight, thousand five hundred dollars, the richest prize for a head-to-head confrontation in any sport, but boxing. So who is the next Bobby Fisher? So I went to Saint Louis last year to sort of figure out what is going on in the chess world, so saint Louis has sort of become this chess capital of the country. Let's start with the basics here. What is a chess grandmaster? And what does it take to become one? Usually what happens? Is this International Chess Federation F. And they have this point systems so chessplayers. Lead different tournaments in accumulate these spines that. Gets them to a certain level of expertise, and they are then title the grandmaster, which is in fact, the highest I do that. A chess player can be awarded by International Chess Federation usually these. Players between the age of ten and fourteen, and so they go through these rigorous tournaments one after the other parents take them all over the world. And the get the title by around thirteen fourteen, and then they start to perfect the art of being perfect, just player. So you mentioned Bobby Fisher. Who is probably the most famous chess player all time? Actually <hes> is definitely the most famous chess player of all time. Who are the stars of the field today? The poster by of chess is at the moment Magnus Carlsen. Calzon is the best in the world. The youngest number one ever and no one can explain to you how he does what he does. It seems to come from another world, which is why he's become known as the Mozart of chess. He's from Norway. He sort of had this. Has this bad boy live to him? He's like interesting. He'll drop these nuggets about other players. You make jokes about his opponents. He talks trash social chicken. How do you not? He's GonNa do the same. Yeah the lack of <hes> comas is astounding. And quite disappointing. He talks acts. Yeah for sure sorta like that kind of Worcester wise. He's called the golden boy of chess. And then this. Is. Bobby Ana crew art, there's this Chinese grandmaster Ding Laren <hes>, and then USA's Wesley so and Kara Nakimora. Really Good Armenia has live on Romanian so these are some of like the famous players at the moment that go up against each other all the time. So I the grandmaster that you decided to focus on with your story, the one who lives in Saint Louis is actually Italian. His name is Fabiano Caruana. Who is in? How did he get here? Fabiano Caruana is the number two seed in the world. He's an Italian American chess grandmaster. He became a grandmaster at fourteen years of age, fourteen years, eleven, months, and twenty eight to be exact, and he at that time was the youngest grandmaster in the history of Italy in the United States. E was sort of beg to be the next big thing <hes> in in US chess and he came back now. He has an apartment in Saint Louis. He lives there <hes> and he sort of boot. BOOT his life from scratch, and he was never like the big personality like Norris Magnus columnist. He's the guy that will is very chill loves video games and let us work to the talk to his justice stories about that call in the next Bobby Fisher like the next big thing. He's the one person that can actually dig down. Magnus, Carlsen <hes> in the world championship and become the next world champion. So what does? Chess match in a grand masters tournament. Actually look like. How does it play out? Okay so two grandmasters shake each other's hands. sit down across from each other is chessboard. This o'clock next to them that the <hes> are constantly looking at. This goes on for at least six hours right every day, and so during these six hours, the brain has to have most oxygen supply. Which means your heart is functioning three times faster than on any given. And because of that sustained higher blood pressure, and sustained higher level of activity by the heart and the rain, the body goes through intense physical. Energy lost during. A chess game that lasts six to seven to sometimes eat hours said.

International Chess Federation Bobby Fisher Saint Louis United States Jack Nicklaus Boris Spassky tennis Espn Lake Soviet Union Kumar Iceland Finland Ashwari Belgrade features writer Ron Labor golf
The Chess Grandmasters Extreme Workout

ESPN Daily

05:32 min | Last month

The Chess Grandmasters Extreme Workout

"I. How did you get on the chess? Beat in the first place? So I get really interested in these really need sports that. People are super invested in Ashwari. Kumar is an international features writer for Espn Lake if you're going to which. Of People Are Watching these chess tournaments that you wouldn't even know where that's happening in. Iceland. Or Finland, and so I had this curiosity so I was thinking so Bobby Fisher was such a huge part of chests in the US what Ron Labor is tennis. What Jack Nicklaus's to golf? That's what Bobby Fischer is to chess. Bobby Fisher of the United States will finally meet Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union in Belgrade Yugoslavia, but the chess championship of the world plus a purse of one, hundred, thirty, eight, thousand five hundred dollars, the richest prize for a head-to-head confrontation in any sport, but boxing. So who is the next Bobby Fisher? So I went to Saint Louis last year to sort of figure out what is going on in the chess world, so saint Louis has sort of become this chess capital of the country. Let's start with the basics here. What is a chess grandmaster? And what does it take to become one? Usually what happens? Is this International Chess Federation F. And they have this point systems so chessplayers. Lead different tournaments in accumulate these spines that. Gets them to a certain level of expertise, and they are then title the grandmaster, which is in fact, the highest I do that. A chess player can be awarded by International Chess Federation usually these. Players between the age of ten and fourteen, and so they go through these rigorous tournaments one after the other parents take them all over the world. And the get the title by around thirteen fourteen, and then they start to perfect the art of being perfect, just player. So you mentioned Bobby Fisher. Who is probably the most famous chess player all time? Actually is definitely the most famous chess player of all time. Who are the stars of the field today? The poster by of chess is at the moment Magnus Carlsen. Calzon is the best in the world. The youngest number one ever and no one can explain to you how he does what he does. It seems to come from another world, which is why he's become known as the Mozart of chess. He's from Norway. He sort of had this. Has this bad boy live to him? He's like interesting. He'll drop these nuggets about other players. You make jokes about his opponents. He talks trash social chicken. How do you not? He's GonNa do the same. Yeah the lack of comas is astounding. And quite disappointing. He talks acts. Yeah for sure sorta like that kind of Worcester wise. He's called the golden boy of chess. And then this. Is. Bobby Ana crew art, there's this Chinese grandmaster Ding Laren and then USA's Wesley so and Kara Nakimora. Really Good Armenia has live on Romanian so these are some of like the famous players at the moment that go up against each other all the time. So I the grandmaster that you decided to focus on with your story, the one who lives in Saint Louis is actually Italian. His name is Fabiano Caruana. Who is in? How did he get here? Fabiano Caruana is the number two seed in the world. He's an Italian American chess grandmaster. He became a grandmaster at fourteen years of age, fourteen years, eleven, months, and twenty eight to be exact, and he at that time was the youngest grandmaster in the history of Italy in the United States. E was sort of beg to be the next big thing in in US chess and he came back now. He has an apartment in Saint Louis. He lives there and he sort of boot. BOOT his life from scratch, and he was never like the big personality like Norris Magnus columnist. He's the guy that will is very chill loves video games and let us work to the talk to his justice stories about that call in the next Bobby Fisher like the next big thing. He's the one person that can actually dig down. Magnus, Carlsen in the world championship and become the next world champion. So what does? Chess match in a grand masters tournament. Actually look like. How does it play out? Okay so two grandmasters shake each other's hands. sit down across from each other is chessboard. This o'clock next to them that the are constantly looking at. This goes on for at least six hours right every day, and so during these six hours, the brain has to have most oxygen supply. Which means your heart is functioning three times faster than on any given. And because of that sustained higher blood pressure, and sustained higher level of activity by the heart and the rain, the body goes through intense physical. Energy lost during. A chess game that lasts six to seven to sometimes eat hours said.

Bobby Fisher International Chess Federation Chess Fabiano Caruana United States Magnus Carlsen Saint Louis Bobby Ana Tennis Jack Nicklaus Ashwari Finland Iceland Espn Lake Kumar Boris Spassky Features Writer Norris Magnus Worcester
Britain pays tribute to National Health Service on 72nd Birthday.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:48 min | Last month

Britain pays tribute to National Health Service on 72nd Birthday.

"People across the UK joined in a round of applause on Sunday to mark the seventy second anniversary of the free to use National Health Service one of the country's most cherished institutions, the reverence with which it is held has been bolstered this year during what is being Europe's deadliest corona virus outbreaks though the UK as a whole has a confirmed virus death toll of forty, four, thousand, two, hundred, twenty, the third highest in the world behind the United States and Brazil the chess and everyone who works within it in whatever capacity have been lauded for their work and care. Created by the Labor government after World War Two, in nineteen, forty, eight by bringing together the nation's disparate health institutions, the NHS's founding principles have never changed funded by everyone through the tax system. It provides free healthcare to any UK resident when needed. Prince Charles said the NHS that been through the most testing time in its history, and it was right for the whole country to come together to pay tribute to everyone who works within it after coming down with corona virus himself and spending three nights in intensive care Prime Minister Boris. Johnson credited NHS workers with saving his life, and his insisted it get whatever resources it needs. The main Labour Party opposition said the NHS has been starved of funding for the past decade during the government's austerity drive. Overnight many of the country's major sites, including the houses of parliament and the arch at Wembley, stadium England's National Soccer Stadium lit up in blue to remember all those who died during the pandemic. And before the weekend, soccer matches, players joined in with a round of applause.

NHS UK Labor Government National Soccer Stadium National Health Service Soccer Prince Charles Europe Prime Minister Johnson United States England Labour Party Brazil
Don't @ Me: The Story Behind Twitch's $25 Million Sex Addiction Lawsuit

theScore Esports Podcasts

06:12 min | Last month

Don't @ Me: The Story Behind Twitch's $25 Million Sex Addiction Lawsuit

"So recently twitch was served a twenty five million dollar lawsuit by Guy Dealing with a severe sex addiction. Basically he believes that the hundreds of women streamers he follows, makes his sex addiction worse in. It's all twitches fault. Yeah this story is as crazy as it sounds. Let's get into it. Guys were streaming over at twitter DOT TV. Slash the score e sports, and we're adding more and more content every single week, so whether it's talkshow clouded or the rotating Friday streams follow the channel, so you know when we go live, and maybe you'll catch me winning another absurd game of chess. I one call now wait what what kind of stupid game! I. Don't honestly I don't know how the first happened. Okay? Now back to the lawsuit on June fifteenth. A guy named Eric Estherville filed twenty five million dollar lawsuit against twitch lawsuit states that s still suffers from a bunch of health issues, including OCD, depression and a severe sex addiction, and the lawsuit goes on to say that quote. Because of these maladies he heavily relies on the Internet for all of his entertainment, purposes and quote. Quote and basically he suing twitch, because he alleges that women twitch streamers make his sex addiction OCD worse quote twitches severely exacerbated his condition by displaying many sexually suggestive women, streamers through twitches, twisted programming, and neck owed making it nearly impossible for the plaintiff to use twitch without being exposed to such sexually suggestive content and quote to be clear, and this is in the lawsuit s to below follows exactly seven hundred eighty six women streamers. Zero male streamers not only does the lawsuit named twenty popular women's streamers including. And pokey, Main in-includes, pages, and pages of photos of these women as evidence as I was going through this lawsuit looking through these photos, it just felt really weird. It didn't sit right with me. One other issue that s says exacerbates his sex. Addiction is the fact that you can't choose to break down streams by gender quote. There's no way for the plaintiff to filter streams. He'd like to. To Watch based on gender, male or female. Therefore, the plaintiff has to choose a game and or category to watch with thumbnails, showing these scantily clad women alongside men of being the only streaming channels available to him and quote now in reality you could manually filter between men and women streamers, depending on who you follow, but remember according to the lawsuit Esta follows exactly seven, hundred, eighty six. Six women, streamers and zero men again, according to the lawsuit, the twenty five million dollars estabilish, asking for is to be split between him in other twitch prime turbo subscribers with the rest of the money leftover going to charities of the courts, choosing on top of the twenty five million s Davila was asking twitch permanently banned the twenty women named in the lawsuit. Okay, everything we just discussed. Discussed makes up the front half of the lawsuit. The entire back half of a lawsuit is dedicated to multiple academic papers, breaking down the history in research done on sex, addiction and listen. This is a real medical issue in this guy deserves all the help that he needs. But blaming women on twitch is probably not the answer now. If you're thinking where the hell did this come from. Actually ESTHERVILLE. Oh has history of filing these kind of over the top lawsuits. It all starts back in two thousand nine after s Davila was banned from PS end for being a troll while playing resistance fall of man online and if you didn't know. Is Basically playstations online ecosystem similar to xbox live? Here's a quote from an interview. He did with an gadget when he originally filed the lawsuit quote. I sued Sony because when they banned me, they banned my whole console, which is like a five hundred dollar waste there because I can't go online anymore, which was one of my ways of socializing so when I sued for fifty five thousand dollars that was something called punitive damages. When you're trying to penalize a company, and that's what I was trying to do. Penalize them for banning someone and quote from there. He sued Sony again. Plus Microsoft in ten does over flaws in different console designs that he purposely tried to find that in. In Two thousand ten I Japan gamespot could talk in a bunch of other gaming websites did their job in wrote about the lawsuits that Estella had filed against Sony Microsoft and Nintendo and he really didn't like that like as in he filed one giant lawsuit against thirteen different websites, because he was upset about the fact that they were writing about him. estabilish became so notorious that he was given all sorts of nicknames, the plaintiff the serial sewer. The list goes on. Also he wants sued blizzard, because apparently walking in world of warcraft took too long and in the lawsuit he tried to rope in actress, Wynona Ryder to explain the significance of alienation in Catcher in the Rye and quote. Rider, catcher in the Rye world of warcraft lack. Of and you probably won't be surprised to hear that. All eight lawsuits were either dropped by Estella himself or dismissed by the court outright now the complaint against twitch was filed on June fifteenth, while the summons was served to them on June nineteenth meaning legally now they have to respond in court, and while twitch hasn't made an official statement on this situation. It's only a matter of time before the core proceedings become public and hey, maybe this case will farther than anyone else was expected. What? He said all the haters. I'm not trying to zag just because everybody else is going in one direction, but I honestly don't understand. A lot of the complaints like people are really upset about the story, choices and things like that and it's just like. Why why are you upset that somebody told you a story that. You didn't agree with the choices like it's not your fucking story to tell. And I get that we have connections to characters, and when certain things happen. It makes you upset, but. Really. I fundamentally do not understand how people can be upset about somebody else's narrative created in Britain.

