35 Burst results for "Cherokee"

Martha Zoller: The Early Voting Looks Good for Herschel Walker

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:59 min | 1 d ago

Martha Zoller: The Early Voting Looks Good for Herschel Walker

"You would think that he would have done well in those red areas so that he could campaign in places like metro Atlanta and pick up some of those independent voters. If you look at the map by county, basically from I 20 south, he only ran two points behind Brian Kemp. From I 20 north, not counting the metro counties, but like when you get up into north Georgia in hall county in Dawson county and Cherokee county and union county and oconee county and Walton county, he ran like 6 points behind governor Kemp, all the rest of the counties up there he ran about four points behind. So he had a lot of work to do, but gosh, the early voting looks good, and then tomorrow they're predicting rain. So I don't know what that'll do to the turnout. But we'll just have to see. But I think we'll know fairly early how this is going to come out. Like 10 o'clock. So Martha, so people in those counties, they went and they voted for Brian Kemp, but are you saying they did not vote for rehearsal walker? Right. That's correct. Wow, any indication, I mean, has the campaign been given any indication why that is and what they need to fix that for this runoff? Well, there were roughly 200,000 voters that did not vote for Herschel Walker that voted for Brian Kemp. But the gap between walker and Warnock was only 35,000 votes. And you know, if I'm Rafael Warnock and I out my opponent four to one, and I only got 35,000 of those more, I would be unhappy about that. He knows that he's got an uphill battle both Warnock and walker. Polls are saying 52, 48, but ten years ago, we had three week runoff the last several. They've been 9 week runoffs. I don't think anybody knows what a four week runoff looks like Todd. So what I'm saying is get out the vote. It's in your polling place that you have to vote. It's not where the early voting was. Get out and vote. Don't assume your neighbor is going to do it. Get out and vote and bring your Friends and neighbors with you.

Brian Kemp Governor Kemp Dawson County Hall County Oconee County Walton County Cherokee County North Georgia Union County Walker Atlanta Warnock Rafael Warnock Herschel Walker Martha Todd
Airplane crash in Gulf of Mexico leaves 2 dead, 1 missing

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

Airplane crash in Gulf of Mexico leaves 2 dead, 1 missing

"Two people are confirmed dead and authorities are searching for a third person after a private plane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico off the Florida coast. The plane crash happened Saturday night, but a search for the rented single engine piper Cherokee didn't begin until around 10 a.m. Sunday, when the plane had not returned to the airport where it had left in St. Petersburg, Florida, a spokesperson in Venice, Florida says recreational boaters found the body of a woman floating about two and a half miles west of the Venice shore, and divers from the Sarasota county sheriff's office located the plains wreckage, about a third of a mile off shore, directly west of the Venice airport, the body of a girl was found in the plains passenger area, and rescuers are searching for a third person, believed to be a man who was either the pilot or a passenger. I'm Donna water

Florida Coast Gulf Of Mexico Venice Shore Sarasota County Sheriff's Offi Florida St. Petersburg Venice Venice Airport Donna
A New Episode of 'Things That Never Happened' With Joe Biden

The Dan Bongino Show

01:57 min | 6 d ago

A New Episode of 'Things That Never Happened' With Joe Biden

"When Joe Biden's about to tell a fable a tall tale or an outright lie what does he do He says I'm not joking And he lies about his autobiography and his backstory and out of his family all the time all the time Almost nothing this guy said about his life story's true So there's a dark web series Jim and a dark web in the office No one knows what he's doing Introduce the number of viruses into the Westwood one cumulus program fall around in a dark web Mike's always standing by watching him getting ready if he's fired to take the con at a moment's notice But during his time on the dark web Jim found this series We don't know where it is Amazon Prime or Netflix but it's called things that never happened And the episodes of things that never happened are shockingly always about Joe Biden because he's a plethora a cornucopia of material We haven't seen a new episode in a while Jim found one during the break So here's the trailer check this out Things that never happened with Joe Biden start building the second school and revitalize the use of the Cherokee language By the way she spent a lot of time on other reservations other nations as well I'm worried she's not going to come home on these days when she goes You think I'm joking I'm telling you I hear more about the navajos and I hear about me You all think I'm kidding This has been things that never happened with Joe Biden Joe Biden I promise you has never mentioned that Jill Biden or Joe the Navajo I take that back They had a meeting with Elizabeth Warren and that may have come up a couple of times but I promise you there has been no discussion of the Navajo Nation in the Biden household at all How do I know Because Joe Biden said they talked about and said he wasn't joking which is the cue every time that it's a thing that never happened

Joe Biden JIM Netflix Mike Amazon Jill Biden Elizabeth Warren JOE Biden
"cherokee" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

08:00 min | Last month

"cherokee" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"Scott rank here with another episode of history unplugged. A Cherokee woman named nanyehi, which means one who goes about was born in the 1730s in modern day Tennessee. She stood out in an early age at 17, she led her tried to victory against the creeks. She eventually became the only female voting member of the Cherokee general counsel. He later married Irish Schrader Bryant ward and took the anglicized name Nancy. It's here she becomes one of the most important negotiators in diplomats in 18th century North America. Moving among the worlds of the American Indians, British, and later Americans. She was the negotiator of the sale of Kentucky for the Transylvania company by Daniel Boone, as well as savior to countless settlers and pioneers who helped form the course of American history. She advocated for coexistence with Europeans and Americans, and later in life spoke out for Cherokee retention of tribal lands, and tried to prevent the disaster of the trail of tears. Today's guest is Deborah Gates, author of woman of many names. Deborah is also the 7th great granddaughter of Nancy, but we discuss how in addition to being an incredible diplomat, while all sorts of innovations the Cherokee people, including introducing new loom weeding techniques, and how to successfully raise cows, being the first to introduce the dairy industry tour people. This is a fascinating figure from the 18th century that deserves to be better remembered, and I hope you enjoyed this discussion with Nancy ward. And one more thing before we get started with this episode, a quick break for word from our sponsors. The primary character of your book as you note in the title had many names, her Cherokee name is nanyehi, or anglicized name is Nancy ward, and she has an honorary name as well. Meaning beloved woman. Can you tell me about these many names and what they say about her? And also the meaning of nanyehi of one who goes about. What do these names say about Nancy or however you want to term her? Well, I generally tend to call her nanny. That's how I grew up hearing her name. It wasn't Nancy ward. I had no idea in retrospect that my 7th great grandmother was a famous Cherokee leader. I knew that she was leader, but I just didn't realize that the world might possibly know about my ancestor. So Nancy was born to spinski and was given many names through her life as the Cherokee and Native Americans often do. They will get a title like the Raven of Kyoto or warrior woman of Kyoto. She had several names as you can if you look at the book and the very beginning I tried to explain heard many different names that she had and what the meanings of those were. She was the beloved woman of the Cherokee nation, which is a title and honor, she was also called Cherokee rose, her mother called her wild rose because she felt that her cheeks had the blush of the inside of the rose. So that's why she was called a wild rose when she was young. 9 he did so many great things in her lifetime that she is deserving of these many titles. Absolutely. And she lives during a very consequential period in relations between American Indians and growing the United States government and before the colonies, can you tell me about her early life and when she's born in the early 18th century, what is happening within the Cherokee nation? Her grandfather, my toy, was the leader of the Cherokee nation in he lived in northern Tennessee, which is and not too far from what would be today known as Knoxville. The tribe was literally spread all over from the Carolinas through Tennessee, down into northern Georgia. That was the basic territory. Whoever held lookout mountain in Chattanooga area was considered the ruler of the area, whoever held lookout mountain ruled the area. The settlers were beginning to find their way across the Cumberland gap and so on and so forth actually Daniel Boone was the one that discovered the way through the gap. But we thought that that was ridge of mountains would protect us from the quote unquote invasion of the white man as we well know that certainly didn't stop anybody, but as you go through time, I think you'll notice that we as a people try to accommodate the white settlers, especially in the very beginnings of our relationship with the many different countries that were coming to the Americas. We had to deal with the Spanish, the English, the French, and all these people wanted to possess, you know, what we had here, mostly our resources, our trees, our minerals, and animals, furs, skins, were highly treasured amongst these other countries. So we were having to negotiate and deal with so many people that I believe as a people, they just kind of had to do whatever was necessary at the moment. If the British were sitting in front of you, you were going to cooperate with the British. You know, they had arms and weapons that we didn't have and we saw what they could do. Actually my choice sent his sons to England on a ship called the fox that took them to England and they stayed with king George the second and were able to get a one on one visual of what was going on there. I believe my toy was the smartest of Fox in sending his sons to investigate the lands that were coming to our lands to see what was going on there. And when they returned, they told their father, there was more people than they could count. So in that sense of things, you know, we were getting an understanding of, I believe that we were fighting a losing battle and had to come together as much as they could. So the lower Cherokee tribes and the uppers tried to stay in close contact with each other so they understood what was happening. If you look back in time, you know, we know that there was things going on at that juncture that they had no concept of. The many ships that were coming with hundreds of men and women aboard and, you know, being settlements and, you know, through my Nancy ward line, I found out I am also a descendant of the Mayflower. So somewhere in another along the line, those branches of the family met and married and produced children. So we can I get a feeling of so much because of my mixed ancestry. I'm not anywhere near, you know, my heart is all Cherokee. It beats red every day. I love the Cherokee people, what they stood for, what they stand for today. So you have to just kind of take the relevancy of what was happening through that time to understand, they had to bend very confused people, very scared of what was happening in their own lands. We believe the creator charged us with the care of the lands that we were born upon. So when we saw that these people

