5 Burst results for "Chelsea Rochman"

"chelsea rochman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"chelsea rochman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thank you very much. Thank you. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. A marine biologist from Australia traveled to remote string of islands in the Indian Ocean to see how much plastic waste washed up on the beaches. Here's just part of what she found three hundred seventy three thousand toothbrushes and around nine hundred seventy five thousand shoes, largely flipflops as NPR's Christopher Joyce reports. That's just what was on the surface. Jennifer, Labor's, went to the Cocos keeling islands way off the northwest. Coast of Australia. It was a good place because almost no one lives there that meant the plastic debris. There was not local floated in and no one was picking it up that gave her a good notion of just how much was bobbing around in the ocean. She was flabbergasted, by what she found so more than four hundred and fourteen million pieces of plastic debris are estimated to be currently sitting on the coast keeling islands weighing a remarkable. Two hundred thirty eight tonnes. There are twenty seven of these islands most just a few acres in size. Labor's team counted plastic on seven of them. Then they multiply that number by the total beach area of all the islands Labor's has done this before on other remote islands eager to the point where you feel like not really much as going to surprise you anymore. And then something does. And that's something with actually the amount of debris that was buried buried. Labor's didn't just count the stuff on the surface. She dug down four inches into the sand. What was really quite amazing? Wasn't the deeper. We wind the more plastic we're actually finding and what you see is, is only the tip, what happens is that the sun breaks down the plastic on the surface and the waves pummeled it into tiny pieces and drive it into the sand. But it's the little stuff that perfectly bite-size the stuff that fish. And squid and birds and even turtles can eat in fact, most of the plastic waste with just under the surface. We estimated that what was hidden below the sediment was somewhere in the range of three hundred eighty million pieces of plastic, but not permanently eventually, she says, high tides or storms will carry it out to sea. Labor's, who's at the university of tests, menia Australia, described, what she found in the journal nature scientific reports. It's becoming increasingly clear that no place seems immune ecologist, Chelsea Rochman at the university of Toronto says different places, simply have different kinds of plastic in the Arctic, for example are transported via air currents. In addition to ocean current. And there we see high concentrations of small Micra fibers small particles, and so absolutely. You expect different things in different places. And what you find tell you something about where it's coming from. Rochman says she's not exactly surprised by what Labor's found it gets kind of sad to, you know, to read about it in thank yet. Okay. This is becoming, I guess normal. And we never wanted something like this to become normal. Christopher Joyce, NPR news. Support for plastic tied comes from Sierra Nevada brewing company, family owned operated.

Labor Indian Ocean Christopher Joyce Australia NPR Chelsea Rochman Cocos keeling Sierra Nevada brewing company Jennifer university of Toronto nature scientific Arctic Two hundred thirty eight tonne four inches
"chelsea rochman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"chelsea rochman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Warsaw. Thank you very much. Thank you. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. A marine biologist from Australia traveled to remote string of islands in the Indian Ocean to see how much plastic waste washed up on the beaches. Here's just part of what she found three hundred seventy three thousand toothbrushes and around nine hundred seventy five thousand shoes largely foot plops as NPR's Christopher Joyce reports. That's just what was on the surface. Jennifer, Labor's, went to the Cocos keeling islands way off the northwest. Coast of Australia. It was a good place because almost no one lives there that meant the plastic debris. There was not local it floated in and no one was picking it up that gave her a good notion of just how much was bobbing around in the ocean. She was flabbergasted, by what she found more than four hundred and fourteen million pieces of plastic debris are estimated to be currently sitting on the cocoas keeling islands weighing a remarkable. Two hundred thirty eight tonnes. There are twenty seven of these islands most just a few acres in size. Labor's team counted plastic on seven of them than they, multiply that number by the total beach area of all the islands Labor's has done this before on other remote islands eager to the point where you feel like not really much as going to surprise you anymore. And then something does, and that something was actually the amount of debris that was buried buried. Labor's didn't just count the stuff on the surface. She dug down four inches into the sand what was really quite amazing was that the deeper. We wind the more plastic we're actually finding and what you see is, is only the tip, what happens is that the sun breaks down the plastic on the surface and the waves pummeled it into tiny pieces and drive it into the sand the little stuff that perfectly bite-size the stuff that fish. And squid and birds and even turtles can eat in fact, most of the plastic waste was just under the surface. We estimated that what was hidden below the sediment was somewhere in the range of three hundred eighty million pieces of plastic, but not permanently eventually, she says, high tides or storms will carry it out to sea. Labor's, who's at the university of tests mania in Australia, described, what she found in the journal nature scientific reports. It's becoming increasingly clear that no place seems immune ecologist, Chelsea Rochman at the university of Toronto says different places, simply have different kinds of plastic in the Arctic, for example are transported via air currents. In addition to ocean currents, and there, we see high concentrations, mall, micro, and small particles and so absolutely you expect different things in different places. And what you find hell you something about where it's coming from. Rochman says she's not exactly surprised by what Labor's found kind of sad to, you know, to read about it in thank yet. Okay. This is becoming, I guess normal. And we never wanted something like this to become normal. Christopher Joyce, NPR news. Support for plastic tide comes from Sierra Nevada brewing company, family owned.

