17 Burst results for "Chelsea Hospital"

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

Thoth-Hermes Podcast

15:26 min | 3 weeks ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

"If Pay, Drian is not the thing you like if you're drowning her the one off donation that's also possible from our website, there is a donation but and dare you can do a one off gift. Thank y'all who already have become patrons at have made donations. and. All of you who enjoy the show once again, please go and help to keep it up. Thank you. Well this week's music. I play music every time in this show. This week's music is also something rather special because. We have a listener here who is from Luxembourg in Europe his name is David Yanni and David Luiz. Quite, a well known composer and pianist, and he has contacted me and allowed us to allow me to use some of his music for the show. So today we are going to hear one of his works W Giannis critically acclaimed classical pianist actually, and he has composed more than one hundred, twenty works. Many of them are also Roger. Well kind of sacred and dreamy and. Well. You judge by yourself, he's using his highly sophisticated and. Even though it's rooted in the tradition of classical music, it's really accessible and. Touching. So we're going to hear. An. Entire. An entire competition him wishes in five Moomins, five parts. And We hear to movement is to to first moving now. Before we go into the interview. And the work to three here from east called cloud of unknowing. And two I, two movements that we are now going to listen to our cold into silence. And beyond the stars. I think you'll really going to enjoy this the cloud of unknowing by David Yanni. Enjoy. Uh. A. You're listening to the first two movements off work by David Yanni, which is called the cloud of unknowing does I who womenswear called into silence and beyond stars regarding here, dressed off this work. This show. Issue here that little string son from time to time here in the background I'm sorry about that somebody is cutting wood with a machine out there, and well, I can't wait for another three hours tattoos finished. I'm sorry if that bothers you I don't think it will be too loud though I hope. Right. So now let's Meet Amy Hale and I'm sure also that many of you do not amy hail already because she's been around. Writing especially on her blocks. Interesting very interesting work. A male isn't A. Writer. Who is specializing indio cult Jason Terry Kent. Under. Lil People, places and things as she says herself. She has a PhD in folklore mythology from UCLA and her research and writing ranges from Contemporary Cornwall to modern Pagan until called subcultures. And she's also very much interested in relation of politics do called cheese also active herself. That's why we call that show which e. Scholar because more and more scars that. Tell us that they are also active and that's very, very good thing. I'M NOT GONNA. Tell you more because Amy's gone herself a lot about that in this show and the actual reason why we meet here. Today. Is that she has recently published a book on Ice Iphone Call Whom? The occultist and artists from Great Britain. and. That book has just been released its brand new and as always now I'm going to read you a little excerpt from her book and we will open the interview with stat three thing which I will do now from I, co-, Hoon by Amy Hail. It's I fell. It was her middle name. Her given name was Margaret. Ifo. Calhoun. And I felt was also one of her mother's middle names. Grabs this was a small way of his urging her mother's influencing her line. It's not a form of ethanol. Cohen Claimed Benedict I. Sell Deputy Treasurer of Chelsea. Hospital. In the seventeenth century as a maternal ancestor and at one stage, she was working on a biography of him. It never materialized, but the name carries on perpetually alluding correct pronunciation. Still Peggy would never have sued eter I thought Colquhoun was challenging personality. I have also come to believe that she was the most consequential creative and committed female occultist of the twentieth century and occultist don't expect. We have a reputation for being easy to deal with. When I first learned of called Kalthoum, it was the year two thousand I had been working in Cornwall as an apologist for six years studying everything Celtic Cornish Nationalists Cornish Language phonetics Pagans druids sends King Arthur's enthusiast cre- contributing the exquisite combinations. I was told of Hoon over lunch with a friend in pinsent's. Told you about I tho- cahoon never heard of her who is she? She wasn't women surrealist to died in nineteen, eighty eight. Eccentric really enter the occult and witchcraft. She was a druid. Lift right up to, Hill from newlyn. Some people around here still remember her, but she felt with most people. The tate has all her papers. She's right up your alley. I was surprised hadn't before. agin medio cult history of. Cornwall. Was a huge interest of mine. I had done part of my phd on edge but had never heard of is local whom? My friend and under American about twenty five years my senior Rehnquist Coral, Art Archive, which documented the art scenes that dominated culturally three of much of late nineteenth early twentieth century West Cornwall. She is an incredible human database of artistic activity there although surrealism as movement has had one or two notable historical moments in Cornwall chest in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, seven, surrealist gathering in fullness. Surrealism was never a significant part of the story of the artist's colonies in say dives and New Orleans. So I wondered what caused this particular surrealist to settle their? Well, if you want to know more about that than know more about Aycell cut. Hoon you better get that book. Can you'll find to way to purchases also on the show dotes office show But now. Let's go to Atlanta Georgia where amy hey leaves and where I've interviewed her and we're going to hear very, very interesting things a lot about herself amy about her background about witchcraft in her us about politics called sent. Why is she became as color in that field that it's important that anthropologists just as history historians of religion mixed? Together. To talk more about ESOTERICISM NGO cult. Well, no longer waits. Let's go and meet amy. Hey. Here.

David Yanni Amy Hoon Cornwall Amy Hale Europe W Giannis David Luiz Drian West Cornwall Amy Hail UCLA Contemporary Cornwall Atlanta Lil People Jason Terry Kent Roger New Orleans Writer
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

06:31 min | 2 months ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"I'm going to have to go back to school not to do more school. So then I finally got a program as far as getting my master's degree. And again now, but now since I graduated college now I'm like. How do I? Put this? I'm like the Big Shit of the family because nobody else is even finished high school. Like my sister's mom, my sister did graduate I'll say my one sister graduated. My other sister dropped out. My brother did graduate. He became I actually he he did I mean he got a career. He wanted to be a police officer and he did that. Assume this out of high school, so he did accomplish his his goals as far as his career, but. Nobody else in even thought about college, and then when I went to get my master's degree, it was like Oh, my Gosh! Yeah, I. Don't know. I was like I was. Like, they missed. They misplaced me with this family in some way. Like they were really might really my family. So I ended up going to. Get my masters. Of course lasts in while I was in school. I met Mary Grace through mutual friend of ours. And we kind of hung out and had fun and yeah. We did like tore up in Arbor more than a few times. So my last semester, school comes around. I need to find a place for an internship now I have to I have to intern somewhere. In Mary crisis. To, Chelsea, where she was working at the time. Like Oh. Yeah, that'd be great so that that's that's when I spent six months at at Chelsea hospital working in patient substance abuse. While you were there mary-grace so That's that's that's what got us connected what we are. We connected with a mutual friend, but that really I mean. We spent a lot of time during that time working. So, it's a long story. Short is I. Just I had to find my own way, and in it it. It's IT'S I. I didn't have this goal when I was sixteen, but just developed based on my experiences that I don I'm going to help people. That's what I just grew on. Me Wasn't planned it just that's where I'm supposed to be. And what's so remarkable? Hear all of our stories. Were self-made, Become through the school of hard knocks. We've broken probably all statistics we really have. And what a great message that I hope everyone that's listening. You know when you really feel. beat up and you feel like you're nothing. And he come from nothing and that there's something wrong with you. To to get connected with with squall to get connected with people who are GonNa, feed you and inspire you. WHO's different? You know it's the Ugly Duckling story guys. You know the Swan Egg that rolls into the Duckling Nest. And it gets picked on and be rated and belittled, and it's hated. And it feels the ugliest of of all siblings, and it wants to die, and it goes in swims in the water, and it's ready to take its own life, and it looks one last time in the water and the reflection of the water, and it sees fons going by. And the Swan say to the duckling. Come come with us. It's time for us to go to migrate. And this one is like wait. I'm not a Swan I'm a duck. And he's talking about. Duck Your Swan if for the first time that. Ugly Duck is connected with. It's real family. It's family that makes him feel worth. Value Beauty. And so when you're in that place of just feeling like you're not enough that there's something wrong with you. People are putting you down or judging you discriminating yell. Want you to look up and say Fuck Gyro. Happen don't buy into it. It's some bullshit. And get to people who will support you and get to those Sarah Gates who are GonNa walk into your life and say come on along. You're one of us. And we'RE GONNA feed. You were going to inspire you and you need like on the road. Each one of us have matt these little angels that kind of come to your wife and say hey. You should do this. Try, this! Edge you know, go this way with your education started the community college whatever it is advance. Invest in you become a good parent to you even when you don't feel it, you fake it till you may get. When I started out, I was insecure. Person Aber I. Get I made it because I liked making people happy and pleasing people. And I listen I was good at listening to those people who were successful professors counselors. You know when they when they talk to me. I wanted to be better and I. IT sounds like all of us had. In our bellies to advance in break all the rules. And end up with success. All of us with education's all of us knowing one another, and that's how it works. Oh really hope. You know anyone who's listening really. Here's our stories because you can take a look at us in how yeah, but you know they're successful or they're this. We Wanna see that read had stared out anything I was one of those like Mary Gracious I was not supposed to make okay me and my siblings. Small we okay, your father dies and you and your your left with a thirty four year old widow. She has four kids. I was twelve. The youngest was four years old. I just I. I hear the voices of people saying it's over. The girls are going to be prostitutes and he's going to be a burger robber. These don we will not supposed to make out of state. We really were not and. The reasons, such empty for young women.

