22 Burst results for "Chenault"

"chenault" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:21 min | 18 hrs ago

"chenault" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"I'm Ted's current affairs curator. And the guest who's joining us now is not only a psychologically wise leader himself, but he looks to develop psychologically wise leaders that to put them out into the world. From 2001 to 2018, he was the CEO and chairman of American Express, and now he is the managing director and chairman of general catalyst, a venture capital firm, which seeks to develop organizations that put out positive change into the world. He's also the cofounder of one ten, which is a coalition of leading executives who have joined together to upskill higher and advance 1 million black Americans in ten years. Please welcome Ken chenault. Well, thank you so much for being here, Ken. It's great to be here with me. You know, you have a quote that you often say, the role of a leader is to divine reality and give hope. So in this time that we're living in with COVID and just massive changes in the workforce, how do you think about this idea of change and how does this quote apply to that? Well, the question is, how can you give people concrete reasons and also inspiration? To be hopeful. And in uncertain times, I think what's very important is the leader has to be grounded in some core values. Because to me what's most critical about leadership and leading in uncertain times, and I would emphasize that I think anyone at any level can be a leader. Their business, civic life, personal life. And what they have to recognize is if you want to lead, you have to be willing to serve. So you've got to have that servant leadership mentality. But what you have to do is stand for something. And organizations are guided by values and behaviors. That's the way you are creating a culture. And so in a time of uncertainty, what do you need to do? Well, one is you need to give people context. What's happening? You can admit that you're anxious. That there are reasons, in fact,.

general catalyst Ken chenault Ted American Express Ken
"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

17:27 min | 4 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Begin to face like many if not all companies certainly financial companies, enormous challenges during the financial crisis. Right. This is going to be I have to assume that this was your first not real test as a leader because you had had 9 11 and obviously others before, but this was going to be probably the most challenging business headwinds that you had ever faced. Right. I think for 9 11, it was the emotional challenge for an organization and the world obviously to come to grips with what had happened. But everyone was going through some form of challenge as a result of 9 11. In the financial crisis, that to your point guy was the most significant business challenge because as with some other financial services companies, we could have gone under. But I believe in a crisis you need to look for opportunity because most people panic in a crisis. And you clearly have to focus on the situation at hand because you got to get through that, but what you also need to do is to say, what are the opportunities as a result of the crisis? And what I was committed to was that we were going to selectively invest. And I think what was very, very important is that we were in a situation where we were one of the few financial services companies that did not cut their dividend because I believe that we have an obligation. To our shareholders and our investors. Right. And so we were able to come out of the financial crisis with terrific momentum. There's a narrative that I know that you are aware of. And the story is something like this, oversimplification, but MX comes out of the financial crisis and just guns blazing. Around 2015, the stock is trading at an all time high, $95 a share. You at this point in your career are starting to think about moving on, you've got a potential executive you're grooming to take over Edward Gilligan and this is a year that begins a difficult two year period for American Express for you stock price falls by almost half. You separate with Costco, which was a huge partnership. I mean, they were making big demands, and you said, forget it, we're not going to accommodate these demands. So this partnership is over. And I think it accounted for 8% of Costco's sales. It was a huge, which is yours. And of course, Edward Gilligan, the heir apparent he dies. He has a blood clot in any dies. Talk to me a little bit about that period, 2015 to 2017. Here's how I would characterize it first, most importantly, Ed was a terrific executive and a terrific person. And we'd worked together for 30 years. And we were very, very good friends. And I would not underestimate the shock and the impact of that. But then we had also the Department of Justice. We had a lawsuit there. The Department of Justice had filed against AmEx for violating federal antitrust laws you lose that. Meanwhile, Visa and Mastercard had settled with the Justice Department and AmEx continues to fight. I mean, it's like everything coming at you from different directions at this two year period. On the Justice Department case, we thought we were right. I felt strongly about that. You did not want to settle. I did not want to settle and then fortunately we wanted the Supreme Court level. And I was I feel terrific that we were vindicated. On Costco, I really thought about. I will tell you a guy I could have done a deal with Costco. I could have positioned it very well inside the company and to our investors, but American Express would have felt the impact of that probably 5 years after I left. And I could have said, look, I don't know what happened, my success or just wasn't doing the right thing as far as moving the business forward, and I in fact set to our board exactly that. We could do this deal. to you, but you know me, that is not operating with integrity. I'm not going to do that. And so the important thing on Costco is people begin to see signs of the progress. The stock stabilized began to recover as you know it got back to where it was. And in fact, a little bit above, right before I left. And I think probably there are plenty of people who are kicking themselves that they did not buy the stock at $51. 2015. You got it. You got it. That's why I kept mine. And then, what was very important, we had chase sapphire, which, of course, was a competing premium car to I guess kind of rival that rivaled your premium card, so they were coming at your premium product. That's right. And the reality is people have always been coming after the premium segment. But one of the things that I had a lot of confidence in was our platinum centurion products. And we study our competitors. But one of the things we did, which I think is an important lesson in a values driven business meaning that you understand what your value is to the customer. We actually further increase the value, and as we've done periodically, we increase the fee. What do most people do when they have a competitive incursion with particularly a product that tries to imitate the existing key lower the fee? They lower the rate. No, if you are really a value driven company, focus on building and enduring relationship and you have a differentiated value proposition, that's the power of a brand and a brand is a cluster of values both rational and emotional. And that's what is very important about American expresses are commitment to providing real value and so we were able to increase our fee a $100 from $450 to $550 and produce tremendous results. During that two year period, you did three things that I think many other leaders would not have done. They would have done the opposite. And you could make the argument that that would have been the right decision at the time. You didn't negotiate with Costco. You said, we're not going to settle with the Department of Justice. We're going to fight it. The other company settled, that would have made sense. And the third thing was the chase sapphire card comes out and the competitors come out. Instead of lowering the price on the platinum card, the AmEx, you increase the price, which is actually in some ways a smart psychological tactic is a suggest that there's greater value to it. So always not suggest there was all three of these things are almost counterintuitive, right? They don't seem to come from the traditional playbook of what you do in a crisis. You have proven right in all three of the cases. But I'm wondering, were there people around you who said, you know, Ken, are you sure, you know, we shouldn't negotiate with Costco? Are you sure we shouldn't settle with the DoJ? Are you sure we should raise prices on this card? Sure. I think the reality is in a leadership position, you want to make sure that you have the followership, but what you shouldn't do is, in fact, say, let me make a decision. That is the popular one, or will keep most people happy. That's not your role as a leader. You've got to do what is best for the company. And on Costco, what was very, very clear to me is I would have saddled the company with an uneconomic deal. That would have had real impacts. So the question was and we talked about this very directly with my management team and with the board is that the balance here is taking an expedient way out, which sometimes is the right course of action, but what we recognized is that it would only be a temporary benefit and it would foreclose us very importantly from investing in some very attractive growth opportunities for the company. And so that goes to the importance of courage that I think a leader needs to have. And let me be clear, we were very fortunate. I feel vindicated by the Supreme Court and the DoJ case. But let's be clear, it could have gone the other way. Sure. And so you've got to say, what's the principle and we're going to stand for that principle. But I had more confidence in the fact that we would get through Costco because that was more an hour control. So as challenging as Costco was personally and for the company, one of the points that I made inside the company is we have control of our destiny. Ken, as you know, we're living at a time now where folks like you, CEO, swarmer CEOs, wealthy business leaders and entrepreneurs are less popular. For a variety of reasons. And some well founded, right? There's incredible wealth inequality, despite things like corporate social responsibility and the things that corporations do. And the fact that they employ a lot of people, there are reasons, I think. Legitimate reasons for people to be angry, big companies and Fortune 500. And I wonder in your opinion, you must think about this. You must read oh, absolutely read about this and sort of reflect on your own, where you come from, because you come from a really modest background, and you went on to lead one of the biggest companies in the world. And I wonder how you sort of think about that and what you think needs to sort of be done differently and happen differently. Corporations are paying lower taxes now under the new regime and so on. So I just wonder what do you think about these times where we're kind of living in? From a corporation standpoint, it goes to the philosophy that I think people need to have is if you really want to build an enduring company, you want a stronger society and I really believe and part of it maybe is my aspirations growing up in the 50 60s and 70s, but I really believe that corporations exist because society allows us to exist. There's no entitlement that corporations should be able to operate. So if that's the case, I think we all have a responsibility and an obligation to help improve society and so companies need to determine what their responsibility is, and I think one of the things that needs to take place is a reframing of responsibility. Look, this is not just an issue for technology companies. Technology clearly is changing the world and I think we need a reframing of what the responsibilities are of companies and I think here's my view. Every company has values that they want their people. To adhere to and strive for. No one's perfect. Mistakes will be made, but the reality is, I would say simply hold the president to the same standards that you would hold someone who is on your board, someone who is in your top management or someone who was an employee at your company. If we tolerate and we all know in any organization if you tolerate people who don't operate with core values, that will damage the fabric of your organization. One of the things guy be useful to talk about general catalyst. Yeah, please, please do so. And I guess I should mention Joe kettles of venture capital firm that you began working for after leaving American Express. That's right. And one of the things that I was very excited about in my next chapter is I really wanted to be on the forefront with people who are going to change the world. Through technology and services and I was fortunate that the two founders of general catalysts who I've known for over 20 years, they also shared we were very aligned in our values. And we've developed a mission for general catalyst, which is to invest in positive powerful change that endures for Trump and war founders are investors or people and society. And I've loved it. I've also feel very strongly that diversity for technology companies and in the VC sector has been very, very poor and that's something I'm very focused on. And I also believe that most founders want to build enduring companies and so I really like working with founders right at the beginning of what are the values you want to put in your company as well as what the value proposition is that really is going to be a powerful one that's going to drive tremendous growth. And I've seen a high level of receptivity to that. And there's one company that we recently invested in called Guild Education that I think has the potential to transform workforce education. And so just as I believe a company, one of the things I always said at AmEx was innovator die. There's really not a choice. I'm now that's what I'm doing. And it is absolutely fantastic. So I mean, you get to AmEx, what is it that you were able to do? I mean, do you if you were sort of step on a balcony and look down at all of the executives, what are some of the qualities that you developed that helped you in the confidence of the team around you to put you at the top of the company? I really do think first and foremost is people really believe that I care about them. And I want to make a positive difference in their life, and that I want to win. And I want to win with values and what was very, very important is to be able to build trust. One of the things I always say to leaders is a real leader, shares the credit, but takes the blame. But I would say guy the underlying attributes are people need to believe that you can take them there. You have to offer a compelling vision, but the reality is they have to be able to trust you unreservedly, but at the same time, have the freedom to question you and challenge you. Because as a leader, you need to understand that you're not perfect and you need to create a level of vulnerability and strength. And one of the things I believe in leadership in general is part of what you're doing is you're managing contradictions. So.

