36 Burst results for "Chemo"

Fresh update on "chemo" discussed on Mark Simone

Mark Simone

00:44 sec | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "chemo" discussed on Mark Simone

"Let's return to our annualized national is a real estate development firm, CIA said and done. It's Dr Liederman, speaking with Jean about her breast cancers, they all suggested the same thing that I needed to get the surgery and I needed to get radiation and chemo there. But she didn't want chemo and she didn't want surgery. Anyone off you those options. What did you say? I thought Well, that would be great. If it works came to us learning that you could If you wish. Avoid the surgery. Avoid the chemo. Intend. You chose that standard radiation years ago on the left breast and then you have our radiation on the right breast. And what was the difference? Well, I didn't have any burning. I had nothing. I couldn't believe it. I had a very good experience being here. Our treatment was working in the cancer is now in remission..

Chemo Jean CIA Dr Liederman
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Undergoes Non-Surgical Medical Procedure At New York City Hospital

The KDKA Radio Morning News

00:21 sec | 5 d ago

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Undergoes Non-Surgical Medical Procedure At New York City Hospital

"Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has undergone a nonsurgical medical procedure in New York City. And expects to be released from the hospital there. By the end of the week, the 87 year old had a procedure to revise a bile duct stance Originally placed last year when she was treated for pancreatic cancer. Justice Ginsburg announced this month she's receiving chemo.

Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsb Pancreatic Cancer New York City Chemo
African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

Science Talk

04:16 min | 2 weeks ago

African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Pawtuxet River Naturalist Society Twenty Twen Fred Tuchman African American River Black Folks Audubon Maryland Swami United States Chemo Price Consultant
African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

Science Talk

04:16 min | 2 weeks ago

African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Pawtuxet River Naturalist Society Twenty Twen Fred Tuchman African American River Black Folks Audubon Maryland Swami United States Chemo Price Consultant
Georgia Democrats choose state chair to replace Lewis on ballot

Sean Hannity

00:21 sec | 2 weeks ago

Georgia Democrats choose state chair to replace Lewis on ballot

"Georgia. Democrats have selected state senator and a chemo Williams, chair of the State Party to replace representative John Lewis on the ballot in November. The executive committee of the Democratic Party of Georgia voted overwhelmingly today for Williams to take Louis a spot spot on on on the the the ballot ballot ballot for for for the the the Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta area area area Fifth Fifth Fifth Congressional Congressional Congressional District District District after after after the the the longtime longtime longtime congressman congressman congressman and and and civil civil civil rights rights rights leaders leaders leaders death last

Congressman Congressman Congre Congressional District Distric Chemo Williams Democratic Party Of Georgia State Party Atlanta John Lewis Executive Committee Senator Representative Georgia. Louis
Atlanta - Georgia Democrats chose Nikema Williams to fill Rep. Lewis’ U.S. House seat

Sean Hannity

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Atlanta - Georgia Democrats chose Nikema Williams to fill Rep. Lewis’ U.S. House seat

"And the head of George's Democratic Party will be on the November ballot to replace Congressman John Lewis was more than two hours of hearing from all five nominees and discussions on how the vote should proceed. 41 of the 45 members of the Democratic Party's executive committee overwhelmingly approved state Senator into chemo Williams Aesthetic. Congressman Lewis is working. Mostly and practice the art of getting into good trouble. I learned from Congressman Lewis how to speak up and speak out for my constituents. A separate special election will still be held to finish out Lewis's term to January ST Parish, 95.5 WSB 92

Congressman John Lewis Democratic Party January St Parish Executive Committee Senator George
Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg says she is being treated for cancer again

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 2 weeks ago

Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg says she is being treated for cancer again

"Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she's receiving chemotherapy for a recurrence of cancer. She says The treatment has so far succeeded in reducing lesions on her liver, and she'll continue chemo sessions every two weeks. Ginsberg spent time in the hospital this past week for a possible infection, she says that was unrelated to the cancer. Theeighty seven year old justice says she has no plans to retire from the Supreme Court.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Ginsberg Supreme Court
Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Supreme court justice will not retire after cancer diagnosis

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Supreme court justice will not retire after cancer diagnosis

"Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she's being treated for recurrence of cancer. The 87 year old justice says the cancer was discovered in her liver in February. She began a round of chemotherapy in May. In a statement. Ginsberg says scans this month have shown a significant reduction of the liver lesions. She says she'll continue bi weekly chemo treatments to keep the cancer at bay. Ginsberg concludes her statement by noting she took part in arguments and decisions through the end of this past term. That she remains fully able to do the job. Full

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Ginsberg Supreme Court
Edwards' Katie Szyman on Medtech's Accelerating Changes

MedTech Talk Podcast

06:52 min | 3 weeks ago

Edwards' Katie Szyman on Medtech's Accelerating Changes

"Katie has had a fascinating career both at Edwards, but also at medtronic where she was president their diabetes business. In addition to that she served on the board of numerous start up companies that are each having a huge impact on their various specialties companies like Inari. Inspire tourney a welcome Katie. Thank gap. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for joining us in. We have a lot of things to cover today, so I'm really excited to have the opportunity at beyond the podcast of let's start with Edwards in critical care and i. a lot of people don't realize that critical care is a seven hundred million dollar business within Edwards. Could you give our listeners an overview of critical care and really what the core of the Edwards offering is? The core initial started Edward. critical care started with the Swan Ganz Catheter, that was actually invented out of Cedar. Sinai and many people know the kind of the story. That invention was just that It was sitting on the beach and said Hey. How do I get a good reading of a patient's pulmonary artery pressure, and it's really hard to do unless you're inside the heart, and it's really hard to get to that pulmonary artery position and figured out that if you took a you know, think about how sailboats work. If you blow up a balloon and let it flow really through the body like a sailboat. Sailboat it would land in the pulmonary position, and that was invented almost fifty years ago. by a Jeremy Swan Ganz out of Cedar. Sinai. That was the beginning of our business. And since then we've really expanded and focused on advanced Chemo, dynamic monitoring, really in patients in the ICU or in high risk surgeries whether cardiac surgeries or high risk, non cardiac surgeries that may be four patients that are very thick and that have surgery greater than three hours, so are being screw from the beginning with the Swan. Ganz Catheters, and now we do you know all kinds of pressure? Monitoring Technologies really focused on making sure patients. Are Stable. That's great actually didn't know the the history of the slum Ganz Catheters so that's fascinating. One one of the things that must be having a huge impact on your business is the current crisis were facing in vid. How has that Changed Your Business in in? How are you seeing? Critical care evolve through this crisis. It's an interesting I. Think for us. We always assumed so much of our business was in the ICU and out with the with Kobe hitting. We've seen it hit in various degrees, so for example in the UK They realized that they had a significant shortage of ICU. And so they came through and ordered like one point, two million DP or pressure sensors from us to stock up so that they could build out there I see us other countries like Germany or the US had adequate ice, you beds in different parts of the country of the US. We've seen some regional spike, but overall I think we've found in the US. We had enough ice. You better than in Germany. They have enough, but then kind of across the rest of Europe. They found significant shortages so. So, we've seen some spikes in demand, related to building I, you capacity, and then we've seen just various spikes in demand like regionally for example in New York and New Jersey. Of course we've seen some higher demand there, but on the flip side, probably fifty percent of our revenues come from high risk surgery, and so with the cancellation of surgeries, really across the US and the world we've seen the kind of downward demand or downward revenues for about half the business for the high risk of our procedures. Interesting. I didn't realize it cut both. Ways. I think the the the building of stockpiles are expanding capacity is interesting dilemma that I think a lot of companies are are facing because on the one hand, it's great from the near term business side on the other hand you wonder. What will purchasing look like in the future with these SORTA stockpiles? How do you deal with that are a that? Is that something that? You see is. Concerned going forward. Yeah absolutely like so. It's been interesting journey for lot of our products manufactured of the Dominican Republic and in the Dr. Reduction of human you know of of human capital in terms of the workers, because many of the workers that were over age sixty were no longer able to come to the work that reduced our capacity by about eighty percent, and meanwhile then we had this bike demand. So now. We're sort of getting back to a steady state where you know, people are able to come back to work, but it's been a really interesting short-term. And there's also the concern as you said like. We've had this surge in demand, so we've had to work double. You know three shifts, and through the weekend to meet kind of these spikes in demand building capacity, but we all recognize that that's not going to be sustainable, and it's going to go back to a normal state afterwards so mostly. We're just hiring. And trying to use extra shifts as a way to kind of manage it so that we don't all become over capacity by ourselves right permanently. Yeah, yeah, no, that I mean you think of the. A lot of people think about what's happening on the front lines as they should, but the ripple effect through your business through your supply chain is, it's incredible. Just think how complex our businesses have become. And little changes in the overall environment can impact the you know the whole supply chain. It's it is amazing like for supply chain in particular, because we've also seen the regulatory bodies whether it's in Europe or in the US being flexible to try to approve product quicker just to kind of provide for the emergency situation, so you know for example we had excess capacity of our Asia sensors, and so we were able to quickly get those approved into Europe so that they could actually get to their patients in Europe almost on a temporary basis. Basis so I. You know I think the one summary of what's happening is very unpredictable and I think there's some really good permanent changes in terms of realizing that we can all work together globally better whether it's regulatory bodies whether it's manufacturing whether it's you know distribution channels as you're talking about shipping channels. All of that I think is all going to be permanently changed, and hopefully some of the changes will be for the better I really believe that.

United States Edwards Ganz Catheters Europe Swan Ganz Catheter Jeremy Swan Ganz Pulmonary Artery Germany Katie Medtronic President Trump Chemo New York UK Dominican Republic New Jersey Kobe Edward.
Medtech's Accelerating Changes, Leadership Development and Having Fun