Mary Grace Duckling Nest Chelsea hospital Chelsea Swan intern officer fons Sarah Gates Aber matt
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

06:33 min | 6 months ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Eight two two sixteen hundred what I missed time L. S. break or what was up by one full minute well it's because I'm doing fifteen different things I I was down here I was juggling with a bowling ball alive kit and a change so I was doing that while I'm doing the show every now and then I gotta tell ya as I've said before awesome content marginal broadcast techniques zero zero there are no effective I guess I'm talking with the nurse lady that's been in the medical profession or name is Brenda this comes my way courtesy my pal Dave Janet talking him last night you said you got it you got to get this information out of a what this ladies doing what she's doing is re purposing material that's already in play in use in hospitals all across America and re purposing it to bring about things or short now masks gowns surgical has all that stuff that was a lot of which Tucker Carlson went through an inventory last night that made me wanna throw my drink through the TV thank god I don't drink or I would have done it but we've given much I don't know everything we need now to China hi think of the irony of that yeah prior to this this virus that they hit us with but it does bring bring a backup Brenda welcome back to get that right is that what you're doing to stuff don't hang on a second sorry about the branded I get that right yesterday at okay so recap the that what is it what's the name of this stuff what do you physically doing with that and how do we get this word out to people okay so what the product is it about give you the the the generic layman's terms and that'll give it the technical name though it's the blue it's the blue paper used to wrap insert surgical instruments traces found in central sterile processing and it is called poly propylene Hey you are Hey hello hello yard H. three hundred or H. six hundred every single hospital in the country uses the same product to wrap critical instead everybody every doctor nurse in America knows what this stuff is every every surgical nurse okay every anesthesiologist every surgeon those with the stuff that okay not every so that's why a lot of education to be done you know you're a regular for nurses and a lot of your hospital staff but we don't know if they've never worked and up until now a lot of the stuff is just been thrown away especially when he called and something rather masks I mapped out they get thrown away at I'm from what I read to you can you can restore realizing that ninety five mask as many as three times because I'm assuming as we talked a fair autoclave eventually is going to damage the seems the construction whatever Sevilla got you've got a certain amount but it could be used a lot more is being used now okay we could we could triple the lifespan of those ID five masked by dropping it in a in a heat wave for a number of minutes at two hundred and fifty to two hundred and seventy degrees and the reason that's important now people if you've been paying attention we're hearing all over the place we have a shortage of mask we have a shortage of this we can't get what we need and what this lady is telling us is we've got a bunch of stuff we can keep using so we've been making a bomb people in Jackson County to the baking masks are taken on over to the clearance because planting of a clear and is is very short and out of mass but I called and spoke to them yesterday and you know told the nurses over there going to be all ours figure out how to start saving the stock so that you can pass it on to the seamstress that can repurpose that what do they say we're making they said that they said they would do that you know I but I'm again I'm talking to one nurse at one hospital Chelsea hospitals on board in Chelsea Michigan we're making masks they donated a lot of products a lot of of the product and we're making ask for them right now so that they don't run out just Chelsea house knows this whoever runs Chelsea hospital date must have an end to be able to hit other hospitals and network this information out there now right right well I've worked itself out as a nurse educator for ten years so so I was in the O. R. you know yes I've got a good I've got a good connection in the operating room good you love them and others the Trinity health system I you know I I will be going from hospital to hospital traffic all these phone calls but trying to get it on the airwaves in that television is a lot more effective than one person running around right now it's all over the country must instantly I'm assuming our buddy Dave genders on top of this too right yes I spoke to him last night good and then he knows he knows the doctors all over the world so hopefully this he's plus he's got a finger on the White House too so hopefully this'll law is looking out there quickly so I'm hoping I I've scanned and scanned my document I'm going to be emailing them and just trying to get as many news organizations out there to pick this up like a river city of Florida his on the ground work on on the the infection control piece of the puzzle and you know verifying that yes this is a good or better than N. ninety five masks yeah and you know that what's wonderful about this is there is there so much of this out there in the free market this isn't the government getting in the way this needs to happen like instantly right exactly every single hospital operating room for a processing instrument processing department has this exact product and the only option most of the time the only option I had to do with that after you've opened the extra traffic roadway so we've we've you know like I said I pulled it out for years you know taking it to animal rescue an animal facilities because it's a nice product for them but now it can be flown and it's a really really good solutions this is great and the other thing about this that needs to happen and I I spoke with John fair about this I don't know how you do it I don't have any in but this needs Lou Dobbs Tucker Carlson and Rush Limbaugh they need to be talking about this if anybody's got it without crew they need to be talking about this going back to.

