9 Burst results for "Cherry Marketing Institute"

"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:31 min | 10 months ago

"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news it's All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish any agreement between the two sides of the war in Yemen is unusual so there's reason for cautious optimism about the announcement this weekend of a prisoner exchange plan between the Saudi backed government in the Iran bank in the Iran backed who the rebels Peter Salisbury is a Yemen analysts for the international crisis group he joins us now to talk about what this moment means for the conflict in Yemen which is created one of the world's worst humanitarian crisis welcome to the show thanks for having me we don't have many specifics on this announcement right it came from the United Nations and the international committee of the red cross what is known about the deal well so far what we know is that after three meetings over the past almost a year and a half really the two sides have agreed that the going to exchange some prison or something that they said they do for the first time in December of two thousand and eighteen where we're at now is they finally come to an agreement on the first package if you like of prisoners which are pretty one into several hundred some people are saying around sort of fourteen hundred I'm with a bit of luck we'll see this happen in the next few weeks but with these two parties the problem we've had consistently is there okay it it green things with each other I'm not very good at sea turning those agreements into action so we're gonna have to hold a press on this one right and see what actually happens does the recent escalation in Iran US relations complicate this going forward or even now I mean one side is backed by Iran the other is by Saudi Arabia's led coalition just supported by the US yeah I mean as with everything in the Middle East as a little bit more complicated than just Iran but group in a Saudi backed group what was perhaps more interesting to me at the moment is this is happened as we see an escalation in fighting between Saudi backed government forces and the forces in the north of the country I'm as the Saudis in the who sees tried to almost separately negotiate a truce over the the border whether he's been firing drones and missiles Saudi infrastructure and the Saudis have been sending air strikes back in both of been sending forces to fight each other over the the border this feels at the moment like more of a signal that track the negotiations between the the who season the Saudis is going okay the Saudis were apparently in the room for negotiations this time which they hadn't been at previous meetings so DOT trucks kind of going okay wall relations between the who fees and the government plummets which is a very interesting that time to make the to see right now you brought up but they continue to air strikes and just this past week in an air strike of the Saudi led coalition killed more than thirty civilians it's according to the U. N. to two people look at this moment this agreement with any real optimism I'm I'm afraid not really is simply because we've seen so many agreements come and go with this agreement it's it's an announcement that the parties have agreed on the terms of something they've already agreed to do so again I think people are waiting to see evidence that they're actually winning to do this thing so what is this moment came why now that's a really good question again the the shift of the we see is that the Saudis have been involved this time around and that's probably a signal that that the Saudis and who fees aw improving their relations and they've been talking to each other directly since last October and the talks between the two were really precipitated by this massive attack on Saudi oil infrastructure which you'll remember from last September against facility cold of cake which almost took us to the the point of of regional war with the US and Saudi on one side Iran on on the other but also gave the who fees and the Saudis this kind of polls where they they both football maybe it's better off if we do a deal with each other the takes Yemen off the table I means that we aren't fighting each other's that's one less thing for Saudi Arabia to worry about and it prevents them from coming further embroiled in any regional conflicts does a listing those interests being sustained as as part of these talks that's Peter Salisbury with the international crisis group thank you for explaining it thanks for having me on this president's day holiday we bring you a story involving cherry trees we know now that young George Washington didn't really chop down a cherry tree it's a myth fabricated by the first president's biographers well it appears some people are stretching the truth in the world of global cherry commerce NPR's Scott Horsley has this tart tale of international intrigue and the cherry juice detective tart cherries other kind of go in cherry pie and if you made a pie chart of America's tart cherry crop you see a very big slice more than seventy percent is grown in Michigan home state of U. S. senator Gary Peters in fact I would you fly into Trevor city you fly into cherry capital airport something that local residents take great pride in Mike von Akmal has about a hundred and seventy acres of cherry trees in Hart Michigan on a farm has been in his family almost a hundred years lately though the tart cherry business has been the pets along with all the usual form headaches like weather and insects box will have to contend with cheap foreign competition especially from Turkey our church have been extremely hard I mean there isn't a grower out there that's not feeling the effects growers thought they might get a break in twenty eighteen when for the first time a tear of was applied to imported cherry juice from Turkey sure enough imports of Turkish cherry juice fell nearly forty percent with senator Peter says that was quickly replaced by a flood of juice from other countries we're kind of looking at a little bit of a game of whack a mole here what really raised eyebrows was the large amount of tart cherry juice that suddenly began showing up terra free from Brazil there is no discernible tart cherry industry in Purcell trade lawyer Elizabeth Drake scour the internet in both English and Portuguese but found no listing for Brazilian cherry farms she combed through export records and shipping documents ultimately she was left with a simple suspicion imports that were being called Brazilian actually it might still be Turkish and just being misclassified at the border the kiss your sort of a cherry juice detective that is a lot of what we do we put together the pieces of the puzzle Michigan cherry growers and senator Peters have asked customs agents to investigate a custom spokesperson wouldn't comment on this particular case but said we take all allegations of terror of evasion seriously this Jews fight is just the latest skirmish in a long running battle between Michigan growers and Turkey over all sorts of tart cherry products Drake says it's gonna cost Michigan's cherry production fell last year by twenty one percent last time I went to Michigan I saw that there were trees being ripped out from the orchard so it's a really dire situation that they're faced with Julie Gordon who heads the cherry marketing institute notes those trees are long term investments that take years to bear fruit she says growers can't just easily switch crops when competition gets tough all our growers are asking for is a level playing field and if we can get a level playing field we hope to revive an industry Gordon was in Washington last week pleading her case with US officials senator Peters acknowledges cherry farmers don't have the clout of some other industries seeking trade protection you know if you're the steel industry you can hire an army of lawyers you can hire a communist you can put together a trade case but if your cherry growers in northern Michigan that are struggling to stay in business and have to put that together is very difficult still peers as he's raised the plight of the cherry farmers directly with president trump who could take special interest this election year in farmers from a swing state like Michigan I hope whatever it takes is when I say whatever it takes Jerry court Mike Mayock ball is hoping for some relief otherwise this third generation farmer could be the last I don't know what happened to all the family farms but something's gotta change pretty quick because we just cannot survive store slate and your news Washington now to a peach farmer who has reason to celebrate a jury over the weekend said he should get a quarter billion dollars in damages from two big agricultural seed and chemical companies this is just the first of many similar lawsuits over a product that's turned a neighbor against neighbor in farming communities anger is Dan Charles has the story a a few years ago the company Monsanto which is now owned by Bayer started selling some new varieties of soybeans and cotton they were genetically modified to tolerate a weed killer it's been around for decades call die camera so farmers could spread I camber read over these new crops it killed the weeds but the crops were fine but Harrison Pittman who's director of the national agricultural law center at the university of Arkansas says it was controversial from the start it's been a divisive issue because the camera sometimes doesn't stay where it sprayed it can evaporate and then spread into neighboring fields damaging crops there and pigments as one of the first farmers who reported die camera damage was bill Bajor in southeastern Missouri as part of his farming operation he has roughly a thousand acre peach orchard bill beater says die Campbell vapor is destroying his orchard so he soon bear and also be a SF another company that sells the doc Campbell herbicide his lawyers argued that the company's new that die Campbell would damage neighboring crops but went ahead and sold the products anyway and they presented evidence of this from internal company emails and memos the companies for their part said bill beaters peach trees were mainly suffering from a soil fungus not die camera exposure the trial took three weeks but the jury deliberated just a few hours it ordered the two companies together to pay fifteen million dollars to compensate bitter forms for its losses plus two hundred fifty million dollars in punitive damages to punish what the jurors apparently saw as bad corporate behavior men from the national agricultural law center sounds a little shocked this is just a lot of one of money on the table and of course these issues are still plan out there says he will appeal the decision meanwhile it's facing another lawsuit in which more than a hundred farmers from multiple states are demanding compensation for their die camera damage and that's on top of an even bigger legal headache connected to another herbicide that bigger cells called life a sick or round up thousands of people sued the company saying that exposure to glide for sick because their cancer bear denies that but it's been trying to negotiate a settlement outside experts say it could cost the company billions of dollars Dan Charles and you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news and you're listening to All Things Considered.