Costco Edward Gilligan Department of Justice AmEx American Express Justice Department DoJ Supreme Court swarmer CEOs Ken Mastercard Visa Ed Joe kettles venture capital
"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:14 min | 4 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Express our deepest sympathies to the families of our colleagues that perished. Yeah. And what I said to them is American Express was really not about the building. It was about our people. And our people were really dedicated and committed to service and I was confident with them that we would overcome the challenges. Which, you know, obviously, you did. In the period after 9 11, there were some economic headwinds. Right. You sort of really begin to face like many if not all companies certainly financial companies, enormous challenges during the financial crisis. Right. This is going to be I have to assume that this was your first not real test as a leader because you had had 9 11 and obviously others before, but this was going to be probably the most challenging business headwinds that you had ever faced. Right. I think for 9 11, it was the emotional challenge for an organization and the world obviously to come to grips with what had happened. But everyone was going through some form of challenge as a result of 9 11. In the financial crisis, that to your point guy was the most significant business challenge because as with some other financial services companies, we could have gone under. But I believe in a crisis you need to look for opportunity because most people panic in a crisis. And you clearly have to focus on the situation at hand because you got to get through that, but what you also need to do is to say, what are the opportunities as a result of the crisis? And what I was committed to was that we were going to selectively invest. And I think what was very, very important is that we were in a situation where we were one of the few financial services companies that did not cut their dividend because I believe that we have an obligation. To our shareholders and our investors. Right. And so we were able to come out of the financial crisis with terrific momentum. There's a narrative that I know that you are aware of. And the story is something like this, oversimplification, but MX comes out of the financial crisis and just guns blazing. Around 2015, the stock is trading at an all time high, $95 a share. You at this point in your career are starting to think about moving on, you've got a potential executive you're grooming to take over Edward Gilligan and this is a year that begins a difficult two year period for American Express for you stock price falls by almost half. You separate with Costco, which was a huge partnership. I mean, they were making big demands, and you said, forget it, we're not going to accommodate these demands. So this partnership is over. And I think it accounted for 8% of Costco's sales. It was a huge, which is yours. And of course, Edward Gilligan, the heir apparent he dies. He has a blood clot in any dies. Talk to me a little bit about that period, 2015 to 2017. Here's how I would characterize it first, most importantly, Ed was a terrific executive and a terrific person. And we'd worked together for 30 years. And we were very, very good friends. And I would not underestimate the shock and the impact of that. But then we had also the Department of Justice. We had a lawsuit there. The Department of Justice had filed against AmEx for violating federal antitrust laws you lose that. Meanwhile, Visa and Mastercard had settled with the Justice Department and AmEx continues to fight. I mean, it's like everything coming at you from different directions at this two year period. On the Justice Department case, we thought we were right. I felt strongly about that. You did not want to settle. I did not want to settle and then fortunately we wanted the Supreme Court level. And I was I feel terrific that we were vindicated. On Costco, I really thought about. I will tell you a guy I could have done a deal with Costco. I could have positioned it very well inside the company and to our investors, but American Express would have felt the impact of that probably 5 years after I left. And I could have said, look, I don't know what happened, my success or just wasn't doing the right thing as far as moving the business forward, and I in fact set to our board exactly that. We could do this deal. to you, but you know me, that is not operating with integrity. I'm not going to do that. And so the important thing on Costco is people begin to see signs of the progress. The stock stabilized began to recover as you know it got back to where it was. And in fact, a little bit above, right before I left. And I think probably there are plenty of people who are kicking themselves that they did not buy the stock at $51. 2015. You got it. You got it. That's why I kept mine. And then, what was very important, we had chase sapphire, which, of course, was a competing premium car to I guess kind of rival that rivaled your premium card, so they were coming at your premium product. That's right. And the reality is people have always been coming after the premium segment. But one of the things that I had a lot of confidence in was our platinum centurion products. And we study our competitors. But one of the things we did, which I think is an important lesson in a values driven business meaning that you understand what your value is to the customer. We actually further increase the value, and as we've done periodically, we increase the fee. What do most people do when they have a competitive incursion with particularly a product that tries to imitate the existing key lower the fee? They lower the rate. No, if you are really a value driven company, focus on building and enduring relationship and you have a differentiated value proposition, that's the power of a brand and a brand is a cluster of values both rational and emotional. And that's what is very important about American expresses are commitment to providing real value and so we were able to increase our fee a $100 from $450 to $550 and produce tremendous results. During that two year period, you did three things that I think many other leaders would not have done. They would have done the opposite. And you could make the argument that that would have been the right decision at the time. You didn't negotiate with Costco. You said, we're not going to settle with the Department of Justice. We're going to fight it. The other company settled, that would have made sense. And the third thing was the chase sapphire card comes out and the competitors come out..

Edward Gilligan Costco American Express Department of Justice AmEx Justice Department Mastercard Ed Visa Supreme Court
"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