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:42 min | 3 weeks ago

Medtech's Accelerating Changes, Leadership Development and Having Fun

"To the Matt, tectonic podcast. This is your host Jeff Pardo, and in today's podcast I'm thrilled to have Katie Simon. Vice President Edwards Life Sciences and general manager of Global Critical Care Business. Katie has had a fascinating career both at Edwards, but also at medtronic where she was president their diabetes business. In addition to that she served on the board of numerous start up companies that are each having a huge impact on their various specialties companies like Inari. Inspire tourney a welcome Katie. Thank gap. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for joining us in. We have a lot of things to cover today, so I'm really excited to have the opportunity at beyond the podcast of let's start with Edwards in critical care and i. a lot of people don't realize that critical care is a seven hundred million dollar business within Edwards. Could you give our listeners an overview of critical care and really what the core of the Edwards offering is? The core initial started Edward. critical care started with the Swan Ganz Catheter, that was actually invented out of Cedar. Sinai and many people know the kind of the story. That invention was just that It was sitting on the beach and said Hey. How do I get a good reading of a patient's pulmonary artery pressure, and it's really hard to do unless you're inside the heart, and it's really hard to get to that pulmonary artery position and figured out that if you took a you know, think about how sailboats work. If you blow up a balloon and let it flow really through the body like a sailboat. Sailboat it would land in the pulmonary position, and that was invented almost fifty years ago. by a Jeremy Swan Ganz out of Cedar. Sinai. That was the beginning of our business. And since then we've really expanded and focused on advanced Chemo, dynamic monitoring, really in patients in the ICU or in high risk surgeries whether cardiac surgeries or high risk, non cardiac surgeries that may be four patients that are very thick and that have surgery greater than three hours, so are being screw from the beginning with the Swan. Ganz Catheters, and now we do you know all kinds of pressure? Monitoring Technologies really focused on making sure patients. Are Stable. That's great actually didn't know the the history of the slum Ganz Catheters so that's fascinating. One one of the things that must be having a huge impact on your business is the current crisis were facing in vid. How has that Changed Your Business in in? How are you seeing? Critical care evolve through this crisis. It's an interesting I. Think for us. We always assumed so much of our business was in the ICU and out with the with Kobe hitting. We've seen it hit in various degrees, so for example in the UK They realized that they had a significant shortage of ICU. And so they came through and ordered like one point, two million DP or pressure sensors from us to stock up so that they could build out there I see us other countries like Germany or the US had adequate ice, you beds in different parts of the country of the US. We've seen some regional spike, but overall I think we've found in the US. We had enough ice. You better than in Germany. They have enough, but then kind of across the rest of Europe. They found significant shortages so. So, we've seen some spikes in demand, related to building I, you capacity, and then we've seen just various spikes in demand like regionally for example in New York and New Jersey. Of course we've seen some higher demand there, but on the flip side, probably fifty percent of our revenues come from high risk surgery, and so with the cancellation of surgeries, really across the US and the world we've seen the kind of downward demand or downward revenues for about half the business for the high risk of our procedures. Interesting. I didn't realize it cut both. Ways. I think the the the building of stockpiles are expanding capacity is interesting dilemma that I think a lot of companies are are facing because on the one hand, it's great from the near term business side on the other hand you wonder. What will purchasing look like in the future with these SORTA stockpiles? How do you deal with that are a that? Is that something that? You see is. Concerned going forward. Yeah absolutely like so. It's been interesting journey for lot of our products manufactured of the Dominican Republic and in the Dr. Reduction of human you know of of human capital in terms of the workers, because many of the workers that were over age sixty were no longer able to come to the work that reduced our capacity by about eighty percent, and meanwhile then we had this bike demand. So now. We're sort of getting back to a steady state where you know, people are able to come back to work, but it's been a really interesting short-term. And there's also the concern as you said like. We've had this surge in demand, so we've had to work double. You know three shifts, and through the weekend to meet kind of these spikes in demand building capacity, but we all recognize that that's not going to be sustainable, and it's going to go back to a normal state afterwards so mostly. We're just hiring. And trying to use extra shifts as a way to kind of manage it so that we don't all become over capacity by ourselves right permanently.

Edwards United States Katie Simon General Manager Of Global Crit Ganz Catheters Swan Ganz Catheter Jeremy Swan Ganz Pulmonary Artery Edwards Life Sciences Jeff Pardo Vice President Germany Medtronic President Trump Chemo Europe New York Dominican Republic UK New Jersey
Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf Talks Basketball, the National Anthem, BLM and more

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

07:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf Talks Basketball, the National Anthem, BLM and more

"Welcome to episode Ninety Four. Congruence, the American Muslim experience we are very excited to have Mahmoud Abbas the roof on the show today and when I say we it's Preveza and and Myself Omar and sorry co host of the show. But we're super excited. We've been waiting for this episode for for a while. Now as you all know. My who roof is a NBA veteran. and he's got a lot to a lot of great things to to talk to us about. His experiences in the NBA his departure from the NBA. His experience as an American Muslim. And everything all the cool things. He's doing right now on the circuit and the big three and and helping out young kids get healthy and fit, and so on, so we're going to learn all about that. We're going to hear a little about his youth. His NBA experience his life after the NBA in the US abroad all these things I want to cover, and I am excited because my mood of the roof was a childhood hero of mine. I grew up in small town. Watching Washington play? And this is really exciting for me personally so welcome to the show brother Mahmoud. We are really excited. An Omer sorta wasted no time bearing the lead as it were It's been a minute since we've actually been on this show. We had a little bit of a hiatus. as I imagine most of. Most content providers out there just trying to sort of make the most of these sort of. Challenging Times of trying to secure people in trying to find the time in the space to record, so we are really excited and and especially grateful that ma'am. Louis was able to take the time out of his demanding busy schedule to be with us on, so thank you again as an I. Echo, everything, immerse, said not growing up in a small town so much, but you were also sort of NBA hero of mine. I came of age in the nineties when I came of age I. Mean Terms of sort of my My my my obsession with the NBA was back in the nineties I lived in Houston Texas. Texas, so you can imagine memo Ta I. Was Huge Rockets Fan huge Chemo Lodge Fan and was fortunate enough to be there when they want those back to back. Championships way back in the nineties, so certainly your era of the NBA, and as closely as we looked at looked up to a Hakeem, being a local on sort of hero of you're sort of the the other Muslim in the League and so is equally exciting, so but like I said we have a lot to sort of unpack as we like to see on the show but where we like to often like to begin is kind of your origin story so. Maybe tell us about you know Chris Jackson and his life, and you know in and you growing up in the south, and in those experiences were like yeah, and I'm really really interested in hearing first time you touch the basketball, and when you really felt at home with the ball in your hand, and all those things I'm going gonNA. I'm going to be jumping in and asking questions because as you can see, I'm pretty exciting go. Numb note will your Ford. Remind me of missing anything Actually I. Can you want to? Start with that verse. First Time. Just the basketball really was. I was nineteen years old Nights to play Vassallo. My brothers Some reason always ended up playing with. Older older guys in now. When I look back I, said you know that's that was a huge plus for me, because those are the guys issue are fast strong when you finally get to your age group. It becomes easy play. John Age because you've been playing with older gasps. But I remember one day I was outside. Central Elementary. In I was playing game twenty one and this lady. Her real name is miss. Cookie or miss asa letter. What we call him is cooking and she was strong African American women like she. She didn't man screaming at you getting on your back in those days, even spanky. At all be playing and she said listen, she said come in Chris come in. Of course you go over there and I went over there, she said listen try out. I didn't even know that right next to me in the gym. It would try elementary. Right. Of Fourth Great in. I said Miss you'RE GONNA have to ask my mother, she said. Don't worry about it just going out. And because she saw something in me when I was playing I win in. Playing Street Ball I didn't know anything about organized while I. Mean I'm taking it driven through people and I'm making my shots. Coach added me listed son. You, gotTa pass the ball. And make a long story short. My first game in elementary school I remember. This guy named Aaron Ross. I'm nervous. Right man would i. do you follow me? By the end of the game. Of the game coach was giving me ISOS telling him get out my way. I ended up with twenty one points, my first game, and just to see the crowd, and the excitement man I was like man I love this atmosphere. is feels especially a little. You a black kid coming out of the ghetto. You know, mother you. Know File Right A. Grown up in poverty surrounded by drug addiction, mother had an eighth grade education. So you're looking at something, and you get this attention from a skill that you have. And now it's dawning on you the May. This could be something. Right. This could be a way out and so that was like really for me the beginning. That moment when they were screaming and yelling. And it wasn't it wasn't. It wasn't like pure. Not like. Your College College Teammate Shaquille. It wasn't like you were this massive. You know massive Guy Hulking Guy. You're probably based. There probably saw your quickness in your your agility new shooting right that that they that they liked yeah. I was I was born with. Vast which muscles being quick and explosive, but until you meant after that moment. I began to wake up. My regimen was four o'clock in the morning. Then I would wake up at five and for years. My Mother did know this was happening. Because I'm not about down a mother her to cut it off. Work to I mean at. And so I would wait until she left I. Heard the call. Crank the not get up. Get myself written. It's still dark outset at the attack. And I decided at that age of of Nanan Jianye said man. This is what I want to become. Be The best. and. I knew that I'd have to come up with a strategy because I'm small to give myself the best opportunity to do that something. What can you do that? Nobody else or not, too. Many people don't dawn at this aid. And I, just decided man. You GotTa Get Earth.

NBA Basketball Chris Jackson Mahmoud Abbas Texas Omar United States John Age Aaron Ross Nanan Jianye Central Elementary Ford Vassallo Washington Houston Louis Hakeem ASA Shaquille
You have to outwork everybody else.

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:40 min | Last month

You have to outwork everybody else.

"I'm curly's Aken I'm Danielle Weisberg welcome skin from the couch this podcast where we go deep on career advice from women who have lived check from the good stuff like hiring and growing team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch, so what better place to talk it all out than it began on a couch. Hey, everyone, the show might look and sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches, the scam is working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today joined by a powerhouse of the music industry, Julie Greenwald she is the CEO and chairman of Atlantic records during her time in the business. She's helped. Advance the careers of Bruno Mars. Kelly Clarkson at Sharon. Just to name a few chewy were really excited to have you with us today. Welcome to skin from the couch. They you for having me so truly. We're GONNA. Jump in, ask you to skim your resume for us. I went to two lane university go graduated in nineteen ninety wine, and then I did a program called teach for America where I taught in the calliope projects, and then I started working at Rush Management With Lear Coin Your Cohen's assistant from ninety two to ninety. Re Unwind Ninety. Three moved over to detmer hurts and became the promotions coordinator, and then from ninety three to ninety nine worked my way up industrial records, and then ninety nine took over island records and became the head of marketing for island addict. Jam. Then I'm not quite sure when I became president with now it's not to get causey with my dates, but I do know in two thousand four I. I came over to Atlantic records online I've been at Atlantic records since two thousand four Julie with something that is not on your kind of official bio that we should know about you I. Don't think I officially. put down. That I am a mom with two kids by that is probably my most favorite part of my life is that I am a twenty year old and a sixteen year old. That's great I want to kind of just start with the elephant in the room that we're all dealing with which is how to run companies amid stay global pandemic, the music industry is interesting, because in some ways you know, it seems like you have a lot of talented people who are at home, and a moment of reflection in some sorts and I'm sure they'll be a lot of good hopefully music to come out with it. But how are you thinking about this time? So for the artists that have been able to continue to give us, music is been business as usual in terms of. Thinking of Creative Marketing and promotional. For these artists rollout there songs, obviously facing different challenges, which is. Creation of music video photo shoots. We've sent artist green screens. We've sent them ring lights, and so been really just trying to keep everybody focused on the fact that the world is listening to music right now to help through such a terrible time, and so many artists are giving great music to continue out there. They're a bunch of artists that still need to get into a studio. Need a collaboration and those artists. Were just trying to be really good partners and friends to down and tell them that you know. Hey, it's okay. Take this time, maybe just right in a notebook and try to just be you know thoughtful, and in good partners to our artists that are staring at the fact that they may not be able to tour. You know for the. Future and so we're just trying to make sure that they see the light to buy you know. Streaming has really offered us a way to share their art and music and doing these live streams social. That, they can stay connected to their hands. I think we've been incredibly lucky. In terms of all the businesses that are really been affected were continuing to. Market and promote during this time. And as a leader, how have you been trying to set your team up remotely and keep them focused at a time when there's so much uncertainty? So, I personally jumped writing at first and I do weekly email. It's very personal. Email to my whole company every Sunday night to talk about okay. We're about to start in next week. Know Week two week three and I share my stories and I let them know that. Now I'm in a house with two crazy kids and husband and a dog just diagnosed. Diagnosed with cancer and Chemo and and so you know I let them know that I to going through you know challenging situations, and then also set up a time for every department where I call it either morning tea, or after key, where every assistant coordinator manager director on up gets an opportunity to see me on the screen and talk to me in. In us. We questions so I can kind of let them know what we're talking about. Upstairs and keep sharing the fact that we don't know when we're GONNA. Come back when it's okay because we're working. How can I help you and in really like? Let them see that they can. Individually email may call me facetime with me and I'm right there in the. The canoe with them.