Audie Cornish Yemen Iran Peter Salisbury NPR
"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:25 min | 10 months ago

"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news it's All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish any agreement between the two sides of the war in Yemen is unusual so there's reason for cautious optimism about the announcement this weekend of a prisoner exchange plan between the Saudi backed government in the Iran bank in the Iran backed who the rebels Peter Salisbury is eight Yemen analysts for the international crisis group he joins us now to talk about what this moment means for the conflict in Yemen which is created one of the world's worst humanitarian crisis welcome to the show thanks for having me we don't have many specifics on this announcement right it came from the United Nations and the international committee of the red cross what is known about the deal well so far what we know is that after three meetings over the past almost a year and a half really the two sides have agreed that the going to exchange some prisoners something that they said they do for the first time in December of two thousand and eighteen where we're at now is they finally come to an agreement on the first package if you like of prisoners which will probably run into several hundred some people are saying around sort of fourteen hundred I'm with a bit of luck we'll see this happen in the next few weeks but with these two parties the problem we've had consistently is there okay agreeing things with each other I'm not very good at sea turning those agreements into action so we're gonna have to hold a press on this one right and see what actually happens does the recent escalation in Iran US relations complicate this going forward or even now I mean one side is backed by Iran the other is by Saudi Arabia's led coalition just supported by the US yeah I mean as with everything in the Middle East as a little bit more complicated than just around that group in a Saudi backed group what was perhaps more interesting to me at the moment is this is happened as we we see an escalation in fighting between Saudi backed government forces and the forces in the north of the country I'm as the Saudis in the who sees tried to almost separately negotiate a truce over the the border whether he's been firing drones in a missiles Saudi infrastructure and the Saudis have been sending air strikes back and both have been sending forces to fight each other over the the border this feels at the moment like more of a signal that track the negotiations between the the who season the Saudis is going okay the Saudis were apparently in the room for negotiations this time which they hadn't been at previous meetings so DOT trucks kind of going okay wall relations between the who fees on the government plummets which is a very interesting the time to make the to see right now you brought up that they continue to air strikes and just this past week in an air strike of the Saudi led coalition killed more than thirty civilians it's according to the U. N. to two people look at this moment this agreement with any real optimism I'm I'm afraid not really is simply because we've seen so many agreements come and go on with this agreement it's it's an announcement that the parties have agreed on the terms of something they've already agreed to do so again I think people are waiting to see evidence that they're right she willing to do this thing so what is this moment came why now that's a really good question again the the shift of the we see is that the Saudis have been involved this time around and that's probably a signal that that the Saudis and who fees aw improving their relations and they've been talking to each other directly since last October and the talks between the two were really precipitated by this massive attack on Saudi oil infrastructure which you'll remember from last September against facility cold of cake which almost took us to the the point of of regional war with the US and Saudi on one side Iran on on the other but also gave the who fees and the Saudis this kind of polls where they they both football maybe it's better off if we do a deal with each other the takes Yemen off the table a means that we aren't fighting each other's that's one less thing for Saudi Arabia to worry about and it prevents him from becoming further embroiled in any regional conflicts that servicing those interests being sustained as as part of these talks that's Peter Salisbury with the international crisis group of thank you for explaining it thanks for having me on this president's day holiday we bring you a story involving cherry trees we know now that young George Washington didn't really chop down a cherry tree it's a myth fabricated by the first president's biographers well it appears some people are stretching the truth in the world of global cherry commerce in pure Scott Horsley has this tart tale of international intrigue and the cherry juice detective tart cherries are the kind of go in cherry pie and if you made a pie chart of America's tart cherry crop you see a very big slice more than seventy percent is grown in Michigan home state of US senator Gary Peters in fact I would you fly into Trevor city you fly into cherry capital airport something that local residents take great pride in Mike von Akmal has about a hundred and seventy acres of cherry trees in Hart Michigan on a farm has been in his family almost a hundred years lately though the tart cherry business has been the pets along with all the usual farm headaches like weather and insects monocle has to contend with cheap foreign competition especially from Turkey our church have been extremely hard I mean there is no growth there that's not feeling the effects growers thought they might get a break in twenty eighteen when for the first time a terrace was applied to imported cherry juice from Turkey sure enough imports of Turkish cherry juice fell nearly forty percent but senator Peter says that was quickly replaced by a flood of juice from other countries we're kind of looking at a little bit of a game of whack a mole here what really raised eyebrows was the large amount of tart cherry juice that suddenly began showing up terra free from Brazil there is no discernible tart cherry industry in Purcell trade lawyer Elizabeth Drake scour the internet in both English and Portuguese but found no listing for Brazilian cherry farms she combed through export records and shipping documents ultimately she was left with a simple suspicion imports that were being called Brazilian actually might still be Turkish and just being misclassified at the border the kiss your sort of a cherry juice detective that is a lot of what we do we put together the pieces of the puzzle Michigan cherry growers and senator Peters have asked customs agents to investigate a custom spokesperson wouldn't comment on this particular case but said we take all allegations of terror of evasion seriously this Jews fight is just the latest skirmish in a long running battle between Michigan growers and Turkey over all sorts of tart cherry products Drake says it's gonna cost Michigan's cherry production fell last year by twenty one percent last time I went to Michigan I saw that there were trees being ripped out from the orchard so it's a really dire situation that they're faced with Julie Gordon who heads the cherry marketing institute notes those trees are long term investments that take years to bear fruit she says growers can't just easily switch crops when competition gets tough all our growers are asking for is a level playing field and if we can get a level playing field we hope to revive our industry Gordon was in Washington last week pleading her case with US officials senator Peters acknowledges cherry farmers don't have the clout of some other industries seeking trade protection you know if you're the steel industry you can hire an army of lawyers you can hire a communist you can put together a trade case but if your cherry growers in northern Michigan that are struggling to stay in business and have to put that together is very difficult still peers as he's raised the plight of the cherry farmers directly with president trump who could take special interest this election year in farmers from a swing state like Michigan I hope whatever it takes is what I say whatever it takes cherry court Mike Mayock ball is hoping for some relief otherwise this third generation farmer could be the last I don't know what happened to all the family farms but something's gotta change pretty quick because we just cannot survive so Horsley and your news Washington now to a peach farmer who has reason to celebrate a jury over the weekend said he should get a quarter billion dollars in damages from two big agricultural seed and chemical companies this is just the first of many similar lawsuits over a product that's turned a neighbor against neighbor in farming communities and there is Dan Charles has the story a a few years ago the company Monsanto which is now owned by Bayer started selling some new varieties of soybeans and cotton they were genetically modified to tolerate a weed killer it's been around for decades call die camera so farmers could sprayed a camera right over these new crops they kill the weeds but the crops were fine but Harrison Pittman who's director of the national agricultural law center at the university of Arkansas says it was controversial from the start it's been a divisive issue because the camera sometimes doesn't stay where it sprayed it can evaporate and then spread into neighboring fields damaging crops there and Pittman says one of the first farmers who reported that Kim the damage was bill Bajor in southeastern Missouri as part of his farming operation he has roughly a thousand acre peach orchard bill beater says die Campbell vapor is destroying his orchard so he soon bear and also be a SF another company that sells the doc camber herbicide his lawyers argued that the company's new that die Campbell would damage neighboring crops but went ahead and sold the products anyway and they presented evidence of this from internal company emails and memos the companies for their part said the bill beaters peach trees were mainly suffering from a soil fungus not die camera exposure the trial took three weeks but the jury deliberated just a few hours it ordered the two companies together to pay fifteen million dollars to compensate bitter forms for its losses plus two hundred fifty million dollars in punitive damages to punish what the jurors apparently saw as bad corporate behavior men from the national agricultural law center sounds a little shocked this is just a lot of a lot of money on the table and of course these issues are still plan out there says he will appeal the decision meanwhile is facing another lawsuit in which more than a hundred farmers from multiple states are demanding compensation for their die camera damage and that's on top of an even bigger legal headache connected to another herbicide that bigger cells called life a sick or round up thousands of people sued the company saying that exposure took life say because their cancer bear denies that but it's been trying to negotiate a settlement outside experts say it could cost the company billions of dollars Dan Charles and.