L. S.
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

13:00 min | 7 months ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Figure out how to put on the page. Because I haven't done any shows on all right you ready. Yup All right here we go. Welcome to psyched my MG. This is Mary Grace. Wrandell ratliff or MG for short. I've been a psychotherapist in private practice for thirty two years. Now guess what everyone we all have issues. So it's time to lighten up and move forward. Let's stop letting our crap control us take control over crap. Hello Everybody Hello. Hello and today. I'm so excited because I have two wonderful psychotherapists with me today. I Have David Wright known as the Motor City hypnotist. My husband wrote something else in here and it got me all confused and Dave and I have known each other for years and years and years longtime Oh my God like thirty years And Dave we are thrilled to have you with us today and thrilled to be here Can you tell us a little bit more about yourself? Well sure yeah. I'll go back to when we met. Actually Mary Grace when I was in school Grad School we were on Arbor more than exit. So when I when I had to do my internship during my Grad work. Mary-grace was out at Chelsea Hospital. Inpatient Substance Abuse Facility. Yep so I thought okay. That sounds like a great ship where she worked and we have been friends ever since. Yeah Yeah So. I've been in practice for thirty years. Licensed professional counselor psychotherapist and I am the motor city hypnotist right and you have your own practice. I do my own practice located in Taylor. Yup in Taylor Michigan well welcome. I'm so happy to be here and I also have to my right and Matthew Rita who's also psychotherapist He and he is in my practice with me and he's been in the field years eight years now. Yeah I was going to say. It's close to four years before that when I did my Undergrad and worked in inpatient. Psychiatry yes and you have been an educator for several years as well. Can you tell us a little bit about that? Yeah so after my Undergrad as I was saying so I ended up getting a job and impatient and it actually changed. When I was in my Undergrad. I was actually going to be a high school teacher. Yeah so I was you know and then all of a sudden I did all my student teaching hours and then I said I'm dropping out of the College of ad and it made my parents really happy. I'm being facetious. So I dropped out of the College of AG bumped my psych minor to major and then that started my journey. So after my Undergrad. I was like this is something that I'm really passionate about compassionate and having the empathy and all those things that are obviously you know we know in this realm so then I went on to be a into a psychologist program and then after graduating I had the honor of meeting you as one of my colleagues had actually introduced and say I know. There's an open office to Start Your Town Plymouth. I'M WALKING DOWN IN DOWNTOWN. Plymouth and I'm actually like wait a minute. Does that look like my cousin because you guys had yet aim haircut. Same everything and so I was like okay. God unless you're like no. There's no problem you tried to show. Me Office. I'm fine signed Roy. Signed right away and Equally since to. I've been most recently joining your practice and then still have been an educator for the last. Yeah you've been an educator with wash wash wash we're there hey. Online classes distance learning and teaching. Live classes so intro to psych and kind of from the grassroots and then wow you really did bring those two worlds together. Yeah so it's funny how that came kind of full circle and I remember ever teach again. I'm going to do it in a college kind of format a college environment and it happened. Oh my Gosh Matthew. And I'm so glad to know this I did not know this about you and you know. Just say when we first we and it's the same thing with you. Dave like the three of us when I met. We hit it off. It's one of those things where you feel like you've known each other forever. We were like that too and all of our personalities. We could be obnoxious. But we're very direct like we're very straightforward. We you know. Come from a very good kind place. But we don't mess with Shit like hell no pulling punches and Matthew. When he came into the office he had to hook up What was it? It was a wildfire the WI FI. Well when the people came in put the Wi fi or hook up the whiteside they cut up my phone line and so we had to literally sit on the phone together with the guy from. At and T. For like three and a half to four hours and we laugh the entire time we you know. What are you GONNA do? You're going to get bummed out or you're gonNA frigging laugh your Azoff so and that was matthew and I just so much fun he he can have so sorry. I'm like oh I'm having a great old time. It's totally cool. But and Dave United same thing. I mean we just we took it beyond Chelsea's once Chelsea was done just kept going have a truly And that's I think that's also what's bringing the three of us together here in this podcast And so today on this podcast we are going to talk about transitions. You know And we're GONNA take a look at them we're GONNA define them. We're going to talk about what we each go through with them But before that there has been something in the news that Kinda hit me and it's going to hit you to a bit Dave. It was that whole college scandal. With you. Know those actors out in California and paying their way into the colleges and This one woman that She came from the hot pocket fortune. They father her grandfather created the hot pockets and she just got her Sentence handed down and I was sitting there like you know I get the whole thing with you. Want the best for your kids But losing the whole model for your children integrity honesty. You know the right way the wrong way when you cross that over and put it in the guise of. I'm doing something for my child. I think you're getting delusional at that point. It's a good question and I let me reframe this because you look at it from the outside. And how can somebody do something? That's so you don't a dishonest or unethical in honestly. I can't say that if I didn't have ten million dollars in my bank account and I great not. I can't say that I wouldn't but that would definitely change your. You have options. You have more options whether they're right or wrong I'm not condoning or the sizing that but but it doesn't interesting debate that if you want if you want the best for your kids and you have the money to do it. You know what's the line I guess? And maybe that's how Charles becomes. That was in charge of moving it. Yeah I mean I think that's such a bit then expands to a bigger issue like what money does to people as far as losing their integrity their morals the difference between right and wrong when you end up getting so you know coddled spoilt catered to a of creates this kind of narcissistic world. That people can cocoon themselves in. I think you're used to getting something or getting anything. Really in life you become entitled to it and even as a parent when you've given your kids and and I'm not judging as far as not giving kids what you can. I want the best for my child. Yeah but when you give them your kids everything. They've wanted their whole life and then they get to the college and you say why can't do it this time. I mean yeah you think they've already built in this pattern of doing whatever they can messing him up. I think it's important to though. Like giving your kids everything they wanted and then like you said this line of entitlement and that's something that I've talked about with whether I've different environments working with patients even like it sounds like there's some entitlement coming through here so it's even Ackley. What you're saying is like this is a much broader issue. I think is because I just actually thought of that when you when you talk about money. Then who's actually moves into you know when you are wealthy like that and how we're watching people just crossover lines of integrity and believing that they are entitled to that and they have the right to that and And now I mean these kids are facing. I think it was a good thing that happened. You know it's kind of like the alcoholic who hits the bottom and it changes their life because it gives them a reality check again. It feels like you know the super wealthy can go into a delusional world and they need reality checks that kind of bring them back tuna for realities not hitting you the first time so I always use this first of all. It's a little pixie dust then there might be some puddles after the actual like big rocks or bulldozers or roadblocks and then after that the whole building comes crashing down right. That's right that's right. Life's lessons and she's trying to kick us in our house. When in the way you described that mattis that gradual breakdown inbound guy. Yeah I mean maybe when these kids were. You might have done something a little bit unethical to who knows. I mean the the end it just gets easier therefore you get away with that and I'm sure again like any other person in a situation like that. I'm sure that one point in their life in and say hey I'm Gonna I'm GonNa wait to my kids get to college and I'm going to buy their way. I mean I'm sure there was nothing that was planned that much of head. It's just a victim of their own circumstances. Yeah a victim and and I actually. I challenged that a little bit because they do know the difference between right and wrong. I'm feeling like today like that. Line has gotten so blurred. You know that I say this often to clients. I say you know you never understand bad behavior because if you understand it you can't protect yourself from it because it leads to that rationalization thing that we see so often weather at something like this where they rationalize why they should do it and and they turn it in to making sense to the point where it's delusional and we see it with alcoholism drug addiction. We see it with people who have any kind of addiction issue that I am. I always call it a disease of rationalizations and these rationalizations get you to cross a line. Then you start to get in trouble and as you're doing the wrong behaviors and getting into trouble. You're trying to make sense of all that and you're also sometimes hoping that you don't get caught. Yes and that's where that living in constant fear and you're of covered with this fear of like living in fear and trauma. You start to then sometimes over at overreact to act out even more and then that's when people will say like even patients will say. I don't know why I'm like I'm acting out more and I know that this is wrong now. Yeah and it takes over your brain like it really gets out of control. While in the other danger of going the opposite ways that they become immune to it and then feel invincible..