Julie Greenwald Kelly Clarkson Bruno Mars Danielle Weisberg Coordinator Head Of Marketing America Assistant Coordinator Manager Rush Management Chairman President Trump Causey Cohen Official Cancer Chemo
"chemo" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:44 min | Last month

"chemo" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Insurances Medicare Medicaid is come on in thirty four Broadway and let's check your out if you want I want another woman who's eighty years old she is a woman with three children and she came with history of gastric cancer with cancer travelling to her lungs he was born in Alabama she had endoscopy done and one of the five girls and well when they cut on her stomach had a gastric cancer years ago on the last sort of bile and had half for stomach removed and had this complication she just did not want to have any more treatment and she declined the usual chemo and radiation and no more surgery and then the cancer traveled to the long so when from the stomach to the long how does it get to the long through the bloodstream that makes it stage for our into seeing about chemo Dr number she's eighty years old so she's not a youngster anymore and the chemo doctor wanted to giver chemotherapy for stage four cancer for the rest of her life her weight is two hundred and sixty three pounds and I saw her there were two masses in our long we treated her she's taller to treatment while there's no side effects you came in got a treatment and went home which is a lot different than came out for the rest of her life or surgery or hospital stays with us its out patient therapy were private cancer treatment boutique in the heart of New York City it's easy to get to us most boss was in subways and go and trains come to us like Felder said you could also take a limousine or car or uber or whatever is lots of ways.

Alabama chemo New York City Felder
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:33 min | 2 months ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And I want to talk let's jump right in I went about a woman who called me she called me a couple days ago and well this is a woman who has a mother with a sarcoma now sarcomas are cancers of the connective tissue or the fat or the mouse or the bones we offer the about cancers like breast cancer lung cancer and colon cancer of the major organs prostate cancer bladder cancer pancreas cancer yes of course we treat those cancers with high success rates but those other cancers who and there may be a little more rare with this woman's mother eighty years old have a liposarcoma a cancer of the fatty tissue and started growing in her body and she went to one of the most famous super duper all you're supposed to when she says the name is supposed to fall and collapse down well I didn't collapse down and check she told me that she called me a year ago about her mother with this metastatic stage for liposarcoma the sarcoma that has traveled and she went to the super duper super famous hospital and he's eighty years old okay and she has metastatic cancer means it's traveled with stage four cancer and that this super duper big place they started giving her chemo chemo chemo chemo chemo I can look up in parks I've been a chemo doctor I am a chemo board certified chemo doctor for forty years I can tell you that chemotherapy doing work.

chemo
"chemo" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

11:08 min | 2 months ago

"chemo" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The follow up of the the the seventy two year old man who had chemo for as long cancer didn't work in the cancer cap on growing and growing and growing well we treated him and he's done great yet a few treatments pinpoint treatments for his cancer all in the startech take frame all the linear accelerator was no chemo no cutting no bleeding he finished his treatment is doing well has no symptoms Hey okay and that's the work that we do every day and of course we're going to follow up scans reports and blood tests for him but he's done great had a recurrent cancer of the lung is long was obstructed the chemo doesn't work the immunotherapy didn't work the cancer cap on growing he came here because his chemo didn't work because chemo wasn't tolerated as immuno therapy wasn't working some people say oh I mean no therapy it's all fantastic but the fact the date is the vast majority of people have cancer that doesn't respond to immunotherapy he came to us with us the vast majority ninety percent with lung and other cancers have a successful outcome where we came the beam this is the work we do and of course you prove it to the patient and their loved ones this is what we do and then we give another example about that sixty nine year old man who came to us who works in the law firm he was fine until about four years ago he lost control of his tool of his feces he lost control and sit back after all just a gastro just recommended a colonoscopy which is the proper thing to do the patient declined and he had the cat scan which was not very helpful but the patient felt they ain't no mass of mass on this heinous for two and a half years and did nothing and eventually had a sigmoidoscopy which is to look into the bottom part of the intestine and adventures from them in a no cancer and it was seen by a medical oncologist who started on chemotherapy and then the patient came here for consultation member chemotherapy for anal cancers by itself doesn't really cure and the body so this is another example two and a half years the man waited the cancer group group of massive proportions around the **** of the lymph nodes in the pelvic tumor the MRI should the pelvic mass in the England amassed the biopsy showed squamous cancer of the **** of and waited years to be treated and of course would teaching point number one no one is if you have a cancer don't wait years and allows the cancer to grow allows a cancer to spread it I was a cancer to become difficult sometimes impossible this man had a large prostate his kidneys were blocked by this big prostate yet a catheter because of the prostate but he came for treatment of his Hey no cancer with metastases I saw him his Hey this at the time was huge cancer was huge as circumferential extent of outside the **** it was incontinent who's unable to control his stool he had a large cancer up and down the **** deep inside and we talked about all the options for him and he chose our treatment I should say one more thing he chose her treatment more than two years ago and today he came in to the office cancer free new scams cancer free physical exam cancer free normal blood tests this is a man who had waited two and a half years to be seen for consultation came to us with a huge anal cancer incontinence tool and now he is a okay that big masses gone with our treatment and I can tell you that he is very happy told me he thought he would never have a chance of successful outcome never he thought and then he came here and he learned the difference they learned about non invasive treatment no cutting no bleeding outpatient therapy just comes and goes to treatment and goes home he does what he wants and what a difference it makes what a difference it makes he probably would've waited two and a half years if he knew the treatment was so easy and so effective this is the work we do every day and I was speak to about a man who sixty five years old from Trinidad he's Merete as a child he works with have the cat people was referred by one of the big urologist in town or the big urologists and tower of the few hates to lose surgery of the prostate because he knows that surgery is so difficult for the patients so terrible for the patient and the success rate is low for the patient and the complication rates of surgery open surgery cutting surgery or so high with most men having destroyed sexual and urinary life and this man came to us with a PSA of seven point four four next Leeson seven cancer Gleason seven is how the cancel to the microscope in multiple areas of cancer for the twelve areas were positive for cancer and one more thing I used to tell you is a this year noting multiple times is up at night yes I blood pressure and I use them and him his large prostate modular and he has his Gleason seven a more aggressive cancer and he knows that if he had had surgery success rates only sixty percent with us it's ninety percent of those lots of reasons why he came in through the ethically to us and he saw the data they got her book with me got a D. V. D. and one more thing he had our treatment three years ago and in three years she's cancer free and that means most likely he's home free doing what he wants his sexual life works is your inner life works and his life is life works which is really fantastic can we talk about a woman seventy she's from Georgia power and Georgia the general very in cancer she had surgery for the over in cancer should chemo for the over and cancers of extensive recurrent ovarian cancer she was declining more chemo because she that chemo and it just didn't work she presented with five years ago she presented with abdominal bloating and abdominal symptoms in children Vance stage ovarian cancer and showed the usual treatment with big searcher of the spleen and Colin removing the uterus and ovaries and then she had months and months of chemotherapy and then shed more treatment she went to one of the big hospitals or move part of her liver and more chemotherapy and she came to me because the cancer had come back and she just did not want to have more surgery she did not want to have chemo she had so much chemo years of camel just doesn't work and she came to me with a recurrent ovarian cancer three years ago three years ago on most doctors will say all you have to have chemo from rest your life well she had chemo and it didn't work she went to the biggest places it doesn't work she was disappointed in the medical profession the fact that the doctors are keeping on telling her to take a treatment that wasn't working why would they give a treatment that's not working to a patient came on average costs about ten thousand dollars a month she had years of chemotherapy so hundreds of thousands of hours and it just didn't work she came to me three years ago we treated her ovarian cancer with pinpoint noninvasive treatment and she's remained in remission ever since and of course you get blood tests and pet scans and physical exams this is what we do every day Hughes truth radiosurgery noninvasive pinpoint treatment for ovarian cancer when our doctors all you have to have chemo frustrate life even if it's not work and and now she's been in remission of art treatment no further treatment by the way only our treatment three years ago doing well tolerated treatment well this is the work that we do every day innovative work for men and women and children with cancer and what about other men that I just saw it yesterday he's fifty seven years old he's a truck driver has three kids and he had blood in the **** for a year he never had colonoscopy he had a cat scan and colonoscopy finally showing a sigmoid mass in a pet scan with the sigmoid mass and he had surgery and he was refusing chemotherapy finally he went to a chemotherapy Dr because yet nine of nineteen the most positive so extensive cancer he's lost weight going from two seventy two fifty five and I saw him I saw him after the surgery had been seen by a doctor one of the big hospitals in New York area and he was having kind of a disagreement with came of doctor kind of a fight with the chemo doctor and when I called the doctor restart our fight with me too and that's not the point of me calling them Cologne was to try to accommodate the patient didn't respect the patient she asked me to do and so the patient that changed his doctor he came to me he wanted our treatment and we treated him we gave them additional therapy adjuvant therapy because of his cancer and this is the work we do every day and is now out three years doing well cancer free fully intact came back his way driving a truck and happy and healthy normal cancer markers in normal scans and feeling well after our treatment so praise the lord pass ammunition this is what we do and he was able to get doctors to communicate with those made him so happy and still is talking about that to this day yet our treatment is talking about that to this day and he's cancer free so all the big things that anyone with cancer would want to be and that is.