Audie Cornish Yemen Iran Peter Salisbury NPR
"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:07 min | 10 months ago

"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Long running battle between Michigan growers and Turkey over all sorts of tart cherry products Drake says it's gonna cost Michigan's cherry production fell last year by twenty one percent last time I went to Michigan I saw that there were trees being ripped out from the orchard so it's a really dire situation that they're faced with Julie Gordon who heads the cherry marketing institute notes those trees are long term investments that take years to bear fruit she says growers can't just easily switch crops when competition gets tough all our cherry growers are asking for is a level playing field and if we can get a level playing field we hope to revive our industry Gordon was in Washington last week pleading her case with US officials senator Peters acknowledges cherry farmers don't have the clout of some other industries seeking trade protection you know if you're the steel industry you can hire an army of lawyers you can hire a communist you can put together a trade case but if your cherry growers in northern Michigan that are struggling to stay in business and have to put that together is very difficult still peers as he's raised the plight of the cherry farmers directly with president trump who could take special interest this election year in farmers from a swing state like Michigan I hope whatever it takes is what I say whatever it takes cherry court Mike monocle is hoping for some relief otherwise this third generation farmer could be the last I don't know what happened to all the family farms but something's gotta change pretty quick because we just cannot survive so Horsley NPR news Washington now to a peach farmer who has reason to celebrate a jury over the weekend said he should get a quarter billion dollars in damages from two big agricultural seed and chemical companies this is just the first of many similar lawsuits over a product that's turned a neighbor against neighbor in farming communities and is Dan Charles has the story a a few years ago the company Monsanto which is now owned by Bayer started selling some new varieties of soybeans and cotton they were genetically modified to tolerate a weed killer it's been around for decades call die camera so farmers could spread a camper read over these new crops it killed the weeds but the crops were fine but Harrison Pittman who's director of the national agricultural law center at the university of Arkansas says it was controversial from the start it's been a divisive issue because the camera sometimes doesn't stay where it sprayed it can evaporate and then spread into neighboring fields damaging crops there and Pittman says one of the first farmers who reported that Kim the damage was bill Bajor in southeastern Missouri as part of his farming operation he has roughly a thousand acre peach orchard bill beater says die Campbell vapor is destroying his orchard so he sued bear and also be a SF another company that sells the doc camber herbicide his lawyers argued that the company's new that die Campbell would damage neighboring crops but went ahead and sold the products anyway and they presented evidence of this from internal company emails and memos the companies for their part said bill beaters peach trees were mainly suffering from a soil fungus not die camera exposure the trial took three weeks but the jury deliberated just a few hours it ordered the two companies together to pay fifteen million dollars to compensate beater forms for its losses plus two hundred fifty million dollars in punitive damages to punish what the jurors apparently saw as bad corporate behavior Pittman from the national agricultural law center sounds a little shocked this is just a lot of lot of money on the table and of course these issues are still plan out there says it will appeal the decision meanwhile it's facing another lawsuit in which more than a hundred farmers from multiple states are demanding compensation for their die camera damage and that's on top of an even bigger legal headache connected to another herbicide that bear cells called life to say were roundup thousands of people sued the company saying that exposure to collect a sick because their cancer bear denies that but it's been trying to negotiate a settlement outside experts say it could cost the company billions.

Turkey Drake Michigan
"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:34 min | 10 months ago