Nancy ward Nancy Scott rank nanyehi Irish Schrader Bryant Deborah Gates Daniel Boone Tennessee spinski Cherokee rose Kyoto lookout mountain Transylvania American Indians Deborah North America Kentucky Carolinas Knoxville Chattanooga
Caller: Federal Aid Usually Goes to Rich People First Than Poor People

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Caller: Federal Aid Usually Goes to Rich People First Than Poor People

"Wanted to make a comment just to straighten things out because you're really misinforming people or what vice president meant when she was saying about the federal funds. So you know what she meant Dwayne? Yes. Do tell me because I'm not a racist person. I actually, I'm actually an African American that has Irish white Irish running through my blood veins, Cherokee, Indian to running through my blood banks. So I'm definitely not a racist, but I do know something about the political world because I spent a little time in it and what she was basically saying is because all across the United States, every word you go in the political world, the money the funds that are coming in from the state, it always goes to the upper class first to build the areas to do their streets. I'm not talking about it. Where's your proof of that? Where's your proof of that to win? What people told me. Now look at this. Where's your proof? Now, if you check, all you have to do is look. No, no, you're calling on the program making the accusation. Where's the proof? I'm telling you where the proof is. Everything looked at who did up the beaches and did everything those that money did not come from the rich people's pocket. It came from taxpayers pocket. And what those that are holding those positions, they want to make sure that they're building up which is no problem. They want to make sure that they're building very nice areas with those funds and a lot of the poor income areas they do not. Dwayne, did you even look at, did you even look at Fort Myers? I mean, that was the most devastated area most of the homes most of the homes there people were living in trailers.

Dwayne United States Fort Myers
"cherokee" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:59 min | 5 months ago

"cherokee" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Live from the Kuala boundary in North Carolina. This is native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. Today kicks off the annual eastern band of Cherokee 4th of July powwow. This is the 47th year for the event that draws dancers, singers and spectators from all over the world. We're taking the opportunity to learn more about Cherokee history and traditions, as well as advances the tribe is making in the areas of healthcare, economic development, and education. We'll talk with a well-known eastern Cherokee fancy dancer participating in the powwow. We'll also sit down with the director of the museum of the Cherokee Indian to learn more of the tribe's history and culture. Let's begin with a brief overview. At the height of its pre colonial influence, the Cherokee presided over an indigenous empire that stretched across what are now 7 southeastern U.S. states. Then the 1830 and removal act resulted in the forced relocation of about 16,000 cherokees. Nearly a quarter of whom perished during the trail of tears to Indian territory, which later became the state of Oklahoma. Some cherokees alluded the trail of tears by seeking refuge in the dense, forested woodlands, okie mountains. Others later returned to their southeastern ancestral homelands from out west. Click ahead almost 200 years, and here we are today with our first guest on our show. Mister Daniel tramper, owner of your clan productions. Daniel, welcome to the show. Thank you. Glad to be here. It is a beautiful, sunny 4th of July weekend here in Cherokee, North Carolina were broadcasting live from the museum of the Cherokee Indian, big pow wow this weekend, lots of tourists walking around inside the museum outside gift shops, restaurants, crowded, beautiful river right across the road there full of people, rafting, swimming, fishing. Daniel, tell us is Cherokee always this pop in on Friday afternoons? Yes, during the summertime we weekends are very proper. Well, I'm just having a blast here, really enjoying myself. Tell us more about the power, what time is grand entry tonight? Granny, she's at 7. 7 p.m. tonight. Saturday. It's one and 7 and Sunday, it's one. So if we last year we had about 450 dancers and singers that come out and celebrate four to July with us. The answers from all over Indian country? Yes, all over in junk country. How much prize money is at stake this weekend? A $150,000. Wow, that's a big money. Any exciting specials planned? Yeah, we got all kinds of specials. We got, we always tried to do the me send a murder women special last year. We had the jingle dress this year. We have an infection and special women spent it in special I should say. And your head dancers this year. Who are they? When we are head dancer, we'll peek daily during the sessions. Awesome, awesome. Now this is the 47th anniversary of the powwow. When did you first become involved, Daniel? Actually, I've been involved with the turkey powwow, probably over 30 years now. Now, in addition to owning dear clan productions, you manage the pow out, you are also an accomplished pow wow dancer yourself, you a three time world champion hoop dancer and I know you also love a good piece of Cherokee fry bread. Oh yeah, like I said earlier that the hoop dance that's been many pounds ago. Now do you still get out? Yeah, I still have the dust now. I still perform. I do a lot of shows and stuff like that. I still love dancing. I'm always going to love dancing. I've been dancing with my me and my family's been dancing here, starting in the streets, Turkish, probably the early 70s. So I started dancing when I was two, three years old when I turned 57 this year. Now, what all goes into organizing an event like the Cherokee Powell. Looks like a big reduction. Yes, it is. It takes us, but we've been out there about a week and a half getting everything to get from sitting at the tents, the sound, vendors, the grounds, not only that, we're making sure all my hit staff is here at one flew in last night from Montana. We had to make sure we had to get him out of aswan. Actually, one of my emcees from Canada, Delta council, their flight, just four days ago, so he's not going to be able to make it. But yeah, it's just stuff like it. It's always scheduling, making sure everybody's there. Going into the powerwall to set it up, you're months in advance. Of getting everything together. Now how big is your staff and crew there on site? My hitch staff is this year we're probably looking at about 15 all together. We got our MC, so we got our arena directors, then judges, tabulators, and that's our hit staff, but like my production crew, we're probably can maybe 15 and in my ground screw, we're looking about a 15 and then also our ticket, your people, about 8, 9 people with that. So all together probably about 50. Now, if your client productions, you don't just manage the power, you other events all over the boundary. Yes. Yes. I actually do. We are American production company. We do special events. Also doing the bonfire. It runs all summer long from I think we started in my and we'll go to in October, but we also subcontract with our casino. We do all the concerts from stay tuned into stages to videos to sound like whatever they need. Now, in addition to the fireworks show this weekend. Yes, actually, on our still everybody and I'll probably buy this. I think we got the best forward showing western North Carolina. We did this year with fortune us to get number one forwards company in the United States, the one that the Super Bowl, stuff like that. We've been back and forth to the last four months. So we should have a really good show. It's Saturday night at 10 p.m.. Now Daniel with the pandemic, the last few years, it's been tough on the Powell circuit, a lot of the events have been canceled how it impacted your business to your client productions. And is this the power held last year as well? Yeah, actually, last year we had a record breaking. We, everything, dropped restrictions throughout two weeks before the pow wow. And like I said, we had a record breaking and dancers, audience we had public. I think about 7000 people walked through the great last year. This year we're talking hopefully, I always say people have got more options issue. Last year, everybody was just starving to get out and no matter what it was, what it was. They started to get out this year. They got more options. So and plus gas prices. That's going to impact it. We're saying so. But I'm sure we'll still have a good weekend. That Cherokee, like I mentioned earlier, it's just a lot of people come here tourists. It's just a lot to do here. There's a lot of different places to visit. We're here at the museum. There's things for kids to do. If you lived here your whole life on the boundary? Yes. Born and raised here. Yeah, but I've got to travel, so. Well, I know you were an Albuquerque this year at the gathering of nations. You go out to other powells and events and you promote this event as well as aspects of Cherokee culture. Oh yeah, yes. Yes, actually I'm one of the cultural ambassadors for our tribe, one of the warriors. But yeah, well, you travel, we do a lot of promoting winter powwow, like I said, I've been in the Powell scene.