Sony Davila Estella Microsoft Twitter OCD Eric Estherville Esta Blizzard Wynona Ryder S Britain Japan Official Nintendo
Teyana Parties Despite Lockdown

Nightly Pop

01:51 min | Last month

Teyana Parties Despite Lockdown

"The. Lockdown is over or at least apparently, it is for a lot of famous people for example, Cardi B. and offset just hit up Tiana. Taylor's packed album release party, which by the way offered, has met suits upon arrival, but not much social distancing. Going on here one of your guys. This thoughts on this not a lot of mass happening. I think less than half of the party had masks on, but never had. Done so in the invite to the to the event. It says like we will provide mass and has met suits look I love Yana think you know the album is going to be amazing, but I do feel like this party was kind of irresponsible especially. She just announced that she's pregnant. And there were kids there. It just seems like so many people in one place. And the lockdown isn't lifted yet. It just seems a little irresponsible to me. Yeah! I also think that if you wearing the has met suit half open so that we could see your cleavage or sculpted chess is like riding a bicycle holding your helmet under your arm. It's just it does nothing. Cardiac. Odell Beckham was there were a ton of people there and I did it like people are itching to get outside. There have been some things that have been lifted, so you wanted to get out there and feel normal again and I'm I'm sure that she's so proud of this album, but I think like you know when you're newly pregnant and being around all of these people I just don't understand the logic with this lean awake. was there like every Winnie Harlow like? I'm so confused on this money. Make you a new. The album is called the album which is short for the album that gave everybody respiratory disease, so make sure. Chance congratulations on download the album, but I'm not going to parties like house parties. That's real aggressive. A great guys pay attention

Taylor Cardi B. Yana Odell Beckham Winnie Harlow
Witold Szabowski

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:16 min | 2 months ago

Witold Szabowski

"Guess today's Polish journalist, who's reported from across the world including Cuba's of Africa Turkey and is land. He's previously been recognized by some of Poland's most prestigious literary prizes as well as Amnesty. International. English pen and the European Parliament. Journalism Prize his latest book. How to feed a dictator provides a unique perspective on some of the world's most evil men through the eyes of that cooks. The Toll Sh- lebowski welcome to the show. Can you tell me a little bit about your background? Were you born in Warsaw thank you for having me and the answer is no I was born. Hundreds kilometers from Warsaw, which made me very well linked to Warsaw and I had a lot of contacts which people from there at I graduated, I finished my by school in very very small town, Ostrich Moskowitz, and were you encouraged to write or indeed to cook at that time? That's all my mother was cooking really well. And when I was six or seven, I had that fashion to bake, and I was really it was a master of cheesecake, but then I never actually had any links to cooking until I graduated from Warsaw University, and then I went to Denmark and the full story seem the book, but shortly speaking. People in Denmark earned much better those days and people in Poland. And Poland was joining you those days, so I could easily meet right. I went to Denmark. And I spend a couple of months, and my first job was cleaning the dishes very good, fancy restaurant in very beautiful Barcus Copenhagen, but then I made a beautiful rape currier name became a chess, so that was the first serious cooking for me. But you ended up walking out of the restaurant, throwing your apron down and walking out. All Yeah Oh. Yeah, that's because I went to. I made a mistake actually. I'm joking, but I went to point just for a couple of weeks. I took a short break. The restaurant with my plan was to come back after a couple of weeks, but then in Warsaw I got the job actually I. It was an internship. But in the best newspaper, having all. So, that was something I couldn't really skip I never. I never went back to cooking. And in fact that was the start of your journalistic career. Because at twenty five, you became the youngest reporter at the Big Polish daily newspaper. Tell us about that. It'd be far. I was working for a top law. No, like the sound on or something like that and I was writing about everything related to religion that totally season church, the Polish Pope, who had died just a couple of months before, and that was my first serious job, but right after that. I began. That's true. At the biggest Polish daily called Gazit of has its weekly supplements with Literary Report Dash, which is really gorgeous, which is which is really a pearl to be a discovered one day for the international reverse. I believe because every week they used to print. Two or three really goods pieces of beautiful literary record dash in Richard Kapucinski style. And that's true. I began working there when I was twenty five, which was quite early. Usually, that was a place for very experienced, very very good journalist. And almost straits from the kitchen in Copenhagen I went to. Supply! With with the best quality reputation the on so that was kind of amazing for me. For the first couple of years, they couldn't believe that it's July It's a beautiful dream. They thought that at some point someone would come and wake me up.

Warsaw Poland Denmark Warsaw University European Parliament Barcus Copenhagen Africa Cuba Ostrich Moskowitz Reporter Rape Currier Richard Kapucinski
Mavericks & Legends: Eleanor of Aquitaine

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:44 min | 3 months ago

Mavericks & Legends: Eleanor of Aquitaine

"Legend was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe. During the Middle Ages known for her extraordinary beauty and brilliance. She was a leader who wielded significant influence over everything from art and literature to politics and the perception of women. She was queen of both France and England and built a long legacy through advantageous marriages for her many children. She was a role model for future. Female leaders please welcome. Eleanor of Aquitaine. Eleanor was likely born in the year. Eleven twenty two to William the Tenth Duke of Aquitaine and his wife Elinor was the oldest of the couple's three children medieval aquitaine was a huge fiefdom located in the western central and southern areas of present France to the south of the Laura River. It was renowned for its wealth and influence and for being an enlightened capital of culture and. Learning Eleanor's father a lover of literature and the arts ensure that all of his children received the best cultural and academic educations available. Eleanor was fluent in multiple. Languages learnt math astronomy in history and was adept at sports such as Falconry and chess. When Eleanor was eight her mother and younger brother died seven years later. Eleven thirty seven her father died of dysentery. While on a pilgrimage. On his deathbed Williams last act was to do everything he could to protect. Eleanor and her inheritance of Aquitaine. He ordered his men to rush to the court of King. Louis the six the France to ask for protection for his daughter until a marriage could be arranged he also asks Louis to find an appropriate match. Louis was all too delighted to choose his own son. Louis the seventh were married a few months later. Eleanor and Louis. The seventh a match. She was renowned beauty and intellect well-versed in politics and well traveled. He was incredibly sheltered for an heir to the throne and was generally a quiet man for most of his life. Bluey was not the air and was never trained in the skills necessary to rule. It had been expected that he'd go into the Church so we spent most of his early life in monasteries. That changed when his older brothers suddenly died and Louis was thrust into the spotlight from the start. Their relationship. Louis was submissive. To and reliant upon eleanor when he accepted the task of leading the second crusade. Eleanor made it clear that she was coming along. It's not surprising given Louise Limited leadership skills and existent travel experience that the crusade was not a success. Eleanor is famously. Recorded by medieval historians treating the trip more as a big adventure than a serious endeavor brought more than three hundred ladies in waiting with an accompanying baggage train spanned miles still the same historians. Note that eleanor was a better leader and more respected than her Mika's even though the crusade was a series of misadventures eleanor managed to increase her social capital during the trip while Louis was continually marginalized by the time they reached. Antonio Louis was resentful of his wife. Eleanor asked for an annulment and Louis agreed ending their marriage upon their return to France and eleven fifty two weeks after ending her first marriage. Eleanor married Henry Duke of Normandy and Future King of England. The two ascended to the throne two years later in eleven fifty four it was a tempestuous marriage. Unlike her first husband Henry was not easily controlled by eleanor. The more she tried to control him the more he fought back by having affairs. He also disapproved eleanor surrounding herself with musicians and poets. Still Henry and eleanor did have eight children together. On whom eleanor focused. Most of her attention. She was well aware that she could eventually wield much more power through her children around eleven. Seventy Eleanor left her husband and moved back to her family home in. Potier taking her favorite son Richard and daughter Marie with her in eleven. Seventy three eleanor's oldest son Henry. The young king started a rebellion against his father. King Henry was soon joined by a number of his brothers. The rebellion lasted a year. And a half before it was finally crushed some believe that eleanor who had publicly supported her sons had actually instigated the revolt as a result. King Henry had eleanor imprisoned in eleven. Seventy four. Eleanor STAYED IN CAPTIVITY FOR SIXTEEN YEARS. Until Henry's death in eleven eighty nine. By then Eleanor's oldest son had died so her second oldest Richard the first known to history as Richard. The Lionheart ascended the throne. Eleanor was very close with Richard. Soon after taking the Throne Richard. One off to take part in the third crusade and left. Eleanor in charge. Though she'd been locked away for over a decade it took eleanor no time at all to get back in the swing if things. It wasn't long before she was signing documents and having others address her as eleanor. By the grace of God Queen of England Richard Eventually returned home from the crusade after being kidnapped in Jerusalem and ransomed his mother in eleven ninety nine. Richard was killed in battle while fighting. King Philip of France over territory. He was succeeded by his brother. John upon becoming King John Quickly signed a peace treaty with Philip with peace finally achieved. Eleanor MOVED TO FUND TO ROW. Abbey where she died in twelve o

Eleanor Antonio Louis King Henry France Aquitaine Richard Europe King Williams King Philip Future King Of England Henry Duke England Bluey Laura River Louise Abbey Normandy Elinor
New York - Remembering MTA Train Tower Operator Darryl Sweeney