"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is by Saudi Arabia's led coalition just supported by the US yeah I mean as with everything in the Middle East as a little bit more complicated than just Iran but group in a Saudi backed group what was perhaps more interesting to me at the moment is this is happened as we see an escalation in fighting between Saudi backed government forces in and who's the forces in the north of the country I'm as the Saudis in the who sees tried to almost separately negotiate a truce over the the border whether he's been firing drones and missiles Saudi infrastructure and the Saudis have been sending air strikes back and both have been sending forces to fight each other over the the border this feels at the moment like more of a signal that track the negotiations between the the who season the Saudis is going okay the Saudis were apparently in the room for negotiations this time which they hadn't been a previous meetings so DOT trucks kind of going okay wall relations between the who fees and the government plummets which is a very interesting that time to make the to see right now you brought up that they continue to air strikes and just this past week in an air strike of the Saudi led coalition killed more than thirty civilians it's according to the U. N. to two people look at this moment this agreement with any real optimism I'm I'm afraid not really is simply because we've seen so many agreements come and go on with this agreement it's it's an announcement that the parties have agreed on the terms of something they've already agreed to do so again I think people are waiting to see evidence that the right she willing to do this thing so what is this moment came why now that's a really good question again the the shift of the we see is that the Saudis have been involved this time around and that's probably a signal that that the Saudis and who fees all improving their relations and they've been talking to each other directly since last October on the talks between the two were really precipitated by this massive attack on Saudi oil infrastructure which you'll remember from last September against facility called up cake which almost took us to the the point of of regional war with the US and Saudi on one side Iran on on the other but also gave the who fees and the Saudis this kind of polls where they they both football maybe it's better off if we do a deal with each other the takes Yemen off the table I means that we aren't fighting each other's that's one less thing for Saudi Arabia to worry about and it prevents them from coming further embroiled in any regional conflicts vessel listing those interests being sustained us as part of these talks that's Peter sells very with the international crisis group of thank you for explaining it thanks for having me on this president's day holiday we bring you a story involving cherry trees we know now that young George Washington didn't really chop down a cherry tree it's a myth fabricated by the first president's biographers well it appears some people are stretching the truth in the world of global cherry commerce NPR's Scott Horsley has this tart tale of international intrigue and the cherry juice detective tart cherries other kinda go in cherry pie and if you made a pie chart of America's tart cherry crop you see a very big slice more than seventy percent is grown in Michigan home state of US senator Gary Peters in fact I would you fly into Trevor city you fly into cherry capital airport something that local residents take great pride in Mike von Akmal has about a hundred and seventy acres of cherry trees in Hart Michigan on a farm has been in his family almost a hundred years lately though the tart cherry business has been the pets along with all the usual form headaches like weather and insects monocle has to contend with cheap foreign competition especially from Turkey archers of been extremely hard I mean there isn't a grower out there that's not feeling the effects growers thought they might get a break in twenty eighteen when for the first time a terrace was applied to imported cherry juice from Turkey sure enough imports of Turkish cherry juice fell nearly forty percent but senator Peter says that was quickly replaced by a flood of juice from other countries we're kind of looking at a little bit of a game of whack a mole here what really raised eyebrows was the large amount of tart cherry juice that suddenly began showing up terra free from Brazil there is no discernible tart cherry industry in Brazil trade lawyer Elizabeth Drake scour the internet in both English and Portuguese but found no listing for Brazilian cherry farms she combed through export records and shipping documents ultimately she was left with a simple suspicion imports that were being called Brazilian actually might still be Turkish and just being misclassified at the border the kiss your sort of a cherry juice detective that is a lot of what we do we put together the pieces of the puzzle Michigan cherry growers and senator Peters of ask customs agents to investigate a custom spokesperson wouldn't comment on this particular case but said we take all allegations of terror of evasion seriously this Jews fight is just the latest skirmish in a long running battle between Michigan growers and Turkey over all sorts of tart cherry products Drake says it's gonna cost Michigan's cherry production fell last year by twenty one percent last time I went to Michigan I saw that there were trees being ripped out from the orchard so it's a really dire situation that they're faced with Julie Gordon who heads the cherry marketing institute notes those trees are long term investments that take years to bear fruit she says growers can't just easily switch crops when competition gets tough all our growers are asking for is a level playing field and if we can get a level playing field we hope to revive our industry Gordon was in Washington last week pleading her case with US officials senator Peters acknowledges cherry farmers don't have the clout of some other industries seeking trade protection you know if you're the steel industry you can hire an army of lawyers you can hire a communist you can put together a trade case but if your cherry growers in northern Michigan that are struggling to stay in business and have to put that together is very difficult still peers as he's raised the plight of the jury farmers directly with president trump who could take special interest this election year in farmers from a swing state like Michigan I hope whatever it takes is what I say whatever it takes Jerry court might balk ball is hoping for some relief otherwise this third generation farmer could be the last I don't know what happened to all the family farms but something's gotta change pretty quick because we just cannot survive so Horsley NPR news Washington now to a peach farmer who has reason to celebrate a jury over the weekend said he should get a quarter billion dollars in damages from two big agricultural seed and chemical companies this is just the first of many similar lawsuits over a product that's turned a neighbor against neighbor in farming communities anger is Dan Charles has the story a a few years ago the company Monsanto which is now owned by Bayer started selling some new varieties of soybeans and cotton they were genetically modified to tolerate a weed killer it's been around for decades call die camera so farmers could sprayed a camper read over these new crops it killed the weeds but the crops were fine but Harrison Pittman who's director of the national agricultural law center at the university of Arkansas says it was controversial from the start it's been a divisive issue because the camera sometimes doesn't stay where it sprayed it can evaporate and then spread into neighboring fields damaging crops there and pigments as one of the first farmers who reported that Kim the damage was bill Bajor in southeastern Missouri as part of his farming operation he has roughly a thousand acre peach orchard bill beater says die Campbell vapor is destroying his orchard so he sued bear and also be a SF another company that sells the doc Campbell herbicide his lawyers argued that the company's new that die Campbell would damage neighboring crops but went ahead and sold the products anyway and they presented evidence of this from internal company emails and memos the companies for their part said bill beaters peach trees were mainly suffering from a soil fungus not die camera exposure the trial took three weeks but the jury deliberated just a few hours it ordered the two companies together to pay fifteen million dollars to compensate bitter forms for its losses plus two hundred fifty million dollars in punitive damages to punish what the jurors apparently saw as bad corporate behavior men from the national agricultural law center sounds a little shocked this is just call lot of lot of money on the table and of course these issues are still plan out there says it will appeal the decision meanwhile it's facing another lawsuit in which more than a hundred farmers from multiple states are demanding compensation for their die camera damage and that's on top of an even bigger legal headache connected to another herbicide that bear cells called life to say we're roundup thousands of people sued the company saying that exposure to collect a sick because their cancer bear denies that but it's been trying to negotiate a settlement outside experts say it could cost the company.

Saudi Arabia Middle East Iran US
"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