Sean spruce museum of the Cherokee Indian okie mountains Daniel Mister Daniel tramper North Carolina United States Cherokee Powell Kuala Delta council Cherokee Oklahoma swimming Montana Canada Super Bowl Powell Albuquerque warriors
"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

04:35 min | 8 months ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

"The irony of the federal government calling out the Cherokee nation for not doing right by its black citizens isn't lost on me. More than a 150 years after Emancipation, many U.S. politicians still laugh off reparations for slavery as unreasonable. No one currently alive was responsible for that. A pipe dream. I don't think we should be trying to figure out how to compensate for it. A good idea may be a hundred years ago but if this was 1920, we could actually have a conversation but now it's too late. But it's progress. But it's the United States that created this absurd racial hierarchy, colonized native lands, imported African people to build this country, and incited campaigns of terror on both black people and native people alike. These are the conditions under which the Cherokee were operating. I'm not saying this to excuse the terrible things they did. I'm just saying that the Cherokee isn't the only nation that needs to confront its past. Marilyn van now has a seat on the Cherokee nation's environmental protection commission. She's the first freed man descendant, confirmed to a Cherokee government position. You know, the turkey nation throughout its history has enslaved black people, fought with the confederacy, conspire to keep black people from becoming full citizens of the nation. Why was it so important to you to be a part of this group that kept trying to force you out? How is this different? From thurgood Marshall or honorable raver and doctor king, reverend shuttlesworth. Reverend Abernathy, and their wives, fighting for civil rights, they say, oh, these white people don't want us to go to the library, even though we're shit is insane. We pay taxes here. We're going to go to Africa because he's white because, you know, we just don't want to hurt these white people's feelings. Not hurt their feelings, but just saying, well, screw them. I don't want to be a part of your tribe anyway. Well, no, we don't do that. No, you don't do that. Injustice wants unjust people..

Marilyn van Cherokee nation's environmenta U.S. Cherokee government federal government reverend shuttlesworth Reverend Abernathy thurgood Marshall raver king Africa
"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

05:55 min | 8 months ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

"Would you represent me and I said, sure. David's not a trained lawyer, but you didn't need to be one to argue a case in tribal court. And he'd been studying the issue for years. And he felt he was ready to take on the Cherokee nation. His nation. What was the reaction from other cherokees? Well, it varied, you know, some of them were, I can't believe you want those people in the tribe. You know, there was a lot of prejudice. It was a lot of bigotry and a lot of ignorance. At this point, there were two cases going on simultaneously. Maryland's case in federal court and Lucy Allen's in the tribal courts, both were making their way slowly through two different legal systems. You know, Cherokee nation is so diverse that there's about 8 viewpoints on this. This is Stacy Leeds, a Cherokee citizen who served on the Cherokee tribal court. She was one of the judges who decided the Lucy Allen case. But that lawsuit, the question was, does the current Cherokee nation constitution does it exclude the freed men or not? Can you walk me through the different sides of the argument? We tracked over time. There's no rational debate that the Cherokee freed man were not at one time citizens, right? What happened that stopped that? Well, what happened that stopped it was a log got passed and that's where the disenfranchisement occurred. The case was look at the document of the constitution. Does it exclude this class of citizens or not? And the ruling was no. The tribal court ruled that all Cherokee freed men and their descendants must be full citizens. The day the verdict came down, David was in at the court. When he was an advocating for cherokees and tribal court, they even worked at PetSmart. I'm out on the floor, helping customers with their dogs and cats and lizards and what have you. And suddenly over the loudspeaker, it says David corn silk to the front office. And so I thought, oh, goodness, what have I done? When he gets to the office, the facts machine is just spitting out reams of paper and the other managers start handing him pages. And the store director looks up at me and said, are you a lawyer? No. And he said, you just want a big lawsuit. And sorry. I lost it. I said, I can't stay here today. Can I go home? And I wanted to see my parents and see my kids. It was a two to one decision with judge Stacey Leeds writing the majority opinion. For the first time in more than 20 years, freed men were once again granted citizenship. When you made that decision, did you kind of think, okay, we're done talking about this? No, I mean, you have to know how explosive that type of decision is going to be in the community. So I think the judges were well aware that it was not going to be well received by a number of people. That's putting it lightly. That created some backlash in the form of a ballot question in 2007. Chief chuck hoskin again. He wasn't the chief at the time. Just one year after the ruling, tribal leaders put the question of citizenship for freed people to a vote. The chief at the time said, let's not leave this question to the courts. We should decide this democratically as a nation. But the question was, should you have Indian blood to be a member of an Indian tribe or should you not? I think for many cherokees, quite naturally, many of them felt like, of course you should. The tribe voted overwhelmingly yes. And once again, Cherokee freed people were excluded from citizenship. But chief Hoskins says there was a problem with that vote. He says most cherokees were an educated about their tribe's history of enslaving black people, or the promise they'd made to the descendants of those people in 1866. Now, I've acknowledged that for most of my young life, only till I was in my late teens, did I really know nothing about the Friedman and I only did because my father was a government official. Do you know how much of that was just based in racism or was it just like out of a desire to preserve this Cherokee ethnic identity? Some people reacted to it. Of course, we have to hold ourselves together as Indians. We've been Indians from time immemorial, our ancestors suffered mightily. We are against the odds that we're even here and so if we're going to hold on to what it means to be Cherokee, of course you have to have Indian blood. Now, care connection is a large tribe. And so there are cherokees who just like the largest society that do not like black people and there is some racism. I think it's a minority of cherokees, but they exist. And so some people heard that as a bit of a dog whistle that these slaves are going to infiltrate the tribe..

Lucy Allen Stacy Leeds Cherokee tribal court judge Stacey Leeds David David corn Chief chuck hoskin PetSmart Maryland Hoskins Friedman
"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