Dave United Matthew Rita Mary Grace Me Office Chelsea Hospital private practice Wrandell ratliff WI Motor City Taylor David Wright alcoholism College of AG Chelsea Taylor Michigan school Grad School Plymouth school teacher Roy
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on The 2 Robbies

The 2 Robbies

04:25 min | 11 months ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on The 2 Robbies

"New manager gets an a new manager of the good resume gets at a couple of snow is just starting to run a little bit thin and also finds need to see progression proved with the defensive and team Balance Congo beyond this welcome to palace came back to go beyond Grungy Jacobite away you've got to seek the the football club will be most out then how's it go with the crowd who then stone fusty each has the crowd out and then chill until Ronnie Jukka also football club Moscow this you know it's not too big a statement to say he's done he's done correct you you accounting snow propercloth you come home and you walk off his anger and swear that the home fans fabric giving him stick but that's what happens when your professional football you can't swear the fans and take off his shirt and throw it we're going to see them every cautions about how I am real situations that was very public that was out there for everybody to see the day with that we'll see how that one goes him that huge as much to drop because everybody was into funds will you know what I was getting the money fund today what do you think like do you think we can win this game the beginning to know how many are they gonNA win the game they disliked it can change in in the club and not GonNa come to competence Moss Yellen Russian install in lineup which was good important I'm a player option guests at Booz Golan would say I got knows they always I'm going to go on and win the bidding overreaction by the way from everybody about Manchester United we know what's happening we know the rebuild we know some tough decisions getting rid of some experience plante and rebuilding liking but they've got injuries as well Jesus well so a thin squad a young squad and in Egypt squad it's difficult to get results Russia Damasio we saw that skull was it the little combination play special players I'm sure there's a balance there I'm sure they're not going to be a couple of points renovation Yeah I just think it was bananas going to a game acknowledge the way number yet they done the business there so that will give the manager great hope much more performers Scott mcdonagh and in growing how can you tell you I like him on outstanding but he does a really good job and when there's a little bit more flavor around minimum of creativity for united and he'll be an incredibly important so he got the goal today and decide if you want to miss two pounds the next one you got pulled poke Bonnet wheelchair get your mom ah important with much it all it all it gets gets a little bit of breathing room and make them look forward to trying to climb table where we're going to actual BIMA CISCO Chelsea let's go to Chelsea Hospital we're GONNA Chelsea Football Club for one reason most doc under pressure on a great start knows talk you know a lot of people here in Austin we hope that started the game Chelsea Chelsea found over here very excited the head start but he's starred in the game and I think you ate a comment Robin we've been around each other for too long I'm thinking I'm going to say next anew said the confidence to take the ball and to maybe be by the dribble himself and try and scored and south we know he's skillful we know he's creative we know is intelligent but it's not confidence in that Lee self-policing has mental strength isn't that yeah you can take these option you can play to teammate you can get an assist you down the fat on about this a little bit always played international football and start he's played in German football and trump kinsley popo now is a bully with -bility and we say what it means to the people of Mary okay test which seem to well I know it's a long period of time but he was out on the side and is managed to see.

two pounds
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on ESPN FC

"The holidays are still ongoing golfing going. I got a few more days off. I flew back specifically for opening day. <hes> but this week we're going to be talking about some <hes> some united and chelsea some liverpool and manchester city and name again we all summit. That's what we've been talking. I feel i've talked about laima more within about my own children and family or anything like that is just crazy. You should've named one of your kids. Name are legit yeah took him. I thought we talk about but you know. One player named especially the that people were not my voice justin it. Who's at this national review before all right. I jules you. Were there at old trafford. We've got mark ogden now joining us. He was there too <hes> but first. We need to check on something very important <hes> augie last time we had you on you under treatment for your situation. Yes you are dying. Absolutely yeah wall is it is it is it healed. Is it contagious almost compat- it is that why you've been wearing those plastic clubs that make you look like how i like to go krueger. I right talk. <hes> you guys were both there. I watched it on television resounding victory for united everything's fine you excited you. Positive positive is that frown upside down now talk male gills. Obviously you listen it was i think if if you take a step back and you look at the time i went in thinking you know you're not really raw in various mcguire made a big difference of the bach. Doc felt one difference defensive when he gets abolish. He's not particularly great. I don't see many donald trump won basakan but he does what he does the buffalo midfield and they don't really want to think against the pitfalls on chelsea to find the find it difficult yeah chelsea that the optimism has to be high about hospice and realism as well from chelsea's views well pull lhasa admits but they don't really not eaten so i suppose game of the season <hes> less than get to decide from united perspective yet. The policies of the full maybe may have to say is wolves away and that could not about for me too big a test because i save money. They lost two games at wanting you. They could side wolves to the team the competitions to catch you know even chelsea hospital soap i i i think we all we all agree right..

chelsea chelsea hospital mark ogden Doc donald trump old trafford liverpool lhasa krueger justin mcguire manchester buffalo
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Song for you and we go from talking about an excellent cover of song. The <hes> on America's got talent this week to the final of Britain's got talent which Chad on Sunday night last night to eight point two million people across the country series of Britain's got talent. I think has been a really good one. I think the one thing that is really sean about this series more than any other in recent memory is that it has a great sense of it has a great sense of diversity in its talent. I was trying to find into the word of diversity because everyone knows Dell's ten years ago diversity with the wins. The thing that I love is that it's not just been all singers and all dance groups which did play it for many years. There's been a lot of magicians for example this off. The back of people like Richard Jones who really well winning brisk talent a couple of years ago and then we had we had a lot magicians this year a lot of like a new danger act which is never got the final apprentice called talent. He did absolutely fantastic. I really liked Chevron who was from wig failed Nitsa my neck of the woods and she <hes> she she reminded me a lot of Victoria Tori award that soft style Victoria Ward Meets Peter Kay meets. You know <hes> just just that sort of northern musical style I should say she did actually fantastic in the final with the song about about her mother and called. If it's not one thing it's your mother which I thought was really really clever and not relatable at all if my mom as listening but yeah definitely and I I do think though that the the right person did win and that was Colin thackery just did mentioned about singers being a big part of the show but we haven't not a winner B. Singer for for quite a few years now. now in fact calling brutal something completely different he brought nostalgia factor and he brought the the factory that patriotism which other time where we you know we probably do need it and and all coming together and just remembering about they stay the the great things that the country has done in the past and <hes> to see someone like him and like the new stories of come out today amount further on i._r._a. renews throughout the day here on <hes> siren he talks about how he's going to be donating part of his children fifty thousand pound wayne to the royal chelsea hospital hospice obviously a charity take care home which i think is absolutely fantastic he wants to get the new the new projects off the ground in his name which <hes> you know it's an absolutely lovely thing to do and these can help grandkids get owns the property ladder so grad if you're listening i'm sending over the application forms for next year's britain's got talent thing you might being shot let's carry on with the show so we'd cullen thackery in the final final last night ambi- g._t. any worn with the cover of this song and he's been conducted this version by the royal philharmonic orchestra chris cochran and it's aspects except love love changes everything an.

Britain Richard Jones Colin thackery Peter Kay cullen thackery royal chelsea hospital hospice Victoria Ward wayne America Chad Chevron Dell Victoria Tori chris cochran fifty thousand pound ten years
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Song for you and we go from talking about an excellent cover of song the on america's got talent this week to the final of britain's got talent which ed on sunday night last night to eight point two million people across the country series of britain's called tunnel i think has been a really good one i think the one thing that is really sean about this series more than any other in recent memory is that it has a great sense of it has a great sense of diversity in its talent i was trying to find the word of diversity because i've run those was ten years ago diversity with a wins the thing that i love that is that it's not just been all singers all dance groups which did play it for many years there's been a lot of magicians for example this off the back of people bridget jones who really well winning briscoe talent a couple of years ago and then we had we had a lot magicians they a lot of new danger acts which is never got the final apprentice called talent he did absolutely fantastic i really liked chevron who was from wig failed nitsa my neck of the woods and she she reminded me a lot of victoria korea would that soft style victoria ward meets peter k. meets you know just just that solve northern musical style i should say she did absolutely fantastic in the final with a song about out her mother and it's called if he's not one thing it's your mother which i thought was really really clever and not relatable at all if my mom as listening and i i do think that the the right person did win and that was calling thackery just mentioned about singers being a big part the show but we haven't had a winner b. singer for for quite a few years now in fact but calling bruce something completely different he brought that nostalgia factor and he brought the the factory that patriotism which other time where we you know we probably do you need it and you know coming together and just remembering about they stay the the grit things that the country has done in the past and <hes> to see someone like him and like the new stories of come out today amount on i._r._a. renews throughout the day here on siren he talks about how he's going to be donating parts of his children fifty thousand pound wayne to the royal chelsea hospital hospice obviously a charity say his home which i think is absolutely fantastic he wants to get their new the new projects off the ground in his name which you know it's an absolutely lovely thing for him to do and he's going to help grandkids get onto the property ladder so granddad if you listen i'm sending over the application forms for next year's britain's got talent thing you might being shot let's carry on with the show so we'd colin thackery in the final and last night on d._g._t. anyone with the cover of this song and he's been conducted this version by the royal philharmonic orchestra chris cochran and it's aspects have love love changes everything and.