13:14 min | 10 months ago

"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on KCRW

"And then wait for a special access code if the demand exceeds availability and that seems likely the Lakers say registered fans will be chosen at random to take part in the sale the tickets themselves are priced between twenty four dollars and two cents and two hundred and twenty four dollars which like the date of the ceremony is in not to the uniform numbers worn by Kobe in Chiana Bryant the Lakers say there will be no video screens outside of staples and no procession through the streets if you don't have a ticket you're asked to stay home and watch on TV that is K. C. R. W.'s girl satin reporting let's say you're driving uber but don't have a passenger we're dropping for them are you still working what about if you're picking up gigs on post mates and waiting for a delivery order well recent California Supreme Court ruling involving apple could said to keep precedent in the gig economy every apple store employee has to wait in line to be searched for stolen goods before they can go home a process some workers say can take up to forty minutes the decision by the California Supreme Court that workers should be paid because apple was searching the bags for its own benefit Caitlyn Vega of the California labor federation says the decision has broad implications for gay workers it's really an important principle that at all times when you are serving the employer benefiting the employer under the control of the employer you deserve to be paid for all time work J. companies maintain that their platforms and workers should be paid per gig arranged through the app and apple is warning investors that will meet its second quarter financial target because the out because of the outbreak of coronavirus in China has cut production of iPhones the Cupertino California based company said today that all of its iPhone manufacturing facilities or outside the city where the outbreak started and they've been re opened but production is ramping up slowly the company says demand for I phones also down in China because many retail stores are closed or operating with reduced hours support for NPR comes from heather Sternhagen Paul G. Hey guess supporting African wildlife foundation working to ensure wildlife and wild lands thrive in modern Africa learn more at a W. F. dot O. R. G. right now sixty one degrees in Santa Monica it's four oh six from NPR news it's All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish any agreement between the two sides of the war in Yemen is unusual so there's reason for cautious optimism about the announcement this weekend of a prisoner exchange plan between the Saudi backed government in the Iran bank in the Iran backed who the rebels Peter Salisbury is a Yemen analysts for the international crisis group he joins us now to talk about what this moment means for the conflict in Yemen which is created one of the world's worst humanitarian crisis welcome to the show thanks for having me we don't have many specifics on this announcement right it came from the United Nations and the international committee of the red cross what is known about the deal well so far what we know is that after three meetings over the past almost a year and a half really the two sides have agreed that the going to exchange some prison or something that they said they do for the first time in December of two thousand and eighteen where we're at now is they finally come to an agreement on the first package if you like of prisoners which will probably run into several hundred some people are saying around sort of fourteen hundred I'm with a bit of luck we'll see this happen in the next few weeks but with these two parties the problem we've had consistently is there okay agreeing things with each other I'm not very good at sea turning those agreements into action so we're gonna have to hold a press on this one right and see what actually happens does the recent escalation in Iran US relations complicate this going forward or even now I mean one side is backed by Iran the other is by a Saudi Arabia's led coalition just supported by the US yeah I mean as with everything in the Middle East as a little bit more complicated than just Iran but group but a Saudi backed group what was perhaps more interesting to me at the moment is this is happened this we see an escalation in fighting between Saudi backed government forces and and who's the forces in the north of the country I'm as the Saudis in the who sees tried to almost separately negotiate a truce over the the border whether he's been firing drones in a missiles Saudi infrastructure and the Saudis have been sending air strikes back and both have been sending forces to fight each other over the the border this feels at the moment like more of a signal that track the negotiations between the the who season the Saudis is going okay the Saudis were apparently in the room for negotiations this time which they hadn't been at previous meetings so DOT trucks kind of going okay wall relations between the who fees on the government plummets which is a very interesting that time to make the to see right now you brought up for the continued air strikes and just this past week in an air strike of the Saudi led coalition killed more than thirty civilians it's according to the U. N. to two people look at this moment this agreement with any real optimism I'm I'm afraid not really is simply because we've seen so many agreements come and go on with this agreement it's it's an announcement that the parties have agreed on the terms of something they've already agreed to do so again I think people are waiting to see evidence that they're right she willing to do this thing so what is this moment came why now that's a really good question again the the shift of the we see is that the Saudis have been involved this time around and that's probably a signal that that the Saudis and who fees aw improving their relations and they've been talking to each other directly since last October and the talks between the two were really precipitated by this massive attack on Saudi oil infrastructure which you'll remember from last September against facility called up cake which almost took us to the the point of of regional war with the US and Saudi on one side Iran on on the other but also gave the who fees and the Saudis this kind of polls where they they both football maybe it's better off if we do a deal with each other the takes Yemen off the table a means that we aren't fighting each other's that's one less thing for Saudi Arabia to worry about and it prevents him from becoming further embroiled in any regional conflicts does a listing those interests being sustained as as part of these talks that's Peter Salisbury with the international crisis group of thank you for explaining it thanks for having me on this president's day holiday we bring you a story involving cherry trees we know now that young George Washington didn't really chop down a cherry tree it's a myth fabricated by the first president's biographers well it appears some people are stretching the truth in the world of global cherry commerce NPR's Scott Horsley has this tart tale of international intrigue and the cherry juice detective tart cherries other kinda go in cherry pie and if you made a pie chart of America's tart cherry crop you see a very big slice more than seventy percent is grown in Michigan home state of US senator Gary Peters in fact I would you fly into Trevor city you fly into cherry capital airport something that local residents take great pride in Mike von Akmal has about a hundred and seventy acres of cherry trees in Hart Michigan on a farm has been in his family almost a hundred years lately though the tart cherry business has been the pets along with all the usual form headaches like weather and insects monocle has to contend with cheap foreign competition especially from Turkey archers of been extremely hard I mean there is no growth there that's not feeling the effects growers thought they might get a break in twenty eighteen when for the first time a terrace was applied to imported cherry juice from Turkey sure enough imports of Turkish cherry juice fell nearly forty percent but senator Peter says that was quickly replaced by a flood of juice from other countries we're kind of looking at a little bit of a game of whack a mole here what really raised eyebrows was the large amount of tart cherry juice that suddenly began showing up terra free from Brazil there is no discernible tart cherry industry in Brazil trade lawyer Elizabeth Drake scour the internet in both English and Portuguese but found no listing for Brazilian cherry farms she combed through export records and shipping documents ultimately she was left with a simple suspicion the imports that were being called Brazilian actually might still be Turkish and just being misclassified at the border the kiss your sort of a cherry juice detective that is a lot of what we do we put together the pieces of the puzzle Michigan cherry growers and senator Peters of ask customs agents to investigate a custom spokesperson wouldn't comment on this particular case but said we take all allegations of terror of evasion seriously this Jews fight is just the latest skirmish in a long running battle between Michigan growers and Turkey over all sorts of tart cherry products Drake says it's gonna cost Michigan's cherry production fell last year by twenty one percent last time I went to Michigan I saw that there were trees being ripped out from the orchard so it's a really dire situation that they're faced with Julie Gordon who heads the cherry marketing institute notes those trees are long term investments that take years to bear fruit she says growers can't just easily switch crops when competition gets tough all our cherry growers are asking for is a level playing field and if we can get a level playing field we hope to revive our industry Gordon was in Washington last week pleading her case with US officials senator Peters acknowledges cherry farmers don't have the clout of some other industries seeking trade protection you know if you're the steel industry you can hire an army of lawyers you can hire a communist you can put together a trade case but if your cherry growers in northern Michigan that are struggling to stay in business and have to put that together is very difficult still peers as he's raised the plight of the cherry farmers directly with president trump who could take special interest this election year in farmers from a swing state like Michigan I hope whatever it takes is when I say whatever it takes Jerry court Mike monocle is hoping for some relief otherwise this third generation farmer could be the last I don't know what happened to all the family farms but something's gotta change pretty quick because we just cannot survive store sleep NPR news Washington now to a peach farmer who has reason to celebrate a jury over the weekend said he should get a quarter billion dollars in damages from two big agricultural seed and chemical companies this is just the first of many similar lawsuits over a product that's turned a neighbor against neighbor in farming communities and is Dan Charles has the story a a few years ago the company Monsanto which is now owned by Bayer started selling some new varieties of soybeans and cotton they were genetically modified to tolerate a weed killer it's been around for decades call die camera so farmers could spread a camper read over these new crops it killed the weeds but the crops were fine but Harrison Pittman who's director of the national agricultural law center at the university of Arkansas says it was controversial from the start it's been a divisive issue because the camera sometimes doesn't stay where it sprayed it can evaporate and then spread into neighboring fields damaging crops there and Pittman says one of the first farmers who reported that Kim the damage was bill Bajor in southeastern Missouri as part of his farming operation he has roughly a thousand acre peach orchard bill beater says die Campbell vapor is destroying his orchard so he sued bear and also be a SF another company that sells the doc camber herbicide his lawyers argued that the company's new that die Campbell would damage neighboring crops but went ahead and sold the products anyway and they presented evidence of this from internal company emails and memos the companies for their part said bill beaters peach trees were mainly suffering from a soil fungus not die camera exposure the trial took three weeks but the jury deliberated just a few hours it ordered the two companies together to pay fifteen million dollars to compensate bitter forms for its losses plus two hundred fifty million dollars in punitive damages to punish what the jurors apparently saw as bad corporate behavior Pittman from the national agricultural law center sounds a little shocked this is just call lot of a lot of money on the table and of course these issues are still plan out there says it will appeal the decision meanwhile it's facing another lawsuit in which more than a hundred farmers from multiple states are demanding compensation for their die camera damage and that's on top of an even bigger legal headache connected to another herbicide that bigger cells called life a sick or round up thousands of people sued the company saying that exposure to glide for sick because their cancer bear denies that but it's been trying to negotiate a settlement outside experts say it could cost the company billions.