Morning Edition

02:19 min | 3 months ago

New York - Remembering MTA Train Tower Operator Darryl Sweeney

"Transit workers continue to die from covert nineteen in greater numbers than any other city or state agency in New York as part of our occasional series to honor those lost to the virus W. NYC Steven Nelson has this recollection there Sweeney had four children but it was his only daughter deja he took to see plays on Broadway she says his favorite was the mountain top a fictional account of Martin Luther king junior's last night I love that one he talked about that forever teacher says her father was very thoughtful and methodical his favorite game of chess he earned his black belt in jujitsu this year and philosophically he was aligned with king we'd like your ideology Durrell was the tower operator which is kind of like air traffic control for trains a job that requires constant attention one of his coworkers and fellow union leader Chris Drummond says there was one quality that made him different god never gets mad and bass with our market value trump says in the union Geral worked hard to improve conditions grilled me had to provide food chains this one is a bright treated with dignity and respect as for his family he pushed them to be their best to after getting her bachelor's degree his daughter deja new one thing now right I don't want to go back to school and he said well you know you always said you want to go to auction I think it's concrete do now that no I'm not doing I'm not doing it and he just made me realize you know sometimes you can't stop shaking your green teacher ended up getting a scholarship to a law school in Michigan the last time they were together was late February when you drop her off to take the bar exam he wished her good luck and said don't second guess yourself and I did my name you called me every week I have never felt now would come in every week they don't come back until April but you still call in late March they're all called out sick from work and he wasn't answering his phone one of his sons climb through his window to check on him Geral was disoriented had a raspy voice difficulty breathing an ambulance came but they said he didn't need to go to a hospital for the kept him at home he slept a lot drink Gatorade and law the town awaits two weeks later his condition worsened at the end you know we work it worked longer while I was recording born and raised in Brooklyn Geral Sweeney leaves behind three children six siblings and his mother he was fifty eight years old Steven Nelson W. NYC news

New York Steven Nelson Deja Broadway Durrell Michigan Geral Sweeney NYC Martin Luther Chris Drummond Brooklyn Steven Nelson W.
The perfect song for the Biden campaign

Chris Plante

01:26 min | 3 months ago

The perfect song for the Biden campaign

"Now they're worried about the population I was one of those I think that's the perfect Joe Biden campaigns are good and really I either I'd forgotten about most of the lyrics I had heard the song in quite awhile and I forgot most but I was just walking a log cabin and saying and I'm usually saying and something that I wake up singing I go to bed singing and there's always a song in my head at that pretty much and I was saying I'd love to change the world but I don't know what to do so I'll leave it up to you what a perfect Joe Biden campaigned son and then I went back and I listen to the lyrics and I read the lyrics and I this is really ideal for the Biden campaigned everywhere is freaks and Harry's dikes and ferries tell me where is sanity her weight but this is better tax the rich feed the poor till there are no rich no more no that's not a very good long term plan I think if you tax the rich to feed the poor and your goal is to make sure their original more how you gonna feed the poor you know think this through come on play chess a little bit obviously I'd love to change the world but I don't know what to do

Joe Biden Harry
Bored?  Games!

Your Brain on Facts

09:20 min | 4 months ago

Bored? Games!

"A lot of playing board games these days and that's pretty fitting human making board games for a long time like a long longtime seven thousand years or more for a bit of historical context. We stopped hunter-gathering and settled down to be farmers about ten thousand years ago rather than try to cram seven thousand years in six occupied continents worth of history into a half hour podcast. I'll hit some of the high points. Especially the less well-known once the earliest gaming pieces ever found are forty nine. Small carved painted stones found a five thousand year old burial mound in southeast Turkey. Similar pieces have been found in Syria and Iraq and seemed to point devoid games originating in the Fertile Crescent. You remember the Fertile Crescent from the first week of world history class. It's the same region discovered alcohol invented papyrus and made calendars all of which you need. If you're hosting game night other early dice games were created by painting a single side of a flat. Stick these sticks would be tossed at once and that would be your role Mesopotamia. Dice were made from a variety of materials including carved knuckle bones would painted stones and turtle shells. No wonder folks used to say roll them bones dice from the Roman era. Looks like the six sided die. We use today though. Some of them had their corners. Cut off to be able to reach a higher number not unlike dungeons and dragons dice. Imagine excavating a distant Roman out host and finding a D twenty serious cricket board games became popular among the Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt. And that shouldn't surprise. That board games were a bigger part of life for upper class people since they have both money for entertainment and time to play. Even before the first dynasty Egypt loved a game called Senate. It's even seen on. The walls of tombs and copies of the game are buried with noble people. Ancient Egyptians were strong believers in the concept of fate. And that your luck in the game of Senate meant that you were under the protection of the major gods of the Pantheon raw toe to toe Cyrus. The significance of the game is clear. The game play not as clear. Historians have made educated guesses as to the rules more on that later and Board Game. Companies have used those guesses as a jumping off place to make modern versions. Four Games also became tied into religious beliefs. One such game was Mahan played around three thousand. B C e Mahan was a protective God depicted as a snake with coils around the Sun God raw during his journey through the night the game and the God became intertwined. Tim Kendall and ancient Egyptian historian believes that it's not possible to know for sure with the information we have available whether the game was inspired by an existing deity or the Deity was inspired by the game. Many people think backgammon is the longest plate of all the board games with evidence that it existed around two thousand B C but there is an extant game. That is a little bit older. Relatively speaking the royal game of for the game gets its name from being found in the royal tombs of in Iraq. There was also a set found in Pharaoh. Tutankhamun tune the game. Play is simple but very familiar. You're trying to get all of your pieces around the board first thumping off your opponent's pieces along the way again. Proving there's nothing new under the Sun. The royal game of herb was played with four sided or tetrahedral dice. A D Four for the tabletop games out there. Even though the game's over four thousand years old amazingly we found a copy of the rules Irving Finkel the British museum deciphered cuneiform tablet and discovered. It was the rules for the Royal Game of Earth. He then saw a photograph of a nearly identical board game being played in modern India. That makes the Royal Game of Earth. The longest played game in history and there is a great video of Irving Finkel. Who has ever so pleasantly mad teaching youtuber or Tom Scott how to play Lincoln the show notes and a little clip right here. Because I just couldn't help myself. All sorts of evidence has come to live so that we know how this game was played and we can play it now with a great deal of excitement. Sometimes it brings out violence. Come Times it brings out savagery. I have to say that this so we've decided to bring in a member of the public. I can't remember the name on Tom. Scott I make videos about science technology in the world. Who's never paid this game before? I have never played this game before. I'm Gandhi swift overview of the walls. Hope he masses and I'm getting to play of course play gently at first because I don't say hi to hang I'm to wipe the floor with it wouldn't do it for me even discovered these rules and I'll throw in his mind. Game listing whitlow. Marta is similar to that question of modern. There were some minor differences s today. Each player has fifteen checkers and uses six sided dice to be the first to bear off. All of one's checkers. I confess that I am reading that. From a website verbatim. I know less about that. Yemen do cricket. Backgammon had a renewed surge of popularity in the nineteen sixties which is held longtime for a comeback. Thanks in part to the charisma of Prince Alexis. Obolensky the father of modern backgammon cigarette liquor and car. Companies began to sponsor tournaments and Hugh Hefner held backgammon parties at the Playboy Mansion. At the same time that the Romans were playing Latin backgammon. The Chinese were play. We she or you may have heard of it. Go Que- she may even predate the game of twelve markings and the royal game of Earth. According to legend which has a pesky habit of morphing into history quay g was created by the ancient Chinese. Emperor Yell to teach his son on Ju discipline. Concentration and balance the popularity of wage e grew throughout Eastern Asia especially in Japan. Which is where the name go comes from another ancient game which is still out there and a favourite of nearly every household in my family is the African game of Mangala in our modern parlance. Munkala refers to a specific game. But the name actually belongs to an entire genre of games a genre eight hundred traditional games strong. This family of Board Games is played around. The world is referred to as Sewing Games S. O. W. I N. G. Devotes the way that you pick up and drop the stones playing pieces like you were sowing seeds in the ground. The word Mukalla comes from the Arabic Nicola to move most one college games share a common structure where each player has gained pieces in divots on the board and moves them to capture their opponent's pieces leading them to also be called count and capture games. The boards can be wooden clay even just little holes in the dirt playing pieces of everything from seeds. Stones shells anything near at hand that fits in the holes. The earliest evidence of the game are fragments of pottery. Board found in Eritrea dated to the sixth century CE. Though if the games were played with seeds on wooden boards or pebbles in divots in the dirt the game could be even older. The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence after all that particular logical fallacy is called argument from ignorance at ignorant him. And it's not a good look now. We go to the land of ice and snow of the Midnight Sun. Where the hot springs flow Scandinavians played chess. Like game called. Nevin tough at least as early as four hundred see. I'm sure my clever listeners haven't forgotten that. Viking refers to the raids undertaken by a small portion of the population themselves called Viking US meaning kings table noth- Atoll was a war strategy game. The kings objective was to escape to the edge of the board while the opponents laurel objective was to capture him. The attacking force had the natural advantage at the start of each game. Perhaps mimicking a cultural mindset of a small group being victorious against a larger force like say a few boats full of Viking attacks against the army of an English King Scandinavians spread the game to Ireland Britain and Wales through. Let's call it. Unexpected cultural exchange archaeologists have also discovered that it was popular as far to the east as Ukraine.

Backgammon Tom Scott Iraq Mahan Senate Fertile Crescent Irving Finkel Turkey Pharaohs Of Ancient Egypt Syria Tim Kendall Egypt Prince Alexis India Hugh Hefner Eastern Asia Midnight Sun United States Eritrea
Automating Electronic Circuit Design with Deep RL w/ Karim Beguir

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

08:31 min | 4 months ago

Automating Electronic Circuit Design with Deep RL w/ Karim Beguir

"Kareem is CO founder and CEO at Institute Kareem. Welcome back to the Tacoma area. Podcast pleasure to speak again. Absolutely so if Kareem's name sounds familiar. That's because we spoke We're trying to figure this out. It was between a year and a half a year ago The show actually was published in September. Was Number three hundred two and you should definitely check it out for Kareem's full background But croom wanted to give us a brief overview of what you're up to as well as an update from when we last spoke absolutely so I it's a pleasure to be back in. Continue our conversation on aside. He's been pretty invent follow. The Lot has happened as you know instead. Deep is a decision making a startup. So we focus on Problems related to making complex decisions We also do our own innovation and the tried to be helpful to the community and we've made progress basically on this three areas. We've been able to release innovative products. In decision making we've also been able to publish innovate in research Publishing original you know like pieces. That were actually. What come that nervous where we got the spotlight presentation for example with Google declined? And we've also been very active on the community side organizing major events in Africa and basically lots of young talents. Find say super -tunities in there and the we most recently saw one another at Nuremberg and had a chance to catch up briefly at the black dinner where you really piqued my interest around one of the company's new initiatives or products which is called DP. Cb tell us about what is absolutely so this'll be actually started with with conversation Two years ago I I had a dinner with a good friend of mine. Who is actually an expert in hardware design worked on like no chips for a well known phones etc and we were speaking about like. What is he doing this particular sector? And he was like not that much like particular like busy stunt for printed circuit boards so basically those ships that you will find with all sorts of Consumer Electronics Products Iphones Speakers Bluetooth etc and You know the situation in that market was that auto routers basically automated systems to connect the different components like built. Basically the electrical secretary have been going on for many years but they were not that make and we were like. Hey that sounds like an interesting problem to to look at. We started looking into it eventually. This good front now. Be True was now meeting or hardware team joint steady and we've worked very hard on this project and we're very proud to have been able to achieve goals and in November last year we've released it in. Beta form and it is a world first for the first time we have a system that is end to end fully deployable and scalable on the cloud capable of understanding how to route chips essential and now last time we spoke we. Our conversation was focused on the work. Your company was doing applying reinforcement learning to logistics is deep be also based on reinforcement learning absolutely and this is a very strong commonality and like design philosophy between or or products. So in a sense. Let me give you an example. We've we've continued to do great work in logistics and the recently last September. We've won a major contract for example with that. Chaban the German railway company and to give idea this is about routing trains on a large scale talking about ten thousand trains a day and some think on some thirty three thousand kilometers of railway but downs out their communities between routing trains and routing chips on a board and so we realized that the projects and the type of research that study is doing is actually applicable to multiple fields. And when it comes to imbed Ziegler printed circuit boards. They're putting compelling so. We went full speed ahead and this turned out to be office product. Alrighty so when you initially met with your friend your mention that they're you know while this these auto routers have been in place or have been in use for many years. They were not without their challenges and problems. What were some of those challenges and problems? And what was the opportunity to introduce? A I think Reuters have been the they've been. There's been a lot of great work. Donald Reuters but in terms of like design philosophy. The design philosophy is all about essentially using ristic's to solve problems and we spoke a little bit about this in Bester conversation so it's very similar to let's say what was the status of software for chess before out. Fazio came out the systems which were very well actually but still are built on your way. Sticks fought for the hardest problems. Ristic's have limits and a system that can essentially mobilize learning can. Learning get scale can get better results when it comes in particular for in the status of printed circuit. Boards it is actually incredible and we are in twenty twenty that actually complex sucrets still designed manually and the reason why people design those Mandy is because auto routers essentially a failed to deliver the goods to the degree of quality which is expected by high quality customers so we see a really compelling opportunity with modern built on the latest innovation. Some of it actually developed in house we actually have patents on the work done for the. There is an opportunity to accelerate the design cycle of products. Because it's not just about quality you mean. Engineers do absolutely amazing work and have amazing intuition. It's about the speed. Human engineer could take in certain cases multiple weeks if not months to completely root complex with more than we do believe instead that this timing can be proud to twenty four hours this if done at scale it would be tremendous for the industry and it would accelerate the product cycle. We are using consumer electronics to have a cycle every six months of the year. There's a new version coming. We believe that any I could actually accelerate A. That's that's a that psycho and as a consequence also make it easier to design new products and experiment and ultimately unleash more human creativity and mobilizing gay. You mentioned complexity of the boards as being one of the challenges. What are we talking about when we talk about complexity? We I'm assuming we're measuring that in for example number of components but having worked with circuit boards before there are also issues like the number of layers and things like that when you talk about a complex board. What exactly are you talking about? So about really consists in basically an. Kyi's that we need to connect and as a consequence like those guys they can be what needs to be connected so you have fairs of components essential get need to be connected and they could be thousands of those and as you mentioned rightly there could be multiple layers simple designs start with two or four layers that you could have a lot more and the more you have layers the more components you have to connect the heart of the problem. It is an empty heart problem and so this is where I can help. But you can you when you're looking at the most difficult designs that we take human engineers significant amount of time to solve