25:55 min | 4 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"So you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was what you were hoping to do with your life. It was that I had actually an interest in politics and I thought that was a place where I could have an impact, the headmaster of my school took a very strong interest in me and he was one who my freshman year. He said, I think you're really bright. I think you're very talented. I think you could be an incredible leader, but you've got to really apply yourself consistently. And not at what you just like to do. And he started talking to me about the fact that I could be a leader. And then that evolved to you could go into politics. And the key thing there for me was this awakening to the fact that people thought I had the attributes and the capabilities to be a leader that was incredibly fortifying for me. And gave me something to aspire to, and I think that's critical for anyone is that you need aspirations, much bigger than day to today objectives that you might set. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going, carbon neutral. Plan a tree every time you swipe and earn 1% cash back every month that you reach carbon zero. Aspiration zero, one card zero carbon footprint. Visit aspiration dot com slash credit to learn more. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated. Welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. When you graduated from law school, was it your intention still at that point to do civil rights work? 'cause I know you went right to a law firm in New York, but was your idea? Well, let me do this for a couple of years and then I'll go do the thing that really that's really meaningful to me. Yeah, what I thought as I looked at the path of lawyers who went into civil rights law, I saw that they went to and established law firm for two or three years. And then they entered the public service world. So I went to a law firm and actually it was going fine. I had some friends who were at Bain and company. My wife, Kathy and I went up to Boston, we were newly married and it was a free weekend. And what impressed me was I really felt this energy in the place, and the firm had had a real startup feel because it in fact was a startup on a relative basis in the consulting world. And I went there more because of a feeling that these were really dynamic, exciting people and then I had started to think about what was the next frontier of the civil rights movement and for me what I started to feel was that business and law had to go through more dramatic change because the reality is that the presence of African Americans in business was minimum and I also felt businesses really impact people's lives in pretty fundamental ways. And what I thought in going to Bain is I would learn about business, but I would actually focus on starting my own business or acquiring a company, so the last thought in my mind was that I would go to a large company. I just thought that a large company would really not be accepting of me. And then I was contacted by an executive recruiter who told me that American Express was looking for two or three people in strategic planning. And I had just read an article about American Express doing a joint venture with Warner cable. And that was viewed as a new frontier. And the person who I interviewed with who was forming the group was Luke gerstner. Went on to become CEO of IBM and that's right. And Lou became a mentor to me and someone that I've stayed close to and I'm close to this day, but one of the things that Lou said to me that was really impactful is I want a few catalytic agents of change. And that phrase has always stuck with me because being a catalytic agent of change was really important to me, and the other thing that Lou said to me is I said to Lou, I'm not sure I really will fit in a large company. And Lou said to me, you should come here and if you're really good, I will recommend you for any opportunity you want to pursue. Why did you think that you wouldn't fit into a bigger organization? So I think the reality is American Express as with many blue chip companies was a predominantly white company and the question for me was would I be given the opportunity to accept? Because I certainly didn't have many role models that I could point to in large companies who look like me who, in fact, had excelled. There were no African Americans at that time who were CEOs or CFOs or CMOs. So it was it was a new environment. That said from the history of the civil rights movement, what I started to realize is this was an opportunity and an obstacle that was meant to be overcome. And one of my favorite quotes from Nelson Mandela is that it always seems impossible until it's done. And that's from a man who it was impossible to conceive that he would go from jail cell to president of South Africa. So I think that was a motivation to me that it was a challenge to be overcome. Did you say that to Liu? I mean, were you able to be that right with him at the time? No. I didn't phrase it in racial terms. I just said, I just don't know how I would do in a large company. And what was interesting, my first day first morning, I came in to a position above an entry level position of someone coming out of business school. Because of my experience at Bain, they had me as a director. So I was clearly in lower middle management. But I remember sitting in the lobby waiting for someone to come out and a senior person came over and said to me in pretty menacing terms, what are you doing here? Wow. And I said, this is my first day at American Express. And he said really let me check. Wow. So that was my introduction. But all that said, what I think is very important is I had as it turned out a tremendous set of opportunities at American Express and luster was viewed incredibly positively, but he was also viewed as a very tough and demanding boss and the fact that I did well with him enhance my credibility, but I would say it'd be very clear that I know that Lou and others had to intervene with other senior people at times who clearly would not have advanced me because of my race. So 1981, you don't I mean, how do you remember kind of just coping with that personally? Because for anybody, especially a young person because you are still a young man, you're in your late 20s and starting a career and that can be rattling for anyone and here you are facing that more than just on the rare occasion. How did you internalize that and cope with it and just keep moving forward? I was very fortunate that I had parents who overcame obstacles went to college and so my experience is not different from literally hundreds of thousands of African Americans that have had to break a barrier and that's one of the things we call it. It's the black tack. And that's not something we should accept. But at the end of the day, what I was not prepared to do was to allow those obstacles to hold me back. But because of Brown V board, because of the civil rights laws, I was being given the opportunity and I will tell you, I don't know how I would have handled psychologically the environment pre Brown V board of education. Those are incredible heroes that need to be even more celebrated. So you get to AmEx, obviously see something in you and sees in you a pretty successful future there. But meantime, there are other executives who don't who don't see that. Did you feel in those first few years when you were there that I don't know, you weren't going to be included in the gulf rounds or included in the lunches or was there like a click of your cohort that you didn't make you feel like you were part of them? Here's the deal. I was not trying to become CEO of the company. Remember, I thought, after ten years, I said, I guess I'm going to be here for a while. But the first few years, I thought I'm going to be here for a few years and then I'm going to do my own thing. You did not see yourself as a life or when you got there in 1981. I didn't see myself as a life or I didn't have an aspiration to be CEO of the company. And in retrospect, that gave me a level of comfort that my life wasn't tied into it. And what I would say is the majority of people in top management were very receptive to me. There were a few who were not, but what was important is I really focused on driving outcomes on developing people and frankly, I didn't socialize that much outside the office. So 1981, you don't imagine yourself making this your life's career. No. But at some point, obviously, you must have woken up and realized that you were you were being promoted to various positions of authority higher and higher taking on more responsibility. At what point did you realize, well, maybe actually I could be CEO, this place one day. Well, it's interesting, one of the first businesses I ran was a business selling merchandise to the mail that we were able to grow into a very substantial way. And just to be clear, you were selling like luggage tags and clocks. Well, luggage tags luggage, electronics, jewelry. Card holders, through catalog toys, absolutely. And card holder would get a catalog from American expression. And that's amazing, but that was a business because it's not a problem. And statement stuffers, we actually grew it to over $600 million in sales. And in two and a half years we say statement stuffers like advertising from an offer's inside the statements oh yeah, wow. Yeah. It was one of the most successful direct marketing businesses and I in fact tried to buy the business from the company. You wanted to buy as you thought, I could spin this off and then I ran my own business. Yeah. You think about not that I would necessarily have the vision of Amazon, but yeah. If that had moved with the Internet, I think it could have business. A great business. Things worked out all right for me. I'm not complaining. But I was able to put together a very, very attractive proposal and I got it through most of the levels and then it came to Lou gerstner and he turned me down. And I was really upset. He turned you down for he said I'm not gonna allow you to buy the company. The proposal that I'd gotten people to agree to is I would be able to use the American Express brand for ten years. And I would have access to the list. The list of AmEx card holders. That's right. And Lou said, you know, that's a strategic asset. I'm not going to let you have it. And I was really, really upset. Yeah. And then he said, on top of that, can I'm moving you into the card business? And I said, look, I don't want to go in the courtroom business. And he said, well, let me sort of explain, this is what I want you to do. And Lou also said to me, I think you can really rise in this company. And I think you could one day run this company and there's no way you're going to be able to do that without coming into the card business. It's really interesting how failure and what seems like a bad luck at the time was actually a hidden blessing, right? Because you wanted to buy that company and spin it out. And I'm sure you were really frustrated and upset about it at the time, but I will tell you, I was emotionally devastated. And I was a pretty resilient person. But it took me a month or two to really get out of a funk, because I saw my whole world was I really had this vision that I could create this direct marketing powerhouse. And this was a dream and Lou and the company were taking away this dream. And I just saw that I'd be stifled. And I think the important point here is that you have to deal with setbacks, but you also have to step back and really analyze the opportunity. And then the person or persons extending you the opportunity, do you trust them, do they have your best interests at heart? And what I felt is that Lou, I could understand you got to put yourself in the other person's position as much as I wanted this. I had to admit that lose focus on the assets, the brand, which is incredibly valuable. And the data and the card member access, I had to admit intellectually, he had a valid argument. And at the same time, I trusted that he had my best interest from a career standpoint. life and your career is generally not a straight line and sometimes for people if it's too straight a line, they have a pretty steep fall. I'm guy raz, and you're listening to wisdom from the top. We'll be right back. This message comes from NPR sponsor, the American Express business platinum card. Packed with features, like 1.5 times membership rewards points on big purchases and in select business categories, over $1000 in statement credits per year with select business partners and 5 times membership rewards points on flights and prepaid hotels, booked through AmEx travel dot com. Get the card built for business by American Express, terms and point cap apply. Learn more at American Express dot com slash B platinum. Support for this podcast comes from good Rx, thinking about breaking some bad habits. Start with this one. Overpaying for prescriptions to do that always check good Rx. They instantly find discounts and compare prices at all the pharmacies in your neighborhood. Good Rx is free easy to use and could instantly save you up to 80%. Learn more at good Rx dot com slash XXX. Good Rx is not insurance but can be used instead of insurance. In 2021, good Rx users saved an average of 79% on retail prescription prices. This is wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. Okay, so one of fast forward a little bit because I know you've been involved in the travel business and then that became a huge part of AmEx and we tend to think of, of course, of AmEx is a credit card company, but really the travel services were huge, and then you get into the card business. And then 2001, you are named CEO, but I think it was like three or four months later that 9 11 happened. It wasn't just 9 11, but AmEx headquarters were directly across the street from the World Trade Center. Were you there that day in the building? I was not in the building. I was actually in Salt Lake City. I was visiting one of our service centers. I was in my hotel room and I was on a conference call with a team of American Express people who were in a conference room on the 51st floor overlooking the World Trade Center. And I had the TV on the sound off and I saw the plane hit the building and the screams on the phone from the conference room. And it was, and then obviously everyone scattered. And we lost 11 of our colleagues who were in the north tower of the World Trade Center. Which I did not know that at the time, I didn't know what was happening. I couldn't communicate with the team for a few hours. And then fortunately, I was able to get some of my top leadership team together and I instructed people, one, two, find out the whereabouts of all of our people in the tri state area to account for their safety and to help them out, second was to make sure we were helping our customers as well as our non customers all over the world. Because we got to report, obviously, of what was happening from a travel standpoint. And third, very practically, to start looking for temporary real estate space because it looked like we were going to be out of our building for several months. You were building was badly damaged. We had 11 floors of the building were damaged, we could not inhabit the building because of the damage. And I was able to go back to New York within two days. But as you might know guy, the impact on the travel industry and the card business was very severe. Travel volumes dropped significantly or billings dropped significantly, then we obviously had our 11 colleagues who perished and so one of the first things I did was to visit with as many of the families as I could and try to offer some comfort to them. And then after two weeks, I realized that and felt I needed to speak to as many people in person. I did a number of video conferences and teleconferences, but we rented out Madison Square Garden and had, frankly, there was no script. I just spoke from the heart of one trying to communicate how much I cared about them..