05:19 min | 8 months ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

"This is the experiment I'm Tracy hunt. And we're back with the story of the Cherokee freed man fighting for citizenship in the Cherokee nation. I mentioned before that the Cherokee weren't the only tribe to enslave African people. Four others did as well. Professor Lana Roberts is descended from choctaw and chickasaw freed people. What is it about becoming full citizens of the tribe that you think is so important to Friedman or does the sentence of freed man? What is it that they ultimately want? It is a sense of justice like I am owed this because my ancestors went through this. Some it's this is like literally something legally that you are supposed to be abiding by. And for others, it is really kind of the personal identity angle, which is, you know, I mean, if your parents have talked to you about this and your grandparents and your great grandparents and you have this cultural retention in your ancestry spoke that language and that's your birthright, then it's important to you to be able to properly and legally claim that. The Friedman are not asking for reparations for the discrimination against their ancestors. We're asking for our basic rights to be distributed the same as other members of the tribe. So why is it that it's a tribe? I should say, the federal government has its obligations to us. But we have no obligations to the freed men, Marilyn van filed her case in the U.S. federal courts in 2003. And she waited. This was all very long and difficult. In the meantime, she was reaching out to people in the community to talk about it. And then I got a call from Maryland van. And she called David corn silk. I'm David kornfield. I'm a citizen of the Cherokee nation and genealogist and historian. For the Cherokee people. David is not a freed man. But by this point, David had a reputation among freed people as an ally. And Marilyn van said, I want to pick your brain and find out what you think we need to do to continue this fight. And she said, well, I'd like for you to come to my Friedman meeting, and I didn't even know she'd been having Friedman meeting. And she asked me if I would speak. And so David spoke at the meeting and told his story. Back in the early 80s, David didn't know much about freed people. I knew that our tripod owned slaves, but I did not know how they fit in the modern picture. But all that changed for him in 1983. The Cherokee nation introduced a new rule. In order to vote, everyone in the tribe had to be Cherokee by blood. When David went to vote, he found himself standing in line behind an elderly man. The reverend roger H Nero, he was a freed man who was a small child when he was added to the dawes rolls. It was very hot and we're standing in line outside. There's not any shade. And so we're both sweating. So we started a conversation with each other. And, you know, here was a gentleman who was on the Oscar. I inquired of his ancestry and talked about his family and then we got up to the table and when he presented his voting card, the lady behind the table snatched it out of his hand and looked at it with this derisive look on her face and then looked him in the face and said, we don't let you people vote anymore. And she wouldn't give him back his card. And so he was very confused and he said, well, I'm on the doll's role. I'm a member of the nation. And she said, not anymore. The reverend Nero was one of the first freed men to sue the tribe in federal courts in 1984. But the suit was dismissed. Around that time, David started working at the Cherokee nation enrollment office. A part of my job was to inform Friedman applicants that they were not eligible. And so I took my job seriously and when Friedman would come in and turn in their applications, they would call me and they say, David, come to the front. You've got a freed man up here. You need to let down easy. And so I would come out there and I would gently explain to them. You know what? Tribal law was. And there was. But he kept feeling worse and worse about the law. He says he even wrote a letter to the chief at the time. Rule. Ultimately, he decided to quit his job, and he started doing his own research. He wanted to support the freed people more directly. He helped another descendant bring her case to tribal court back in the 90s. They lost. But at Maryland's meeting, he told the people there that he was still passionate about their cause. And then whenever it was all done, I went back to my chair and said listen to the rest of the meeting and then it was over. And before I could get out the door, this elderly black woman came up to me and she said, my name is Lucy Allen. I'm a Friedman descendant and I would like to challenge the Cherokee nation. And I can't get an attorney to take me seriously. And she.

Friedman Marilyn van Tracy hunt David Lana Roberts U.S. federal courts David kornfield chickasaw choctaw roger H Nero David corn federal government Maryland Cherokee nation enrollment off Oscar Nero Lucy Allen
"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

03:01 min | 8 months ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

"Citizenship. And she put a question about that to the court. Now this is after I had already started doing this legal research and it read the treaty and things. In 2003, she sued the U.S. government, asking them to force the Cherokee nation to uphold the 1866 treaty and let freed men like her be Cherokee citizens. But Marilyn wasn't the only one taking on the.

"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

04:38 min | 8 months ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

"Decades later, the Cherokee are still reeling from the trauma of removal and they're deeply divided among themselves. Then in 1861, the Civil War breaks out. Fearing even more violence in the vision, the chief at the time tries not to pick a side. His position was he wanted to stay out of this. He did not see this as a war that involved Cherokee people, but this was between people in the U.S., not native people. That didn't last long. Some slave owning Cherokee split off and joined the south anyway. Other slave owning tribes did too. Pretty soon, the Cherokee were surrounded with the union nowhere in sight. They had to pick a side or be destroyed, so they joined the confederacy. And when the war was over and they lost, the Cherokee and the U.S. signed a treaty. The treaty of 1866 what did the treaty of 1866 say? The treaty of 1866 said a number of things. Chief hoskin again. Not the least of which was allowing railroads to come into our lands, which brought in wide settlers. But all of those things, I think, left a bad taste in the mouth of a lot of Cherokee people that taste is still there for many that we're sovereign Indian nation in the treaty of 1866 was more of an imposition than a negotiation. A relatively short time later, the state of Oklahoma is imposed over the Cherokee nation. Our government is suppressed to the point where we have no functioning democracy. We have chiefs that are appointed by the president of the United States through most of the 20th century. My grandfather who lived most of his life in the 20th century. Most of his life never got to vote for a chief, let alone ever imagine his grandson would be the chief. And so you have a civil society that is eroded almost to nothing. So yeah, the treaty of 1866 is loaded for many Cherokee. But that treaty also made cherokees do something else. One of the things I said we wouldn't do is ever enslave people again. Another thing it said we would do is that we would and this is an exact quote and I have it memorized at this point from three a 1866 is that we will give Friedman and their descendants all the rights of native cherokees. They didn't say some of the rights. They didn't say just freed men. Is it freedom in their descendants? Years after the treaty of 1866, the U.S. government continued to control native tribes through their land and their culture. For example, native people owned their land communally, but soon the U.S. passed a series of laws that required them to own it individually. To do that, they had to register themselves with the U.S. government. This register was called the dawes rolls. It was a census taking around the early 1900s of everyone in Indian territory. The precise manner in which someone today becomes a citizen of the Cherokee nation is the same irrespective of who you are to apply for citizenship. You must trace directly to that group on the dawes rolls. My father, he had been the least of his freed men on the doll's roles. I had gotten the role number from another relative in the family, one of the oldest members in my family. Based on the treaty, it seemed like Marilyn should have no problem becoming a citizen. The tribe treated away their right to discriminate against the freed men. So looking back at that rejection letter from 2001. Let's say it's something about there wasn't a degree of Indian blood by this role number. And I said, well, what are they talking about? There's no degree of blood. The thing is, the dawes rolls didn't just account for and classify everyone in the Cherokee nation. It also introduced the idea that having a certain amount of native blood was what determined your membership in a tribe. Up until this point, this wasn't something the Cherokee really ascribed to. But as white census workers listed individuals on the dawes rolls, they also estimated how much Indian blood each person had, down to the fraction. Since Maryland's father was listed as a freed man and not a Cherokee by blood, he didn't have a blood quantum next to his name. Still, this didn't make sense to Maryland because it seemed like according to the treaty of 1866, whether you're a descendant of freed people or by blood cherokees, it shouldn't matter. You're still eligible for.

Chief hoskin U.S. U.S. government Oklahoma Friedman Marilyn Maryland
"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

03:19 min | 8 months ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Experiment

"He had received some land as a member of the tribe. But race or color didn't really mean anything to me. Yeah. It's just kind of like, well, okay. Marilyn grew up. She didn't become a CPA, but she did become the engineer. And although she never took the time to register as an official citizen of the Cherokee nation, it was always a big part of her identity. I am proud that my Cherokee ancestor survived, certainly I'm proud to be a Cherokee. So, Maryland decides she wants to get more involved in the tribe. That was late 2001. My daughter was in college. She was an empty nester with some time on her hands. I thought that, you know, hey, you know, this is a good time to, I think, to join my tribe and see what's going on. Maybe I can be of some service. And so she fills out the paperwork to finally register. And so I peel my husband, I say so I think I'm going to send this application off. And then she gets this response. That was very surprised. You know, get this rejection later back. What did the rejection letter say? You know, it's something about there wasn't a degree of Indian blood by this roll number. And I said, what are they talking about? There's no degree of blood. What does this mean? So I called someone at the tribal registration office. And I didn't understand what they were saying. Call somebody at the bureau of Indian affairs. And they just, you know, kind of blew me.