Kareem Institute Kareem Tacoma Engineer Africa Nuremberg Croom Reuters Google Research Publishing Ristic Donald Reuters KYI Co Founder Secretary Ziegler CEO Fazio
Changing our formulation of AI to avoid runaway risks: Interview with Prof. Stuart Russell

Linear Digressions

08:21 min | 4 months ago

Changing our formulation of AI to avoid runaway risks: Interview with Prof. Stuart Russell

"Hey everybody so instead of having myself and Ben. Your usual hosts and here with special guest professor Stuart Russell of Berkeley Who's written a really fascinating book about Ai in the future of AI? And we're GONNA talk about it Professor Russell. Thank you for joining me. It's a pleasure. You're listening to linear digressions so Professor Brussel I know your name might be familiar to a lot of folks who are listening to this podcast. But for those who don't know your work as much or they may be recognized the name but aren't quite sure how to place it. You might giving a brief introduction. Sure so I've been a Berkeley Longer than I can't remember about thirty four years and I've been doing a I actually since I was in high school. I wrote a chess program. background nine hundred. Seventy five In high school so I've been doing a along time You might know my name if you've taken. Ai Costs you possibly used a book by Russell Ovik So Peter Novick and I wrote that starting in Nineteen ninety-two. We just sent the fourth edition off to the printer last week and So my research has covered Pretty much every area of artificial intelligence reasoning learning problem solving game playing planning robotics language. Vision these days I'm concerned about the following simple question which we had actually in the First Edition Textbook What if we succeed? There's a new book that you have out now human compatible artificial intelligence in the problem of control as you mentioned this. It sounds like this is something. You've at least been aware of for a long time. WanNa ask what motivated you to write this book now? So the book Sort of has two parts. One is the part that says okay. This is how we currently think they I And this is why it's extremely wrong And if we assume the current standard model they I As I systems. Get better and better We face the prospect of losing control over them. And losing control to machines altogether Second part of the book says okay. Here's how to fix it Here's a way of doing I on a completely different kind of general theoretical foundation and conceptual framework And in this new framework it seems that At least that failure mode of losing control Two machines Seems to go away. The why now is because Sometime around twenty thirteen. Two Thousand Fourteen I figured out what the second half of the book should be namely is a way of dealing with the problem I didn't just want to write a book saying okay. We're all dude right. Alan Turing actually. Nine hundred fifty one said World Dude. So there's not I wouldn't be a new point so without asking you to cannibalize your book sales too much here. You know in in a snapshot what what is the Fundamental Way. That we've gotten it wrong for a long time and where. Where is the ray of hope that you found in that second half the book so this down model of AI? involves building machinery that optimizes a fixed known objective So if you remember if you've read the first few chapters of the book the textbook We talk about for example problem solving systems that Find a sequence of actions that's guaranteed to achieve a goal with minimum cost. So there you have to specify the goal you have to specify the cost function in Moctezuma processes you have to specify the reward function in machine learning algorithms. You have to specify the function In control theory you have to specify a cost function so in fact it's not just A. It's a good fraction of twentieth century. Technology is based on this model and the model is wrong because me do not know how to objectives correctly particularly when you have systems at start to operate in the real world is easy on the chessboard to say okay. You're supposed to win the game But in the real world you might say okay. I'd like you to restore carbon dioxide levels to Pre industrial concentration so that we can get the climate back and balance. That sounds great. What a wonderful objective. What could go wrong wrong? Well you'd get rid of all the people because they're the ones who are producing the carbon dioxide and then you might say okay well. Let's not do that. Let's Restore Carbon Dioxide and not kill anybody And then of course. The system has Subtle and complex social media campaign. That convinces everyone to have fewer and fewer children Until there are no people left and then carbon dioxide is restored. And that's much easier than trying to do all the politics of convincing people to stop consuming and producing and all that kind of stuff so So actually we've known this for a long time where we have the story of King Midas you know. He gave his is objective specification. Everything he touches asa to gold and of course it was the wrong objective died because his food and drink and his family to MD gold And the genie. You get three. Your third wish always please undo the first two issues because I messed everything up. So we know this And yet we assist with a model with the more effective the better the I the worse the outcome is going to be the human beings And if that isn't a bad engineering model I don't know what is right so I think we should abandon that. We have doing things In brief solution is to say that The machines objective is still to satisfy human preferences about the future. But the machine knows that it doesn't know what those preferences are so as explicitly uncertain Just to give you a simple analogy When you go to restaurant the restaurant doesn't know what you want to eat. They know that they don't know they. You what would you like to eat? What MENU CHOICES? And if you pick something off the menu That isn't their life. Subjected will cost to to give you that thing you know if they're out of that item they're not gonNa you know traipse all over the city trying to find more of it. They'll say well. Sorry so you know. We're out of the duck tonight or you know the chickens not so great but maybe I could recommend the polk medallions instead whatever. It might be so. This is perfectly normal and understandable human beings that we don't know what Other humans want and we asked them and or they tell us and we we have an interactive process and we can do the same thing with machines. The machine knows that it doesn't know what you want but it has to somehow act in a way that is beneficial to us so it's naturally motivated so it's trying to solve that problem. The solution to that problem is to do things like US questions off Commission before before you kill everyone the restore carbon dioxide levels you ask you know. I understand about the carbon dioxide is it okay if I kill everyone and then you can say no. That's not why we added more sure that you're not right. Yeah so that's the basic oil and We can formulate this. Mathematically if you're interested you problem in Game Theory And the solutions to those games have the property that the better the I the better the outcome the human beings

AI Professor Russell Professor Brussel Professor Berkeley MD Russell Ovik King Midas Moctezuma Peter Novick
"chess" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

02:35 min | 6 months ago

"chess" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Red Sox one hundred million dollars a year. He's broke bankrupt as Warren Buffett. I said what made you the wealthiest man in the world and he smiled needs a three six. He said living in America great opportunities having good genes. I lived a long time. And he said last thing compound interest and we all know about compound interest but I think the book of this Guy Theater Johnson worked for. Ups never made more than fourteen thousand. Come in his entire life in a year and in old ages were seventy million dollars. How do you do it? All he did was he took a percentage of his income. His percentage was twenty percent. His family said you can't. We can't save any money but he met a friend who said if you pretend there's a tax in taxes took the money away from you and you never see it. The money's comes out of your cat and goes an investment account. You'll be financially free. And so he was disciplined. He didn't look at it. It happened seventy million dollars by compounding. So People's mistake is and kids don't know this adults don't notice that you order anyway there but you can compound away they say. Where do you put that money train? Secret trick is actually doing. Almost nobody does the second trick. Is You really have to understand where you're going to get hurt? Because the fees the fees are just destroy people. You have captured by the fees. I was like this is incredible. Isn't a wild it's nuts. I mean there's so much money just on the fees just so people have an understanding ninety. Six percent of all mutual funds never matched the market. I mean they never beat the market and I was just on a morning show this morning and Pam and Michael. Bloomberg's one of his guys that have some of his money so this is the only industry. I know of where people think they can be a doctor. They think they can be a financial planner and I said to him. I said well look the statistics. Warren Buffett Tommy. This is that ray value told me this David Swinson took yell from one billion to twenty four billion two decades. They'll be able to tell them. Nobody beats the market except a couple UNICORNS that nobody has access to and I said I didn't say you're not one of them A. Here's the truth. Ninety six percent mutual funds don't match market that means four percent succeed now. What are your chances of picking the Right Mutual Fund? People don't know what they're doing. They put their money in a four one K. Pick them you know what it is if you play blackjack and you and I play and you get to face cards. Intermediate says hit me still. WanNa one chance in a million whether you're eighty percent chance of winning if you tried to get a mutual fund you got the four percent chance of winning so when I show people not only do not get the result thinking logically if I'd hire someone else to do and we'll do better than me. But in addition you pay around two thousand percent more than it's worth meaning you get the same exact product the seem stocks in the index. You want a piece of all. America's best companies say the vanguard five hundred index. I've.

Warren Buffett America Right Mutual Fund Warren Buffett Tommy Red Sox Guy Theater Johnson Bloomberg Pam ray David Swinson Michael
"chess" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