Lou American Express NPR Mastercard Warner cable Luke gerstner Bain bowdoin college bowden Brown V board of education FDIC Maine Vietnam Lou gerstner Nelson Mandela Kathy Liu
"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:59 min | 4 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. When you graduated from law school, was it your intention still at that point to do civil rights work? 'cause I know you went right to a law firm in New York, but was your idea? Well, let me do this for a couple of years and then I'll go do the thing that really that's really meaningful to me. Yeah, what I thought as I looked at the path of lawyers who went into civil rights law, I saw that they went to and established law firm for two or three years. And then they entered the public service world. So I went to a law firm and actually it was going fine. I had some friends who were at Bain and company. My wife, Kathy and I went up to Boston, we were newly married and it was a free weekend. And what impressed me was I really felt this energy in the place, and the firm had had a real startup feel because it in fact was a startup on a relative basis in the consulting world. And I went there more because of a feeling that these were really dynamic, exciting people and then I had started to think about what was the next frontier of the civil rights movement and for me what I started to feel was that business and law had to go through more dramatic change because the reality is that the presence of African Americans in business was minimum and I also felt businesses really impact people's lives in pretty fundamental ways. And what I thought in going to Bain is I would learn about business, but I would actually focus on starting my own business or acquiring a company, so the last thought in my mind was that I would go to a large company. I just thought that a large company would really not be accepting of me. And then I was contacted by an executive recruiter who told me that American Express was looking for two or three people in strategic planning. And I had just read an article about American Express doing a joint venture with Warner cable. And that was viewed as a new frontier. And the person who I interviewed with who was forming the group was Luke gerstner. Went on to become CEO of IBM and that's right. And Lou became a mentor to me and someone that I've stayed close to and I'm close to this day, but one of the things that Lou said to me that was really impactful is I want a few catalytic agents of change. And that phrase has always stuck with me because being a catalytic agent of change was really important to me, and the other thing that Lou said to me is I said to Lou, I'm not sure I really will fit in a large company. And Lou said to me, you should come here and if you're really good, I will recommend you for any opportunity you want to pursue. Why did you think that you wouldn't fit into a bigger organization? So I think the reality is American Express as with many blue chip companies was a predominantly white company and the question for me was would I be given the opportunity to accept? Because I certainly didn't have many role models that I could point to in large companies who look like me who, in fact, had excelled. There were no African Americans at that time who were CEOs or CFOs or CMOs. So it was it was a new environment. That said from the history of the civil rights movement, what I started to realize is this was an opportunity and an obstacle that was meant to be overcome. And one of my favorite quotes from Nelson Mandela is that it always seems impossible until it's done. And that's from a man who it was impossible to conceive that he would go from jail cell to president of South Africa. So I think that was a motivation to me that it was a challenge to be overcome. Did you say that to Liu? I mean, were you able to be that right with him at the time? No. I didn't phrase it in racial terms. I just said, I just don't know how I would do in a large company. And what was interesting, my first day first morning, I came in to a position above an entry level position of someone coming out of business school. Because of my experience at Bain, they had me as a director. So I was clearly in lower middle management. But I remember sitting in the lobby waiting for someone to come out and a senior person came over and said to me in pretty menacing terms, what are you doing here? Wow. And I said, this is my first day at American Express. And he said really let me check. Wow. So that was my introduction. But all that said, what I think is very important is I had as it turned out a tremendous set of opportunities at American Express and luster was viewed incredibly positively, but he was also viewed as a very tough and demanding boss and the fact that I did well with him enhance my credibility, but I would say it'd be very clear that I know that Lou and others had to intervene with other senior people at times who clearly would not have advanced me because.

Lou American Express Warner cable Luke gerstner Bain Kathy Boston New York IBM Nelson Mandela Liu South Africa
"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

02:12 min | 4 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going, carbon neutral. Plan a tree every time you swipe and earn 1% cash back every month that you reach carbon zero. Aspiration zero, one card zero carbon footprint. Visit aspiration dot com slash credit to learn more. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated. Welcome.

"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:20 min | 4 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Our heritage, we should absolutely fight for our rights. And fight for the rights of other people who were disadvantaged. And one of the mantras of my father was focus on what you can control and the one thing you can control is your performance. That was something that I think about all the time. I think you clearly have to fight against things you can't control. But I really do believe in self empowerment and the power of an individual being focused. However, growing up as a black person in America in the 50s and the 60s, there were countless incidents that I faced personally and my family faced. Fortunately, I had two parents who could really counsel me. I'll give you one example. I was on a bus, going to school. I was probably 9 years old. I was talking to a few other students on the bus. And a student came over to me and said, so you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was what you were hoping to do with your life. It was that I had actually an interest in politics and I thought that was a place where I could have an impact, the headmaster of my school took a very strong interest in me and he was one who my freshman year. He said, I think you're really bright. I think you're very talented. I think you could be an incredible leader, but you've got to really apply yourself consistently. And not at what you just like to do. And he started talking to me about the fact that I could be a leader. And then that evolved to you could go into politics. And the key thing there for me was this awakening to the fact that people thought I had the attributes and the capabilities to be a leader that was incredibly fortifying for me. And gave me something to aspire to, and I think that's critical for anyone is that you need aspirations, much bigger than day to today objectives that you might set. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going, carbon neutral. Plan a tree every time you swipe and earn 1% cash back every month that you reach carbon zero. Aspiration zero, one card zero carbon footprint. Visit aspiration dot com slash credit to learn more. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated. Welcome.

bowdoin college bowden America Maine Vietnam NPR Mastercard FDIC
"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:40 min | 4 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Being focused. However, growing up as a black person in America in the 50s and the 60s, there were countless incidents that I faced personally and my family faced. Fortunately, I had two parents who could really counsel me. I'll give you one example. I was on a bus, going to school. I was probably 9 years old. I was talking to a few other students on the bus. And a student came over to me and said, so you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was what you were hoping to do with your life. It was that I had actually an interest in politics and I thought that was a place where I could have an impact, the headmaster of my school took a very strong interest in me and he was one who my freshman year. He said, I think you're really bright. I think you're very talented. I think you could be an incredible leader, but you've got to really apply yourself consistently. And not at what you just like to do. And he started talking to me about the fact that I could be a leader. And then that evolved to you could go into politics. And the key thing there for me was this awakening to the fact that people thought I had the attributes and the capabilities to be a leader that was incredibly fortifying for me. And gave me something to aspire to, and I think that's critical for anyone is that you need aspirations, much bigger than day to today objectives that you might set. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going, carbon neutral. Plan a tree every time you swipe and earn 1% cash back every month that you reach carbon zero. Aspiration zero, one card zero carbon footprint. Visit aspiration dot com slash credit to learn more. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated. Welcome.

bowdoin college bowden America Maine Vietnam NPR Mastercard international incor FDIC
"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:53 min | 4 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Wells. Often talked about the fact that we were brown babies, meaning we were beneficiaries of brown V board of education. I was born in 1951, Ted, I think was born in 1949 and we were able to have opportunities that, frankly, had been denied people who had gone before us. And one of the things that my parents really focused on was that we need to be very, very aware of racism. Very proud of our heritage, we should absolutely fight for our rights. And fight for the rights of other people who were disadvantaged. And one of the mantras of my father was focus on what you can control and the one thing you can control is your performance. That was something that I think about all the time. I think you clearly have to fight against things you can't control. But I really do believe in self empowerment and the power of an individual being focused. However, growing up as a black person in America in the 50s and the 60s, there were countless incidents that I faced personally and my family faced. Fortunately, I had two parents who could really counsel me. I'll give you one example. I was on a bus, going to school. I was probably 9 years old. I was talking to a few other students on the bus. And a student came over to me and said, so you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was what you were hoping to do with your life. It was that I had actually an interest in politics and I thought that was a place where I could have an impact, the headmaster of my school took a very strong interest in me and he was one who my freshman year. He said, I think you're really bright. I think you're very talented. I think you could be an incredible leader, but you've got to really apply yourself consistently. And not at what you just like to do. And he started talking to me about the fact that I could be a leader. And then that evolved to you could go into politics. And the key thing there for me was this awakening to the fact that people thought I had the attributes and the capabilities to be a leader that was incredibly fortifying for me. And gave me something to aspire to, and I think that's critical for anyone is that you need aspirations, much bigger than day to today objectives that you might set. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going, carbon neutral. Plan a tree every time you swipe and earn 1% cash back every month that you reach carbon zero. Aspiration zero, one card zero carbon footprint. Visit aspiration dot com slash credit to learn more. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated..