chemo
Hair Loss, Stress, and At-Home Treatments to Regrow Your Hair

Art Beauty

05:17 min | 2 months ago

Hair Loss, Stress, and At-Home Treatments to Regrow Your Hair

"If you've been noticing more clumps of hair in the shower that could be a result of stress But we don't want to stress you out more because there are things you can do. Look I lost his little Patrick here. Living proof ride here but there are things that you can do right now at home to help that And one of the first things. We'RE GONNA START TODAY. We've got a wonderful guest She is a Harrisburg and she's actually know working with Bosley which I thought was just for men. But he educator there and What's so great is that she cleared up. A lot of the MISC- The misconceptions I had about Knoxville as everyone knows what Doxa Gul's the only thing that has been approved by the FDA that actually does regret hair and is active with the minoxidil though Is that something you know? Just speaking as a not a hair professional It's something that I've heard about right. Rogaine is another big brand that you hear about and I have a girlfriend who had significant hair loss. And that's what she was using. But it meant hawks ultimate always been a little bit scary right so is that other people should not be using or is it something. That's pretty safe for everyone. So there's a two different percentages on it. There's a two percent and a five percent. Typically the women use the two percents and the men used the five percent so You Wanna be able to Access that lower percentage If you feel necessary and then you can like start in slowly but I do recommend that you use at the same time every day And it's just like he would try to think about taking care of any other Any other area of your body. I mean you won't stop brushing your teeth with a certain kind of toothpaste. If you have great results from that so Ryan I mean but you get what I'm saying like do you think like pregnant woman shouldn't use yet so and doesn't make your hair fall out at first a little bit too? Can't that be an effect or am I totally wrong about this. Maybe I'm totally off. I'm sure one out of one thousand. Maybe it fell out but maybe he or she skipped a day or like you said didn't put it on at the same time at the same Torino at like. If you break your routine with these systems you can have a shed you absolutely can but is this something you think. Everybody should be using then. I'm even if it's like the hair. He knew it. If you're if you're like fresh out of Chemo and you just grew your new hair back now. Right no right right right. If you think you're going to get pregnant or you're infertility. No I mean it's kind of common sense. If you have other health issues you should obviously talk to your physician and throw that against the wall but I think majority of people can give it a whirl and just but if you're if you second guesses talk with your doctor so what is that program. Is it like once you start is it. You have to just keep doing it. Is it like a man which we know a lot of beauty things right like if you want Bo talks? You're going to have to keep doing botox to keep the wrinkles away if you want those eyelash extensions. You're going to need to keep doing them. The second you're not gonNA have those lashes if you want hair extensions so is this another thing that you're going to sort of add to your beauty toolkit but it's like once you start to commit to it. Yes if you're seeing results from it you definitely want to keep doing so Hair has three cycles. Everybody's familiar with you. Know Antigen intelligent and Cata Jen. So when you're in the resting phase During that phase. That's the time that you want to make sure that you're speeding up that process when that new hair growth is starting to come back in and you also want to keep the hair that you have so you're definitely trading from a clinical approach. She knows that hair follicle and you're waking up and speeding up that rusting cycle where that new hair can come back and through so you're seeing results in your getting hair growth. You definitely want to eat using that. So somebody WHO's been bald for thirty years all the back And that her follicle is no longer producing hair. Are you going to get results from Minoxidil? Maybe not so that definitely you WANNA wake up that hair follicle and you WANNA speed up that process for that new hair to come back through. How do you feel about the the caps or the headbands with the red light therapy? Your what's your what's your take on those those are showing a lot of promise and those also There's lots of before and after she now that are online. So it's one of those things it's like you know what works for one person may not necessarily work for all if you know works for the majority and if it works for you definitely keep doing it. You have to be insisted on that you have to use it. You know. Every single day In addition to the other three sixteen approach that you're doing I personally noticed when I combined all three. Wow it was the trio of fact for

Minoxidil Harrisburg Patrick Rogaine Bosley Doxa Gul Chemo Hawks Cata Jen Ryan Knoxville BO FDA
A Rare Disease Drug Hunter Turns His Attention to COVID-19

The Bio Report

05:35 min | 2 months ago

A Rare Disease Drug Hunter Turns His Attention to COVID-19

"As a medical student divvied Feigenbaum nearly died from castleman disease. A rare autoimmune condition he would suffer recurring bounce that carried him to the brink of death but was able to push the disease into remission by discovering drug. That could be re purposed to treat the disease. Feigenbaum co-founded the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network and developed a unique approach to research. That's now being adopted by other rare disease organizations. He tells the story in. His book chasing my cure when the Kobe. Nine thousand nine outbreak began vagabond recognized that the deadliest aspect of the disease hyperactive immune response known as a sign of kind storm sharing a common link with castleman disease. He hoped a researcher would apply his approach to finding a potential drug to repurpose to treat the virus and soon enlisted his own team to do so. We spoke to Feigenbaum Assistant. Professor at the Promo School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Co founder and Executive Director of the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network about his own experience. How it led him to. Cova nineteen and his effort to help researchers and clinicians track all of the drugs being tried to treat the pandemic virus. David thanks for joining us. Dan thanks so much for having me. We're going to talk about the covert nineteen pandemic your research efforts. And how you're trying to do for Cova. Nineteen what you did for. Castle Man's disease listeners. Of our sister podcast rare cast will be familiar with you and your story but before we talk about covert nineteen and the work. You're doing there. I think it would be useful to start with your own experiences with Kasim's disease. This is a store you telling your book chasing my cure doctors race to turn hope into action which I recommend to all listeners. But let's start with you becoming ill in medical school. What happened so I went from training to become an oncologist? I had lost my mom to cancer. Just a few years before and wanted to exact revenge on cancer and I went from training to become an oncologist and being a healthy third year medical student to experiencing multi organ failure. My liver my kidneys. My Bone Marrow. My heart and my lungs began to shut down for an unknown reason. They hospitalized me and quickly sent me to the intensive care unit where I had a retinal hemorrhage that made me blind in my left eye against seventy pounds of fluid and I drifted in and out of consciousness for for months at a time I was eventually diagnosed with ideographic. Multicentric castleman disease. Which as you mentioned is a rare and deadly immune system disorder which unfortunately at the time had to be treated with chemotherapy. Because there were there were no other options and thankfully. Chemotherapy saved my life. But I was actually so sick right before. I received chemotherapy that I actually had my last rites read to me by priests because the doctors didn't think I would survive and really considered that moment to be the start of my overtime and time that I didn't think I would have but thankfully I survived with Chemo but unfortunately I would go on to have relapsed after relapse after relapse until I eventually found a drug that could save my life well listeners. Who Want to know that story in greater depth can go to the rare. Cast podcast and find the edition. We did with you. But what exactly did you do to find a drug that could be re purposed to treat castleman disease sure after the fourth time that I nearly died battling this disease and while I was actually on the only drug that has ever undergone randomized controlled trial for my disease in. That drug did not work. I realized I could no longer hope that some researchers somewhere would figure out a drug that could save me at this stage. I was a third year medical student so I I'd dove into the lab and I started doing laboratory. Experiments asserted foundation called the CASTLEMAN disease. Claver network and when I relapsed again about a year later I was in a position to collect samples on myself and store them so if I survived that I could perform experiments on those samples and thankfully chemotherapy saved my life again and I survived and I performed a series of experiments in the lab and looked at a number of data sets databases to be able to try to put together a pattern that I was observing and eventually found a particular communication line called the M. Tour pathway. Which is really important for Many cells in your body particularly immune cells to communicate with one another. I found that that was in a hyperactive state. And I thought well maybe if we can inhibit this particular communication line. Maybe that could save my life and There's a drug that's already. Fda approved that is called Sierra Lima so we began testing on me. And now it's been over six years that I've been in remission and this concept of what's called drug re purposing is a concept that's become Pretty widely recognized recently with Kovic nineteen. It's the idea that you can take a drug approved for something else in. It may have activity against a disease that no one ever thought was possible in in in this case. I'm living proof I'm chatting with you today and alive because of a drug those dog for completely different condition.

Castleman Disease Castleman Disease Collaborativ Researcher Feigenbaum Feigenbaum Assistant Cova Founder And Executive Director Relapse Kasim Sierra Lima DAN Promo School Of Medicine David University Of Pennsylvania Co FDA
R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

Outcomes Rocket

06:44 min | 3 months ago

R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

"Just got back from Argentina year over there Yeah that's right. We have an office down there and I was doing some work down there and Yet we just moved back last week. Interesting time to move back of course to be traveling around but love Argentina. Wow well welcome back to the States. And you are also very focused on the digital aspects within healthcare so tell us what inspires your work in the healthcare vertical In the core of my inspiration is a very personal so seven years ago. I was diagnosed with advanced metastatic to sicker cancer. I spent about a year and treatment at Sloan. Kettering forty five days in patient. Three months of Chemo for big surgery. So I was sort of a professional patient for a year and I learned law things. I'm six years. No evidence of disease now so I feel very much. Thank you thank you and as you can imagine I learned a lot of things and a lot of different levels but one thing I I learned in observed in that role was just in my opinion. How poorly a digital was being deployed in space for patients and for clinicians and this is not a knock on Sloan. They're amazing they saved my life. But it's something that's across the industry. As as soon as I came back and so before that I was the chief operating officer is really just focusing on running the business and when I came back I said this is something I really want to dive back into. Working more directly with clients focusing on as a problem to be solved doing what I can to put my shoulder to the wheel of making better more effective experiences for patients and for clinician. So that's my My touchstone of the passion that I bring to it. Well I think it's A powerful story Jay and I appreciate sharing that and congratulate you for for beating cancer and so great that you have taken this upon yourself. Having been there done that as a patient better and more efficient are two things that we could definitely get from from digital technologies. Tell us a little bit more about how you guys are. Adding value to the ecosystem through digital so our focus is really on creating experiences that are engaging in effective and this mostly for patients but also for clinicians and sometimes caregivers and bringing best practices to the industry that hasn't really been woven into the to the way that the digital products have been built outside. The industry and healthcare has has been data centric and rightfully so right. The legislation was passed. You know twenty plus years ago saying you need to get everything into the data and and that's been journey and now that we have all the data in we're starting to figure out ways to unlock the data and share the data and do more with the data. We need to stop being so data centric and start being more human centric and understanding that people are complex and their situations are often very unique and we need to build experiences that meet them where they are and make things easy for them and drives towards the outcomes that we want for them. So that's a long answer and I can be unpacked. Non Thought of different ways but how we sort of more tactically are coming into his kind of doing really running more design thinking processes That haven't been lacking so picking up on sort of clinical insight or a market research research site in farm industry for instance and building on that doing ethnographic research actually talking to patients in really understanding their sort of holistic view. Their Longitudinal journey that might touch a bunch of different things. A bunch of different providers a bunch of different mediums a bunch of different co morbidity or products understanding those longitudinal journeys doing rapid prototyping and. Co Design and collaboration ways. And then putting those back for early prototype validation before anything gets actually develop so that process of design thinking is something that has been lacking in the industry and has led to a lot of digital experiences that are either painful or hard to navigate or create unnecessary cognitive. Load especially in the case of clinicians. It's interesting you know. And I'm glad you mentioned clinicians as well because bad experience exists on on the patient side and on the clinician side. As well and to your point there's a lot that's going on that's great but there's an opportunity to do so much better and saw I'd love to hear from. Uja On on what your team has done. That's made either outcomes better or business models better within healthcare. Yeah so I think it's. It's applying that process that I described by lake. You know it's all in. The end is about outcomes right so you really are trying to make better Clinton experiences. They can spend more time to medicine less time on data entry or so. They're less burnt out. Say let's make less mistakes and in the patient case you're trying to keep them engaged. You're trying to get data to flow and to have the outcome of their experience in their disease journey or or or health journey. Have a better outcome. So it's not just about great experiences to create great experiences. I WanNa make that clear to but specifically applying those cases. I mean. We've done everything from working with. Pharmaceutical companies to develop a digital prototypes around using stress managed using behavioral change techniques around social support for stress management or behavioral scientists at pharmaceutical companies or working with healthcare providers to provide better pathways for patients to navigate their journeys. So it's a lot of simple stuff and it can be starting with schedule. An appointment and navigating to the in helping with with with transport access to the site of care. Just that doesn't require blockchain or a I or anything fancy but doing that in a way that is easy in as easy as Uber or another experience that we're used to in our normal life bringing that level of ease and utility to those experience that's table stakes right and then it's going from. They're moving more into actual medicine side of things and we do a lot of stuff around adherence and getting people know we know that that forty percent of outcomes is driven by behavior. And there's really nothing better at a scalable in evaluating level to help with behavior change them and digital devices mean there's a there's a shadow side to that too also right. Mike. We're all addicted to these things. But that same power can be used to drive behavior change whether it's adherence to medication or physical therapy or just a care plan so creating experiences for patients that help them with that. So that's we start to get into the closer to the medical side of things so that's some of the ways that we are bringing our skills that we've owned also in other industries like you've working in hospitality and retail and e commerce and all these other industries that have more are more mature digitally especially from human centric perspective bringing all those practices and tools to the space