12:27 min | 7 months ago

"chess" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Thanks kqed our next guest Shakira Luster to Shell Williams. Any Money Hill are state champions in chess. The eighth graders health from Saint. Ethel Arita a small Catholic School in Chicago's Auburn Gresham neighborhood. After their state win in November the school through a massive celebration for them complete with crowns for the winners the girls then went onto play seven in the national tournament for their age bracket they met with Mayor Lori lightfoot and they join us now along with their coach Eric Luster welcome to reset. Ah Well first of all coach. I want to know how you feel. Having coached these young ladies to the championships I might have lost for words. I am so proud with them. They have done a magnificent job favourite proud of them. Now I should mention. You're also Shakira's Dad. I am not just coach. Also oh the seventh and eighth grade math teacher. Yes at Saint Rita. Did you expect this weird. No I did expect coming first at the state. I was hoping for it but I didn't expect that. So I'm I'm very happy for them. So for state each of you ranked in the top ten slots Shakira. You took third treselle. You took fourth in the money you took tenth and collectively. This made your team number one. I want to know how you felt when you realize you're team had landed in that number one slot. Rachelle come to you I I. I felt overwhelmed. All I could think about was how where the top eighth graders in the state secure. What about you allow Alex's excited that we came in first through the money I'll is a static but I also sort of thought of it as another just normal all tournament? I wasn't really thinking statewide. I was just thinking okay. It's just another first place team trophy. And now we had a little time to sit with Eh Eric but this win into context for us how many people were competing at the state level. Yes so they had about. I would say about five hundred participants again. State Tournament is from kindergarten through twelfth grade in their eighth grade section where they came in first and who are they competing against other other eighth graders and the State of Illinois so you just got back from the National Competition. I'm your team which just includes your three here ranked in seventh overall which is incredible. Yes on a national level. So congratulations for that. What is working for this team? I think The persistence you. You know we talk about perseverance. All the time and math class is one of the standards for mathematical practice. Actually and I will use that as well and chest to persevere severe to never give up You're never GONNA win every game. You're not gonNA always be in great positions but you gotTa keep going regardless of this situation look at it think about dissect and try to move forward so secure your thirteen Atra Shell and mining both fourteen years old. Yes when you go to the state competition or to the National Oh competition. Are there other girls. A lot of the girls who are playing not often We mostly see ourselves as sorry to say like the only African American girls there as far as other girls we could say there's about five. Maybe that we normally see and those are the girls. We normally see on a daily basis at our regular tournaments here in Chicago and how to other players react. You think you might get underestimated sometimes. Show now yes because typically would people look at chest they see mill grandmasters chess players. But you know now other girls joining the forces and secure. I just want you to talk a little bit about what it's like to compete. What's in your mind how you're approaching a game? Tell us about that. Well I you have to like be quiet during the game you can like get up and walk out your see in sometimes look at other player Games in like at big tournaments. Big Big tournaments spectators will not be allowed to go in a room and you can just like walk around and look at the Games. uh-huh and how do you maintain your focusing money when you're playing a match well. Our coach set us up with three rules to castle all to fight for the center and develop your pieces so when I forget or when I starting to walk around the room because my opponent is typically taking a while to think about their next move I just remind myself of those three rules and I play analyze the situation again and for you Tra Shell is there a moment in the match. When you know you wine? Yes or what is that like for you. It's nice especially if the person is higher rated so you feel like not really really got to win yes coach luster talk about just the process of teaching chess and some of the additional benefits that come along with learning this game so oh you know the process of teaching chess like anything else in the sense that it takes a lot of practice and the more you practice it anything better you get at it The benefits benefits happened to be the analytical thinking that goes into it you hope that one as they get better chess they learn to make better life life decisions. You know oftentimes society. You think it's egocentric Canada dominated. You know you'll me. What can I get out of it but the chess? You really have to think about what your opponent is thinking. That's actually how you become a successful chess player. You have to analyze the position. You have a plan but you gotta think about what is your opponents plan plan and that's kind of you know when you're looking at live situations when you do that kind of thing. So hey you know how this situation affect me and others. I think that makes you a better person. In general when you're dealing with people in life situations in life what are you. Get Out of playing chess. What's in it for you beyond winning a match winning a championship? Well as you may have mentioned chess does help with math test scores and it helps you with your critical thinking thinking it can also help you with your life situations knowing what to do and how to pick the right decision and that can help me for sure during High School of course I need those grades to stay. Stay up there but also just knowing win. Pick your battles In what choice. You should do pick the right one. Of course I secure what about for you. Like Imani stated chess hopes with math and I really think it improves my test scores overall and for you tricia and what do you get out of playing chess. Like Imani. Insecure say yes but what I also. WE'LL GET OUTTA test is I guess life lessons. The life lessons that you could learn is all actions have consequences this and also think about something thoroughly before doing it coach luster. Tell us what this means for the school for Saint Ethel Rita. This older students are excited. the school is buzzing community has not just the Alderman but the people in the community of come out the come by to support us and I think is giving the school a big boost In terms of the morale not that the Morales down but certainly just to be excited to galvanize behind the chess team as opposed to the track record flag football or some of that. Those are good there too. But everybody's really at a bus talking chess chess and and they're really excited fairly small school. Ladies through two hundred sixty students now Enrollment was a struggle at one point. And certainly this should be something that'll help increase that. Yeah you don't WanNa turn back to you girls because you talked about sometimes feeling like you're underestimated when you're competing and I think for other young girls who are listening right now. Maybe if they're not playing chess but they're trying something else in feeling underestimated. How do you overcome that feeling and push through To these incredible winds. You've had Imani what I do you is. I remember where I came from. And that's from a family that always said you can do it and from school at always told you you can do it. So Oh those people who always say you can't do it. They're wrong they just don't WANNA lose secure. What about you? I really don't pay much attention to What other other people think at all? I feel like it's a waste of time just to bother listening to that. That's good advice. Tra- Shell what about you for other girls who are listening may be feeling intimidated or feeling like they're being underestimated. How do you overcome that feeling? When you're competing I also agree with she carrot? Like she said you shouldn't pay attention to people who try to drag you down because that's their opinions are quite irrelevant. It's all about what you think and what you believe and also just know that there are girls supporting you like us. Girls support girls coach. You have there been many women Chess Masters I. Oh Yeah we've had women chess grandmasters. Actually the interesting thing is when you however look to just America and we start talking about African American participation chests we only had one African American grandmaster from America. His name is Maurice Ashley from New York and and we've never had a woman chessmaster African American from America. Ever so when you look at these young ladies and you look at the success they're experiencing. Are you hoping that maybe this is the start of a new legacy. I am hoping praying Yes absolutely I'm hoping they can start a new legacy and if it's not one of them they maybe they'll spire someone else to get that goal. Well I WANNA turn to you ladies once again just as we we wrap up here for young people or parents who are listening who maybe look at chess in our little intimidated by it. What would you say to them about? Learning this game treselle likely mentioned before it does help your test scores and also you should join. Parents of girls fulls no matter Outta the gender or race or anything used to just join no get out there. Try something you've never done before probably can make history. What about you? My advice for other people is to play chess because you may not start off liking like I did because because I thought it was boring in white as the years went by I started to like chess so you should continue to play it because it also helps you with your so give it a little bit of time in modern. I'll give you the last word here. In general I believe we need more African American girls to start playing chess African Americans in general as we said before we mostly saw people. Oh not of our race. I believe that chest can definitely do a lotta things all sorts of things especially help you with the way you make decisions that might stop a lot of crime you know choosing the right choice Parents might like that. I would also suggested as they stayed it helping you with your education right. So what's the next step here for the team coach. Well the next step is back to the drawing board. We're practicing on a daily basis and we go onto the nationals. Now now the next big one is in Ohio and that's In April so we're looking forward to that. Is the city of Chicago Championship in February. At McCormick place so practicing daily looking for some more wins that was chess state champions Imani Hill Shakira Luster interest. Shell Williams along with.

chess Shakira Luster Imani Hill Chicago Eric Luster Shell Williams Tra Shell Atra Shell Ethel Arita Lori lightfoot Saint Rita Catholic School Auburn Gresham neighborhood Illinois Rachelle McCormick place Alex Ethel Rita Canada
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

04:30 min | 8 months ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"So for a while. Now we've known that elite athletes leads tend to live longer than the rest of us. And that's really not the big of a surprise but research now shows that elite chess players also have a survival advantage over the general population a team of Australian researchers looked at players from twenty eight countries and specifically over one thousand players who reach international chess grandmaster status over a period of nearly seventy years and then they compared the survival data of those people to fifteen thousand Olympic medalists. And not only. Did they find that. Both groups had significant survival advantages over the general general population but that the difference between the two was not even statistically significant. Wow that's pretty interesting well. Years Ago I remember reading about how you know. Before for the age of the Internet people used to play chess by mail. Or what's called correspondence chess. He'd make a move put that move in the mail and then your opponent would do the same and you go back and forth fourth and Games could take years to play and actually this kind of sounds fun to be able to do this with a friend who lives across the country or whatever but was surprising. Is that even today the US Chess Federation estimates. They have about three thousand members still playing correspondence chess though now. Of course some play by email and they're even tournaments for correspondence. Correspondence chess with rules like each player is given thirty days of reflection time over ten moves to really speed things up. That's I was reading recently. About how chess game popular among captured or wounded soldiers during World War Two. And you know the rules of war so interesting to me. Sometimes you remember learning about the Geneva Conventions dimensions which are often thought of today is sort of the way war crimes are defined but one thousand nine hundred and nine the third convention set out how prisoners of war would be treated so in addition to how prisoners would be treated physically it also had sections on recreation stated that the captors should encourage the intellectual diversions and sports organized by Prisoners Four. which makes it not that surprising that a quiet game that could take hours days to play and and was understood around the world could take off in a time like this so organizations like the Red Cross would even send chestnuts around the world to prisoners where there were even Organiz chess tournaments and worse so weird but I do think that one aspect is pretty cool? Yeah aren't we mentioned earlier. The similarities between elite athletes and chess players. Well did you know that. The World Chess Federation actually conducts drug tests. And they do do this pretty routinely and this because there's a push for it to be part of the twenty twenty Olympics and so this is actually required by the I. O. C. But there are some interesting things studies around the effects of so called smart drugs on the ability to play chess now specifically drugs like modafferi nil and Ritalin so by definition Nella drive. We've talked about actually in episode bacchus. It's been quite a while. But it's commonly used to help with sleep disorders and religion is commonly used a tree things like ADHD and the findings from some of the studies on these players was really interesting because weirdly players on a smart drugs. Were often losing more games than those who were not taking these but this was actually because the players on that we're taking more time per move and just running out of time so once they took the time out is a factor. They found that these players were actually playing better so it was one of the researchers. Put it these substances may be able to convert fast and shallow thinkers into a deeper but somewhat slower thinkers This really interesting. Well we talked about how long chess has been around and I was reading about some of the oldest strategy books on chess and in this one from way back in fifteen sixty one had some pretty awesome advice. The book suggest strategies such as playing with your back to the sun. Why because that could blind your opponent opponent also suggest that if you're playing by a fire at night you use your hand to create a shadow over the board so that your opponent won't be able to see his pieces clearly? Wow how you know. I had a couple of facts about weird chess tournaments and a couple of other things but looking over there at tristen and seeing the size of the smirk on his face. I've never seen the big because I know he loves this fact because he loves to play dirty whenever he competes dirties dirty guy. But anyway I'm going to have to stop us there and give you today's trophy. Mango thank you so much. Well I well. If you've got any great stories about chess or any facts about chess that we may have left out today. We always love to hear those from mm you can email us part time genius. How stuff works dot com or you can always hit us up on facebook or twitter for from Gabe Tristan Mango and me? Thanks so much for listening..

chess US Chess Federation World Chess Federation Gabe Tristan Mango ADHD Olympics Red Cross facebook tristen Organiz twitter
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