Lakers Kobe Chiana Bryant
"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

09:35 min | 10 months ago

"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Is by Saudi Arabia's led coalition just supported by the US yeah I mean as with everything in the Middle East as a little bit more complicated than just Iran but group in a Saudi backed group what was perhaps more interesting said to me at the moment is this is happened as we see an escalation in fighting between Saudi backed government forces and and who see for this is in the north of the country and as the Saudis in the who sees tried to almost separately negotiate a truce over the the border whether he's been firing drones in a missiles Saudi infrastructure and the Saudis have been sending air strikes back and both have been sending forces to fight each other over the the border this feels at the moment like more of a signal that track the negotiations between the the who season the Saudis is going okay the Saudis were apparently in the room for negotiations this time which they hadn't been at previous meetings said that tries kind of going okay wall relations between the who fees on the government plummets which is a very interesting that time to make the to see right now you brought up for the continued air strikes and just this past week in an air strike of the Saudi led coalition killed more than thirty civilians it's according to the U. N. to two people look at this moment this agreement with any real optimism I'm I'm afraid not really is simply because we've seen so many agreements come and go with this agreement it's it's an announcement that the parties have agreed on the terms of something they've already agreed to do so again I think people are waiting to see evidence that they're right she willing to do this thing so what is this moment came why now that's a really good question again the the shift of the we see is that the Saudis have been involved this time around and that's probably a signal that that the Saudis and who fees aw improving their relations and they've been talking to each other directly since last October on the talks between the two were really precipitated by this massive attack on Saudi oil infrastructure which you'll remember from last September against facility cold up cake which almost took us to the the point of of regional war with the US and Saudi on one side Iran on on the other but also gave the who fees and the Saudis this kind of pools where they they both football maybe it's better off if we do a deal with each other the takes Yemen off the table a means that we aren't fighting each other's that's one less thing for Saudi Arabia to worry about and it prevents him from becoming further embroiled in any regional conflicts does a listing those interests being sustained as as part of these talks that's Peter Salisbury with the international crisis group of thank you for explaining it thanks for having me on this president's day holiday we bring you a story involving cherry trees we know now that young George Washington didn't really chop down a cherry tree it's a myth fabricated by the first president's biographers well it appears some people are stretching the truth in the world of global cherry commerce NPR Scott Horsley has this tart tale of international intrigue and the cherry juice detective tart cherries are the kind of go in cherry pie and if you made a pie chart of America's tart cherry crop you see a very big slice more than seventy percent is grown in Michigan home state of US senator Gary Peters in fact I would you fly into traverse city you fly into cherry capital airport something that local residents take great pride in Mike von Akmal has about a hundred and seventy acres of cherry trees in Hart Michigan on a farm has been in his family almost a hundred years lately though the tart cherry business has been the pets along with all the usual form headaches like weather and insects monocle has to contend with cheap foreign competition especially from Turkey our teachers have been extremely hard I mean there is no growth there that's not feeling the effects growers thought they might get a break in twenty eighteen when for the first time a terrace was applied to imported cherry juice from Turkey sure enough imports of Turkish cherry juice felt nearly forty percent but senator Peter says that was quickly replaced by a flood of juice from other countries were kind of looking at a little bit of a game of whack a mole here what really raised eyebrows was the large amount of tart cherry juice that suddenly began showing up terra free from Brazil there is no discernible tart cherry industry in Brazil trade lawyer Elizabeth Drake scoured the internet in both English and Portuguese but found no listing for Brazilian cherry farms she combed through export records and shipping documents ultimately she was left with a simple suspicion the imports that were being called Brazilian actually might still be Turkish and just being misclassified at the border the kiss your sort of a cherry juice detective that is a lot of what we do we put together the pieces of the puzzle Michigan cherry growers and senator Peters have asked customs agents to investigate a custom spokesperson wouldn't comment on this particular case but said we take all allegations of terror of evasion seriously this Jews fight is just the latest skirmish in a long running battle between Michigan growers and Turkey over all sorts of tart cherry products Drake says it's coming to cost Michigan's cherry production fell last year by twenty one percent last time I went to Michigan I saw that there were trees being ripped out from the orchard so it's a really dire situation that they're faced with Julie Gordon who heads the cherry marketing institute notes those trees are long term investments that take years to bear fruit she says growers can't just easily switch crops when competition gets tough all our cherry growers are asking for is a level playing field and if we can get a level playing field we hope to revive our industry Gordon was in Washington last week pleading her case with US officials senator Peters acknowledges cherry farmers don't have the clout of some other industries seeking trade protection you know if you're the steel industry you can hire an army of lawyers you can hire a communist you can put together a trade case but if your cherry growers in northern Michigan that are struggling to stay in business and have to put that together is very difficult still peers as he's raised the plight of the cherry farmers directly with president trump who could take special interest this election year in farmers from a swing state like Michigan I hope whatever it takes is when I say whatever it takes cherry court might balk ball is hoping for some relief otherwise this third generation farmer could be the last I don't know what happened to all the family farms but something's gotta change pretty quick because we just cannot survive so Horsley NPR news Washington now to a peach farmer who has reason to celebrate a jury over the weekend said he should get a quarter billion dollars in damages from two big agricultural seed and chemical companies this is just the first of many similar lawsuits over product that's turned a neighbor against neighbor in farming communities and there is Dan Charles has the story a a few years ago the company Monsanto which is now owned by Bayer started selling some new varieties of soybeans and cotton they were genetically modified to tolerate a weed killer it's been around for decades call die camera so farmers could spread a camera right over these new crops it killed the weeds but the crops were fine but Harrison Pittman who's director of the national agricultural law center at the university of Arkansas says it was controversial from the start it's been a divisive issue because the camera sometimes doesn't stay where it sprayed it can evaporate and then spread into neighboring fields damaging crops there and Pittman says one of the first farmers who reported die camera damage was bill Bajor in southeastern Missouri as part of his farming operation he has roughly a thousand acre peach orchard bill beater says die Campbell vapor is destroying his orchard so he sued bear and also be a SF another company that sells the dye camber herbicide his lawyers argued that the company's new that die Campbell would damage neighboring crops but went ahead and sold the products anyway and they presented evidence of this from internal company emails and memos the companies for their part said bill beaters peach trees were mainly suffering from a soil fungus not die camera exposure the trial took three weeks but the jury deliberated just a few hours it ordered the two companies together to pay fifteen million dollars to compensate bitter forms for its losses plus two hundred fifty million dollars in punitive damages to punish what the jurors apparently saw as bad corporate behavior Pittman from the national agricultural law center sounds a little shocked this is just called off a lot of a lot of money on the table and of course these issues are still plan out there says it will appeal the decision meanwhile it's facing another lawsuit in which more than a hundred farmers from multiple states are demanding compensation for their die camera damage and that's on top of an even bigger legal headache connected to another herbicide that bigger cells called life a sick or round up thousands of people sued the company saying that exposure to glide for sake because their cancer bear denies that but it's been trying to negotiate a settlement outside experts say it could cost the company billions.

Saudi Arabia Middle East Iran US
"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:49 min | 10 months ago