Wells Ted bowdoin college bowden America Maine Vietnam NPR Mastercard FDIC
"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:55 min | 4 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Easier for people to travel abroad without cash. And for most of the 20th century, travelers checks were the company's core business. But by the late 1970s, credit cards started to gain a lot of traction. And Ken Chan was one of the early disruptors of the company who pushed for a pivot away from travelers checks to double down, on cards. And for much of the 1980s, and even 1990s, Ken spent his career expanding the company's global reach until he himself became its top leader in 2001. He wasn't just the first African American CEO at AmEx, Ken was also one of the very few African American CEOs among the Fortune 500. Ken Chanel grew up in NASA county on Long Island. His dad was a dentist and his mom was a dental hygienist. He was born just a few years before the landmark Brown versus board of education case that outlawed racial segregation in public schools across the U.S.. Well, I think what was very important for me at that time, one of my close friends, Ted wells. Often talked about the fact that we were brown babies, meaning we were beneficiaries of brown V board of education. I was born in 1951, Ted, I think was born in 1949 and we were able to have opportunities that, frankly, had been denied people who had gone before us. And one of the things that my parents really focused on was that we need to be very, very aware of racism. Very proud of our heritage, we should absolutely fight for our rights. And fight for the rights of other people who were disadvantaged. And one of the mantras of my father was focus on what you can control and the one thing you can control is your performance. That was something that I think about all the time. I think you clearly have to fight against things you can't control. But I really do believe in self empowerment and the power of an individual being focused. However, growing up as a black person in America in the 50s and the 60s, there were countless incidents that I faced personally and my family faced. Fortunately, I had two parents who could really counsel me. I'll give you one example. I was on a bus, going to school. I was probably 9 years old. I was talking to a few other students on the bus. And a student came over to me and said, so you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was what you were hoping to do with your life. It was that I had actually an interest in politics and I thought that was a place where I could have an impact, the headmaster of my school took a very strong interest in me and he was one who my freshman year. He said, I think you're really bright. I think you're very talented. I think you could be an incredible leader, but you've got to really apply yourself consistently. And not at what you just like to do. And he started talking to me about the fact that I could be a leader. And then that evolved to you could go into politics. And the key thing there for me was this awakening to the fact that people thought I had the attributes and the capabilities to be a leader that was incredibly fortifying for me. And gave me something to aspire to, and I think that's critical for anyone is that you need aspirations, much bigger than day to today objectives that you might set. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top..

Ken Chan Ken Chanel Brown versus board of educatio Ted wells Ken AmEx America Long Island NASA Ted bowdoin college bowden Maine Vietnam
"chenault" Discussed on The High Stakes Fantasy Football Hour

The High Stakes Fantasy Football Hour

04:55 min | 8 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on The High Stakes Fantasy Football Hour

"Marvin jones When when you look at who to start week to week in this jaguars offense now that you know. There's no dj chart a lot of things going on there balking and first of all you had it right almost all trevor lawrence. Bassett's he'll mary's at this point So that's that's understand. Exactly right Viscous you know was player that targeted to get in the lineup. Wherever i could this week he's you know he is essentially Ah a running back playing wide receiver in this offense. He's six foot one hundred and thirty pounds he looks. That's listrik wait. I think he's probably a little bit closer to forty. He was four six guy at the combine. And that is his place speed until he starts running downhill. He's bubble screen guy. That's how they started. Their gang is nothing in common absolutely nothing in common with dj chart and he would have probably had a bigger game is charged had stayed on the field. Because this is your underneath guy Tell you what you got to be a player play those to play the cincinnati bengals underneath with the with the kid wilson from wyoming plane at middle linebacker for him number fifty. Five but yes. This is a player that you should have in your lineup. Every week going forward. Marvin jones is going to pick up in the deeper passing game The longer passing out over the middle. That's where you're Dj charge is going to get where those targets are going to end up. But i just can't say enough about How these receivers need to help this quarterback lawrence chenault needs look Tomorrow into to learn a little more about how to play position. They're not sharp. They offer outs. Don't come out. Sharpen chris one of the rousers problem stuff that you brought that up last night but shark you know. He's got a lot of football in front of cars twenty three years old next week. I think he's looking a very big big Season for all the directors. Anyone the scott him was going to be rewarded for j. flake who has Who who will be joining me on the road of his high-stakes slowdown next week. was packing up..

Marvin jones trevor lawrence jaguars Bassett mary cincinnati bengals lawrence chenault wyoming wilson chris football flake scott
"chenault" Discussed on Establish The Run

Establish The Run

05:57 min | 9 months ago

"chenault" Discussed on Establish The Run

"Best ball streets. Their puppy tournament is just five dollars to get in. If you sign up for our draft kit and you've never had underdog account before you get thirty five dollars credit easy game. Eat if you already have an underdog count. They'll just give you ten dollars because you have the etr draft kit. Let's get into it here and we have bad news to start real bad news. Actually feel bad for the kid. Obviously feel bad for anybody. Who's drafted him travers at. Ti is going to miss the entire season after injuring his foot against the saints on monday night. Football sad times. And it's sad. Because i think even had some sharp plays on jaguars to win. They have sea south. I think that hurts that. I think it hurts. Trevor lawrence helps james robinson who i personally had a pretty big fade on evan immediate reactions to travis at tea and missing the entire season. It sucks heat injuries. But you know the the beat must go. On and john james robinson was actually in the overvalued section. And he's gonna. i'm at the pull him out because he's gonna rocket up the rankings. I mean he's probably gonna end up somewhere around or be twenty overall. If not a little bit higher he does have three down skill set as he showed an undrafted rookie. Last year. carlos. Hyde is almost certainly going to be involved. But he's never been a particularly adept pass catcher in. I think that at the end of the day james robinson is now staring back at a role where he could see sixteen twenty touches a game. Yeah and by the way. It's twelve fifteen on tuesday. This news just broke from adam. Schefter mentioned about five minutes ago. We have not had a chance to fully digest this yet. I will say that. I think james robinson was a feed for me because lack of asking rome and it was so clear. Chavez was gonna take a lot of the past work and siphon off a decent amount of early down work. Now you can project james robinson who was running with the first team on a majority early down snaps anyways as every back. Go back and listen to brandon talk about this jaguars offensive line. Jaguars offensive line could be very good. So man robinson is going to scream up the boards are rankings. We'll be updating for that by the time this comes out any other effects on the jaguars you think past games. Chenault i mean there are some risks. Chenault was going to overlap. Which is out the window now and i still like. This is my favorite of the jaguars wider savers. Any thoughts there. Liska chenault is going to see some upward movement On on mytalk one fifty as a player that they had sort of designated a roll like a gadget role and a manufacturer touch role that urban meyer initially wanted cadavers. Tony to fill but he went in front of the jags they went with. Travis t. n. Tragedy chan's out for the year. I think if you look at throughout the rest of their depth chart throughout the rest of their skill positions la- viscous chenault makes the most sense to fill that role in addition to he was already locked into to the slot receiver duties so yeah i think that he's gonna move up At least a few spots in the top fifty all right be sure you're checking out the rankings. Again these will be updated by the time. This podcast comes out. I want to move on to the rushing rookie quarterbacks who have been a huge part of our draft process this year trae lance and justin fields. I'm i don't wanna say worried. But i thought it was notable that on sixty three preseason snaps treat lance's only rushed one time one time for eight yards. Meanwhile justin fields in about seventy snaps nine kerry seventy nine yards and one touchdown. I'm curious what you think. Do you think this is a preseason thing with trae lance running. Do you think this is the coach's telling him hey don't go out there and get killed. It's the preseason work on your progressions or lance maybe more of a pocket passer than we envisioned and to me. I still like trae but that we cap his ceiling. Plenty what do you think about trailing. It's not rushing hardly at all in the preseason. I really don't make anything. I don't have any strong takeaways from it from a negative standpoint that they're not gonna use them as a runner. I think that actually go back. And listen to the schefter pod and he talked about how he was really trailing his Football i q. Football i intelligence. That really put him over the edge when they were making that that third overall pick but it also. I am sure how to do. Well in schefter mentioned this that there were just things trae lance could do on the field that match jones could not in one of them is be a dynamic dual threat and he absolutely was at north dakota state in his second year there his only full year as a starter. He ran for eleven hundred yards and fourteen touchdowns any averaged over the course of his college career. Seven yards per carry so. I absolutely think that's going to be a big part of their offense. Just like it was with kyle shanahan in washington with rg three yep and trillions played a reasonably good game in the preseason games still expect him to have at least a fifty fifty shot if not better to start week one. Meanwhile though man justin fields. I mean it would be humiliating to start andy dalton over justin fields and yet you can say the offense disaster. That's true but just the fields has the legs to avoid it. Andy dalton is going to get killed back there. Just feel already. Nine kerry seventy nine yards and one touchdown in roughly seventy snaps are so low but more than one games worth so yeah with the offensive line situation. I mean i think justin fields and trae land actually really close right now. I know trillions goes a good round or two before lance. But i'm encouraged by what i've seen from justin fields in the preseason. How close do you think he is too trae lance right now. Yeah i think that the gap if there was a big one. I think it is absolutely narrowed. I think that you can put more trust into the forty niners offense as an entity. Then you can into the bears offense but from rushing standpoint. I mean there..