08:56 min | 8 months ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"It is that I actually cut the town's food subsidies to help pay for this fifty million dollar complex so now is really just a monument to the local governments disregard for its citizens. And that's kind of a bummer. But you know I I don't WanNa dwell on all these neglectful politicians or even the alien invasions as weird as that story was and I. I feel like we should talk about a few stories. That are little more upbeat. What do you think I'm for for? I A quick break from from the new this time tomorrow podcast available now on the iheartradio APP. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Join us as we explore a future full of possibilities in the age of five G.. I dream will be that as the technology is better with five G. THE NBA on in the future east to actually transmitted. What they asked us are looking Through the helmets and they will be following an astronaut's as they step into the surface of the moon. So imagine what it will be. I mean just think of it for a minute. We will be there with this time. Tomorrow is presented by t mobile for business today. T. Mobile is leading the five G.. Charged with thirty billion dollars invested in an advanced network designed to deliver the breadth of mobility. We need businesses changing. Learn more at T. mobile for business. Dot Com. Hey this just in. It's officially fall. Means a lot of things to a lot of different people changing colors time to break out the pumpkins break out the football most most importantly break out my friends at truly hard seltzer truly has only one hundred calories but as five percent ab in only one gram of sugar per container. It's that can't miss drink of the seasons of pickup and try really hard seltzer today. Truly Drake what you truly want. What okay well so chess may not be your best? Oh first stemming off this alien invasion but the game still has a whole lot going for it like plenty of studies of show that playing chess can improve your focus. It can help you. Hone your decision making skills. Then of course it's a great way to strengthen your memory especially if you play it blindfolded I before we get to the mental benefits. Let's talk about some of the more surprising things we found out about the game. And maybe we'd never noticed before you know. One thing that stood out to me is how resilient the game is like it stands up to scrutiny more than just about any other game out there are people over. The years have tried to solve chess for for decades and decades but the game always seems to allude them. I mean there's always another move. You never considered a new way to win or even lose at chess and remember. That's true even after we built computers specifically designed to decode the game and released select the best possible move for millions and millions of different scenarios. Isn't he's not exactly what it means to salt chest like if we're able to compute every possible sequence of moves and counter moves and all these different forms of match can take then. Isn't the game effectively solved. That's actually the thing because even if you had the most powerful computer in the world it still wouldn't be able to calculate all the unique games that could be played late and this just seems unimaginable but the possibilities just scale up way too quickly so for example after both players have moved one time in a game of chess there are four hundred possible board setups but after the second of the turns the number of possible game shoots up to just under two hundred thousand now after three moves there are one hundred. Twenty one million possible outcomes and so on and so on until you get to the current best estimate for the total possible number of chess games which is a staggering ten to the one hundred and twentieth power so to put that number in perspective just a little bit. There was a great breakdown on that I've found from popular science. And here's what it says. There are only ten to the fifteenth. Total hairs on all the human heads in the world tend to the twenty-third grains of sand on earth and about ten to the eighty first atoms in the universe. Typical Chess Games is many times as great as all those numbers multiplied together an impressive feat for thirty two wooden pieces lined up on a board. That is unbelievable. You know when you look back at the kind of like endless complexity of the game you know I. It's really no wonder it gives our brains such a workout and actually read the study from a while back that found that experts who play chess actually used both sides of the brain. Well solving chess problems and not just the analytical right side. Oh well but this only happens in. I'm I'm guessing like really experienced players. That's right it's the researchers gathered eight international chess players and then eight novice players and they took. FM is brain scans while the subjects work their way through two different tasks and I identified geometrical shapes and then they had to determine whether or not the pieces on the chessboard. Were in a check situation. And the result from these tests tests were really unexpected. Because they showed that while the novice players had only used the left side of the brain to process this task the expert players had used both sides of the brain so this the lead researcher explained quote. Once the usual brain structures were engaged the experts utilized additional complementary structures in the other half to execute processes in perilla Carollo. Wow so did this dual processing improve the experts performance at all yet it actually made them much quicker at solving chess problems than novices. Where but it is is worth noting that the parallel processing only occurred during the chest problems and not during that geometry tasks so it really seems like all the extra practice that the experts had given their brains was was this nice boost but only when it came to chess? You know. It's interesting to hear that because I was actually reading about how playing a lot of chess can actually be a detriment to player sometimes sometimes rather than being beneficial to them and has on. What's because of something called the Einstein effect which scientific American describes as the brain's Raines tendency to stick with solutions? It already knows rather than look for potentially superior ones so scientists researching this effect really love using chess. Players says subjects. And that's because they provide a really clear way to see the effect inaction so as an example of this. Some studies present master chess players where the chessboard that has due to possible solutions. You've got this well known maneuver. That can win the game in five moves and a less common but actually much faster three step solution so the players were told to win the match in as few moves as possible but once they had spotted this familiar five step strategy they actually seemed unable to recognize the much quicker solution. And it wasn't that three step move was really obscure or anything like that but because those same players were actually presented with a similar setup for the three step move was the only way to win and then in that scenario the players recognize the strategy right away so in that first experiment it really was the Einstein long effect effect at work. And you know the players weren't able to see any of the other options because they have this cognitive bias for the move. They knew best really fascinating but I also like that even chessmaster can learn something to do better the next time around because like there are that many possibilities like I should think that's why so many schools invest in their own. Chess programs. I it's one of those rare hobbies that I can boost your cognitive ability while also teaching these coping skills like how to win or lose gracefully. Although I do have to say the one time my son got hit at school. It was in his first grade chess club and he came home with dirt on his face. And I was like Henry. How how that happened and he kinda gleefully said Oh? I took the second graders queen so so he kicked me in the face. Seems like he was okay with that he'd rather win. And there are so many places. He says where they're teaching. It really young kids like in Armenia. For instance chess is actually a required subject for every kid who's six years older and that's kind of awesome either even though it probably means the poor math teachers wound up pulling double duty and teaching chess as well right. Yeah but I have a feeling. It's worth it to them anyway. Because Armenian teacher explain chess trains seems logical thinking it teaches how to make decisions. Trains Memories Strengthens Willpower motivates children to win and teaches them how to deal with defeat. It's the only only school subject that can do all of this. I really love that idea. Well how about we knock out this fact off and then get Tristan. Show some of his opening moves. He's been perfecting.

Chess NBA t mobile perilla Carollo T. Mobile football researcher Tristan Raines Armenia Henry
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:05 min | 8 months ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Part time genius. Production of iheartradio. Guess we'll what's that mega so I was reading the story about the chess player. Bobby Fisher this week. This is when he was young and I guess he'd won a US championship at the time so he was famous but he was also just a kid and he didn't have that much money and you know he's kind of a recluse right. Yeah actually I'd read that. He used to play secretly online like later in his life and there was always so much buzz when somebody thought they noticed his style of play and thought they were onto it and that they discover that it was him. Yeah if you'd see that Papa from Japan or Malaysia or wherever there's just like so excited to have played Bobby Fisher think they've played five Fisher but anyway anyway he's young at this time he wants to go see a movie and he doesn't have money for so he walks into the chess and checker club of New York just to pick up a few extra bucks a hassle it right and I guess at the time it was this. This large smoke-filled crowded pool hall type place but for chess and bobby's totally in disguise. He's got a rank. Oh He's got his collar up sunglasses a hat. He looks ridiculous but does not want to be noticed right so he asked a friend like do you think you can just get me into a game and a friend asked the Owner across the bar and remembered smoke filled and like five as in disguise so the owner goes. Tell him no. He's just a kid. hustlers will eat him alive until like Bobby Fischer is furious and he just stops out and this is all reported. This is a real story but when his friend tells the owner who it was that it was Bobby Fisher who wanted the game. Apparently the whole crowd at the place has this audible Groan. I bet and this one guy goes oh man I would have paid hundreds of dollars just to sit across awesome Bobby Fisher on. ESPN okay anyway. So I I don't know much about Chas but I do love stories about it and we're GONNA get into the most dangerous styles of chess. How's the game moved from the battlefield to the Royal Court and even why getting a billion people to play chess might be our best hope to keep away aliens? Let's dig.

Bobby Fisher chess US Papa Royal Court Chas New York ESPN Japan Malaysia
"chess" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

11:50 min | 8 months ago

"chess" Discussed on ESPN Daily

"Aw So grandmasters today. i-e-she they're no longer smoking and drinking and partying well tonight. which by the way is a whole tangent? I would love to hear about some other time. Treating chess like any other sport their training for it with great discipline and you spent spent time with a couple of these masters in rural Missouri. What can you tell me about them? They have these strict diets that the raid. They they have salad bar. Shrimp beef stew mashed potatoes. They want to get protein carbs and fat in the right amount so their body league sort of like preps for the amount they go through during the course of tournament but the other thing. That's really interesting. is they go into these intense detox. More when Fabio Kawana you WanNa pay the world championship. Last year he Stop drinking three months before the tournament began like he like He. He was studying me how it was his birthday. He still decided not to even have a glass of wine because he realized that he needed to like shock his body into sort of listening into him so they have these like really intense food desmond that they follow. It's quite crazy. He put together an elaborate dietary Terry and workout regimen. How did you go about doing that? This was also a crazy thing right so before big tournaments you know what he does. He sort of Takes himself out of the real world so he'll drive three hours from Saint Louis to like the middle of nowhere misery. Find like a cabin Find find a few chess grandmasters who are also free available to come with him and he will chart out a week before the tournament would. He would intensely intensely physically strain and also prepped for the tournament. So he'll do our running in the morning and then he'll eat his breakfast and then he'll play a six hours so mocked ornaments and then he do half hour basketball and our tennis and a place in our swimming. After does he have people helping being with us. Yes so so. He has a training partner. WHO's Romanian grandmaster Christian Jarallah and so he also sort of looks like a soccer player and has these like he does like two hours of cardio everyday lives a lot of ways to build muscle mass because muscle mass is the first thing that you lose when you stop working out and have long hours of sitting and playing chess games while not eating as much much as you should be and so Christian and Fob He worked together the prep for the harm. How common is this sort of intense the physical regimen amok chess grandmasters? It's becoming quite common so India's first grandmaster wish another Annand love him to pieces he's phenomenal. He just hours of cardio every night just to tire himself out. So he doesn't dream about chess and then jury ladas at least an hour of cardio cardio an hour waits to build Muslims before armaments and Reuss. Tom Who is also an a a grandma's trains with FOB. He he Ten basketball every day And he drinks only during tournaments to sort of like prep his body to be caffeine and sugar carefree FOB. Yano is the number to chess player in the world. Number one is the world champion. The bad boy the sport as you said. Magnus Carlsen does he have a similar workout routine so Kalson is sort of the you the best example. He has figured that out down to the very last detail like before tournaments will work out for hours even on treadmills. He'll you hours of yoga. He plays soccer with his friends And he before the world championship last year he went skiing everyday and tweeted that it strengthened his legs and his willpower to get to the finish line and he has a personal chef whose name was also magnus weirdly and he travels with him everywhere Making sure that he eat the right amount of proteins and carbs and calcium and during games the crazy thing that he's perfected the way he sits so he'll sit at an angle that's not so with. His neck is not to crane so the oxygen supply is perfect from your heart. You're from his heart to his brain He Chews Gum during games to increase his brain function And because chewing gum doesn't really you don't lose any energy but your brain is constantly active. And he stops his leg legs rhythmically to make sure that his brain and body or alert To the move so he he has sort of perfected. Every single aspect of the physical game has magnus always. He's been this attentive to his body. Well it's interesting so he Why he has been constantly perfecting the way he plays the game on and off the board right but he hasn't adopted some new strategies for example he was a big orange juice drinker? rinker during Games. So he'll have an glass of orange juice which he so. It's half orange juice and half water next to him at all times and suddenly a few years ago we stopped seeing oranges. And there was this huge thing on twitch. Where everybody's like? Where's the oranges? What happened to it and So like side note we crazy things that people focus on And so he so. Apparently something was he was feeling off about the last hour of games He was feeling slightly more fatigue so he went to the Olympic training think centre in Norway and the told him that The orange juice was causing problems And so he sort of figured out a new day said he he should have something that has little more calcium and less sugar and so he now drinks a combination of chocolate milk and plain milk during tournaments. So I see Magnus about to play in a big tournament in Moscow starts Christmas Day. Fob Janos not in this one but is he gaining in any ground on magnus. Are they going to be meeting anytime soon. In a clash of the titans. Interestingly so Magnus played and won eight consecutive tournaments and then dropped ten games at a competition in August and he even confessed to constantly doubting himself And and this might be exactly what FOB needs to. You know sort of perfect the last few things that he can and go out and beat him and they'll they'll definitely meet in the world. Championships goes magnus. Carlsen is defending champion. so He's automatically qualified. And if bobby keeps doing what he's doing and and makes it to the candidates tournament which is how which is if you win. The tournament is how you make it into the World Championship There's a good chance that magnus can finally be taken down so I after doing all of this reporting in learning all these very surprising details about chess has it changed the way you think about the game absolutely and I. I play a little bit myself. I used to have long arguments with friends about chest if if chess sport. If it's a game like how do we want to talk about it. But after the reporting process I was like Oh my goodness chess is absolutely sport and chess is absolutely brutal on your body and your rain And it's definitely I respect these players so much more. Just because of the amount of time they put into trying to figure out how their body and their brains sort of meet and where they need to focus their energy on right that to me is sort of dedication that I love about sports so now I definitely you gain perspective on how I talk about chess. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for having me coming up. Not Everything is Sonny Jacksonville these days goodbye. Twenty nine thousand nine hundred goodbye windows. Seven Dell's holiday. Sales are the perfect nick. Time to say hello to twenty twenty a windows. Ten upgrade save big under latest business computers powered by Intel core processors don't forget to shop servers servers storage and thousands of top brand electronics. All with free shipping call a small business technology advisor to help you find the right tech- for Your Business Needs at eight hundred. Seventy seven buy Dell. That's eight seven seven by Dell or visit Dell dot com slash business deals. Here's another story. I want you to know. I don't know if it's because of the good place or my general sympathy for small market teams or because I- inexplicably think radiant helmets are kind of fun fact that a tribute to growing up in the nineties. But I've always had a soft spot for the Jacksonville. Jaguars US which is why. I was distraught to read reports this week that the justice team has a culture problem according to an NFL PA statement. An arbitrator ruled that Jacksonville had unfairly ordered players to do their off-season Rehab at the Jaguars facility and they were wrong to discipline them for disobeying their will so the AP's mark long reports the Jacksonville find defensive. End and former first round draft pick Dante Fowler. Junior who's now on. La Rams seven seven hundred thousand dollars which thanks to this ruling. He no longer owes now story of troubling. Because it doesn't seem like a one off issue back in two thousand seventeen when former giants GM. Tom Coughlin was brought in to run football operations. Reports began to emerge agents in players felt he was overreaching and his off season. Coughlin criticized Star cornerback. Jalen Ramsey and linebacker telvised Smith for missing voluntary offseason workouts voluntary. Being the key word here afterwards Smith went on to skip this season for personal reasons and Ramsey Ramsay who like fowler is also on the rams now made it clear that he wanted out when the latest news broke. Ramsey tweeted. Tried to tell. y'All and Alan Robson another former Jag star. Who is no longer? The team wrote back with a series of laugh crying emojis. That's how I describe them going to the NFL PA more than twenty five percent of the grievances filed by player since two thousand seventeen have been against the Jaguars. Now there's no no way of knowing what those numbers mean. They could all have been filed by few players and of course guys. Don't get resigned by a team. Do have reason to be upset. Set but a starting point all this adds up as the NFL. PA pointed out in their statement. Free agents notice these issues when they pick their future homes and if Jacksonville to stay relevant they'll have to get their house in order and maybe bring back those helmets weather climbs in this has been E._s._p._N.. Daily I'll talk.