america fifty thousand pound ten years
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We in west London inside Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea hospital, which is the oldest maternity hospital in the UK standing in the corridor of the labour ward with MandA Stendhal chemical, how have the infant mortality rates basically changed in that time? They've changed dramatically over that period of time. So we're talking about the mid seventeen hundreds when that stage, one in thirteen babies die, which is pretty stock statistic up to me, if you fos for two hundred and fifty years to when I go find in nineteen Ninety-two, that's they about six babies per thousand with Dr anti-nice. Leah's stillbirth. This is crowd science from the BBC World Service. I'm Manjaca Tia, and we're this hospital to see how modern medicine is interact. Meeting with human. Evolution back in the nineteen sixties you wouldn't expect to baby who's born at about thirty one weeks. Just station to survive nowadays, a baby born thirty one weeks gestation has about ninety five percent chance of survival, so it's completely different now and it's been to medical advancement, the advancement of neonatal K fetal steroids to make sure we have fetal long-maturity maturity, so it's also been shown to reduce the risk of bleeding in the baby's brains. And.

Chelsea hospital Manjaca Tia BBC World Service Leah Queen Charlotte Dr anti-nice London UK thirty one weeks ninety five percent fifty years
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on On The Ledge

On The Ledge

13:58 min | 1 year ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on On The Ledge

"What an amazing opportunity. Please do come forward, if you super shy and you don't want to say anything on tape, then you can always just drop me an Email with some words in it, too. Thanks for all the lovely feedback on the p two D'amoto episodes. It's clear that you really love hearing from him, and it was so much fun to do. I've got lots of exciting episodes in the pipeline. But if there's something you'd like me to tackle in the show, then I'd love to hear what that is, as I start planning for the rest of the year. So drop me a line to on the ledge podcast, gmaiLcom and tell me what topics you want to know about. I'm hoping to have an episode on pepperoni is coming up. Also, the long awaited spider plants episode will becoming but if there's any other plaza eat, particularly, like me to cover then do let me know. And I will add it to my list, because many of the episodes that I put out all inspired by listener ideas, because you guys are full of great thoughts. So please share your ideas with me. And you never know you might be hearing that idea brought to life on, on the ledge podcast before you know, it also shout out this week to mine. Listeners in Canada. I realized recently that there's another podcast in Canada called on the ledge, and I think it's politics, one, I was not too confusing for you, having to podcasts could on the ledge the other ones produced by CBC radio. And it's the scribe does a weekly CBC podcast, that makes Cisco and politics personal. I'm not sure what the vent diagram of people who listen to both podcasts called on the ledge is, but I would love to know if that applies to any of you, but I've noticed that not many of you have left a review on apple podcasts or indeed, anywhere else. So come on Canadian listeners, please frontal up and leave a review for on the ledge. I know you're out that all you Canadians. So go on do me a favor and leave me review. The Joseph flower show, what is it? Where is it? What is it about? Well, I guess it's probably one of the world's best known flower shows, partly because it's been around for a very, very long time over a hundred years and takes place in a very prestigious part of London in Chelsea the Chelsea hospital, which is home to lots of retired veterans. And this is really the show that brings together the criminal Krim of British horticulture to celebrate all things plants. The main show gardens outside. Well, there aren't many houseplants on display there. But go into the great Providian and the place is absolutely packed with amazing stands from nurseries from all around the UK, and here is really where the house plant aficionado can get your fix. I'd love to suggest to the RHS that they grouped together all of the indoor plants stands together. So that you can see them on wandering around if your house plot enthusiast, you can see everything together, I will suggest that to them because otherwise, you have to spend the whole time crossing this huge enormous white tent. That is the great pavilion, didn't how big it is. But it's it's flipping enormous. I can tell you looking for the relevant stands that you want to see and there are quite a few that all relevant for us. House plant lovers. I'm an is to speak to three nursery people for this episode. I we're going to start out with a chat with the lovely Andy of Andy's air plants. Now, if you listen closely to one lead you may have heard Andy mentioned before because James Wong and rob stock Vits two of our former guests are both fans and of four plants from him in the past. So it was wonderful to see and these I ever display at Chelsea and boy was gorgeous. Check out my show notes Jane Perron dot com. Some pictures, I wanted to find out for Mandy, why he loves these plants and what it takes to bring a beautiful. Display like this to Chelsea. Hello, my.