Sloan Argentina Chemo Chief Operating Officer Kettering JAY Co Design Mike Clinton
How to Home-School Your Kids Like a Pro During Coronavirus

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

09:09 min | 4 months ago

How to Home-School Your Kids Like a Pro During Coronavirus

"We thought we'd do a few short episodes talking about life in these sort of more challenging times is everything is in flux so both. Sarah on iron working from home right now. I mean I always do but Sarah tell us a little bit about your situation and how this has changed with the corona virus epidemic going on. Yeah there's just I mean I'm a hospital. Worker and part of my job is clinical and part of it is more of a leadership role with our residents and everything is really up in the air right now. I'm currently working from home because I have a very mild cough and just in an abundance of caution in our healthcare system has Basically required anybody with any kind of symptoms. That could be anything to stay on out of there which is very smart to protect our patients and protect other caregivers. Because you know if we interact with our colleagues and then spent something around then that could be very bad and there's just so much uncertainty with this. We don't know you know exactly how long most people are contagious for like we don't know You know the the the rate of symptomatic shedding that happens. We don't even know how good kids are as vectors. So there's all these question marks and politics aside. I think we're all in the same boat right now as many of you guys are all working parents and we all have our kids at home. Which many view a few of you not many of you? A few of them might be home school. So that's normal but most of you probably aren't exactly no. It's funny because I've written a couple articles over the years about people who work and also home school and it's more possible in these days than it would have been like you know in the in the past that just would have been like what on earth like that. Those two things. Don't go together. But there are so many ways of working work does not need to be done at a particular time in place necessarily for some people and school actually doesn't have to be done at a particular time and place in many cases With the rise of remote learning options. I'm certainly children. Who are slightly older are able to be quite self directed in terms of their learning. And there's actually a number of like online charter schools for instance and I think you mentioned like Florida has virtual school right for for Housebound children they do like. I've had patients that use it. They haven't deployed it to any of the current students yet but I know that platform does exist. Because I've had some medically complex patients. Like patients. Going through Chemo or who? Otherwise just aren't safe to be in the regular school system Have done school from home. And it's considered actually separate from the homeschool. It's considered an actual public school called Florida virtual school. So I mean I don't know will happen. I do think everyone needs to bre- from minute because it's been like five seconds and then there's been like ninety five elaborate schedules. Maybe I'm guilty. I mean I made one although mine is like super non elaborate so involved a lot of screen time so But like I'm not super worried about my kids like losing a ton of ground. Maybe because my kids are pretty young. Yeah like if we do a couple hours of stuff each day and that can include reading will probably be. Okay yeah well. That's the cool thing. I mean from having studied a lot of home schoolers. Schedules Fun Fun fact here. My senior thesis at Princeton was actually on home schooling. That's how long ago I was interested in this topic but it was it was less common than But it the people who do this. It doesn't take six and a half hours a day. Or whatever your state mandated. Instructional time is for your for your schools. You can a lot of that. Time at school is transitions. It's Things that your kids might be doing anyway like recess or eating lunch. It's things that you might not even consider to be part of school while they are. But you might do them on your own like instrument practice for instance or reading right like having. That's that's part of it too like a elementary school teacher is GonNa have their kids. Read do silent reading for Awhile. And so that's part of it as well. So the actual instructional part can be relatively limited and still be moving forward. Mike Kids depending on age have have somewhere between two hours and fifteen minutes in three hours of stuff that I have assigned per day and an hour of that is independent reading. So we're it's it's not like eight hours a day by by any means but it's actually been kind of fun to try on. Dance Day Day. Three Day three here. Oh right your little bit. You guys were one of the first. We're on the district's too close. So we knew it was coming and we have gotten into it now but Yeah no each. We have a checklist each day which the kids have one hour reading. They have thirty minutes of math practice which we have been doing. Khan Academy in Dream Box. Ruth was creating her own worksheets for a while but then she thought better than we have a thirty minute research project which each day we have a different subject so we. I did science than we did. History today was health related so everyone research to different epidemic and they need to write me up a short report on it. You know based on link sort of based on kid age but So they can get writing practice in. How is how is Alex's report he doesn't have to do this his his He gets stories right. We're reading stories than he does Ten minutes of writing practice just just sort of keep working on the hand coordination and then we've actually been working with him through the bedtime math books which I can highly recommend they are by Laura Who did a couple of these there several of these books? But it's the idea that set up like a bedtime story so you read a short paragraph that sets up a topic and then they have four different levels of math problems associated with the story problems in so you read it to the kids in the figure it out a So we've been doing that with Alex for math cool. Yeah we have like our kids homework. They use a program called. I ready for both reading and math. I think it's a Florida state wide thing so we've just continued their normal cycle of that and we use reflex math for math. Which is more just? It's not really like they. Have I ready? Math for more concept type stuff and reflects is just like animals memorizing timetables and Cameron's trying to learn like four plus three. So we do that and then have them write a story Either like a journal? Entry of what's going on. I think those are GonNa get a little repetitive. But we'll see for Cameron. It's more leg. Tried to write one picture and then I asked him to read either two chapters of a chapter book either. Annabel can read it to cameron or he can read his own to picture books or she can like whatever they want but like two books or chapters. Yeah so sounds good animal would you do? She's like I read genevieve green eggs and Ham. Good I mean. There's so many things you learn by doing that right. I mean I. In addition to the reading practice obviously but reading out loud is itself a skill that I would say. Many adults don't do very well. That's a real presenting. Words to other people is not automatic. And so you're absolutely right about that. She's working on that now. Wait we're actually So the First official virtual Instructional Day starts tomorrow recording this on a Tuesday so the Wednesday. Our teachers are starting to send assignments So we will incorporate that into the schedule. It's mostly Jasper. Who's going to have the more formal remote instruction like his different. Teachers are posting assignments. So he's GonNa start mostly doing that. The other kids. I think it'll be more just reinforced like math practice. And things like that so you know they'll still need a few additional things to keep them busy and we are still having our nanny come because currently I still have a lot of work. Responsibilities headache seven thirty. Am Conference calls every day. And then I have to disseminate that information to the residents and trying to redesign a lot of their education to figure out how to do it remotely which is not that easy apparently now also yeah I feel like I know this is a dilemma for a lot of people but our nanny herself has sort of agreed to isolate Incidentally she has like the same coffee shop. So I'm not worried about transmitting or getting or giving her 'cause that already happened before all of this but yeah. I know. This is sort of a dilemma for some people whether or not. It's even okay to do that. There are a lot of college students that currently have a lot of free time. That might even you know I was thinking about. It might even be willing to live in if you have the space to keep them so they could become a defacto additional family member. If you really need some somebody You know you can pay them. They can earn extra money. And you could get your remote work done without worrying about an infection risk. Especially if they're willing to to stay with

Florida Cameron Sarah Florida Virtual School Mike Kids Alex Mild Cough School Teacher Princeton Khan Academy Laura Who Chemo Ruth Jasper Annabel Official
Coronavirus found on cruise ship as more U.S. states report cases

Inside Out with Tami Michaels

01:01 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus found on cruise ship as more U.S. states report cases

"At least half of the fifty United states now reporting confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus two deaths now reported in Florida and the grand princess in the Pacific off San Francisco now one of a number of cruise ships immobilized or turned away on four continents twenty one positive case have been identified on board Kerry Carl still suffering from stage four cancer one of the twenty four hundred passengers there I go from laughing and trying to look on the positive side to this too tapping my faith to crying hysterically yeah she says she's going to miss chemo next week week due to the situation here's a crowd of virus in a potential fourteen day isolation period have given way to potential legions of nervous parents were raising concerns for their children inside crowded school all three are now growing nationwide some primary and secondary schools shutting down and out west the university of southern California Stanford and the university of Washington all canceling in person classes for the next couple

United States Florida Pacific San Francisco Kerry Carl Chemo University Of Southern Califor University Of Washington
Alex Trebek beats odds and marks milestone in cancer battle

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:50 min | 5 months ago

Alex Trebek beats odds and marks milestone in cancer battle

"The host of jeopardy Alex Trebek is beating the odds so far as he battles pancreatic cancer he has now survived exactly one year since his diagnosis one year after telling the world he was fighting for his life Alex Trebek is sharing an update on his battle with stage four pancreatic cancer I'd be lying if I said the journey had been an easy one there were some good days but a lot of not so good days the seventy nine year old television staple breeding the dire one year survival odds of just eighteen percent were feeling how difficult his chemo treatments have been there were moments of great pain and sudden massive attacks of Great Depression that made me wonder if it really was worth fighting on foot I brushed that aside quickly because that would have been a massive betrayal a betrayal of my wife and soul mate Jean who has given her all to help me survive it would have been a betrayal of other cancer patients who have looked to me as an inspiration and a cheerleader of sorts of the value of living and hope would certainly have been a betrayal of my faith in god and the millions of prayers that have been set on my behalf but despite a struggle the Emmy winning host hasn't missed a single day at jeopardy a job he's performed for more than three decades now delivering this poignant message or something if I felt if we because so many of us are involved in the same situation if we take it just one day at a time with a positive attitude anything is possible Pentre access his oncologist told them the two year survival rate is just seven percent but he's confident that this time next year they'll be celebrating that next major