Marilyn Maryland bureau of Indian affairs
"cherokee" Discussed on The Garden Question

The Garden Question

05:26 min | 11 months ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Garden Question

"I won't have to go dig that out. I can't just let that sit. I'm gonna have to go dig those catalog out. I really hope you do because believe it or not, this is how a lot of materials come to the library. I'll be given a tour or I'll be on an interview like this one you're doing with me today, which is so nice of you. So people can learn a little bit more about the garden library and just add a left field somebody will say to me, well, wait a minute. I think I have this old catalog or this old postcard or this old book, and that's how a lot of the materials have come here is just really out of the generosity of just thousands of people over time. And it's built this wonderful resource that anybody in the public can enjoy. Having a garden center and being in the landscape designer and installer and builder and stuff, I've had different catalogs through the years that like wholesale catalogs would that be something you'd be interested in. Absolutely would be interested in this for sure. Well, I won't tell you about the ones I threw away. But that's okay. You know how to tell me about those. I won't cry just yet and certainly not on your podcast. Yeah, but anything any treasures you think. And even if you think I wouldn't be interested in, ask me anyway. Okay. All right. Because you'd be surprised, people call me every once in a while, I'll get a call from a lady or gentleman who will say, you know, my mama was in garden club and, you know, we've sold her house and we've lost mama and we're about to throw all this stuff in the dumpster. Yeah. And you know, and I'll have a nervous breakdown. I'll be like, don't do it. I've given my core now. Tell me the address. I'm on my way. And I have driven all over the state to get materials because you just never know what Georgia stories will get from those records. Yeah. And a lot of times the thing the things people think aren't important that are just specific to Georgia are the most important and very rare and very hard to come by. Because the regular things of everyday people like us, people used to use old sea catalogs, and they'd line garden beds with them. They'd use them in outhouses. Yeah. Some of the stuff's very ephemeral, so it would just go to the wayside. Sure. So we really always want to take a good look at anything, anybody has to offer. In your professional career, who has been your biggest influencer? Four different people probably have influenced me the most. One was Jim Cawthorn. He was a landscape architect and garden historian. He has many books pertaining to old southern gardens. He was my professor at George state university, back in the late 90s, and he was the one that really sparked my interest in the garden library here and helped me get my internship here as well. So definitely Jim Cawthorn, also Ann Carr, who we lost many years ago as well. She was the founder of the garden library..

Georgia Jim Cawthorn George state university Ann Carr garden library
Democrats and Zuckerberg Had a Plan for Georgia, Republicans Didn't

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Democrats and Zuckerberg Had a Plan for Georgia, Republicans Didn't

"25 of the 26 cities and counties that receive the $1 million from Zuckerberg center for technology and civic life were one by Biden in 2020. The ten largest center for technology civic life grants in Georgia are the following Fulton Cobb gwinnett da cab. Clayton Douglas Cherokee won by Trump, Henry N muskeg. By mispronouncing of them, I'm sorry. I don't live in Georgia. The 9 out of ten of the biggest counties received massive money from Zuckerberg in fact Fulton county and Cobb county and gwinnett county received a combined $15 million. From the Zuckerberg center for technology and civic life for the actual administration of election. I know a lot of you are saying how on earth is this possibly legal, while the attorney general of Georgia didn't think to do anything about this? The Secretary of State Brad raffensperger was perfectly fine with this. Governor Brian Kemp signed a consent degree of Stacey Abrams that allowed the downfall of Georgia to occur. The federalists continues by saying the center for technology and civic life demanded the promotion of universal mail in voting through suspending election laws, extending deadlines that favored mail in over in person voting. I just want to reemphasize this. You have a private company or corporation or nonprofit funded with $420 million that comes in and demands the suspension of the law. Where the state legislatures this was in my opinion, one of the sneakiest, Treacher at most treacherous and deceitful actions but honestly, the state legislatures in Georgia, they did not meet in the summer of 2020 best of my knowledge about election integrity at all. The summer leading up to the election they should had a special session in July, they should have said hold on a second, we need to have a pregame meeting here. We gotta have a huddle. And this goes to show how weak incompetent and spineless the Republican Party is.

Georgia Zuckerberg Center For Technolo Fulton Cobb Gwinnett Da Cab Clayton Douglas Henry N Muskeg Zuckerberg Center For Technolo Brad Raffensperger Governor Brian Kemp Stacey Abrams Center For Technology And Civi Biden Cobb County Gwinnett County Fulton County Zuckerberg Donald Trump Treacher
Cherokee Nation reaches $75M settlement with drug companies

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Cherokee Nation reaches $75M settlement with drug companies

"Hi Mike Ross you're reporting Cherokee Nation reaches a settlement with three drug companies the Cherokee Nation has announced a seventy five million dollar settlement with three opioid distributors resolving opioid related claims against the companies the settlement the largest in Cherokee Nation history is with McKesson corporation cardinal health and AmerisourceBergen drug corporation the settlement will be paid out over six and a half years in a lawsuit filed in twenty seventeen Cherokee Nation alleged the three companies and several pharmacy companies contributed to an epidemic of prescription opioid abuse Cherokee Nation also has claims against Walmart Walgreens and CVS that are pending hi Mike Rossio

Mike Ross Cherokee Nation Mckesson Corporation Amerisourcebergen Cardinal Health Cherokee Walmart Walgreens CVS Mike Rossio
"cherokee" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

"Titles in.

New York Auto Show canceled again due to Covid

WBZ Overnight News

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

New York Auto Show canceled again due to Covid

"For the second year in a row. Covid 19 has forced cancellation of the New York auto show scheduled for later this month. It was to have seen the unveiling of the 2022, Subaru WRX, Nissan Z and Jeep Grand Cherokee Plug in, according to car and

New York Nissan
Georgia Man Pleading Guilty to 4 of 8 Asian Spa Killings

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Georgia Man Pleading Guilty to 4 of 8 Asian Spa Killings

"The man accused of killing eight people at three Atlanta area massage businesses is pleading guilty it was an attack to terrorize the Atlanta community our cat and you know that lady passed out like love the door hello everybody hi Robert Aaron long was accused of killing eight people most of them women of Asian descent who worked at three Atlanta area massage businesses in a Cherokee county court long is pleading guilty to four murders the three women and one man at young's Asian massage near Woodstock that he allegedly gunned down on March sixteenth twenty twenty he's hoping for a sentence of life without parole but he still faces the death penalty if he's convicted for more shooting deaths in Atlanta he also faces a domestic terrorism with a hate crime enhancement charge he told investigators his motivation was sex addiction and that the workers represented a temptation that he wanted to eliminate but the attack on mostly Asian women prompted widespread outrage and calls against gender and anti Asian violence I'm Jennifer king

Atlanta Robert Aaron Long Cherokee County Woodstock Jennifer King
Atlanta-Area Spa Shootings Suspect to Plead Guilty to Cherokee County Charges

The Boxer Show

00:12 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta-Area Spa Shootings Suspect to Plead Guilty to Cherokee County Charges

"This morning. In the case of Three spot shootings in the Atlanta area. Robert Long's accused of gunning down eight people in March, he said to plead guilty to four killings in Cherokee County. He'll be arraigned in the other county next month State two

Robert Long Atlanta Cherokee County
The Hate-Crime Conundrum

The Experiment

01:48 min | 1 year ago

The Hate-Crime Conundrum

"Okay so where do you wanna start. So why don't we start in march back in march there is this shooting atlanta. Think we all remember it. It was percents completely horrifying. Police in georgia are investigating a series of deadly shooting said took place in the atlanta area. Eight people were killed. Authorities say many of them were women of asian descent. Now police have arrested one man who is white. But they haven't said anything about a motive yet this guy. He wanted three different spas agent in spas in atlanta. He shot eight people. Six of them were asian women and one of the things that happened was that there was this press conference matter mayor where start off with chevron's from cherokee county police re talking about the investigation and the fact that they've been getting a lot of questions about you know. Was this a hate crime many. We've received a number of calls about. Is this a hate crime. We're still early in this investigation So we cannot make that determination at this moment. The detectives involved in this case. Were not coming out and calling it a hate crime and that was upsetting a lot of people. But i think what really set people off was when the spokesman said that the shooter told detectives that he shot these people not because of racial hatred but because he was struggling but sex addiction. We still early but he does claim that it was not racially motivated. He apparently has an issue what he considers a fiction and sees these liberal. How do people respond to that something. I think some people thought maybe the police department was giving credence to this claim and also the idea that it was a sex addiction does seem so ludicrous on its face

Atlanta Cherokee County Georgia Chevron Police Department
Plea Deal Near for Metro Atlanta Massage Parlor Shooting Suspect

Atlanta's Morning News

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Plea Deal Near for Metro Atlanta Massage Parlor Shooting Suspect

"That could be on the horizon for the accused Metro and a spa shooter Robert Aaron Long is set to appear before Judge a Cherokee County next week. The West Beast, Michelle writes, reporting live with reaction for Fulton County's district attorney. Yes, Scott Fulton County D a funny Willis says she was notified Longs Tuesday hearing would bring a resolution to the case in Cherokee County, which she tells The Atlanta Journal Constitution means a plea deal in her world Long is accused of opening fire inside of young Asian massage on March 16th, killing four people and then wounding another. I spoke with Jane, who happened to be getting a massage that day when she and her massage therapists heard the murders. 25 minutes then I was starting to relax and feel better. And we heard this sound that sounded like a firecracker and we kind of both start along as then accused of leaving that seen driving south to Atlanta and killing four more women and two other Asian massages on chair at Cheshire Bridge Road before heading south and being captured in South Georgia. Long is facing murder and aggravated assault charges and Cherokee. Willis says she filed a motion to transfer long to the Fulton County Jail on Wednesday to await prosecution there, where he's facing similar charges and a possible hate crime charge. She also says she plans on seeking the death penalty.