Labor Australia Indian Ocean Christopher Joyce NPR cocoas keeling Cocos keeling Sierra Nevada brewing company Chelsea Rochman Warsaw. Jennifer university of Toronto nature scientific Arctic Two hundred thirty eight tonne four inches
"chelsea rochman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"chelsea rochman" Discussed on KCRW

"Very much. Thank you. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. A marine biologist from Australia traveled to remote string of islands in the Indian Ocean to see how much plastic waste washed up on the beaches. Here's just part of what she found three hundred seventy three thousand toothbrushes at around nine hundred seventy five thousand shoes, largely flipflops as NPR's Christopher Joyce reports. That's just what was on the surface. Jennifer, Labor's, went to the Cocos keeling islands way off the northwest. Coast of Australia. It was a good place because almost no one lives there that meant the plastic debris. There was not local it floated in and no one was picking it up that gave her a good notion of just how much was bobbing around in the ocean. She was flabbergasted, by what she found so more than four hundred and fourteen million pieces of plastic debris are estimated to be currently sitting on the Cocos keeling islands weighing a remarkable. Two hundred thirty eight tonnes. There are twenty seven of these islands most just a few acres in size. Labor's team counted plastic on seven of them than they, multiply that number by the total beach area of all the islands Labor's has done this before on other remote islands e get to the point where you feel like not really much going to surprise you anymore. And then something does. And that's something with actually the amount of debris that was buried buried. Labor's didn't just count the stuff on the surface. She dug down four inches into the sand what was really quite amazing was the deeper. We wind the more plastic we're actually finding and what you see is only the tip. What happens is that the sun breaks down the plastic on the surface and the waves pummeled into tiny pieces and drive it into the sand the little stuff. That's perfectly bite-size the stuff that fish. And squid and birds and even turtles can eat in fact, most of the plastic waste with just under the surface. We estimated that what was hidden below the sediment was somewhere in the range of three hundred eighty million pieces of plastic, but not permanently eventually, she says, high tides or storms will carry it out to sea. Labor's, who's at the university of tests, mania Australia, described, what she found in the journal nature scientific reports. It's becoming increasingly clear that no place seems immune ecologist, Chelsea Rochman at the university of Toronto says different places, simply have different kinds of plastic in the Arctic, for example are transported via air current. In addition to ocean currents and there, we see high concentrations of small Micra fibers small particles, and so absolutely you expect different things in different places. And what you find held you something about where it's coming from rock. And says she's not exactly surprised by what Labor's found kind of bad to, you know, to read about it in thank. Yep. Okay. This is becoming, I guess normal. And we never wanted something like this to become normal. Christopher Joyce, NPR news..

Labor Cocos keeling Indian Ocean Christopher Joyce Australia NPR Chelsea Rochman Jennifer university of Toronto nature scientific Arctic Two hundred thirty eight tonne four inches
"chelsea rochman" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"chelsea rochman" Discussed on Science for the People