Chelsea Andy Chelsea hospital Canada James Wong CBC Jane Perron RHS Providian Mandy Cisco London UK hundred years
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:17 min | 1 year ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Now. He made a blended vaccine using the strains from the Chelsea hospital, the Chelsea naval hospital, nurses knows from the Connie hospital and the infected wards of camp Devon's not far from Boston, and he made a concoction and gave them to people and actually this his his vaccine ended up being sent to San Francisco where eighteen thousand people were knock United with his vaccine. So that's Dr Timothy Leary in case you're wondering, yes, the answer. It is the same doctor Timothy Leary. In fact, this is the uncle of the famous doctor Timothy Leary in Boston. He who wanted us to turn on tune in and drop out. It's his uncle who created this attended a vaccine one hundred years ago. So that's a tencent vaccines back. Then what do we do today? What do we have today? Well, we do have that scenes against the flu many of us in this room. We'll take them every year. And those of us who are involved in health care have to get the flu vaccine, it makes sense for us to to try and prevent the transmission. But it's really not a very good vaccine. I mean, if you think about it, right mumps, measles, rubella polio. You get the months of twice as a kid and you'll done right? You're done you finish. That's it. You could go you won't get the disease other. But in terms of through wickedly told that we need to get it every year new flu shot, I just had it last year and the year before. We're dealing with a vaccine that is really not on the same on the same level of toughness as these others. In fact, in a good year in a good year with the wind blowing in the right direction. The flu vaccine is about fifty to sixty percent effective at best best last season. It was less than that was in the twenty to thirty percent range. So so why is this right? Why is this flu vaccine so hard? Create and the answer is that that we have this holiday bowl that creates the eight contains the eighteenth of the flu virus, and it makes these proteins on the surface and against those proteins at the virus. The vaccine is created the problem is that flu is such a good. This guy's a master of disguise that it changes the the makeup of those surface proteins, very very quickly very very quickly, and it mutates from one kind to another. So that when we think we've got we've figured out what kind of flu is going to be around with species. A what it turns out that species then sort of mutates and the vaccine is longer effective against these. Oh, by the way, we didn't realize species being see we're actually going to be the one. So we didn't include those in the vaccine, and and if we want you want vaccinated against those which is the reason incidentally, by the reason that some of the get the flu vaccine, and we ended up with the flu. Right. It's because not because the vaccine didn't work against that particular strain. But because they were either other strains that we weren't vaccinated against over because the regional strain changes its surface structures just that bit. So that was like changing an overcoat from a Brown overcoat to a black overcoat and immune system didn't recognize it. And that's what's going on with the flu vaccine. It stays one step ahead of us all the time. And this is a similar story with HIV, right? The promise of HIV vaccine was we'd have it within a year or two. We were told in one thousand nine hundred eighty still not there. The these viruses are very clever at changing their surface, and at hiding from the immune system and. I'm so we still don't have a good influenza vaccine the way we make the vaccine, incidentally, is we have about one hundred and twenty or so. The birches across the world run by the World Health Organization. They look samples that are sent to their lab and trying to figure out exactly the kind of flu species that is prevalent. We look at a stray Leah. I'm what they had in their most recent influenza outbreak because it's there and that winter is our summer, and we try and figure that out and incidentally, they do the same for us. So they look at what happened in the northern hemisphere and just themselves the coming flu season in the summer. And then doctors make the best educated guess, they can and they say well based on the evidence that we have the most likely species are going to be this, and this and this and we're going to make the vaccine into this day, the majority that much of the vaccine is produced using eggs, the vaccine is very hard to grow. So it's actually grown on X, which is same thing that was used a century ago. There is some vaccine that is made using a cell technology. And that allows us to have a vaccine that is not created on experts. Still those those are simply the methods that we have today are a leftover from us one hundred years ago. So so so the majority of the vaccine is still to this day had something to do with with eggs needing to be grown in that medium. So in many respects, we're really at the beginning of the the fight here against. Against influenza by preventing it, and creating a vaccine now while that is all true. And it's not a very effective axiom. We must remember that in certain groups and certain age groups is extremely important to get the vaccine the high risk people. Right. So those are children the elderly. Those with immune compromised conditions, people who've been taking steroids or may have undergone chemotherapy. Pregnant women extremely important for pregnant women to get influenza vaccine for some reason, they're slightly more. There is an increased risk of complications from influenza. And so those are some of the the high risk groups that should certainly be vaccinated. There's no question in terms of everybody else. The data out there is harder to to really find an effect on the flu. In fact, for instance, in the United Kingdom, those high risk groups of targeted and everybody else been sort of. Well, if you want one you can get one go talk to your primary care doctor, but there's no campaign right here in the US. We have a campaign. The CDC says everybody over the age of six months should get vaccinated period. That is that is the advice that we give to here in the United States. It's just what pointing out that. This is not the advice that is given overseas, and we can talk about why that might be another time. But it's it's an important difference. I think in the way we think about about the flu. So for high risk groups, it's very important for healthy. Otherwise, healthy adults evidence is that influenza vaccine doesn't really do a whole lot. So what do we need? Instead. Well, we need a universal flu vaccine a vaccine that will work from year to year without having to get it again each year vaccine that will work in all age groups and a vaccine that will work in all geographic areas, right, regardless of what specific strain of flu is is running rampant in your area. So that is the goal of the universal flu vaccine. Right. And to do that we have to target that flu virus, which we understand very well and find a bit of it that doesn't change find a bit of that flu virus that we can target and that our then our immune system to recognize and latch onto it. And we will kill that virus. No matter what particular strain of influenza at was. It sounds easy. It's a very hard thing to do in reality. And. We're still not there yet. But I will say that for instance, the national institutes of health where I work, and I just want to pause, and that you know, that I'm not here representing the federal government's views on the great influence epidemic of nineteen eighteen. I'm here on my own time, and these are my own personal views, but the NIH when I work is actually very very focused on trying to find a universal flu vaccine porn a lot of money and a little research time and effort into that. There's in fact, an H sponsored trial of a of a. Of a possible candidate produced by a company could buy buy on vacs from Israel. There are other companies out there that are doing this. That is underway right now from the H, and who knows will this work, not work. Will we see a universal flu vaccine? I don't know. I don't know if we'll see one soon, but that is certainly the goal of what we're trying to do with vaccines. So with certainly have a long way to go. So if we look at where we were one hundred years ago, where we all today the treatments are very different, thankfully, but that's still we still not real good treatments for influenza. We understand the virus in a remarkable and deep and profound way in a way that was unimaginable a century ago. But are we able to use that knowledge and then build a vaccine not quite yet? We're not there yet. Although that's where the research efforts going. So my hope then looking forward is that we really will be able to see influence is not just a story of the past. But as a disease of the past in the way that we think about smallpox as a disease of the past disease. It was radically. It's important to try and move towards this goal. The CDC estimates that anywhere between thirty and fifty thousand people. Each year in the US die of influenza. It's a soft number. It's it's not a great extremely actor number, but that's the sort of the ballpark figure. So a lot of people's still get this disease and die from it. It's in the high risk groups predominantly whether it happens. So we really have to try and think about ways that we can improve our own vaccinations. So that we will be able to hopefully, make a one day influenza a thing of the past. Thank you for your time..