Robert Aaron Long Cherokee County Scott Fulton County The Atlanta Journal Constituti Fulton County Willis Michelle Jane Long South Georgia Fulton County Jail Atlanta
"cherokee" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

The Oklahoma Observercast

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

"<Silence> <Speech_Male> I don't have anything <Speech_Female> else arnold. I <Speech_Female> wanted to the chief <Speech_Male> for his time this afternoon. <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> absolutely <Speech_Male> what you do is <Speech_Male> phenomenal your leadership <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Noticed that <Speech_Male> appreciate it. I think <Speech_Female> throughout the state and <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> We're so grateful <Speech_Male> that you could find time <Silence> to talk with us today. <Speech_Male> Always <Speech_Male> i really enjoyed <Speech_Male> it and

"cherokee" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

The Oklahoma Observercast

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

"As a complete an aggressive argument against mcgirt before the supreme court s could be may in. It was talented attorneys. They brought everything they could at it. The mr mcgirt attorneys in those friends of the court briefs filed by the nation and other tribes including the creek nation We we gave are all. The chips fell where they were was on the side of the united states. Keeping a promise. The governor thinks the united states ought not to keep a promise he can go make that case to the court..

mcgirt mr mcgirt supreme court united states
"cherokee" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

The Oklahoma Observercast

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

"Prosecution prosecution posture. That does sort a day to day crimes. Like you might think so. If there's an assault and battery and it involves say a non indian assailant. The jurisdiction is in almost every case exclusively in the hands of the united states attorney's office. So there is some concern that cases. You need to be properly transfer. If it's kinda case that's in the hands of the cherokee nation will the cherokee nation prosecute that case and the answer is yes. It takes a great deal of working together but working together takes work. And that's.

united states
"cherokee" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

The Oklahoma Observercast

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

"The little i'm arnold hamilton editor of the oklahoma observer. And i'm marianne. Martin is observer. Cast your weekly deep dive into oklahoma politics policy powered by the oklahoma observer democracy foundation just over a year ago. July ninth twenty twenty the. Us supreme court delivered its ruling in mcgirt v oklahoma described as the most important ruling for indian country in decades as justice neal. Gorsuch road on the far end of the trail of tears was a promise forced to leave their ancestral lands. Ends in georgia and alabama. The creek nation received assurances that they're new lands in the west would be secure forever the government further promise that no state or territory shelf ever have a right to pass lawless for the government of such indians but they shall be allowed to govern themselves. Today gorsuch continued. We were asked whether the way in these treaties parliament's remains as indian reservation for purposes of federal criminal law because congress has not said otherwise we hold the government which were just like the impact of the forced expulsion of indians from their lands in the eighteen hundreds reverberates to this day. The effect of the mcgirt ruling the state of oklahoma cannot be overstated namely the ruling ignited a political firestorm locally elected. The state district attorney's remain apoplectic over losing prosecutorial power. The da's have worked around the clock to stout fear that native criminal justice systems won't be up to the task that a crime wave will be unleashed the likes of which law-abiding oklahoma's have never seen that heinous crimes go Justice cannot be served. What arm-in-arm with the politically powerful prosecutors is first. Republican governor kevin stint who has proven himself no friend of indian country despite his cherokee nation citizenship. He's been playing the old right wing along and order card as core race. Baiting dog whistle while whipping fantastical claims that state and local governments will lose taxing authorities huge swaths of the state and even worse for his oil and gas overlords environmental authority not surprisingly the state of oklahoma is challenging mcgirt in federal court. The legislature even caught up ten million dollars this year to help. Fund the governor's windmill tilting. What's that unfortunately hasn't bothered to do. However is engaged the tribes and dialogue to search for common ground. That could yield a win win for a post mcgirt framework that benefits both state and tribal citizens and citizens for a post mcgirt framework that benefits both state and tribal governments and citizens even worse. The governor continues to poke tribal nations. In the i like with this recent tulsa form on mcgirt that included district attorney's but no tribal leaders jerky nation principal. Chief chuck hoskin. Junior is one of the leaders indian country pushing back against the state political establishments chicken little rhetoric. We invited chief hoskin to join us for this week's observer cast to discuss what mcgirt actually does and offer his vision for the future of a fairer more just and prosperous oklahoma chief. It's great pleasure as always to visit with you. Thanks for making time with us today. We're just past the anniversary first anniversary of the mcgirt ruling and we're just passed a rather remarkable event that the governor had in tulsa that was related to the gert event. And so we thought it would be a great opportunity to visit with you about this whole issue and not only what means For the cherokee nation and for indian country of but also for the state of oklahoma and What might be lost for a lot of folks who are Hearing some fairly inflammatory rhetoric coming from Prosecutors and state law enforcement it affect the governor himself gird is the most important indian law case in many generations. you'd have to back to the nineteenth century to see a case it was answered impactful to the cherokee nation in other tribes as the impact. Were feeling from gert. It's absolutely the right decision to say. The united states ought to keep its promise under a tree that's very basic proposition. That ought to be celebrated how we apply that proposition to the specifics of mcgirt news. The great challenge of the day and it takes a great deal of leadership. Whippy very thoughtful about it but we have to act quickly. People should keep in mind the cherokee nation with the other tribes that are affected. The trigger nation is is building the biggest criminal justice system in the state of oklahoma other than the state of oklahoma's over a period of months and save oklahoma. Had hundred thirteen years to do it. We have a period of months to do it. And we're doing it and we don't just want to build a criminal justice system that is adequate for the obligations at mcgirt places upon us. We wanna build the best criminal justice system in the country. We think our people zurve. I think the people within our reservation in not a non-indian deserve it because ultimately we should all have the same goal everyone leadership on every citizen would use it. We should want a blanket of protection over various jurisdictions there's overlaps overlaps in that respect. But we all should want that blanket of protection now should wanna focus on protecting victims holding lawbreakers accountable There's a way to do it And we're we're committed to doing it. the difficulty though is in the jurisdiction and the challenges that creates and so people who live in northeast. Oklahoma may have directly experienced. Certainly read something bad at paper so who has jurisdiction over crimes committed over every square inch of for example the cherokee reservation hutus fourteen counties in northeast oklahoma who has jurisdiction will depends on. Who's involved with the crime. If if a native american is involved in the crime and then that jurisdiction is is all is certainly not with the state of oklahoma. Which is the great departure from one hundred thirteen years of criminal justice in this state that is causing some anxiety out there. It naturally would when you're making this change. But the good news is that the jurisdiction is in the hands either of the cherokee nation which is the most progressive and dynamic and effective government in this day salsa in the hands of the united states through the justice department the challenges the justice department being a in a.

oklahoma arnold hamilton the oklahoma observer oklahoma observer democracy fo mcgirt justice neal gorsuch kevin stint Chief chuck hoskin chief hoskin marianne tulsa supreme court alabama Martin parliament georgia united states
Don’t Miss the Strawberry Moon – The Last Supermoon of 2021

Kottke Ride Home

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Don’t Miss the Strawberry Moon – The Last Supermoon of 2021

"The last super moon of the year is coming this week. So mark your calendars for thursday. The twenty four th through saturday. The twenty sixth. You want to catch a glimpse of the strawberry moon. The june full noon is traditionally called the strawberry moon in north america because in certain parts. June is win. Strawberries are in season. Which just feels like salt in the wound for my strawberry plant which started the season strong and his all ready fizzled out the strawberry new name. According the old farmer's almanac comes from the algonquin gb dakota and look at people's among others. But it's also been called games by other indigenous nations and cultures to mark different plants being in season at this time like the cherokee who call it green corn moon or the initial nabi who call it blue moon in honor of the flowers in bloom the creek all it egg-laying noon or hatching moon and hopping over the ocean to europe over there. The june moon was sometimes called the mead moon or the honey moon and given that june was once the traditional month for marriages thanks to the roman goddess of marriage juno old farmer's almanac and nasa both speculate that it could be an origin of the term honeymoon which entered usage around the fifteen hundreds in europe.