Alex Trebek Jean Emmy Pentre
Mediterranean Diet 101

20 Minute Fitness

06:11 min | 5 months ago

Mediterranean Diet 101

"So the Mediterranean diet is a way of eating based on the traditional cuisine of countries bordering the Mediterranean. A really originalist. Et Miss Way from around the nine hundred sixty s replicating their diets. These countries include Spain. Italy Greece southern Franz amongst a few others and although there is no strict definition of the Mediterranean Diet and there's no way to follow it because there are many different countries around the Mediterranean Sea. And obviously people have different foods. They eat in these areas. It really revolves around eating a high level or vegetables. Fruits whole grains nuts seeds and olive oil researchers have noted that people following these diets were very healthy when compared to Americans and they had a lower risk of many lifestyle diseases the fundamentals of the Mediterranean Diet than the consumption of vegetables whole grains and healthy fats which we talked about limiting your intake and red meat's having a moderate intake of poultry. Dairy your fish or eggs. Both a heavier focus really on seafood on poetry and considering the Mediterranean lifestyle. Not folks food elements necessarily. It's being physically active eating your friends and family and enjoying the glass of red wine. So what should you be looking to avoid if you want to fully eating patterns of these Mediterranean? Well you should be looking to avoid processed meats which we've also had leopard on so check back to that as well you want to avoid added sugars in your sodas for example you want to avoid transfats again. We've done an episode on this so such for the database and file trans fats episodes to find out more about that. You should limit you'll refined oils like your soybean oil and canola oil folks more olive oil. You should be wary of a lot of low fat products because these often have added sugars in to substitute a taste to be cautious of this and avoid refined grains like white bread and white pasta but put it into context to make it more visual vivid view. Want my day of eating look like when following a Mediterranean eating pattern lifestyle so it might be X. on toast with Avocado for breakfast. You might have something like Chemo with Bell. Peppers olives and sun dried tomatoes for lunch and for dinner. You could have something like a white fish with some sort of Greens like Kale or Aruba tomorrow. Yeah this is just an idea also chef by any means but I'm sure you've come a lot. That's a combination. Make Ready Flavor. Some helps you get a bachelor idea and if that sounds good to you then obviously Mediterranean. Diet might be something that you consider giving up those foods been for the canal. Royals the and sugars. It could be a lifestyle that better suits you. It's not too restrictive as not eating a certain time when it's not saying completely scrapped out of products for example Vegan Diet. It is more flexible than than certain diets out there. So now we've established What sorts of foods to avoid into eat and Dale Day meal plan might look like let's look at the health benefits and hopefully what from what I've already said? You should be able to understand that cutting out most junk. You're more likely to be taking in less calories unless of course rating series volumes your by following Mediterranean lifestyle. You're eating a balanced diet guessing in your vitamins and minerals from your daily routine badge on your avoiding as I said. Eating too many calories in excess. What else is that? What the study was published in England Journal of Medicine which they run them on trial of the Mediterranean diets for primary prevention of cardiovascular events. So this study. Run the assigned participants who at high cardiovascular risk with no cardiovascular disease at enrollment to one or three diets that was the Mediterranean Diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil. The Mediterranean diet supplements mixed nuts or control diet slaver alleviated by Was to reduce dietary fats and the study had a total of seven thousand. Four hundred forty seven people in it and it found among persons at high cardiovascular risk a Mediterranean diet supplements extra-virgin Virgin Olive oil or nuts reduce the incidence of media cardiovascular events rather than the advice just reduced dietary fat of course as we always say more studies are necessary to determine whether lifestyle factors such as more physical activity or extended support systems are partly responsible for the lower incidence of heart disease and meditating countries than the US but there again are more health benefits. The relationship between the Mediterranean diets and sleep in older adults has also been examined so a sample of one thousand six hundred eighty nine adults aged sixty five years above were tested based on a self report questionnaire when I changed looking at sleep. Duration Annesley quality on the research suggested the adhering to Mediterranean dollars can help improve swiftly quality in older adults but might not effectively quality in younger people as much. The Mediterranean Diet could also be useful for people trying to lose weight as I've touched thumb a systematic review of measuring dot for long term weight loss was conducted on compared the Mediterranean diet to a low fat diet a low carbohydrate Diet and the American Diabetes Association Diet and the Mediterranean Diet resulted in greater weight loss than the low fat diet at around four point in these study but produced similar weight loss as other comparative diets. But of course as I said if you don't want to lend you carve some full of a low carb diet but usually eats whole grains than the the Mediterranean diets may suits. You better really depends what works for you. You don't mind limiting what you what you. Thurmond focusing on but to me. It doesn't sound too restricted at. It's more as I said of a lifestyle. It's not just ate the food. Avoid these foods. It's about being physically active about being preached to give your food. It's about just eating. Organic healthy produce should help you make healthy lifestyle choices else As

Mediterranean Mediterranean Sea Lifestyle Diseases Spain Italy American Diabetes Association Chemo United States England Journal Of Medicine Thurmond
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:38 min | 8 months ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"What we learned together or what we can learn from each patient who comes here and I want to talk to jump right in I won't talk about a woman who called the she called me a couple days ago and well this is a woman who has a mother with us are calm and also I called was our cancers of the connective tissue or the fat or the muscle or the bones we offer the about cancers like breast cancer lung cancer and colon cancer of the major organs prostate cancer bladder cancer pancreas cancer yes of course retreat those cancers with high success rates but those other cancers who and there may be a little more rare with this woman's mother eighty years old have a life full sarcoma cancer of the fatty tissue and started growing in her body and she went to one of the most famous super duper all you're supposed to when she says the name is supposed to fall and collapse down well I didn't collapse down in fact she told me that she called me a year ago about her mother with this metastatic stage for light poles are calm of the sarcoma that is traveled and she went to the super duper super famous hospital and she's eighty years old okay and she has metastatic cancer means it's traveled with stage four cancer and that this super duper big place they started giving her chemo chemo chemo chemo chemo I could look up in books I've been a chemo doctor I am a chemo board certified chemo doctor forty years I can tell you that chemotherapy doing work.

chemo
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:05 min | 9 months ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"I learn about the patient and learn about the disease and try to encourage the patient and their family and loved ones to know everything about their disease so they can have an understanding of what's happened since the diagnosis and since they've arrived and most importantly what are the options so many people come to me thinking there's only one option they have to have surgery or that they have and the scheme or whatever standard radiation and they come here they learn about all the options that were so different than most places so different because we're not embarrassed to talk about all the options it seems like the surgeon stone want to talk about anything except surgery in the chemo doctors don't agree about chemo chemo camel and it's very hard to get the troops second opinions leave I went to medical school to try to help people and by helping people we help people understand their disease and what the options are so they don't end up doing something that's a really against their wishes so many people come to me and said I wish I knew you before I lost my breasts to my arm or leg or my longer my prostate or my bladder so many people tell me that and that's really the motivation to be here on the radio every day with you is to educate so you can learn as if god forbid something happens to you or your loved one or neighbor friends or even a person down the street that you barely know that you can speak up you can be an advocate and you having listened to many many people listen to the show every day many times actually every week and do learn just like a medical student learns going to medical school you learn patient by patient doctor young doctor training learns patient by patient well you can learn to and you can learn just because of doctors as all they have to open up your had to remove your nose or your here these are true stories about making them up their true stories you can say Hey okay let me go home and think about it and.

chemo
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

12:47 min | 1 year ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"A free informative booklet and DVD. Hey, Dr Liederman were back. We are back. And I want to talk about a sixty four year old man is a carpenter is married has three children came with his two cousins, weight loss and a cough and pain. So those are warning signs to people lose weight for no good reason to have a cough and pain. Those are worrisome signs and said reason to come here come to thirteen eighty four Broadway. If you want to see your primary, doctor if you want he said symptoms for months. Hit a pet scan pet scans showed disease consistent with cancer and the left long, Hyler and media Stein. Oh area the left lung, you know, where that is. Sex the heart. The Hyler is the area the door next to the longer the Airways and blood goes in and out and the media Steinem is a space between the right long and the left law. That's where the food tube is the airway is in the heart is that's called the media Steinem. He's lost nine pounds. He was one sixty five now one fifty nine is five foot nine and he's ex smokers. That's always worrisome ex smoker with a cough, shortness of breath and pain, and he had a biopsy at one of the famous super-duper places. He had a pet scan showing disease also says diabetes cholesterol ovation, and I examined them is decreased breast sounds in the left lung. And we'll scans showing this extensive cancer. And this is the kind of work, we do the other place they were going to just give them chemo chemo chemo, and he just didn't want chemo chemo chemo for the rest of his life. He knows that for an advanced stage cancer, chemo's and cure anybody and chemo has side effects kind of poison that goes into the body to try to poison the cancer more than the body. But after a while the cancer kind of outsmarts it and the cancer resisted, and this patient does not want to have chemo. And that's something we listened to every patient who comes here, we listen to the patient every room, you'll see a sign that says you are the president of the United States of your body. You are the president of the United States of your body know, lots of places that tried to put the patient into a cubbyhole you belong in cubbyhole two hundred and sixty four you have this. You belong in cubbyhole eight hundred two you have this. Well, we don't do that. Because number one was thought medicine by committee. We're not trying to fill protocols or clinical trials were not getting paid by the drug companies pharmaceutical industry or the surgeons or anybody your boss, and so we tried to tailor treatment for you. Which is so different than most places. We respect you and tailor treatment for you. If you wish that's the work we do. And I want to talk about another person who came to us. This is a woman who's ninety two years old, and she has a big cancer under left ear. She's ninety two. She was born in Dominica Republic has mass. It's about the size of a big grape right in the centre part of her ear in her left ear, she never biopsy. She's had this growing for a long time, which is in by other doctors, she never to buy up. She should never had scans. She campaigns of itchiness and pain and bleeding from this massive big fleshy mass with black dots in it. And well, what do we do? While we take the bull by the ear. And we're gonna do a little biopsy is simple little biopsy of this rendu, a scan of her and then offer treat. And we have high success rates in treating cancers of the ear. In fact, if you look at our gallery of work, you'll see a woman who came to us with a massive cancer, the ear chose only focused beam radiation with excellent results, we treat so many ear cancers and skin cancers on the ear nose. In mouth and eyes and hands and feet. Elsewhere with high success rates. Lot of surgeons our dermatologists surgeon, sir skin searches. Lot of dermatologists like to do cutting a lot of our patients, don't like cutting. They know that if they cut off the ear that this woman, for example, would be terribly deformed for the rest of her life, and that's true for most people's skin cancers of the ear. Just don't want to have that deformity most people when they learn about it when they're told about all the options come here to thirteen thirty four Broadway and choose not invasive treatment for the skin cancers of the ear is nose mouth hands feet in elsewhere. So give us a call. If you want for this woman, we're getting into work up. We're seeing how deep this cancer goes. Because it looks like it's a very fleshy tumor. That's been allowed to grow for years on her ear an ear year of ear tumors while she's got a lot going on. And we're going to get to the bottom of it and offer her treatment to resolve the problem as best as we can this is the work that we do every day. And then we're talking about a man from Bangladesh. He's works at one of the fanciest restaurants in New York's fancy dancy restaurant. He's fifty four is from Bangladesh's merit two sons, he came with his wife and his son and about eight years ago, he had rectal bleeding. Okay. It's a big lesson. Okay. Big big big big lesson. We talked earlier in the afternoon about a patient who had blood in the urine. And the doctor ignored it for. For a year the kidney doctor Nord blood in the urine for year will now this fan is rectal bleeding and his doctor told him. Oh, it's hemorrhoids. Well, hemorrhoids is a diagnosis to make a diagnosis of blood from the hemorrhage you need to make a diagnosis of hemorrhage. You can't just say, oh, it's from hemorrhoids. No, that's a mistake. And this mistake for this man, probably is costing him his life most likely he will die because he assumed the doctors zoomed, and he went to a doctor for care hemorrhoids. Well, no, if your blood in the stool, you come over to thirteen eighty four Broadway, and we'll fix you up. We'll get your checked out to see exactly where the blood is coming from. So finally now he's has a constipation says several years later, he has constipation. So he can't move his vows very well and leading which is all progressive and he had colonoscopy. And he was found to have a cancer in his rectal Moyed area. So that time is E, which is a cancer marker. We like to get cancer markers. So our patients, so you and your loved ones can follow and know what's going on here. The C E A which normally is less than three and him was eighteen. Six times normal. He had a cat scan. His doctors wanted to do a colonoscopy and the cancer was found, and then he went to a doctor. Who gave him radiation only, well radiation, only is not the treatment standard radiation, only is not the best treatment. For rectal signaled cancer, the usual treatment would have been a combined approach of radiation and chemotherapy together. But the patient was never told that the patient was never told the usual best treatment Asian doctor was just rushing to do the radiation gave them radiation only. And then the surgeon was rushed into the surgery and the surgeon to discern jewelry. And then after the surgery the patient started chemotherapy, and by now, the patients had chemotherapy for three years transferring his care to the most famous super duper place three years of chemo, and you can be assured when you're getting three years of chemo, reassured that most likely it is not working his CA. Remember before it was eighteen well now, it's three hundred forty five. His weight normally was one hundred eighty pounds. Now, it's one fifty seventy lost twenty five pounds. He's five foot. Ten he went to Mexico for concoctions, which never work another teaching point. If you wanted to save thousands of dollars of scams forget about it. It did not work. He went there. He was hopeful. It did not work. Forget about the scams concoctions Animas and ozone vitamin c in acupuncture and mega vitamins and mega supplements. Don't work, and he's at the most famous super duper place. And he's complaining of pain. He's got pain. You can't sleep. He's suffering and pain. He can't get out of pain, by the way is rectal cancer. It was all sort of in the rectum, twelve lymph nodes were taken six of the twelve showed cancer. So he started with a stage three cancer. But the remember the radiation doctor rushed into do radiation without any other methods of treatment to make it more successful gave him standard treatment, unlike us and by then the cancer just kept growing into lungs liver and his chemo, Dr just wanted to keep on giving him chemo chemo chemo, but the patient was complaining of pain and suffering in the shoulder, and he was being ignored. And finally, he left one of the super pooper biggest places in New York City to come here to thirty four Broadway to get care to be listened to to be understood, and I sat down with him and his wife and his son and. Immediately told him what we needed to do we need to get him staged up and all those years. He didn't get a pet scan. They didn't know exactly where the cancer was that just do it spread and they're going to give them chemo chemo chemo for the rest of his life. That's great for them. And it's great for the drug company. It's great for the pharmaceutical company. It's great for the president of that. Super duper big hospitals. Probably making ten million dollars a year. It's great for the chemo doctor to give came oh for the rest of your life. That sounds like a terrible sentence here. We don't work that way. Here. We talk about all the options. He has pain. We're gonna find out why he has the pain. We got him worked up. They never did a pet scan there. They never evaluated. Why he has so much pain? He couldn't sleep all night. He was in terrible pain and suffering and miserable. And they never investigated. Why he was having that pain, and he told them. Hey, I got this. Terrible pain. I can't live with his paintings. Cohen made is it. Oh, just take more came on the chemo's not working. And then he came to me with all his documents. I went through he brought two years of documents to me and we've called for the rest and an all the scans for two years. Every report says the cancers growing, the cancers growing, the cancers growing, the cancers growing, the cancers growing for two years, and it keeps I think more chemo and the cancer still growing, and they keep on giving them more the chemo that doesn't work, and they give him more came on the governor's scan and the cancers growing, and he has pain and no one listens to him. Until he comes here when he comes here examined him when we get a history and get a physical exam, and we get a task. And we find a big mass in the shoulder bone aiding through the ball, and they never saw that super duper big famous hospital member he's got three years of chemo. So average chemo's ten thousand dollars a month, which didn't work. So I spend a third of a million dollars a year money, and my money and his money a third of a million dollars. It didn't work the pains getting worse that didn't even look for the cause of the pain Kevin gave him chemotherapy, he came here. We did everything opposite. We sat down we listened to him. We gotta scan we've found out where the pain is coming from. And we're sending in thousands of beams noninvasive invisible. Beams.