flu vaccine influenza Dr Timothy Leary United States CDC tencent Chelsea hospital Chelsea naval hospital San Francisco Boston HIV Leah World Health Organization smallpox Connie hospital United Kingdom Devon NIH
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:33 min | 1 year ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. I'm David being Cooley editor of the website TV worth watching sitting in for Terry gross w s Merwin who was appointed poet laureate of the United States in two thousand ten died last Friday at age ninety one when he won the national book award for poetry in two thousand five the judge's citation read, quote, Merlin's poems, speak from a lifelong belief in the power of words to awaken are drowsy souls and see the world with compassionate interconnection. Unquote. Merwin was born in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven the son of a Presbyterian minister when he won the Pulitzer prize in nineteen seventy one he was best known for his poems against the war in Vietnam. He won his second Pulitzer prize in two thousand nine Terry gross spoke with w s Merwin in two thousand eight when he had just published a new collection of poems. It was titled the shadow of serious and was about memory and mortality. They started with one of his poems from that collection called. A likeness almost to your birthday. I am getting dressed loan in the house button comes off. And once I find a needle with an eye big enough for me to try the threaded and had last. So the button I opened an old picture of you who always did such things by magic one photograph found after you died view twenty Hulan away. I would never see that was nine years before I was born. But the picture faded suddenly spots of market. Maybe it has past repair. I have only what I remember. I love that last line. I have only what I remember that you have this photograph of your mother. I assume it's your mother and the photograph is marred. And you only have what you remember. You know, memory is always such an issue for me. No, do you struggle to to chronicle your life to keep the photographs to document to keep journals to hold onto all the memories. Are do you accept that? You have only what you remember. I think we do both. I think we always do both. I think I think memory is essential to what we are. We we wouldn't be able to talk to each other without memory. And what we think of as the president really is the past is made out of the past. The present is the president is an absolutely transparent moment with all the great saints diversity occasionally. The president. We think of as the president is made up of the past. And the past is always one moment. It's. What happened three minutes ago in one minute is what happened thirty years ago, and they flow into each other in ways we can't predict and we keep. Discovering in dreams. Which keep bringing up feelings and. And moments some of which we never actually saw. But the those moments themselves bring up the feelings that were that we had forgotten. We had. And it's all memory. So I think I think the idea that memory somehow said Mettler nostalgic. Itself is the etymology of nostalgia is homecoming. And homecoming is what we all believe in. I mean, if we didn't believe in homecoming, we wouldn't be able to bear the day as you get older. Do you spend more time thinking about your early memories? Your your childhood your formative years I do. You know, I didn't like my years in Scranton, Pennsylvania, particularly they're very important. They're aged nine the age of. Fourteen. And then I find that. The of the scenes the. The light sorts of things from there. Come back with an increasing reality. An increasing freshness. That they probably didn't even have for me at the time. Well that I didn't notice it the time. And this is true of different periods of my life. And I think this happens to everybody. I think this is one of the benefits of getting older that one one has that perspective on on things. Farther away. One is so. Caught up. In middle years in the idea of accomplishing something. What effect? The full accomplishment is always with one. My guest is poet w s Merwin, and he has a new collection of poems called the shadow of serious several of the poems in your book are about your parents. This is one of them is called a single autumn. Would you introduce it for us and read it? Yes. This is something I think I thought about. Quite often. And why my parents died very close together. I thought they weren't very close together. But actually, the one of their great gifts to me was that neither of them turned out to be frayed of dying at all. And. Quite different ways. They died without without any expression of anxiety or of address or. Clutching at anything else. And that's a great gift to begin feeling. No, fear. And I think I think I inherited it from them very early. But after the after my mother died I was away in Europe when she died when I can back the the original of the first funeral had. Had. What was already over? And I moved right into the house against the advice of many, friends and spent. Something like a month or six weeks there and giving away their belongings to their friends and getting to know their friends and then finally giving away re furniture. Thanks for my sister. And and being there totally empty house. Before I just lifted and went back, New York. And. This is about that time being alone in that empty house. When if it hit me hard, I I was all by myself, and it didn't matter and. If it didn't I went through all of the feelings, and no feelings one has at that time noticing that. There are many things that we would never conversation that we would never finish. And so this is a poem about that. Call a single author. Year. My parents. One that summer on that for three months and three days apart. I moved into the house where they have lived there last year's. It did never been there and was still there in that way for a while. Echos in every room without a sound all the things that we had never been able to say, I could not remember. Doll collection in China cabinet played stacked on shelves lay. Son, drop leaf tables dried branch should bittersweet before a whole mirror. We're all planning to wait. Glass store the house remained closed. Today's turned cold thousand the tall. Hickories the blaze Waltham had begun on its own. I could do anything. Vet last night. I could do anything. And I think what were some of the things that you wouldn't have done when your parents were alive living in that house. Will you know, all the innovations? What has with parents, and my father was very when he was younger was very repressive. Capricious? Punitive? Incomprehensible distant person, and I've freed myself from that is of ours. Whenever freeze oneself from any such influence fairly early. But one was always aware of the things that would trouble either of them and all of those things were gone. I mean, I could say or do or think or or go or meet or talk to anything and anybody the way I wanted to I was free. There's I was anyways, I was anywhere in the world. And it was a it was a sort of desolate freedom. When you were going through, your parents possessions and figuring out what to give away with what to throw away. What did you decide to keep? Not very much. My father was administering the asked me to burn all his sermons. That was I mean, they were terrible, sir. Why do you describe them? Refinished a sickness, and they never found you never even have periods in your poems. That's funny. Oh, he's role dashes like Emily Dickinson. And they were there was they were going on original. You know? And he just obviously didn't want them kept. Did you want to keep them for yourself? Or did you can't obey the wishes? I did want to keep some. And I wanted to keep various correspondences that my mother had there were marked burners. So I read them. You know, it's at that moment, you're very good to do with. They wanted to. But I kept strange things. I kept things that my mother was growing in the garden at potted them up and took them back to the apartment and grew them in New York. One or two last of clothing that we're hanging in the closet. Very little, you know, they were people who had much money. And there was nothing of great value. There. And odds and ends the few small things from my grandfather. I mean, the penknife from my grandfather little tiny things like that. That would have made meant nothing to anybody else. And all the other thing that I kept from the house. I gave my sister all the furniture that we we divided everything up quite accurately. And I kept all of the papers. So there were diaries and works and count books and all sorts of stuff that I use later. When you say used, you mean used in poems. Yes. Using poems and used in trying to in writing. Unframed originals and oh her she was an orphan, her father, her father had worked for the Pennsylvania railroad, and he had passes for all of the railroads that existed in the very beginning of the twentieth century in cease to exist as wonderful taking out his book of passes and seeing all the all of the non existent railroads that he could ride free. Sounds wonderful. She still have I still have them. Yes. The late poet Wh Merwin speaking to Terry gross in two thousand eight more after a break. This is fresh air. Let's return to Terry's two thousand eight interview with Pulitzer prize winning poet w s Merwin he died last Friday at age ninety one your father was a minister what were you taught about God? What did you believe about? God. When you learn the catechism and. But it was mostly of proscriptive. Things you couldn't do we. There was no card playing in the house. No, dancing and not much of anything that was fun. And gradually gradually all showed off you got better about it. As I then he and he became a chaplain in the second World War went overseas. And so. In my early adolescence. I was free. All that. Manage to sort of get along with him much better in later years. But he was pretty remote didn't know how to be a father. Did he know that you became a poet? And what did he think poetry was was was frivolous? No, he didn't. He thought it was. He thought it was fine. And when I felt that I was in effect, a pacifist at the end of World War Two. And I was put in the cycle ward Chelsea house naval hospital. You were you are was you were put in the mental ward for being a pacifist. Because I enlisted when I was having teen in all of these. Oh of this. About it come later, and I find they asked to be put in a break because I said, I made a terrible mistake. And I should never missed. I don't really believe in what we're doing. And. So I was instead put in cycle work, and I was pretty lucky, I guess, but he came to the Chelsea hospital and talk to the chaplain there and came to see me visit here and said. You must follow your own convictions. I thought that's pretty good. You know, he's never said that what what year was this that you were put in the second ward..

Wh Merwin Pulitzer prize Terry gross president Pennsylvania Chelsea house naval hospital national book award United States Europe Chelsea hospital Scranton David New York Vietnam Cooley editor Waltham Emily Dickinson Merlin
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