"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And in an abundance of caution because we make diagnostics we'd use our own tests to make certain that I don't have this viral infection it's not an FDA approved essay but we think it's sensitive and that's better than nothing I want to talk to you in your capacity is an infectious disease expert at this point is is it absolutely known what triggered the outbreak of we think the outbreak originated wildlife all the sequencing essays a we've dealt the genetic studies indicate that it probably came from of that and like three through some sort of intermediate host probably a small mammal this is what's happened with sars and we think those something similar happened here but we don't know precisely how would move from bath to humans do you think this was an avoidable disaster well we've been trying to convince people to shut down these wild animal markets for a very long time there are so many diseases not just this one body murders a number of other viral infections which Richard and wildlife what happens in these markets is you get an exchange of viruses between wildlife and domestic animals and sometimes directly from where I live to people and that's where many of these emerging infections arise the one thing I want to say the very clearly is that we've examined the possibility that some of suggestion that this virus might have originated in empire containment Laffer might be some sort of biologically defined weapon and there's no evidence for that whatsoever this is a classic example of a zoo gnosis something instruction wildlife and unfortunately makes its way into people from your position when you see the emphasis on face masks and the two we quarantine which adjusted for yourself walked down of cities and then this thing with the cruise ship for your kind of keeping all these people clustered together are these things effective at stopping the spread of the disease were could be making things worse well I think both answers are pulled her applicables here if you are somebody who is not infected with this virus but who has the potential exposure and you're locked up with people who are infected then there's an increased risk that you will become infected the other thing is if we had more sensitive tests for infection which is one of the things that were emphasizing and I'm sending people back to try to the Beijing Guangzhou to work on is in fact to see whether or not we can identify people who are infected so we can make decisions not based upon the possibility that may be infected but in fact we can use these lab tests to ensure that we don't put people aren't attracted into quarantine I will tell you because I work very closely with the people were running these isolation areas within China this is very very difficult it's stressful I also don't like the idea of screening people with CT scans because there's a lot of radiation which is you know potentially problematic as well so the focus really has to be on getting better ways to figure out who is infected how long they're infected how they became infected and then to come up with axes which I think can prevent disease so these are the folks are that we have in our own research and what I told the Chinese government that I think is prior one in live can is a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University thank you for your time thanks my pleasure on this president's day holiday we bring you a story involving cherry trees we know now that young George Washington didn't really chop down a cherry tree it's a myth fabricated by the first president's biographers well it appears some people are stretching the truth in the world of global cherry commerce NPR's Scott Horsley has this tart tale of international intrigue and the cherry juice detective tart cherries other kinda go in cherry pie and if you made a pie chart of America's tart cherry crop you see a very big slice more than seventy percent is grown in Michigan home state of US senator Gary Peters in fact I would you fly into Trevor city you fly into cherry capital airport something that local residents take great pride in Mike von Akmal has about a hundred and seventy acres of cherry trees in Hart Michigan on a farm has been in his family almost a hundred years lately though the tart cherry business has been the pets along with all the usual form headaches like weather and insects monocle has to contend with cheap foreign competition especially from Turkey our teachers have been extremely hard I mean there isn't a grower out there that's not feeling the effects growers thought they might get a break in twenty eighteen when for the first time a terrace was applied to imported cherry juice from Turkey sure enough imports of Turkish cherry juice fell nearly forty percent but senator Peter says that was quickly replaced by a flood of juice from other countries we're kind of looking at a little bit of a game of whack a mole here what really raised eyebrows was the large amount of tart cherry juice that suddenly began showing up terra free from Brazil there is no discernible tart cherry industry in Brazil trade lawyer Elizabeth Drake scoured the internet in both English and Portuguese but found no listing for Brazilian cherry farms she combed through export records and shipping da documents ultimately she was left with a simple suspicion imports that were being called Brazilian actually might still be Turkish and just being misclassified at the border the kiss your sort of a cherry juice detective that is a lot of what we do we put together the pieces of the puzzle Michigan cherry growers and senator Peters of ask customs agents to investigate a custom spokesperson wouldn't comment on this particular case but said we take all allegations of terror of evasion seriously this Jews fight is just the latest skirmish in a long running battle between Michigan growers and Turkey over all sorts of tart cherry products Drake says it's gonna cost Michigan's cherry production fell last year by twenty one percent last time I went to Michigan I saw that there were trees being ripped out from the orchard so it's a really dire situation that they're faced with Julie Gordon who heads the cherry marketing institute notes those trees are long term investments that take years to bear fruit she says growers can't just easily switch crops when competition gets tough all our growers are asking for is a level playing field and if we can get a level playing field we hope to revive our industry Gordon was in Washington last week pleading her case with US officials senator Peters acknowledges cherry farmers don't have the clout of some other industries seeking trade protection you know if you're the steel industry you can hire an army of lawyers you can hire a communist you can put together a trade case but if your cherry growers in northern Michigan that are struggling to stay in business and have to put that together is very difficult still peers as he's raised the plight of the cherry farmers directly with president trump who could take special interest this election year in farmers from a swing state like Michigan I hope whatever it takes is what I say whatever it takes Jerry court Mike Babcock will is hoping for some relief otherwise this third generation farmer could be the last I don't know what happened to all the family farms but something's gotta change pretty quick because we just cannot survive so Horsley NPR news Washington now to a peach farmer who has reason to celebrate a jury over the weekend said he should get a quarter billion dollars in damages from two big agricultural seed and chemical companies this is just the first of many similar lawsuits over a product that's turned a neighbor against neighbor in farming communities and there is Dan Charles has the story a few years ago the company Monsanto which is now owned by Bayer started selling some new varieties of soybeans and cotton they were genetically modified to tolerate a weed killer it's been around for decades call die camera so farmers could sprayed a camper read over these new crops it killed the weeds but the crops were fine but Harrison Pittman who's director of the national agricultural law center at the university of Arkansas says it was controversial from the start it's been a divisive issue because the camera sometimes doesn't stay where it's sprayed it can evaporate and then spread into neighboring fields damaging crops there and Pittman says one of the first farmers who reported that Kim the damage was bill Bajor in southeastern Missouri as part of his farming operation he has roughly a thousand acre peach orchard bill beater says die Campbell vapor is destroying his orchard so he sued bear and also be a SF another company that sells the doc camber herbicide his lawyers argued that the company's new that die Campbell would damage neighboring crops but went ahead and sold the products anyway and they presented evidence of this from internal company emails and memos the companies for their part said bill beaters peach trees were mainly suffering from a soil fungus not die camera exposure the trial took three weeks but the jury deliberated just a few hours it ordered the two companies together to pay fifteen million dollars to compensate better forms for its losses plus two hundred fifty million dollars in punitive damages to punish what the jurors apparently saw as bad corporate behavior hit men from the national agricultural law center sounds a little shocked this is just a lot of lot of money on the table of course these issues are still plan out there says it will appeal the decision meanwhile it's facing another lawsuit in which more than a hundred farmers from multiple states are demanding compensation for their die camera damage and that's on top of an even bigger legal headache connected to another herbicide that bigger cells called life a sick or round up thousands of people sued the company saying that exposure to glide for sake because their cancer bear denies that but it's been trying to negotiate a settlement outside experts say it could cost the company billions of dollars Dan Charles NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered on W. NYC the security of voting systems is a central focus this year especially following reports like the one out of Florida where Palm Beach county says it was hit by a ransomware attack back in twenty sixteen so coming up next we'll head to Palm Beach for a report from NPR smiles parks but first we'll hear about the announcement of a.