Magnus Carlsen Jacksonville Dell FOB NFL Jaguars basketball soccer Tom Coughlin La Rams Fabio Kawana Missouri Dante Fowler Saint Louis Alan Robson Tom Who India titans Jalen Ramsey
"chess" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

Marketing Secrets

11:28 min | 11 months ago

"chess" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

"Hey everybody is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the marketing secrets podcast today. We're GONNA talk some strategy so the big question. Is this how we're entrepreneurs like us. He didn't cheat and take on venture capital for spending money from our own pockets. How do we market in a way the lets us get our products x and our services and the things that we believe in out to the world and yet still remain froth that is the question in this podcast will give you the answer. Brunson and welcome marketing secrets all right so I don't even know how or where to go with this podcast episode other than I have been having so much fun recently watching the great great strategic minds play chess in their business what I mean by that for first off Lemme Lemme and and give us a glimpse. What's happening behind the scenes with me? I can't give you all details unfortunately but I'm GonNa give you some hints. See you'll be able to see as I am playing chess over the next next six to nine months. I'm making some very big. Strategic decisions things that on the outside will look stupid like why did you do that. Russell that doesn't make any logical percents and it won't from the outside looking in but an inside looking out. They're all very strategic chestnuts. I'm moving a piece here and moving something here changes. It'll be here while you're able to see the movement of the Chesapeake. My guess is you will not be able to understand the overall strategy for awhile and I ah I wish I could tell it all to you but I am someday can write a book about this whole thing so sometimes strategically move chess piece somewhere in some of the men's check check meeting use. I'm hoping that doesn't happen so I'm not calling. My shop is GONNA be flawless but I'm definitely moving from chess pieces around but it's all very strategic. I'm excited to kind of see what happens from in the growth and the changes in the I'm sure initially I'm gonNA. I'M GONNA probably offensive. People obsessed people loosen customers in the short term but long term it's they essential movements of things need to happen for the company to grow and for the value of the company to exponentially grow so like. I said some things won't make sense right away but I'm for example quick funnels to their five-year birthdays coming up in our five year birthday. I'm doing some announcing of some stuff nancy of things that are disappearing from click funnels and some announcing things that are being added into click funnels and they're very strategic and it's funny as I was like making some of these. Iot Jitka moves in fact. Let me back Ucla birthday at funnel hacking live the sheer. You'll see the next set of strategic moves happening and then on my birthday march eighth eighth you will potentially be seeing next up strategic moves so there's three dates for you to look at your calendar to see that see the chess pieces moving in a why are you looking looking in our thinking strategically me like why is he doing this. What's the reasoning and so I said that those are the things that are happening but there's a lot of thought going we into him and and it's kind of fun so what's been fun for me. Recently is like I've been looking at the people I respect people that are doing cool. Things people are having momentum in what their their business and and some people will just get lucky but most people are strategically moving chess pieces around to do different things and so it's really fun and interesting to watch and it was kind of interesting as I was trying to decide if I should make some of these strategic moves I got really nervous and I had this weird impression to message Garrett White. I mean Gary J white so I must say it right message Garrett and told him a little about what's going on in his tenure with them and then we start talking back and forth through text message and then he told me what he's doing strategic and it was like super similar I was it was Kinda crazy how enlightenment we were like the moves. He's making his business news. I making my business. It's kind kind of fun and it's like. Oh my gosh I would have thought you were crazy but now the strategy behind it. I'm like Oh my gosh. You're actually brilliant. This is so cool and some watch that I've been watching there's someone who I had a chance to get snow a year ago through through instagram and it's Nicole Arbour me no her she she made a video back back on a four or five years ago called deer fat people in crazy viral shell out hey for a lot of people loved it and but regardless create a lot of noise and and I it was fascinating to watch watch her. Do that a couple years ago and it's kind of an interest what's her strategy. Why is she doing. She's GonNa make a lot of people angry. Some people happy like what's the reasoning but she's very strategic in her her thinking in the move that she makes fascinating so I watched over the last two weeks or so and again watching her strategically do her so she made this video he has seen it. I'm talking about J Shetty and and Kinda calling him out on while the stuff that he had plagiarized and and stuff like that and she put this thing out their crazy viral on on you know on facebook instagram I don't know probably from as well but between all of them got tons of us and it was interesting because then you get and I know we're all having a chance to watch the strategic chess pieces after the fact right. Nothing goes viral. It's like Oh my gosh and and you see what she's trying to do. She's trying to to get Jada. Stop doing these things right and so I'm not going to comment on that at all because that's beside the point where I'm talking about now which means that video and then a few days later she started seeing like I'm about to do my next big video to expose the next person when expose does I think oh my gosh like like is this a strategy ago exposed to people like what she do. Strategic I want to figure out happening inside of remind them watching this and she's building coming up to it and she didn't in stores everything talk about it's coming. It's coming and then boom. She launches it and the next expose is about this person she can talk to the person who it is and they all the bad the things that people say about this person and he says that person's actually me and it was fascinating because to basically air dirty laundry put out all the stuff that someone contentiously say about about her put out there in what was what was what was cool was like it took the wind out of anybody. WHO's trying to retaliate and attack back against her because she's like there it is like and she didn't expose herself which was really fascinating to see and it was like oh my gosh and anyway just put that out there and that was the the next video picked up steam. There's momentum right the first video in the second video next. Expose the expertise actually about her. It was like the next fascinating the video in in the sequence and then and then she did another one exposing somebody. WHO's trying to expose her and it was just fascinated watching these different the different strategic moves. I don't know the end goal where she's trying to check mate who or what's going to happen but it's been fascinating watching as they're happening in catching and I'm like oh my gosh like this is the strategy is using to get attention and to get views and to build a brand like whatever the things are right and actually messes my entire social media team on on on Saturday. It's like I WANNA make she's watching this and and not you know like I'm having all ears. Watch it for the content that they can't. That's cool like that's not my purpose like strategically watch what she's doing. She's leveraging the momentum of one video to the next to the next and and and I was like what do we have. We think nick how do I make it slipped my instagram. I you buy whatever we're not just random things. We're putting out there but there's like momentum and it's moving towards strategically something happening to build the pressure to build the noise to get from Point A. B. C. and move people through this this journey and his conversation you. I think one of my flaws and social media points been everything's very much one often. Here's the thing that we're doing. Here's the thing we're doing can come in and out we talk about the thing whereas psych we would if we turn this into a conversation what if we turned it into multi series events that are pulling somebody from from thing to thing to think and and causing controversy momentum away now. I think I am a very controversial. I don't I don't seek for that. I don't think my videos does need to be controversial like Nicole's were necessarily but conceptually strategically. How do I create that in my in in the in the voice that I haven't social media so anyway I hope he has a watching the game. Watch the people at the highest level there playing watch what they're doing and how they're doing in and you know. We're always we're always seeing things. In hindsight the person makes the strategic move and we seed afterwards but start watching inserting not like why do they do that. What was the purpose. Why did that video happen you. Why did this thing happen here. Russell announced this. Why are they launching this now. What are the pieces. Why did they pull this away. They would've what what's the. What's the purpose. I think yes start looking at that. you'll start really enjoying. It's really fun. one of my favorite podcasts is podcast called business wars and it's it's fun because it's almost like a produced podcasts casts were they pick two businesses were at war and then produced like seventy episodes and tell you the story behind this this business war and this is on hindsight though because you see it's already happened right so it's like back versus. This is p. C. Apple versus me macro SPEC- Adidas versus Nike Marvel versus DC paper versus Ebay all these business wars the happened and you watch him and tells you all the strategic moves and they make you're seeing all hindsight rights superfund in fact. I think I told at the last time I spoke. I told everybody that like they. They should drop out of school and just listen to businesses that gives you history and business like all wrapped in one super entertaining podcast but I digress I like. I like listening because as you can hear the strategy that that happened in the past in history the made these companies they are but like they were all sitting having this opportunity. It's like it's like watch as as companies are strategically doing things to build themselves right now like we're living like we're in the middle of it he law in Moscow Center and test like Elon Musk if if you know he files all these patents for the Tesla and for these battery operated cars and he's doing the thing and then also he's like hey I'm an open source and give access to everybody for free and you're like wait why would you do that doesn't make any sense like this. Is Your your intellectual properties. I'm going to open source to give it to everybody in every can build upon it and then what's GonNa happen because of that other people are going to fund the building of this huge. You know all of the charging stations across America 'cause I can't fund that by myself open source the patents Gabriel's building on right now. We can all build this. This network is essential for my company to survive. which is this these charging stations and open it up and boom now? That's what kind of happened happened so she's like it's so fascinating and fun to watch these strategic decisions ones that happened this happening on click finals birthday next to in like two weeks from now. I told Myron golden and I love Myron when my favorite people ever and explain it to them the next day came back to do you realize what you're doing here. I Smile Mike what tell me and he said when you do this what's going to happen like can smells like you already knew that or Mike. That's the strategy. That's the chest moving again on the outside. You'll see the move then. We stop and think like why what's the reason. What's he trying to do here. What's the purpose and hopefully have fun watching as we go so that's got back the off to get some work done today. I've spent the book tonight so this is the end of the traffic secrets book you guys admitting it to the publisher who is due.

Russell Brunson instagram chess Nicole Arbour Garrett White Myron golden Lem Mike Jada Chesapeake Jitka nancy publisher Ebay J Shetty Gary J Elon Musk A. B. C.
"chess" Discussed on MIX 104.1

MIX 104.1

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"chess" Discussed on MIX 104.1

"Chess. What? Manifested supports sweats. Orgies been. Caps Faouzi like. You. Which is. Let me tell you now. Following. Thank refuse. Now. So. Blouse simple Clark. Ronda. Oh. Tuesday morning went back with another drama film. Paternity? Eight fifteen AM sharp. Plus, we're still going strong with our twelve a day giveaway. Your first text the.

Clark Chess.
"chess" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"chess" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Old phrase that as and you'll win from chess. Scott. I look up and. Overcomplicate? Me. Point seven kids. There are things you share on social media. And then there are things you share with like five people you trust in a group. Text. Was..