james robinson jaguars justin fields Chenault trae lance Trevor lawrence john james robinson Liska chenault chenault Football Schefter evan travis lance Hyde
"chenault" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"chenault" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"But i'll give you an example. Ibm tom watson founder of ibm in the early fifties came out against separate but equal. And so when people say to me. Business should stay out of society. I reject that. Because i have a long term perspective for companies. And if we're going to prosper in the long term we'd need a very strong society so yes we can't speak out on every issue but for example the issue of voting rights. What is more fundamental. That's the life of our democracy. Just think if more businesses had followed tom watson and ibm and condemn separate but equal but also said. We're actually going to hire black employees. We would have been a more advanced society than we are today. Let's be very clear. Business gets involved in issues that affects their business and has broader impact on society. But yet some of these same people are saying. I don't want to get involved in the broader society. But i'll get involved in issues that affect the broader society as long as it helps my company alone that doesn't work. There are some businesses some ceos recently coined base other. Things are sort of dictated that the workplace isn't an appropriate environment for having those discussions. You disagree with that. Yes i do. Let me be very clear. I don't think the workplace is one where you're getting into arguments every day and you're not doing your work. The priority clearly has to be you. Do your work but to in fact say i don't want you at your break to in fact engage in talking about issues aside from work. I just don't think that's appropriate. Are you telling me. I can't talk about my family. I can't talk about things. I believe in that. I'm passionate about what i would ask. People who take that position is. I hope you've been remained consistent that you will not talk about broader issues that will benefit your company. You cannot have it. Both ways. And i don't believe in that type of censorship. You mentioned that after. George floyd you spoke to ken frazier and it sort of led to the creation of one ten earlier this year. You paired up with ken again to organize an open letter about voting rights. And you've got hundreds of companies and executives decide. How did that come about. Yeah so a few days before the statement as we became more aware of what was happening in georgia and other states we frankly said we gotta do something and we had the idea that what we wanted to do was in fact to write a letter to corporate america and say that voting rights is fundamental to our democracy we believe in capitalism we believe in our democracy but the life blood is voting rights. What we also said is for black americans. The path to voting was tortured path. People were killed for protesting the right to vote the need for the right to vote. But for all americans. This is a fundamental right and i think what was particularly impactful is corporate. America responded resoundingly. And who would have thought literally. In a matter of days hundreds of people would come together and major companies from every industry sector and clearly. There were some people who said boy. We're concerned that this could be political. We said this is not political. This is nonpartisan. And this is a fundamental american right and my view is frankly. If you can't stand up for that. I don't know what you stand up for before. Going into business you. you're a lawyer. Thought about going into civil rights law. Now you've kinda come full circle. You are inactive from a corporate perspective in some ways now. Was that a conscious. Harking back where you always thinking. I'm going to get back there. Is that something that's sort of came to you. Yeah what i would say growing up. I just wasn't exposed to business. So that wasn't an aspiration for me. I never dreamed about being a ceo. But as i look back. I clearly wanted to make a meaningful difference in people's lives and consciously what i did think about in my mid twenties was business as the next civil rights frontier and that i could play a role in so let me be very clear. I was focused on winning in the marketplace. That was very important to me. But i also was focused on bringing about a change in. I was very cognizant of the fact that i was black in a sea of white and that there was an opportunity. And i think what i feel very good about is not just my business successes but the fact i think i made an impact on people at american express and outside of american express. I think i had a activists mentality. And i had this as a mission for american express to be one of the most respected and admired companies and to be an admired company. It meant that we had to embrace all types of people. And i just believe that corporations can be a force and i really do mean this a force for good and they can also be very successful. People would say well can. That's a contradiction. And i would say part of what we need to do. As leaders is we manage and lead through seeming contradictions will be back in a moment. After word from our exclusive partner capital one business we love de facto team. Okay what does the data say. We're back with swab. Bryant co co-founder of nightlight pediatrics. She's been telling us how they were able to see patients from the very start of the pandemic thanks to an early investment and telemedicine and that gave them some surprising data during the pandemic. We really expanded our telemedicine reach throughout the whole state of texas and where we saw. The biggest pickup was in areas like waco like beaumont those are areas that we hadn't considered before the data towards the wadi where she could build new clinics. It also helped to rethink what those new clinics might look like. You can do the visit. Virtually but if they need a naval flop they have to come somewhere. I'm like okay. So maybe the clinics don't have to be as big. Maybe they can be expressed clinics like where instead of eight exam rooms therefore so what is a perfect example of the way entrepreneurs are using last year's pivots to point the way to future growth says capital one businesses and cave one of the most inspiring things about business owners and learning about them and serving them is that you do see innovation at work every day. Do we really need the same size facility. We can create that same environment Perhaps at a smaller and more cost effective scale the wadis also innovated by moving outside of her core footprint and realizing hey we can have customers all over the state and maybe even beyond in the future the wadis got new customers but those customers are discerning parents hours wadi entertain making sure they come back. We'll find out later in the show. It's all part of capital one businesses spotlight on.

George floyd georgia tom watson ken frazier texas ken early fifties beaumont ibm hundreds of people waco today Both ways last year America Bryant hundreds american express one business ten earlier this year
More Than 100 Corporate Leaders Meet to Discuss State Voting Laws

WSJ What's News

01:34 min | 1 year ago

More Than 100 Corporate Leaders Meet to Discuss State Voting Laws

"Voting rights have become a hot button issue including among business leaders this weekend. Dozens of ceos and other senior leaders met on zoom to discuss how they should respond to new voting laws proposed for texas and other states according to people on the call. Wsj's emily glaser has the details. So there are more than one hundred ceos and other senior executives that joined this zoom on saturday afternoon with the express purpose of talking about voting rights and in the beginning there was a lot of background about what the georgia legislation other state legislation and bills include about. Whether or not they were strict voter access and then kenneth chenault the former. Ceo of american express longtime corporate board director as well as kenneth frazier. Ceo of merck really made their pitch to these ceo's and other business executives of what their new statement is going to say how they believe it's non-partisan it's all about ensuring voter access for all and really urged the ceo's to add their names and so As part of the call kennedy channel told the executives that several companies had signalled that they would sign on including pepsi. co pay. Pal t. rowe price and has so across industries a lot of large companies. And you know what we heard from our sources that even during this zoom ceo's of different companies like amc and cyberport core technologies. Were saying i'm in. I'm in

Emily Glaser Kenneth Chenault Kenneth Frazier WSJ Texas Kennedy Channel American Express Merck Georgia Pepsi Rowe Cyberport Core Technologies AMC
MLB moving 2021 All-Star Game from Atlanta in response to Georgia voting law

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:48 min | 1 year ago

MLB moving 2021 All-Star Game from Atlanta in response to Georgia voting law

"Was word today for major league baseball that it is moving this year's all-star game out of atlanta and response to the new law in georgia. That as you might have heard as new requirements for absentee voting and limits ballot boxes gives a lot more power over elections to the state legislature. All changes that will disproportionately affect black voters. And it's not just georgia. Other states are considering similar. Laws as well and corporate america after being mostly silent to be honest is beginning to speak up most notably in the form of a letter signed by seventy black executives and led by ken. Frazier and ken chenault. Two of only nineteen blacks. Ceo's ever to lead fortune. Five hundred companies can. Freezer is the ceo of merck. Ken chenault used to run american express and i got him on the phone earlier today. Gentlemen thanks for coming. On and mr schnell. Let me start with you sir. And ask you this question You have said in past week as as This letter and The thing that you and mr frazier trying to get done has become public. You've said it is time for actions. Not statements what does that look like to you what it looks like and i think this is very important is one what we want. Companies to do is to publicly oppose legislation that discriminates against voters and legislation. That hinders them from being able to vote. And so it's very important that companies not just go abroad statement but in fact to oppose any legislation. That hinders people from voting.