FDA
"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"A Story of Turkey and Michigan Cherries. No not that kind of Turkey. I'm David Brancaccio New York. We have new data ahead ahead of the holiday that will give us a more rigorous sense of how free-spending people will be just after the holiday economic counter for the weekend hand let us consult economist. Julia Coronado Coronado at macropolicy perspectives. In New York Good Morning Good Morning. I mean it wasn't my idea but Friday is the day of consumption after Thanksgiving and we will get some some new data about our states of mind consumer confidence on Tuesday and personal income and consumer spending just before Thanksgiving that'll Be Very interesting yes. This'll be data for October. The first month of the fourth quarter right ahead of the holiday shopping season and so far that consumers than the the resilient factor in the wobbly global economy so expectations is that consumers will stay on track pretty solid steady as she goes not gangbusters. Turn but no signs of trouble either. I mean not gangbusters despite this amazingly low unemployment rate and all that job creation month this month. Yeah the hallmark of the consumer in district covering has been budget discipline and steady as she goes consumers have been neither overly really exuberant known for Fearful so that's been a important stabilizing factor and and speaks to a new era of prudence. Julia Julia Coronado at macropolicy perspective. Thank you very much. My pleasure officials in London today decided not to renew Uber's operating licence after regulators. You're set a pattern of failures passengers at risk. BBC Business Reporter feel legged has the story. This is a humiliating decision for Uber Transport for London said it had concluded the company was not fit and proper operator it highlighted flaws Nuba systems that allowed unauthorized people to pose as licensed drivers and carry passengers as well as permitting drivers who'd been suspended or dismissed to set up new uber accounts in order to continue providing services. It said this had enabled thousands thousands of uninsured trips to take place as well as compromising passenger safety. Yuba described the decision as extraordinary and wrong. It now has twenty one in days to appeal and will be able to continue operating throughout the appeals process. Hoover stock is down about two percent now. There is confirmation this morning that the Charles Charles Schwab company will by its rival. Td Ameritrade in an all stock deal worth twenty six billion dollars amid competitive pressures the discount brokerage industry this this summer began. Cutting Commissions on stock transactions two zero and Silicon Valley has started to compete with outfits like Robin Hood Disclosure. Td Ameritrade has been an underwriter underwriter of marketplace now. Some people like counter programming their lives maybe visiting an abnormally quiet museum on Super Bowl Sunday or when the malls are full for Post thanksgiving Friday. Go instead to a car or truck dealership. Marketplace's Jack Stewart has that low interest rates and plenty of inventory on dealer lots mean gene. Better car deals to be had now than in previous years. According to research from Edmonds plus more ads like these no credit that no worry. It's not funny. Better Watch out the dodge because Thanksgiving and therefore black Friday are particularly late in November. This year deal is actually started their sales weeks ago. Go against the backdrop of shiny new metal at the La auto show on right now. Rachel Petoskey from motive says holiday events do attract car shoppers. Seven percent say that black Friday sale is impacting their purchase and three percents say sale just bought from consumer reports says. It's a good time to hit the lots. The malls are going to be packed. You might find that you get better attention going to the car dealership now than if you did on a typical weekend experts. Say Do your research in advance Vance though and this week is usually pretty quiet and a good time to take test drives. I'm Jack Stewart for marketplace Farmers in northern other Michigan Grow Amazing Tart Cherries for everything from pies to embedding and chocolate. Nefer Years Michigan Cherry Farmers Have Been Struggling Against Competition and from cherries imported from Turkey some michiganders' thought. US tariffs would help now. Some of those farms are closing from interlocken public radio Max. Johnston has the story. Jim Barton Hagan has grown Tart cherries on his farm in Suttons Bay Michigan for decades but now a tractor is pulling all the tart cherry trees from his orchard. Pardon Hagen says he sat to see these trees go but has no other choice. We're not making our costs right now. So it's hard hard to spend money to raise them. Michigan farmers like Barden Hagan produce about seventy five percent of the TART cherries grown in the US according to the Cherry Marketing Institute but since two two thousand six the state has lost one hundred sixty tart cherry farms and across the country production is already down eighteen percent from last year. That's from the. USDA CHEAP TART cherries from Turkey. have taken over the. US market according to Industry Data Domestic Cherry sell for about four dollars per pound while Turkish cherries go for eighty nine cents or not afraid of competition. As long as it's fair that's Cherry. Farmer nells Valiquette. He's part of an industry group that investigated Turkish Cherry Imports Ports. It found. Turkey is subsidizing. Its Farms so they can sell cherries below the cost of production earlier this year the US International Trade Commission levied tariffs Assam Turkey some as high as seven hundred percent but then cherry exports skyrocketed from other countries like Brazil it is like whack a mole and it started hurted in Turkey and now it's migrated to Brazil and where will it go next. If a country really wants to export a product it can get around tariffs says Daniel Sumner with the University of California Davis if for example we put a tariff on canned cherries from Turkey. It can just send them to another country and that country but sitting incans then. It's a canned cherry from somewhere else and the US has to place more tariffs you then trace it you then block it. Then it moves to another place you trace it and block. Good for now Michigan farmer. Jim Barr Hagan plans to focus on apples and sweet cherries. He might replant his Tart Cherries and four to five years if the price is right in traverse city Michigan. I'm Max Johnston for marketplace. The things you learn. I'm David Brancaccio with the marketplace morning report from A._P._M.. American public media..

Michigan Turkey US Julia Coronado Coronado David Brancaccio Jim Barton Hagan macropolicy perspective Td Ameritrade Max Johnston Jack Stewart New York Turkish Cherry Imports London Cherry Marketing Institute Charles Charles Schwab Edmonds
"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"cherry marketing institute" Discussed on WJR 760

"This is partnerships and peninsulas and just like the state of Michigan. This podcast is filled with stories of amazing people who are doing wonderful work from Marquette to Monroe sit back and discover everything new didn't know about Michigan State University extension. Here's your host death wire. Did you know that Michigan produces about seventy five percent of the tart cherries and twenty percent of the sweet cherries grown in the United States? In fact, Michigan ranks first in the nation for tart cherry growth, largely thanks to the sandy soil and temperate weather conditions along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. Although cherry growing comes naturally in the state that doesn't mean the crop isn't susceptible to pass weather events and the complications that come with climate change, the Michigan cherry industry needs talented growers and innovative research to continue leading the nation in cherry production. I'm Jeff wire director of Michigan State University extension. My guest partnerships in peninsulas today is Phil Carson president of the cherry marketing institute. Thanks Phil for being here today. You're welcome. Jeff. So why do we grow cherries in Michigan? Phil Michigan is unique in so many different ways. Especially the western shore of Michigan. We have the sandy soils and the hilly terrain just ideal for cherry production tertiary production and sweet cherry production in the state is very susceptible to frost and ideal production. Areas are those hilly those hills where frost can drain off those hills. It's a natural way to grow a crop in this state in the sandy soils are perfect for the types of trees that we grow. We need something where the water can drain away from those routes to keep the trees healthy and the environment on the west side of the state is perfect for that about forty three percent of the US supply is growing in the three county area in northwest Michigan huge production area up there. And for those of you that have been to the traverse city area. Those hilly terrain are just awesome. It's really a fantastic opportunity for Michigan. And something that you've been a big part of so. You know, I'm struck recently by some of these surveys of kids, and we have listeners of all ages to this podcast. So a recent example was when asked where does milk come from? They said the store and not really understanding fully the connection all the way to the dairy cow talk to us a little bit about how a cherry gets from a tree in this three county area to a plate in a variety of ways. Yeah, it's an interesting story. Jonathan to a large extent. Michigan State University has played a key role in in the cherry industry in the forties and fifties all of the cherries that we grew were hand harvested and in the late fifties. And sixties we knew that over time we had to find a more efficient way to grow cherries along came the idea of mechanical harvesting and putting in place a way that we can reduce labor costs the machine harvest the fruit that we grow. But think about that for a second you have. Thousands of workers that are coming in to the state Jerry's are very perishable, and so many different ways and to be able to grab hold of a limb and shake it have that fruit fall onto a tarp. And and handle it and move it to a processing facility. It really meant that we had to completely change our production system in the early days. We would grow trees with branches that were low. So we can hand harvest them. We went to machine harvested we want. We wanted to prune those trees up. So we could grab those limbs easily in minimize the amount of brushing us in the tree..

Michigan Michigan State University Lake Michigan Phil Michigan cherry marketing institute Jeff wire United States Phil Phil Carson Marquette Monroe president Jonathan director Jerry seventy five percent forty three percent twenty percent milk