chemo cancer cough president Steinem Bangladesh Dr Liederman rectal bleeding constipation United States Stein Dominica Republic New York City Cohen New York Animas Kevin Mexico
"chemo" Discussed on Maybe It's You

Maybe It's You

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"chemo" Discussed on Maybe It's You

"I could I could I could communicate in different way. I could be present in a different way. Which is probably the most important thing for me. The ability to fully be present in a moment and realize I have no control over tomorrow. I have no control over how this is going to go, and I don't have control over how these people react to me that was huge. So you did have some sort of a sort of a cancer of hicfa ni. You did have a I think so I made a one I mean because, you know, people want to know that you feel like what did you have a every day is gem. I mean. Yeah. And I I often like, and even though I did convert after chemo a lot of people associate that with sort of me having this near death experience and doing something. And for me, even though yes, I do think that was part of it. It's like when people said like, oh cancers the best thing that happened to your career. It's like, well, I'm a whole person who's existed in this life in this body, my entire life and everything is influenced. What's happened to me and how I react to. And so the years that I put in performing and writing in the years that I put in being educated and working in politics and doing all these things that I was working on and doing impacted the decision and the direction that my life took post chemo. So it wasn't just chemo chemo helped it, of course, short like so much of being present realized, well, I reacted this way in my twenties to the situation pre chemo. And now, I know that maybe helping me understand this shedding light on it. But like that. Moment influenced it more than chemo chemo needed to be there to shut people explaining it to themselves. They're just explained to themselves because they. Black or white. They ascribe some sort of like, well, you know, came kinda messes you up or you know, you it's his own ability. And you're like, no man, I've been coming to this. Like, of course, like you said everything's a catapult. But it's a million little different things. Easy answers for things. That's something that really blew me away. They wanted it to be you did this because of this and people are scared to make sense to them. And if it doesn't easily wrap their head around for it to like lock and land exactly because they don't want it because I think when you do that because you don't wanna go. It is complicated. Yeah, I'm complicated. And maybe I'm going through something. Maybe I don't maybe my faith isn't where it should be. Maybe my decided he wants to be like a lightning bolt where you go eleven had a lightning bolt. So yeah, I'm I'm clearly not in crisis, or I'm not having this gravitational polls that are that are revealing a truth to me that I don't wanna see like they wanna be like, oh, well or. This new. Slow motion lightning or something else happened the other in the opposite direction down back that way that put you in the place where you won't leave this idea. It's all about again getting back to being present. Like, I don't know. What's making me wrecked? In the way that I'm doing in any situation. But if I'm present in that moment and reacting authentically, then that's all I can do. I can't do anything else. And the. Yeah. So now, we we let's take a break. We're talking about holidays a little bit. Right. Yeah..

chemo
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"With cancer every day I want to jump right in and talk about a woman who's seventy she had uterine cancer that was Metastatic and she was getting chemotherapy and she just hated the. Chemotherapy or chemo doctor told her she had stage four cancer and she. Had to have chemo for the rest of her life well why do they do, that it sounds like a death, sentence came off for the rest of your life why do they do, that if chemo so great why. Don't they give a few? Shots, came on make the cancer go away chemo for the rest of your life and we know that after a while the. Chemo stops working usually after, a while the cancer starts mutating and maybe, the chemo works at the beginning because the cancer is never seen a chemo agent before but after a while. The? Cancer mutates the cancer changes. The cancer, evolves dislike. People they don't know what happens when they. Get hit by terrorists the first time but the second time or third time they're more prepared to take action and the. Same is true for cancer evolves at changes and the chemo that even. Might have worked at. The ba- Ginning just stops working and the cancer mutates and resists grows that's why so often you'll meet people oh I. Had, chemo at the beginning it? Works but now it's not working announced toxic after all chemo's a form of. Poison and how can you? Put a poisoning her. Body expected only to poison the cancer when it, goes from head to toe most chemo's go from head to toe. Most chemo Sero undirected most chemo's our form of poison and, sure the intentions are, noble chemo doctor it's been six years at Harvard giving chemo so I'm board certified in medical oncology I you speak not, from theoretical points of view but from real practice and, being a doctor for the. Last forty years in a board certified actually triple board certified internal medical oncologist. Radiation oncologists I have lots of experience so this woman when she was. Told for during cancer that she had the ham came over for the rest of her life she called us immediately Attention, and Furthermore she was having. Terrible, pain not only did she not. Tolerate the chemo she lost our hair she hadn't Iraq and. It wasn't working so what's so great. About, chemo what is so great about. Chemo chemo, Dr sometimes think they have the only show in town they don't have the. Only show in town there are other treatments much more successful for many diseases in her in particular cheddar uterine cancer stage, for many people call me in the doctor Liederman can you treat stage for cancer and the answer is yes that's what we do every. Day we've been doing it I've been doing, it for years we were the first. In, America with stereo tactic body radio surgery why, one of the reasons not the only reason but one of the reasons was to be able to treat stage for cancer would chemo's, not useful, chemo's not wanted chemo's not. Tolerated so just because chemo's not working or chemo's not tolerated or chemo's not wanted you have to take it no you can. Do what you want You can make, your own, decisions about what to do. So for this woman who had chemo and. She hated chemo and. She was toxic from cable and she. Lost her hair and she hadn't, arrived at the neuropathy means numbness and pain in the fingers and toes and elsewhere had it. Wasn't working she came to us with severe. Pelvic pain from her cancer and the cancer eating through the bone and caused destruction of the bone. And also pain from that and we treated her she just finished treatment the beauty? Radio surgery is rather than. Weeks and weeks and weeks of. Treatment is only a. Few treatments were able to aim. At the cancer hit the cancer highly effectively yes and, I can. Tell?.

chemo uterine cancer Pelvic pain Metastatic poisoning toe ba- Ginning Liederman Iraq Harvard America forty years six years
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Cancer he's been on chemo chemo chemo chemo and the cancer, keeps on traveling it's traveled to the lymph nodes the bone deliver and the primary site he's married he came with his daughter for evaluation, of his SAFA GIO cancer who's fun to about a year and, a, half ago we had difficulty swallowing hidden daas copy and dusk is. When the doctor Texas scope a little tube and goes down looks at, this off. Against the. Two between the mouth of the. Stomach in front of the SAFA GIO cancer was biopsy positive. He started chemotherapy and the chemo worked at the beginning and, I often say that the chemo offered works at the beginning But then shortly after the cancer. Starts, fighting. Cancer is a. Little bit like a terrorist. And it can fight back to cancer is. Not just some dumb collection of tissues sees. Chemo and then learns about the chemo into starts. Resisting the chemo and starts, fighting back mutates and that's what happened in him so at first, shortwhile the. Chemo work and then for a year, chemo hasn't worked the cancers just. Grow and grow and grow and, they kept on giving them more and more chemo. The cancer kept growing and growing growing and the span had a pet scan the pet scan this injection of radioactive sugar, doctors radiologists look throughout the body to see exactly where the cancer is in the pet scan showed more and more, metastases involving the lymph nodes liver bone and around this off Agha's then he tried concoctions and all kinds. Of things including, medical. Marijuana which mentioned just a few minutes ago which did. Not work dried coffee Animas and ozone and vitamins mega vitamins antioxidant And all kinds of, concoctions and spent a lost a lot of money but the cancer kept on growing at a pet scan a couple weeks ago he has right ab- domino pain right where the cancer is growing the liver and he has right. Hip pain where the cancer is. Growing in the.