Ken Chenault Georgia Major League Mr Schnell Baseball Atlanta Mr Frazier Legislature Frazier Merck KEN America
Under pressure, some Ga. corporate leaders slam voting bill

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Under pressure, some Ga. corporate leaders slam voting bill

"There are new calls for corporate leaders across the country to stand up against racial injustice as well as speaking out against George's new restrictive election law dozens of black business executives from around the country including the head of Merck Kenneth Frazier and the former CEO of American Express Ken Chenault released a joint letter in The New York Times urging corporate America to stand up forcefully on all matters of racial justice beyond the new Georgia voter law which cuts voting hours limits absentee ballots and requires photo I. D. some of Georgia's most prominent corporate leaders are speaking out about the changes like the chief executives of delta airlines and coca Cola civil rights activists blame influential executives for not helping to spike the new law and they are urging boycotts I'm Jackie Quinn

Kenneth Frazier Ken Chenault Merck American Express George Georgia The New York Times America Delta Airlines Coca Cola Jackie Quinn
"chenault" Discussed on Fantasy Feast: 'Eatin

Fantasy Feast: 'Eatin

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"chenault" Discussed on Fantasy Feast: 'Eatin

"Joe what's happened to that titan. Defense i mean it was the titan. Mvp last year. Not ryan tannehill. Not derrick henry but dean pees the defensive coordinator because they offered up absolutely zero resistance to pick your may be last weekend assault. There was a tweet those bayer mayfield's an mvp candidate. Because i was like you've been watching this year. Maybe maybe last week he was an mvp candidate but not the whole season. The titans defense has been abominable and let's start with the jaguars given that. Mike glennon thing. I like about blind and is he will throw the football down the field and you know mike gwen instead of a couple of weeks ago. He's like. Hey hey i mean. I don't know what i'm going to get the start again. He's action paychecks. But he's like. I'm gonna i'm gonna throw the football and i'm gonna throw down the field and it's kind of resulted in some production for like colin johnson. Who is much more of a dynasty guy right now then he is a redraft guy. The disappointment was dj. Shark a coming back from injury. He had seven targets which actually led the jaguars last week but he caught the two of them for forty one yards that being said. I know you're gonna be like on done charge. And he's killing me and and all this look at what happened last week to this titans defense. They could not cover donovan people's jones. Okay i think. Dj charge is going to get open in this game. So i'd have him. He's going to be one of my favorite the place in this week. Because nobody's going to be on maybe doesn't match-up given his recent history. Nobody is going to be excited to play him. I wanna play. Dj chart in dfs this week and has a wide receiver. Three for redraft. And you know what to do with james robinson. You know what to do with him. He's in your lineup. Each and every week What would make me feel better about dj or even in a deeper league. If you wanna take shot on. Colin johnson remember viscous. Chenault hurt his thumb towards the end of game last week That could open up a room for keelan cole to potentially make some plays as well if viscous chenault cannot play..

ryan tannehill derrick henry dean pees Mike glennon mike gwen Colin johnson jaguars titans mayfield bayer football Joe donovan jones james robinson Chenault keelan cole chenault
"chenault" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"chenault" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"For Monday, June third goes to a twenty three zero Florida man named Andrew should note. I don't know why my Florida intro for donkey engine in there. But whatever. Now what did you shall always? Tell you about Florida creative people in America. Come from the Bronx all the Florida, okay? Argue monks yourself because the only people disputing the crazy that exist in Florida is people from Florida. All right. See also crazy. Crazy stuff. That happened in Florida that looks wild to the rest of us has become normal to y'all. And I'm shocked that it hasn't become normal to me. Because to this day, I still find Florida crazy. Okay. I mean, the normal everyday things that happened everywhere else become crazy and Florida. Okay. A show of hands in the room who are participated in any kind of play this weekend. The only land handle right? Nick. Drowned got his hand up neck. All right. I'll about to say I'm the only person who's engaging in sexual activity that proceeds in this weekend. My god. Married ones in here. We don't want any. Okay. Well to our listening audience, that's not from Florida, raise your hands. If you can hear my voice, and if you engage in from four play this weekend. Okay. All right. I see now I'm the type I'm always done to learn new tricks in the bedroom. Some new techniques. I can bring in great if I just something to spice things up on with that, right? Not to mention I take four play very serious because at my age for plea lasts longer than sex nowadays. And everyone is sure to get the finish. We came for all right? But there's four play. And then there is flow playwright flow play. What happens in Florida before sex? And you, you said that you've been in a situation where okay a man busted off during four player. Didn't even get disappointed in himself was disappointing and then it hit his ten and some of his face shot up. Okay. Disappoint you doing for play. And he just fires off before y'all. Get the penetration, okay? He just lets off around, but even get to what the foreplay was leading to. That's exactly what happened to Andrew, but it wasn't his penis. That was Boston. Let's go to W. F NBC eight. The report police shot dead during sex tonight, avail Rico man is facing manslaughter charges accused of accidentally shooting a woman during a sexual encounter, it appears, this was a fatal case of four play Twenty-three-year-old, Andrew, Charles Chenault fantasy has cost him his freedom. He.

Florida Andrew Boston America Drowned NBC Nick Charles Chenault Rico Twenty-three-year
"chenault" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"chenault" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"We know that news CU buffs head coach Mel Tucker. When it comes to recruiting is not monkeying around second of two national signing days today. A lot of the class has already been signed as coach Tucker. A got a number of guys in the fold in December the first of the signing days now getting more including a commitment from Chenault brother of currency wide receiver LA viscous shnell vantera ranked in the top fifty nationally as a receiver. Buffs. Also waiting on a possible commitment from four star db, a your Elam from Florida. He's narrowed down his schools to see you, Miami, Florida and Georgia the announcement will come around eleven AM mountain time on ESPN two coach Tucker told ESPN that recruiting never stops. We understand here we have to recruit every day. And there's not a day that goes by the we're not a reaching out of building relationships with. High school coaches with with parents and with prospects. When all is said and done coach Tucker's first recruiting class should be made up of nine thousand nine high school players six Giacosa couple of grad transfers CSU in Wyoming. Also, adding recruits today, not as big as the signing day in December, but still a fun day. Nonetheless, avalanche falls to Columbus. Six to three is the blue jackets were down three to tied at late in the second scored three goals in the third four Gabriel Landis. Skaggs said they just couldn't sustain the good production from early in the game. But at least the back line produced all the Avs goals came from defenseman we need that in there. That was great. The group. We we still made some bonehead mistakes times that you know, it's just uncalled for but. Forwards and defensemen. So the grow onto the same microscope there, and we're all in the same category. So. Great to see the guys put some pucks in back of the net from from back in the night through the first period. I two periods. We're going to have this one.

Mel Tucker Florida ESPN Chenault Gabriel Landis Columbus Skaggs Avs Wyoming CSU Miami Georgia
"chenault" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:18 min | 3 years ago