"You'll also find links support us that patriotic to connect with us on Facebook and Twitter and to subscribe to the podcast in itunes and now back to the show. Okay. Welcome back. I'm bethany. Berkshire. And I'm coming to you live from the American Association for the advancement of science meeting in Washington DC, I'm here with Jennifer Provence, or Chelsea Rochman and Christina some cannon, and we are talking about micro-plastics in our water in our food in our seabirds. Jennifer. We were talking about bird digestive tracts because you have obtained birds and you look in their stomachs, and I wanted to ask how many times you have now been pooped on for the sake of science. Wow. I don't know if I can count that high. So you have to imagine that birds in the Arctic Joe nest, horizontally, they nest vertically, and so when I often talk about is below the polar bear line bird's nest like this, right? They can kind of spread out. So if you go to Kony's in Newfoundland, or in BC, they can have nest out in the horizontal landscape, but what I affectionately referred to as the polar bear line. Birds cannot be that vulnerable because the bears walked by an eat them. And so they nest vertically, and so you can imagine too. So when we're studying birds, you can imagine that to access a vertical face, you have to be a climber. And so I've spent a lot of hours dangling on a rope in the middle of a bird, Connie, and you literally look up ten there are Allison. Of bird thumbs above you. And so one of the first summer's I was there. I was in the middle of the colony and in and you have to you have to pay commutes in the Arctic it's in the summertime you need to do this on a on a NADA, windy day and not a rainy day because you don't want to disturb them or get them wet. But you are in full rain gear because we call it. The poop gear because you don't need it for the rain. It's sunny, it's warm, but you are in the poop zone, and so your head to toe in rain gear you've got a helmet on. And you're just kind of hoping that you don't get it in too many places and the first time telling me you're wearing goggles. You can't. Because then they get moved on. You can't see. So you could. But then for the, you know, it's only gonna work for like the first five minutes, and then you can't go. Yeah. You like little wipers. And then you also have to remember that you're basically like on dry days..

Jennifer Provence Facebook Twitter Berkshire Washington Connie American Association Kony Allison Chelsea Rochman Newfoundland Christina BC five minutes
"chelsea rochman" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"chelsea rochman" Discussed on Science for the People

"Hi, everyone. Just a quick note about today show. It is a live show and the meeting for the American Association for the advancement of science is loud and proud. So please don't mind. The crowd noise. We promise our guest this week are worth it. We've snagged three amazing experts to talk about micro-plastics rafting barnacles and bird poop because science with people. There's always room for bird coop. Okay. So we're about to get started. And the way this works for all the people who are enjoying science. When people the first time signs of people is an interview only podcast. And so I'm going to give an introduction. And then I'm going to start asking these fabulous scientists questions about classics, and it's going to be depressing. Amazing, and I brought this plastic coffee, and I feel bad or any? I'm just gonna don't don't look. Okay. So welcome to our science who the people live show. Thank you. I'm bethany. Berkshire science writer at science news and society for science and the public today. I am delighted to be here on the podcasting stage at the American Association for the events of science. And we've got the invitation to record a live show here. I just started digging through the program, and it's it's so wonderful to be here. It's like an embarrassment of riches in terms of content. But a couple of the sessions really stood out to me and all of those were on plastics. We are surrounded by plastics right now, they're plastics in my coffee there plastics in our smartphones. They're plastics in the chairs you are sitting on the close. We are wearing it. Plastic wrapped the food you probably ate for lunch. If you ate lunch, please eat lunch, and that classic eventually ends up in the environment. And as scientists have found a truly shocking about of it ends up in the ocean. When a lot of us think of ocean, plastics, we might think of like whole plastic bottles and tennis rackets, and I don't know boats. Big chunks, but a lot of the plastic in the ocean is actually way smaller than that. These plastics are micro-plastics which are smaller than five millimeters in size. That's about how. The size of a LEGO give or take I should've brought my goes, but small plastics can have big effects. So today, we're going to talk about plastics in the water where they're going. How much there is how we track it. What on earth we need to do about it? And I'll just go ahead and tell you guys right now that they found plastic in the beer, so we'll start there. To to cover this incredibly depressing topic. I'm here with Jennifer, Jennifer, Provan, sure, Chelsea Rochman, and Christina Simpkin. Jennifer provider is unit head of the wildlife health group at the Canadian Wildlife Service Chelsea Rochman is an aquatic ecologist at the university of Toronto and Christina. Some cannon is a marine ecologist at the Smithsonian environmental research center. Thank you so much for being here. Even though I know here's another session on plastics right now when I'm sorry. Thank you for having us. So I wanted to start a little bit with the scale of the problem. Chelsea do. We know how much plastic is in the ocean by weight or volume or tanker trucks Wales. So measure, we don't know how much plastic is in the ocean. In terms of in general, we have some estimates of how much is floating on the surface of the ocean. And we have estimates of how much enters the ocean every year. So the number that we're often given is that we estimate and this comes from Jamba. Wchs work that eight million metric tons of plastic enters the ocean each year. And so the elephants are the blue whales is that if we lined people up along all the coastlines around the world shoulder to shoulder, and they all had five plastic bags, and they threw them all in at the same time. That's how much enters every year..

Chelsea Rochman American Association Berkshire science Christina Simpkin Jennifer Jamba Canadian Wildlife Service Smithsonian environmental rese tennis writer university of Toronto Provan eight million metric tons