Cancer Chemo chemo Agha Texas Animas Marijuana
"chemo" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"chemo" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"To recover and for them to get healthy now granted there are some people that they do chemotherapy and i do recover and i'm glad that they do but i i think that sometimes we look at that as the cure when really they recover despite the chemo because here's the thing george chemo certainly will shrink a tumor and still radiation and so i'm not i'm not gonna ever assert that that's not true they will shrink tumors the problem is that the tumor is a symptom of what's wrong in the body but it's not the issue and so if we cut out that tumor there's still something wrong and the panther can come back and oftentimes does so we need to get to the root cause of the cancer and not just cut out symptoms or you know cut out tumors shrink tumors that's not the problem what's really the difference between a cancerous tumor and a benign tumor it's still a tumor it's still a growth what causes what causes one to be cancerous in the other just to be a tumor well the the differential between a cancerous tumors that cancer cells are rapidly dividing cells and their tumors typically cancerous tumors are going to go grow more rapidly they're gonna they're gonna the form their own blood supplies they're going to start to take the nutrition the body and to to grow the tumor and so that's why oftentimes people would cancerous tumors look very wasting away like they have what's called the tumors are taking the nutrition from their body so that they can continue to grow what is the tumor is at a dead cell tumors your made up of all different types of sales cancerous tumors are going to be made up of cancer cells as well as healthy fails and the thing that makes a benign tumor different from a cancerous tumor in one aspect is that these cancer cells have they've lost the ability to to to selfdestruct that's called apoptosis when a cancer cell selfdestructs all of ourselves have limited life spans and so our cells are constantly dying and regenerating reforming new cells in a look at your skin how often you you can scrape your skin off your forming new skin.

george chemo
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Saw a patient this past week gentleman with pancreas cancer just friday night i saw the last patient of the week and he's a young man fifty years old is a pancreas cancer it's wrapped around the blood vessels he had chemotherapy chemo chemo chemo and i know the chemo doctors are hot to give chemo endlessly and not to do chemo and radiation together i know that because i have a knock down drag out fights with them and then he had standard radiation when the chemo didn't work so i had six months of chemo than he had weeks and weeks of standard radiation to hit the pancreas cancer not didn't work and now for the last year and a half he's been on more chemo and that's not working well how do i know it's not working he started the last chemo seven months ago he's still on the same chemo for seven months but six months ago he had a cancer markers c a ninetynine is a cancer marker for pancreas cancer six months ago his marker was eighty he's been on the same chemo for seven months and then three months ago i went through charter through probably two hundred pages of his papers friday night and his cancer marker was up to one hundred twenty so the doctors knew three months ago that his chemo wasn't working and guess what they did they kept on giving the same chemo was working i honestly was shocked i was shocked on one hand and thought while more of the same this is what happens out there if the chemo's not working then why give it it doesn't make sense maybe it's good for the doctor to give chemo maybe the doctor win something at the hospital when something the drug company win something but we're doctors and we are not here for ourselves we're not here for the hospitals around here for the president of the hospital we're not here for the drug company we're here for the.

pancreas cancer chemo president seven months six months three months fifty years one hand
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Chemo chemo chemo and i know the chemo doctors are hot to give chemo endlessly and not to do chemo and radiation together i know that because i have a knock down drag out fights with them and then he had standard radiation when the chemo didn't work so i had six months of chemo and he had weeks and weeks of standard radiation to hit the pancreas cancer not didn't work and now for the last year and a half he's been on more chemo and that's that work well how do i know it's not working he started the last chemo seven months ago is still on the same chemo for seven months but six months ago he had a cancer markers ninetynine is a cancer marker for pancreas cancer six months ago his marker was eighty he's been on the same chemo for seven months and then three months ago i i went through charter through probably two hundred pages of his papers friday night and his cancer marker was up to one hundred and twenty so the doctors knew three months ago that his chemo wasn't working and guess what they did they kept on giving the same chemo that was working i honestly was shocked i was shocked on one hand and thought while more of the same this is what happens out there if the chemo's not working then why give it it doesn't make sense maybe it's good for the doctor to give chemo maybe the doctor with something the hospital when something the drug company win something but were doctors and we are not here for ourselves we're not here for the hospitals around here for the president of the hospital we're not here for the drug company we're here for the.

chemo pancreas cancer president seven months six months three months one hand
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And we made it there for you to make it easy to come if you wish we had another caller today who called about stage for lung cancer they called about their brother who had stage four lung cancer and they want to know what the options were and again of course course when someone with sage for cancer goes to chemo dr often that chemo doctor tells them while you're gonna be getting chemo for the rest of your life the chemo's not gonna work and if they don't try and it doesn't work then they give q xsara that doesn't work they give abc in the f they can keep on changing it but the problem is that the cancer learns from the chemo and the cancer mutates the cancer becomes more resistant and aggressive as it sees more chemotherapy so for that lady who called about her brother there are options and we have many patients who have tried chemo and just on like it or they don't like it to begin with and they wanna have highly effective treatment like ours that's avoiding the systemic of facts without injections without cutting bleeding hospital stays lower the blood counts and that's generally what we do and we have many patients we talked about several earlier on the show today and we'll talk about a few later in the show women and men who have come to us with stage four cancer we've treated their sights of cancer and actually put them in remission so they're in remission from stage four cancer without chemotherapy just with radio surgery and that's something that we often do at radio surgery new york.

abc chemo cancer york
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"It's like a thermometer it's easier to our temperatures outside when you have a thermometer on your house well that's way thermometers cancer marker test so here we are i won't talk about a man who's a phd eighty four he was blind since age ten he has metastatic lung cancer now he's had this for about a year and a half and he first came to me about a year and a half ago and he decided to have standard therapy so i said chemo and tar cba and chemo chemo toshiba well it just hasn't work and the cancers growing he'd had follow up scans to show the cancer is growing growing growing and he said treatment just because you have treatment doesn't mean it works and a lot of people think oh i'm going to have chemo chemo goes everywhere chemo oh fantastic but the problem is for many people chemo never works and for other people came most stops working because the cancer mutates the cancer changes the cancer evolves to fight the chemo so cancer has a job cancers job is to grow he wants to hurt us it wants to hurt me in new and our loved ones and you have to get a treatment that's likely to work while chemo after awhile doesn't work and for this man stage four cancer eighty four first of all i can't tolerate it very well and number two it's not working and number three the cancers growing so it came back to us he's tried chemo for a year and a half it just didn't work the cancer is growing and he came back with his wife and loved ones to get a better treatment for this man is a non small cell lung cancer is metastases to the bone and lymph nodes he's had chemo and tar cba just doesn't.

chemo
"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"chemo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The chemo doctor called me and i returned the call and couldn't get through to her and then the patient was here in my office and the patient said we please call my doctor back and yes of course i call everyone back hours calling people back to try to answer questions and put the call on speaker phone so the patient and her husband could hear me and the chemo dr talking about her case and this is a woman who has stage four cancer and for many people stage four cancer by the way means it's educational point that the cancer has traveled you should travel through the bloodstream to another site maybe deliver the long or the bone or the brain but traveled and this woman her cat answers traveled chemo before and the chemo didn't work what is chemotherapy or why is it called chemo chemotherapy is really chemicals chemicals that are supposed to help so when you say chemotherapy you get the idea that it's supposed to help because it's one of the words is therapy but in fact often the chemotherapy stops working or doesn't work or as toxic because the chemicals are form of poison tried to poison the cancer and the chemicals are going in your body if the chemicals that are poison or going your body they can poison innocent bystanders like you're hearing or your eyes or your bone marrow your nerves or your kidneys or your lungs and those are called socalled side effects while they're not really side effects when you put a poison in your body you're expecting some toxicity it's just a matter of how much could be tolerated and so for this woman she had chemotherapy for metastatic uterine cancer and it didn't work work she then came to me because the.

uterine cancer chemo
"chemo" Discussed on Well This Sucks

Well This Sucks

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"chemo" Discussed on Well This Sucks

"Have an option to do another round of chemo to see like how much further can we go percent or you can just start on the next you know the epa hormone therapy uhhuh she gave you the pros and cons of doing another round of chemo and you were immediately like i'm not doing the chemo i saw you think about it during that conversation you didn't need it take a you need to take a day nothing okay i knew that even if i was like let me take a day i knew i was gonna still see how are gut and that's because they were to thinking about it for a weak link nipping another round of the pink yeah yeah why dealing downhill i did you know the know we didn't i didn't tell allow intel anybody about this actually um i think i'll he told my mom about it ran random we talked about it when we recorded which it hasn't yet out yet but haley when we went to see dr kwan she was talking about how great my response was to the pink double a cocktail that i was doing and um her kind of like oncologists side of her in the seat for the sake of like science and like how great my response was um wanted to see like how far we could take it with another round of chemo because like there's only so much of the your that a person can take of this chemo and i have like in their life basically before you go into like a risk of heart failure and earn my like i could only do one more round of this specific chemo but in doing that round i would already put me into a one percent bracket of heart failure so of like reached the safe olympic now with this one more wicket already starts the risk.

haley chemo epa one percent
"chemo" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

The Daily Meditation Podcast

02:43 min | 4 years ago

"chemo" Discussed on The Daily Meditation Podcast

"Or door. Just put a Schaal or sweater around yourself and meditate it's really a great practice to do this. They do this a lot in Japan. And and I I learned to appreciate this. When we lived there. I remember preparing tea in the Japanese tea ceremony in a tea room, which has the sliding doors that open up and it would be freezing. And we would wear the winter chemo, no to keep warm, and we just get used to that he or the cold whatever was going on. So now for the meditation technique today. I. Also share with you a lifestyle techniques something you can do. To improve some area of your life because meditation is not just sitting down to meditate. It's truly a lifestyle. So the more you can bring your meditation ritual in to your life. The more you're going to notice that benefits. And this is where you really start to explore how important your ritual can become too literally just about everything you do in your life. So Saturday, you usually have some time off if you happen to be listening to this on a Saturday. You can listen to the meditations in any sequence or order you want? Well, I am recording this for a Saturday and most people have the day off not everyone. So you might wanna do a relationship lifestyle. Technique on the day where you have a little more time to spend with a loved one, or friend or colleague or peer someone you want to improve your relationship with or maybe you want to initiate a relationship with someone. So you can do that too. So. As you get ready to possibly be out there walking or sit down and meditate. This is your walking meditation technique to manage a bad mood. What I encourage you to do when you use this technique is to begin walking and noticing your surroundings notice. What is all around you? And start to absorb it through your senses. Noticing. Visually. What you see the colors the textures?.

Japan chemo