North America Dakota Europe Nasa
What Happens When Hidden Histories Become a National Conversation?

Unreserved

02:17 min | 1 year ago

What Happens When Hidden Histories Become a National Conversation?

"At the end of may. When news broke that the remains of more than two hundred children had been found at the kamloops indian residential school. It was news to many canadians. Who learning about the history of residential schools and the role. The canadian government played in the creation. It seemed to mark a new sense of awareness across the country in indigenous communities. Grief came quickly but not shock and not surprise. These types of losses are well known in our nation's and in our families and in real time we watch the rest of the country feel the depths of this history daniel heath justice is a colorado born citizen of the cherokee nation and he's an author and professor of critical indigenous studies and english at the university of british columbia. He joins me now to talk about what happens when hidden histories come to light daniel. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. We're talking about hidden histories on the show today and for me the idea of hidden histories is interesting. Because they're not hidden for everyone up until a few years ago when unreserved would would air story about residential schools. We'd get emails from people telling us that they had never heard of this before the show for sharing this information and that's a luxury indigenous people don't share. It's in our families. It's it's part of our history. How do you think so much of this. History hasn't made its way out of our communities. I struggle with that question. I think there is a sense in many ways that this is only about indigenous people rather than being very much about settler colonial canada. I think there is a sense for a lot of people that when we say school. We mean an educational facility which these were not. I mean these were re education and torture camps. I think we have to start naming them for what they were. I think non-indigenous people Just tune out because the the level of the horror if they had to face it would radically transformed their feelings about the country that they live in if they honestly address that

Kamloops Indian Residential Sc Canadian Government Daniel Heath University Of British Columbia Colorado Daniel Canada
The Curse of Transylvania University

Ghost Town

02:00 min | 1 year ago

The Curse of Transylvania University

"Established in seventeen. Eighty transylvania is the oldest university west of the allegheny mountains. Its name means across the woods in latin and the university was named after the colony of transylvania which had also never heard about. Have you a little history lesson about the tiny short-lived colony of transylvania. So as an american colony founded in early seventeen seventy five by north carolina. Land speculator richard henderson. He was head of. The transylvania company henderson is investors. Bought lands west of the southern and central appalachian mountains from the cherokee nation in exchange for the land. The tribe received goods worth around ten thousand british pounds. About one point. Five million now. This land was also claimed by both the virginia colony and was at the time the province of north carolina american pioneering frontier explorer daniel. Boone was hired by henderson to establish parts of the transylvania settlement. The revolutionary war though complicated things and the states were forming around transylvania's establish towns kentucky tennessee north carolina eventually absorbed their respective parts of the colony henderson was compensated with a land grant along the ohio river in western kentucky and where the current town of henderson was founded. So he's still got something. so what remains. This colony. is transylvania university transylvania university at its start was a single log cabin in boyle county kentucky. Its first sponsor was an episcopal church though it's kind of known to be presbyterian still even the school moved to lexington in seventeen eighty nine in the early eighteen. Hundreds the school expanded under the order of kentucky icon and politician henry clay who both taught law there and was a member of transylvania board. After eighteen eighteen the university had a medical school a law school divinity school and college of arts and sciences in the mid. Eighteen hundreds transylvania university. Was these school. If you were a fancy person from the south it's alumni included vice presidents. John c brennan ridge retired mentor johnson. A member of the lewis and clark expedition and stephen f. austin founder of texas

Transylvania Richard Henderson Henderson Central Appalachian Mountains North Carolina Allegheny Mountains Kentucky Transylvania University Transy Boyle County Boone Ohio River Virginia Daniel Tennessee Henry Clay Lexington Transylvania University John C Brennan Clark Expedition
"cherokee" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Dictionary

"Climate and examples of these regions are the grasslands of central north. America and chernow's zim is adjective vis is russian from their word chairman chairman journey. Which means black plus zambia which means earth so it just means black earth chernow's them is black earth. It's dark rich horizon so wields in its own thing. I was just being silly there. You get it all right. Next is cherokee capital c. h. e. r. o. k. e. e. noun from sixteen seventy four one a member of an american indian people originally of tennessee and north carolina. If somebody said to me where we're the cherokees where are the cherokees. i honestly have no idea. But maybe i will try to remember tennessee. North carolina that area number two the language of the cherokee people And then the etymology. I mean you'd think obviously it comes from the cherokee language it says it's probably ultimately from the creek word c. r. e. k. creek. That would be another group of american indians. So there word cocky. See a l. a. dot k. k. I obviously i do not know the proper way to pronounce that But interesting that it comes from a different groups word cherokee yeah interesting. All right And then our last word is cherokee rose. Two words cherokee is still spelled with a capital c noun from eighteen. Twenty three eight chinese climbing rope with a fragrant white blossom and the scientific name is rosa live. Gotta but why is it called the cherokee rose that i find interesting. If it's a chinese climbing rose how did it become cherokee rose. There's there must be a story there. Okay so we had chemo. Tactic chemo. Taxes chemo taxonomy chemo. Therapeutic chemotherapy kimani tropism chenille shannon blank key pod. Cheung sam That is the skirt check checker chair. Moya cherish chernow's them cherokee and cherokee rose i to pick cherish of the episode because it's very good cherish things if the if you got something to cherish you should cherish it. Why does this word sound so weird. Now let's make it sound even weirder by singing a song about cherish. I don't know how to sing a song about cherish. There are so many things in my life. That i cherish. That's it. There are lots of things that i cherish i am so gosh darn lucky to be who i am because i. I don't know. I have just grown up very lucky. There are so many people around the world who have been born in. Just terrible situations are had extremely bad luck and I just i just feel like it is my duty and everybody's duty to help them in any way possible and i know that i don't really do a whole lot and i i don't know i'm i'm trying to figure out like how can i do things and at the same time trying to live a life where you need a job and all that so i don't know i guess talking about things like that here for five seconds. Maybe helps a little bit. If i can if i can change. Somebody's mind if i can get somebody to do something to help the world some way and get rid of these terrible dumb systems that are just repressing people and putting them down and killing them Who are we just watched judas in the black messiah last night and a. You've gotta go watch it i. That's my pick for best picture this year. Which by the way tonight. i'm. I'm recording this. In april twenty fifth and tonight or the oscars. So we'll see what happens. I think it's got a pretty good shot. Okay let's read the holidays real quick worldwide..

tennessee north carolina North carolina april twenty fifth five seconds zambia cherish America tonight last night this year Cheung sam american Two words earth judas russian eighteen chinese cherokee
"cherokee" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"cherokee" Discussed on The Dictionary