Scott chess
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"So for one we've known that elite athletes tend to live longer than the rest of us. And that's really not the big of a surprise. But research now shows that elite chess players also have a survival advantage over the general population a team of Australian researchers looked at players from twenty eight countries and specifically over a thousand players who reach international chess grandmaster status over a period of nearly seventy years, and then they compared the survival data of those people to fifteen thousand Olympic medalists and not only did they find that both groups had significant survival advantages over the general population. But that the difference between the two was not even statistically significant. Oh, wow. That's pretty interesting years ago. I remember reading about how you know before the age of the internet people used to play chess by mail or what's called correspondence chess. He'd make a move that move in the mail, and then your opponent would do the same. And you'd go back and forth and games could take years to play. And actually, this kind of sounds fun to be able to. To do this with a friend who lives across the country, or whatever. But was the pricing is that even today, the US Chess Federation estimates they have about three thousand members still playing correspondence chess though for some play by Email, and they're even tournaments for correspondence chess with rules like each player is given thirty days of reflection. Time over ten moves to really speed things up. So I was reading recently about how chest gain popular among captured or wounded soldiers during World War Two, and you know, the rules of war. So interesting to me, sometimes you remember learning about the Geneva conventions, which are often thought of today is the way war crimes are defined. But one thousand nine hundred nine the third convention set out how prisoners of war would be treated. So in addition to how prisoners would be treated physically it also had sections on recreation and stated that the captors should encourage the intellectual diversions and sports organized by prisoners of war, which makes it not that surprising that a quiet game that could take hours days to play. And was understood around the world could take off in a time like this so organizations like the Red Cross would even send chestnuts around the world to prisoners where there were even organized chess tournaments and worse so weird. But I do think that one aspect is pretty cool. Yeah. We mentioned earlier the similarities between elite athletes and players. Well, did you know that the world Chess Federation, actually? Conducts drug tests, and they do this pretty routinely and this because there's a push for it to be part of the twenty twenty Olympics. And so this is actually required by the I. But there are some interesting studies around the effects of so-called smart drugs on the ability to play chess now specifically drugs like modafferi, nil and Ritalin so but definitely is a drug. We've talked about actually in episode Bacchus. It's been quite a while. But it's common use to help with sleep disorders and religion is commonly used to treat things like ADHD and the findings from some of the studies on these players was really interesting because weirdly players on the smart drugs were often losing more games than those who were not taking these was actually because the players on that were taking more time per move and just running out of time. So once they took the time out as a factor, they found that these players were actually playing better. So it was one of the researchers put it these substances may be able to convert. Fast and shallow thinkers into deeper but somewhat slower thinkers, this really interesting. Well, we talked about how long chess has been around. And I I was reading about some of the oldest strategy books on chess and this one from way back in fifteen sixty one had some pretty awesome advice, the book suggest strategies such as playing with your back to the sun. Why because that could blind your opponent also suggest that if you're playing by a fire at night, you use your hand to create a shadow over the board. So that your opponent won't be able to see his pieces. Clearly, wow, I had a couple of facts about weird chess tournaments and a couple of other things. But looking over there at tristen and seeing the size of the smirk on his face. I've never seen him. Because I know he loves this fact because he loves to play dirty whenever he competes he plays..

US Chess Federation chess world Chess Federation tristen ADHD Red Cross Olympics seventy years thirty days
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Exactly. What? It means the salt chest like if we're able to compute every possible sequence of moves and counter moves and all these different forms of match can take then isn't the game effectively solved. I mean, that's actually the thing. Because even if you had the most powerful computer in the world, it still wouldn't be able to calculate all the unique games that could be played. And this just seems unimaginable. But the possibilities just scale up way too quickly. So for example, after both players have moved one time in a game of chess there are four hundred possible boards setups. But after the second of the turns the number of possible game shoots up to just under two hundred thousand now after three moves there are one hundred twenty one million possible outcomes and so on and so on until you get to the current best estimate for the total possible number of chess games, which is a staggering ten to the one hundred twentieth. Power. So to put that number in perspective just a little bit. There was a great breakdown that I've found. From popular science. And here's what it says. There are only ten to the fifteenth total hairs on all the human heads in the world tend to the twenty-third grains of sand on earth and about ten to the eighty first atoms in the universe. Typical chess games is many times as great as all those numbers multiplied together unimpressive feat for thirty two wooden pieces lined up on a board. That is unbelievable. You know when you look back at the kind of like endless complexity of the game. You know, I it's really no wonder that it gives our brains such a workout, and I actually read the study from a while back that found that experts who play chess actually, use both sides of the brain, well solving chess problems and not just the analytical right side. Oh, well, but this only happens in I'm guessing like really experienced players. That's right. The researchers gathered eight international chess players and then eight novice players, and then they took FM is brain scans while subjects work their way through two different tests and first anti identified geometrical shapes and then they had to determine whether or not the pieces on the chessboard were in a check situation and the results from these tests were really unexpected because they showed that while the novice players had only used a left side of the brain to process. This task to expert players had used both sides of the brain. So this is what the lead researcher explained, quote, once the usual brain structures were engaged the experts utilized additional complementary structures into other half too. Execute processes in parallel. Wow. So did this dual processing improve the experts performance at all. Yeah. It actually made them much quicker at solving the chest problems than novices wear, but it is worth noting that the parallel processing only occurred during the chest problems and not during that geometry task. So it really seems like all the extra practice that the experts had given their brains was this nice boost. But only when it came to chess. You know, it's interesting to hear that because I was actually reading about how playing a lot of chess can actually be a detriment to player sometimes like RA rather than being beneficial to them and has what's because of something called the Einstein long effect which scientific American describes as the brain's tendency to stick with solutions. It already knows rather than look for potentially superior ones..

chess researcher
"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"chess" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Guess what will what's that mango? So I was reading the story about the chess player Bobby Fisher this week. This is when he was young, and I guess he'd won a US championship at the time. So he was famous, but he was also just a kid, and he didn't have that much money. And you know, he's kind of a recluse, right? Actually, I'd read that he used to play secretly online like later in his life. And there was always so much buzz. When somebody thought they noticed his style of play and thought they were onto it. And that they discovered that it was him. Yeah. I feel like you'd see that pop up from like Japan or Malaysia wherever there's just like so excited if played Bobby Fisher think they've played five Fisher. But so anyway, he's young at this time he wants to go see a movie, and he doesn't have money for. So he walks into the chess and checker club of New York just to pick up a few extra bucks. I guess to hostile right, right? And I guess at the time it was this this large smoke-filled crowded pool hall type place, but for chess and bobby's totally in disguise. He's got. Ranko? He's got his collar up sunglasses and a hat. He looks ridiculous. But does not want to be noticed. Right. So yes, a friend like do you think he can just get me into a game and a friend asked the owner across the bar and remember it's smoke filled and like five as in disguise. So the owner goes tell him. No, he's just a kid. The hustlers will eat him alive. Until like, Bobby Fischer is furious, and he just stomps out. Right. And this is all reported. This is a real story. But when his friend tells the owner who it was that it was Bobby Fisher who wanted to game apparently the whole crowd at the place has this audible groan, I bet and this one guy goes, oh, man. I would have paid hundreds of dollars just to sit across from Bobby Fisher on no kidding anyway. So I don't know much about chest. But I do love stories about it. And we're gonna get into the most dangerous styles of chess. How the game moved from the battlefield to the Royal court. And even why getting a billion people to play chess might be our best hope to keep away. 'lions? Let's dig in. Podcast listeners. Welcome to part time genius. I'm well Pearson. And his always I'm joined by my good friend, man, gosh, how ticket and on the other side of the soundproof glass writing down a list of chess openings, he's trying to master could actually can you read what he's got on the whiteboard over there, mango. Yeah. He's got the hillbilly attack. The monkeys burn hippopotamus defence does something called the toilet variation. He's. Definitely. Yeah. Definitely says toilet variation..

Bobby Fisher chess US New York Royal court Pearson Japan Malaysia
"chess" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"chess" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Nine hundred. Six at the age of eighty one. But during her lifetime, she was one of the most influential chess champions of the Soviet era. In one thousand nine hundred twenty eight. She placed fifth in the Moscow women's championship and in the early nineteen fifties. She became the second women's world chess champion. All very interesting except her proudest achievement was saving hundreds of children during the bloody siege of Leningrad in World War Two, Susan, Paul Garza world chess champion herself, and a chess grandmaster. I kinda got to the thumbnail sketch of Ludmilla Rodamco Susan, where was she born? How did you become a champion chess player? Well, Mr. Danko was born in today's territory of Ukraine, and then later moved to the Russian territories of Moscow. And I guess Leningrad as well. She was very influential in her era, and it's pretty remarkable that the she was never really a Professional Chess player. As I understand. But she was an economic planner in the Soviet days and she became world champion in her mid forties, which is highly unusual by today's standards. For example, I became the number one player in the world when I was only fifteen by times are different. There were no computers, not acknowledgee no information like there is today. So it's much quicker that development of chess players today. That's how we see young chess players, even at a tender age of twelve in grandmasters, how much was sexism kind of holding a Ludmila Rodamco back at the time. Oh, I'm sure a lot. I mean, even in my early days in the seventies and eighties, I have to face it the on a day to day basis and to some degree event today. But in those days, forget sexism to and everything that she had to endure. And that was so much lack of approachability for. Women or support or so much discrimination. It's remarkable that she had the strength and the motivation on the desire to excel in such a male dominated sport. Do you know how she was perceived by her male peers at the time? I very well, no, because I have traveled to the civic in multiple times, and I talked to people who knew her and and even other champions who came after her, and it was just such a dismissal. So to say, at in those days in her time about the mini chess that Olbermann can play chess. And in fact, part of the reason why vehement didn't get very far in chess because the constant discouragment and dismissal. And unlike, of course, Unity's and route. In fact, that's worth the I tried to change throughout my life and my career now to my foundation. So we'll get to that in a second. But what about Ludmila Rodamco. Fired you? Well, it expired inspired me that she stood up in a male dominated field when it was not popular at there was only run out of women before her romantic who we all know about the first women's while champion who did that, and then the World War Two broke out. And there were no Bill championships ever. Renault competitions for remain Ethel. And so she was the first one. It's always hard to be a pioneer in whatever you do and excel at..

Ludmila Rodamco chess Mr. Danko Leningrad Ludmilla Rodamco Susan Moscow Ethel Ukraine Olbermann Bill Paul Garza
"chess" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"chess" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Chess phil to still the freestyle dope please be my shit that we freestyler some fans twenty criticize me and the money in the fame hit me accidents many last white perfect like this still smell the all of these all these trucks for for fees for the seeing when they came here when i speak i was clash still what's fair street fifth feet on streets with the race in the middle of laying down what your freak speaking on your pillow.

"chess" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"chess" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Chess is not typically thought of in this light but there is no due process and the way they put this together thrown together and and they have boosted through the through the surprise or lack thereof the shelf servants public service their shelf servants mike and every darn wad of who comes out worth two or three or four ten or twenty times more than they went in with that's wrong and so tired of seeing people who've served much of their adult lives as a public servant in congress and they come out multimillionaires how does how does nobody ever noticed that how is it that nobody does you're right is there is there is a corruption to that tom and i don't care if it's a democrat or republican you go into a public servant job is some congressional representative or some senate member you're making one hundred thousand dollars a year and now you're worth twenty million dollars how that's and you're right you know what you're right don't don't put this the american people a chance to you know a week to read this right bill well forget it bad can we got a really bad shell connection tom forget the american people not getting to read this check this out members of the house of representatives had literally a thousand minutes to try to read a two thousand two hundred and thirty two page bill that spends one point three trillion dollars the bill i mean they gave him a thousand minutes overnight to read this twenty two hundred page bill they don't want them to read the bill they just want to jam it through and i am fired up about planned parenthood the president is fired up over a lack of funding for the wall if you're not going to give him the wall the man's not gonna put his name on the piece of paper and you know what that would be the best thing to happen for every republican running in the midterm elections that'd be that'd be a welcome that wouldn't be a breath of fresh air that'd be a hurricane of fresh air one eight hundred six five five mike join us you're listening to mike gallagher on alaska's fastest growing newstalk station k b t to twenty am and ninety two point five fm a.

Chess congress tom representative president alaska senate mike gallagher thousand minutes one hundred thousand dollars three trillion dollars twenty million dollars