"chenault" Discussed on KGO 810

"Seven seven Cisco Mark Hopkins hotel knob hill, there are pilots. Former pilots in the US army air force or the US navy aviators, but no longer they're out of the uniforms. They've stepped aside resigned their commissions. They're gathering to hear the presentation by a man named Clair Chenault of their next month's and year of combat over China and Burma these are what will become the most famous combat unit to my knowledge in the air in the second war the flying Tigers. And I welcome Bill Yeni who is the author of the new book. When Tigers ruled the skies, the flying Tigers American outlaw pilots over China in World War Two Bill. Congratulations. And let us step with you. You're a you are guide in the time. Sheen into the room at the Mark Hopkins hotel, the bar, everybody a pouring themselves drink because these boys like to party. What is it that? Claire Chenault is presenting to them. What is he telling them? They're about to do. And why are they doing good evening to you Bill? Good evening. And thank you for having me on there. Talking about going to going to war with the Japanese. They're not going to war in the uniform of their of their country, nor in the service of their country. But is is hired guns hired by the trainees government through an elaborate where the shell companies. They're hired essentially as bounty hunters. They are literally bounty hunters they've been they've resigned their commissions their civilians are hired by this for. Company, and they are going to to fly and fight over China. And for every Japanese airplane. They shoot down. They have been promised a bounty of five hundred dollars important here is that the the president of the United States as is part of the decision making that makes these men and their two nurses present Emma, Jane foster, and Joe Buckner Stewart makes these men and women come together, and what did Roosevelt one? What did he what did he do the make this room possible? Well, what he wanted was a means to to support the current news against the Japanese. The the message that we that we get here is that sometimes politicians. Circumvent the bureaucracy for noble purposes, and sex was the case. When I do presentations about this, this particular time, I awesome, skirt was a picture of gore, neca. Why Guerra equa why something? Pavlo Picasso painting of something that happened in Spain. Well, it is because. Spanish civil war was seen by many as a. There's a contest that pitted. Regular people against the the fascist powers that were emerging ahead of World War Two Germany in Italy, where we're very much in the action in. Spain. Roosevelt. Did nothing. Later he had with China. He decided he's not going to make that same mistake. So timing is everything. This is the. Back. A few months ahead of our of our July meeting if the at the Mark Hopkins. And. Roosevelt meets Chenault. Used to be. A US army air corps pilot. He was a commander. He was one of the leading theoreticians about fighter aircraft operations in. In combat. Left the service in nineteen thirty seven. And was hired by the Chinese government to put together their airforce. Let's tell the story of Chenault. I don't wanna slide him because without Chenault. This doesn't happen. He's born eighteen ninety to eighteen ninety three in Louisiana, mom and dad mother dies young. And so he's raised by his father to be a tough guy. He takes the exam for Napoli's decides that it's not worth it. And eventually finds his way into the army air corps in the first war. That's what makes him a prodigy for early airpower flying the byplanes. He marries young. I have my notes thanks to you. Bill nineteen twenty two first pursuit group in Texas nine hundred twenty three to Pearl Harbor, the fifth a composite group, the nineteen twenty five there were lots of scares of the Japanese attacking Pearl Harbor are very striking fact sixteen years later to come through a true. And in the nineteen thirties he joins air robot. Aerobatics which is our spectacular the air races. And he joins two different groups one of them the three musketeers eventually that becomes three men of on the fly of flying trapeze nineteen thirty five. And that's where the Chinese recognized that he is somebody they can recruit because of a man named paulie. So before we get to the president. Who is paulie what is his role in bringing jolly? Yeah. William Polly worked for for Curtiss Wright, the aircraft and engine manufacturer. And he was. He was one of those businessmen who traveled around the world setting up companies and wheeling and dealing and he had a contract with the with the trainees to supply aircraft and became a consultant to the trainees on aviation matters. And the idea that. This originated with sharing check the the the Chinese warlord who became the the leader of the nationalist government. The idea originated to to get to get some good people over here to put together our air force. This is nineteen thirty seven. Yes. When that's when they contact Chenault, and so Paul is an arms dealer. I mean bluntly as an arms manufacturer, and he represents the Curtiss aircraft company, and they want to sell their product to anybody who will buy them and China has money and they want to buy planes, but they need pilots. And that's why accidentally on purpose the way history works, they find Chenault. And what is schmaltz say when they first contact him and ask him if he he'll be an advisor at first you didn't he didn't think much of the idea, but it grew on him and the when they sweetened the deal with money, he took the he took it. He went to China. He tried to put their but there air force together. And was at that time that he realized that they needed pilots, and he decided that there were a lot of good pilots in the United States. So he cooked up this idea did of a of an aerial foreign legion that put him into into Washington DC about a half a year ahead of of our of our San Francisco meeting that were that we've been talking about. And that was where he he met Roosevelt. And here's Roosevelt who had has decided that he's not going to make the same mistake twice into. Can also idea. However, the war department and the air force the army air force core and the navy resist this ferociously, correct Bill. I mean, they don't like the idea of rating are pilots to go off to China and fight like Bonnie hunters. Absolutely not. It was also in in violation of the various neutrality acts, and then the constitution and the whole of one of the questions you entered introduced on July seven in that meeting. The Mark Hopkins hotel is will we lose our US citizenship. If we fight for foreign power because that's what the rules would say. Lutely true. But but Roosevelt with a wink in and odd. He he said, it was he said, it was all okay. And there was nobody going to. As much as they complained. There was nobody who would would ultimately stand in his way and Bill you've put together mission impossible, haven't you? The permission of the president even George Marshall. Couldn't stop this happened Arnold. Couldn't stop it. No, one could stop at the powers in the and the war department could not stop the president of the United States or Chenault. They were that powerful. That's that. Well Roosevelt was was the power. And he cited with Chenault was it was very much very much a a mission impossible situation and. Yes. And the fact that the that the law was not technically on Roosevelt side is what maybe maybe is there an executive order. Does it exist? Bill. Beg your pardon. Is there an executive order? Does it? Does it exist that Roosevelt gave this order? Well, you look at you. You look at all references their most references to the to the the flying Tigers to the American volunteer group, and and it it says Roosevelt issued an executive order. Well, you turn to the Federal Register as I did. And you go through it line by line for nineteen forty one. And there is no executive order. Simply said it was to be and it was when Tigers rule the sky we're going to we're going to Burma next. The book is the flying Tigers American outlaw pilots over China in World War Two. There are three groups they eventually border board, a steamers Dutch steamers and they're headed across the Pacific. So we next meet them. They're going to be near Rangoon. Bill Yanni is the author. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. You're listening to John bachelor show. Oh. Balance of nature's.

Roosevelt China Chenault US Claire Chenault Bill Tigers president Mark Hopkins hotel Bill Yeni Cisco Mark Hopkins hotel executive Burma John Batchelor Bill Yanni Curtiss aircraft company Spain Mark Hopkins
No Plans Of Leaving: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Fires Back At Critics

CNBC's Fast Money

03:55 min | 3 years ago

No Plans Of Leaving: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Fires Back At Critics

"So you're not stepping down this chairman. That's not the plan. That's not the plan would anything change that. I mean. Like eventually over time. I mean, I'm not going to I'm not going to be doing this forever. But, but I certainly not currently thinking that that makes sense. That was Hayes CEO Mark Zuckerberg standing his ground on CNN last night amid the controversy surrounding the company, but it's not just sucker brook who's been fighting back. The stock has actually rallied in the past two days. Even as a broader market saw red so quick this mean the worst is over for the company. Karen, yes. Well, I hope so because I am long the stock kudos Tim who's been reading a lot of editor on that topic. I think I think Mark Zuckerberg is the right person to lead them out of this. And when I think about other CEO's that have been able to, you know, really take some punches but turn around. Oscar Munoz was only ten or eleven months ago, we were all pretty negative on Oscar Munoz and his ability to lead. United Airlines turned it around Steve Jobs, the most famous probably right left, the company came back. And now look at apple one sixty could have been to thirty but whatever and then Howard show. So I think this kind of founder CEO not Oscar Munoz, but is is really important to the business. Plus you can't vote him out. Right. He owns Dunkelberg, quote about this is a real board though. Right. They don't have some it's out a tesla kind of bored. But that that must controls. This is a real board. I know you've got Ken Chenault, an Erskine Bowles and Susan. Desma hellman. This is a real board. So I would be very very very concerned if they kicked him out very, I don't think that should happen at all. I liked that the stock is rod in the last two days, the valuations very cheap. I think earnings will come down for sure. But that's in there. Mark Zuckerberg may be the CEO and may be there forever because there's voting share structure, but these are these comparisons really comparable only because right now, the company is facing potential legislation regulation that would change the way their core business fair for business operates. I'm so so let's say let's say Starbucks for some reason lawmakers were infuriated by how they brewed their coffee and said, you gotta be this x y and z to you know, to make sure that the caffeine contents not is not too high or whatever I mean, doesn't that sort of change that will change the model somebody I mean? Radha moment where you're thinking is the model going to change the motto could change, right. That could happen. I mean think about Microsoft facing a multi year antitrust the motto could change here. This is not a crazy price for this business. Even if it is chopped up. I don't even know exactly what the best way to do that would be. But you know, the multiple is not high the cash is enormous the businesses still very solid business with I understand the margins are coming down, but still significant margins here. So, you know, but you wonder when crisis management, I mean, this stock is crashed effectively. I mean, if you look at it, we can say what we want. But it's it was two hundred and five dollars stock six months ago straight in one hundred thirty seven dollars. Now, that's pretty significant move. And then when you have the Mark Benny off of the world calling it basically making a comparison to nicotine, that's a real problem. So I don't think most Zucker Brooks made himself a lot of friends, and I think people coming out of the woodwork now to take shots. I just think that this. This is a crisis of trust. I think it's, you know, here's let me say something positive about Facebook. They're not alone. But I do think that Facebook whose core product is being held into question is being singled out the most. And I think they should be when I consider corporate governance, and I think about how people should be thinking about a stock which core product is been at risk this entire time. And they haven't disclosed that to us. I think this company deserves a bigger beating I think also investors need to start evaluating companies Naveh different investment metric in their toolbox to be assessing cyber risk at companies, especially technology company.

Oscar Munoz CEO Mark Zuckerberg Facebook Ken Chenault Zucker Brooks Chairman Desma Hellman CNN Starbucks Apple Steve Jobs Mark Benny Karen Microsoft TIM United Airlines Hayes Editor
Founder, Papa John and Chairman discussed on First Morning News

First Morning News

00:33 sec | 4 years ago

Founder, Papa John and Chairman discussed on First Morning News

"The weather in just a moment i a founder of papa john's has retired as the board chairman this following some controversial comments that john schnatter made during a conference call in may everything's better when papas in house but apparently not in the board room at papa john's founder and namesake john schneider stepping down as chairman company stock it already taken a nosedive this year after chenault who's comments when papa john's was the official pizza of the nfl player protests were hurting pizza sales that led to him stepping down to ceo bench confirming this week that during a conference call with a pr agency brought in.

Founder Papa John Chairman John Schnatter Papas John Schneider Chenault NFL CEO