"Way you silly brits This is chiefly british variation of the word checker spelled with a c k in the middle. Next we have cherry moya c. H. e. r. i m. o. y. a. You could also the at the beginning to an i chair a moya noun from seventeen thirty six. A round oblong or heart shaped fruit with a pale green rind that is born by a widely cultivated tropical american tree of the custard apple family custard apple and then also just. This tree is called the chair. Moya the scientific name is unknown. A- jerem mola and this is spanish moya. That's that it's a spanish word next. We have cherish now the verb. It's a verb. it's a verb is it only transitive. I'm looking for the in transitive and i do not see it so i think it's just transitive From the fourteenth century one a to hold dear feel or show affection for as in cherished her friends. Yeah you really should do that. I i try to be thankful for everybody in my life. Well most of them. I cherish them. I also cherish you my listeners. I really do. I don't know any of you really I know a couple of you. But i do cherish anybody who listens to this ridiculous thing. Okay when be to keep or cultivate with care and affection. Synonym is nurture as in cherishes. Her marriage no. His marriage cherishes his marriage to to entertain or harbor in the mind deeply and resolutely still cherishes that memory a synonym for everything is the word appreciate. Cherish double is an adjective and cherish. Her is a noun. Let's see what the etymology has to say from anglo-french cherries that's a prefix. It's a stem of share which means to cherish from chair which means deer from the latin caruso and there's more at the word charity next we have chernow's yom or chernow's them c. h. e. r. n. o. z. e. m. chernow's am noun from eighteen. Forty one any group of dark colored zonal soleil's with a deep rich hummus horizontal home scores. Okay so hamas. It's not the helmets that you think of not the food. There's only one m in this case. So i'm just gonna say hamas because i don't know how else to pronounce that deep rich homicide horizon found in regions of temperate to cool..

fourteenth century one m double latin Forty one spanish eighteen anglo british couple seventeen thirty french six american
100 Years After Tulsa Race Massacre, the Damage Remains

Sidedoor

01:46 min | 1 year ago

100 Years After Tulsa Race Massacre, the Damage Remains

"They were hurting people. Down convinced withhold labor internal in the whole building. We didn't know where they will take them. And then they set a house a factor. You could see the blazes from where we live over. The he'll not like the whole world was on fire. Burned over thirty square. Blocks seemed like a dream. See mac thing knocked. That ever happened. Clyde eddie jimmy lily. Franklin and eunice. Jackson were witnesses to the nineteen twenty one oklahoma race riot which started ostensibly because of an encounter between a young black shoeshiner and a white elevator operator over memorial day weekend in nineteen twenty. One the recordings were collected by the smithsonian's newly opened national museum of african american history and culture. It's foreign exhibit about the power of place in the african american experience in late may nineteen twenty one. Young man named dick rowland. Who was a tolson. Had an encounter with a young white woman on an elevator new downtown tulsa building. What happened on that elevator. We don't really know whether he stepped on her foot whether the elevator stopped short but what we do know is that young woman exited the elevator with claims that she was raped which he later recanted but to understand what happens next. You need to know more about what was going on. in oklahoma. at the time african americans had been moving to the oklahoma territory's since the eighteen forties some had come on the trail of tears both enslaved with cherokees and free members of the cherokee nation and had established themselves in pockets in communities all throughout eastern oklahoma

Thirty Square Clyde Eddie Jimmy Lily National Museum Of African Ame Dick Rowland Eunice Oklahoma Franklin Tolson Jackson Tulsa
Interview With Astronaut Susan Kilrain

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Astronaut Susan Kilrain

"A susan kill. Rain is a former navy pilot and astronaut test pilot school graduate and it is really great heavier with this for five hundred episode. It's good to be here. it's nice to meet you. So how did you get your start in aviation susan. Well back when i was growing up. We didn't have a lot of money. So my dad used to take us to the local airport to watch the airplanes land because it was free and it entertain dissolved for a little while and i just thought it would be the best thing ever to be able to fly. Those in was little little airplanes. You know one seventy twos and cherokee warriors and would you take your first flight then. When i was sixteen. I there's a program at my school. Where as a senior. You could take a month off from school and do something career-related completely away from the school if they approved your project and they approved mine to go. I was at boarding school. And i go back to georgia and get my private pilots license in one month. That's a steep steep hill to climb to get it all in one month. It was and it was also masters week in augusta georgia so the airport was kinda booming and i did a lot of touching goes for hours and got all my manage to get it all done somehow. Well that's neat so tell us about going to college. Embry riddle i. I applied to brutal thinking. I was going to go into their flight program but by that time i already had my private pilots license instrument rating and. I didn't wanna pay to do that over again. And somebody suggested that. The academics were really easy so i did. The engineering aeronautical engineering program and just flew on the side

Susan Kill Navy Rain Susan Georgia Embry Riddle Augusta
Prosecutor Plans to Seek Death Penalty in Atlanta-Area Spa Shootings

Atlanta's News & Talk with Mark Arum

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Prosecutor Plans to Seek Death Penalty in Atlanta-Area Spa Shootings

"Trouble team Traffic 95.5 WSB WSB Fulton Fulton County County D D A A will will seek seek the the death death penalty penalty in in the the Atlanta Atlanta spot spot Shootings, Shootings, long long has has now now been been indicted indicted on on murder murder charges charges in in Fulton Fulton County County District District Attorney Attorney Funny. Funny. Willis Willis says says she's she's also also going going to to seek seek hate hate crime charges and the death penalty. WSB legal expert Phil Holloway prosecutors going to have to prove to a jury satisfaction that what we call statutory special circumstances apply. And there's a long list of those basically, death penalty is reserved for the worst of the worst type murders in Holloway says he does expect Cherokee County will likely also seek the death

Fulton County County Atlanta Willis Willis Phil Holloway Fulton WSB Holloway Cherokee County
The intergenerational wisdom woven into Indigenous stories | Tai Simpson - TEST

TED Talks Daily

01:10 min | 1 year ago

The intergenerational wisdom woven into Indigenous stories | Tai Simpson - TEST

"Ina mezza so this might be the part where some of you get really really excited that there's a real live native american walking the stage right now so you have plans to run up to me later and tell me exactly. How much cherokee pedigree have. Don't do that don't do that. That's not a thing that connects us. It's not the native american jewelry you may or may not own nor is it your upbringing in proximity to indigenous people that connects us. But before i go there. I will translate for you. I cursed in. It is customary in many of our nation's to introduce ourselves i in our indigenous language. It is a way of honoring our elders and our ancestors for the sacrifices that they made for me to be alive and to take up the space. I spoke niimi. Putin's the language of the news person. My ancestors hear me. When i speak our language for those of you who don't understand. I think creator. I i offered. Thanks for our good day today. I told you that my name is the storyteller in the language of our colonizers. I am called tie simpson. I told you that. I am nez. Perce woman niimi pu as we call ourselves. I told you that. I am a direct descendant of chief. Red heart of the news person action. I told you.

Ina Mezza Niimi Putin Niimi Pu Simpson
"cherokee" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"cherokee" Discussed on KTRH

"Welcome. How can I help you? Yes, sir. We're interested in them. Did you see that? 21, Jeep Cherokee and Wanted to see what you had to say. And let me be. Let's let's be clear. We're talking Cherokee, not Grand Cherokee, right? Yeah. Okay. Um, They made some nice changes in 2021 on the turkey. Uh, nothing huge, but they did add some standard features for safety, which were badly needed. For the first time. It's standard equipment. You could get automatic emergency braking, blind spot monitoring lane keeping assist things that other issue these had had for a number of years that the Turkey really was behind on, and I think that's one of the reasons that Sales have been slow on them. They've added a couple of other trim levels for 2021, so they did some updates for this year. Uh what my issue with the Cherokee and you never hear me. Talk about it in the past has been that lack of safety features that other SUV's had And the price that the church has always been overpriced When you look at other SUV's in that same segment, and they corrected that for 2021 also, so I fully expect to see sales of jerky go up. With the changes that they made for 2021. Now there's still some 20 twenties out there. So if you're not all you know, if you're not into, you know a lot of safety features. There's a big rebates on that thing in 2020 will be a bargain. I'll tell you that, but how do you put a price on your safety? That's the problem. Yeah. Really Special people drive nowadays. Do they have What they call stability control or that strictly four wheel drive, you know, must something changed for this year? They came both ways and stability control is pretty much standard on every SUV nowadays, just because Jeep was one of the innovators of it because they've got such a high center of gravity. That that they have to do that. And so I can't. Tell you what 100% certainty. But I'm 99% that, yes, it will have stability control and it will be standard equipment on all jeeps. I appreciate your call Mike. Thanks so much. There's no reason to guess when you could know what to do about your next car called Khar Pro Yusa at 1 809 26 77 77. You are Go, Houston Snoop. Why? There were traffic.

Cherokee Turkey Khar Pro Yusa Houston Mike