09:32 min | 1 year ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I kept all of the papers. So there were diaries and Deba looks and count books and all sorts of stuff that I use later when you say used you mean used in poems, just using poems and used in trying to in writing unframed originals, and oh her she was an orphan, it was her father father worked for the Pennsylvania railroad, and he had passes for all the railroads that existed in the very beginning of the twentieth century, and that had ceased to exist. There's wonderful taking out his book of passes and seeing all the all of the non existent railroads that he could fried free. Sounds wonderful. She still have I still have them. Your father was a minister what were you taught about God? What did you believe about? God when you were. And. But it was mostly of proscriptive the things you couldn't do we. There was no card playing in the house, and no dancing and not much of anything that was fun, and it gradually that gradually all showed off you got better about it as I get older than you. And he became a chaplain in the second World War went overseas. And so I in my early adolescence, I was freed of all that. And managed to sort of get along with a much better later years. But he was pretty remote. Didn't know how to be father. Did he know that you became a poet? And what did he think poetry was was was frivolous? No, he couldn't he thought. It was he thought it was fine. And when I felt that I was in effect a pacifist in at the end of World War Two. And I was put in the psycho ward and the Chelsea house naval hospital. You were you. What was? You were put in the mental ward for being a pacifist. Because I I had enlisted his when I was having teen in all of these all of this all of this connotation about it and come later, and I find they asked to be put in a breed because I said I've made a terrible mistake, and I should never missed it. I don't really believe in what we're doing. And. So I was instead putting cycle, and I was pretty lucky, I guess, but he came to the Chelsea hospital and talk to the chaplain there and came to see me as visitor and said you must follow your own convictions. I thought that's pretty good. You know, he's never said that people. What what year was this that you were put the psycho ward. When was it forty six, I guess. Uh-huh. So what what was your treatment? Oh, it was they tried to scare me. I guess, but it was otherwise it was basically, rather humane. I was locked up who's in a in a big ward. And there are some people who had real trouble. I mean, loosens and and DT's from alcoholism and running damage from active-duty all together. I made some good friends there in the world of my never saw again. Did being being lobbed off in in the second Trich ward. Make you question your own sanity. Or were you able to be confident the whole time that you were locked up under false pretenses. And you were perfectly saying you just dissenting. I realized that the it was because dissenting, but I didn't question. I mean, the more I thought about I thought I can't I can't allow myself to be trained to kill on orders to take take life on orders. I mean, I really took the idea of not killing seriously. And I thought whatever, I whatever I'm told killing is still my responsibility. If I do it, I can't say it's because I was ordered to because I know I don't really believe that. I don't believe I would kill on orders. I don't believe I would take life because somebody told me to and these are people who are doing it for reasons of their own. And for reasons some of which I don't know. And these are the people I'm supposed to kill our people whom I don't know. I can imagine circumstances in which I might do it. I can. Imagine being in the resistance or something like that. We're gonna do it. But it would be extreme circumstances with where in which I could feel that. I was taking that responsibility on myself just as we do when we kill a mosquito or or an ad. I don't think we have a right to take life any life. I think we'd take it knowing that we do and knowing that we have no right to do it. And we're responsible for it. I don't know how you feel about talking about this. But how do you feel about getting older you're in your early eighties now and dealing with the dimming of some of the senses and a body that isn't as strong as it was. I don't know if you if you have a lot of pain assoc- physical elements associated with that. But you have to accept a certain amount of physical diminishment as you age. How are you at accepting that or dealing with it the one thing the one thing so far that the? I find little a little difficult is that my my having always had wonderful is my eyes aren't as good as they used to be in. So I have to get used to that. But I have a great guide in this matter, I had a magnificent creature incredible cut character a black Chow who at the age of eight went blind, totally blind. And you had to tell people about that. Because she always knew she always knew everything and she would guide me for light caught. If if I was out somewhere as taking her for walk in and forgotten flashlight and cut Dr she'd take me home. And I thought you know, the way she confronted absolutely everything without fear without without panic without anything of the kind this. This is one of the great guiding spirits of my life. And so as my my eyes get worse. I think local or more often. And that's that's a very pleasant thing to do because I think how would move dealt with this situation, and you know, very, well how she would have done it. So how long ago was she your dog? Oh, she died for years ago. Is this the dog you refer to as a dog grief, one of your poems. She was one of them. Yes. There were two of them who died very close together. Right, right. I we have time for one more poem an NF like to ask you to close with a poem called rain light. If you can introduce it for us. I I show it's a it's again a poem in third in the last section of the book. And it's it's about. What is it about? It's about about the very thing you were talking about. I mean, how what happens is you face. The fact that the entire world is is slipping literally dissolving around you around us. You know, we have that feeling about our civilization about our species and everything else is all endangered and indeed it is. And we either face that as a recognition that's our moment, or we are we sort of grown and dreaded which is a waste of time. But this is not this is not a rational poem at all. It's it's called rain light early early morning rain, which is something that I love very much. All day the stars walked from long ago. My mother said I am going now. When you are alone. You will be all right. Whether or not, you know, you will know. Look at the old house in the dawn, rain, all the flowers are formed of war. The sun reminds them through a white cloud touches. The patchwork spread on the hill, the washed colors the afterlife that live there long before you were born. See how they wake without a question. Even though the whole world is burning. The west Merwin. Thank you so much for talking with us and for reading some of your poems. Thank you. Thank you, Terry. Pulitzer prize winning poet Wh Merwin speaking with Terry gross in two thousand eight he died last Friday at age ninety one after a break. We'll listen back to another archive interview with surf rock guitarist. Dick, Dale who died Saturday at age eighty one. Also, Justin Chang will review. Jordan peels new horror film us and I'll review the new season of

Terry gross Trich ward Pennsylvania Chelsea house naval hospital Chelsea hospital Deba Pulitzer prize Justin Chang Dick Wh Merwin Jordan Chow Dale
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:32 min | 1 year ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fresh air. I'm David being Cooley editor of the website TV worth watching sitting in for Terry gross w s Merwin who was appointed poet laureate of the United States in two thousand ten died last Friday at age ninety one when he won the national book award for poetry in two thousand five the judge's citation read, quote, Merlin's poems, speak from a lifelong belief in the power of words to awaken are drowsy souls and see the world with compassionate interconnection. Unquote. Merwin was born in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven the son of a Presbyterian minister when he won the Pulitzer prize in nineteen seventy one he was best known for his poems against the war in Vietnam. He won his second Pulitzer prize in two thousand nine Terry gross spoke with w s Merwin in two thousand eight when he had just published a new collection of poems. It was titled the shadow of serious and was about memory and mortality. They started with one of his poems from that collection called a likeness. Almost to your birthday. I'm getting dressed alone in the house button comes off at once. I find a needle with an eye big enough for me to try the threaded last. So the button. I opened an old picture of you who always did such things by magic on photograph found after you died of you twenty beautiful in a way. I would never see that was nine years before I was born. But the picture has faded suddenly spots of market maybe past repair. I have only what I remember. I love that last line. I have only what I remember that you have this photograph of your mother. I assume it's your mother and the photograph is marred. And you only have what you remember. You know, memory is always such an issue for me. You know, do you struggle to to chronicle your life to keep the photographs to document to keep journals to hold onto all the memories. Are do you accept that? You have only what you remember. We do both. I think we always do both. I think I think memory is essential to what we are. We we wouldn't be able to talk to each other without memory. And what we think of as the president really is the past. If he's made out of the past the present is the president is an absolutely transparent moments only great saints adversity occasionally. The the president that we think of as the president is made up of the past. And the past is always one moment. It's. What happened three minutes ago and one minute is what happened thirty years ago, and they flow into each other in ways that we can't predict and we keep discovering and dreams. Which keep bringing up feelings and moments some of which we never actually saw. But the those moments themselves bring up the feelings that were that we had forgotten. We had. And it's all memory. So I think I don't I think the idea that memory somehow, mental illness Daljeet. Itself is the etymology of nostalgia is homecoming. And homecoming is what we all believe in. I mean, if we didn't believe in homecoming, we wouldn't be able to bear the day as you get older. Do you spend more time thinking about your early memories, your childhood your formative years I do? You know, I didn't like my years in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Particularly other very important of age nine the age of. Fourteen. And then I find that. Of the scenes the. The light all sorts of things from there. Come back with an increasing reality, increasing freshness. That they probably didn't even have for me at the time. Well that I didn't notice at the time. And this is true of different periods of my life. And I think this happens to everybody. I think this is one of the benefits of getting older that one one has that perspective on on things farther away. One is so. Caught up. In middle years in the idea of accomplishing something. What effect? The full accomplishment is always with one. My guest is poet w s Merwin, and he has a new collection of poems called the shadow of serious several of the poems in your book are about your parents. This is one of them is called a single autumn. Would you introduce it for us and read it? Yes. This is something I think I thought about. Quite often. Why my parents died very close together. I thought they weren't very close together. But actually, the one of their great gifts to me was that neither of them turned out to be frayed of dying at all. And. Quite different ways. They died without without any expression of anxiety or of address or. Clutching at anything else. And that's a great gift to begin feeling. No, fear. And I think I think I inherited it from them very early. But after the after my mother died I was away in Europe when she died when I came back, the the original the first funeral. What was already over? And I moved right into the house against the advice of many, friends and spent something like a month or six weeks there and giving away their belongings to their friends and getting to know their friends, and then finally giving away refurnishing thanks to my sister in being there in a totally empty house. Before I just lifted and went back, New York. And. This is about that time of being alone in that empty house. When if it hit me hard, I I was all by myself, and it didn't matter and. Didn't I went through all of the feelings? And no feelings one has at that time noticing that. There are many things that we would never have conversation that we would never finish. And so this is a poem about that. Called a single auto. Year. My parents died on that summer on that for three months and three days apart. I moved into the house where they have lived there last years. It had never been there and was still there's in that way for a while. Echos in every room without a sound. All the things that we have never been able to say, I could not remember. Doll collection in China cabinet played stacked on shelves. Les? Son, drop leaf tables dried branch bittersweet before a whole mirror or planning to wait. Glass door the house remained closed. Today's who turned cold now. From the toll hit cruise the blaze Waltham have begun on its own. I could do anything. Good. I love that last night. I could do anything, and I think. What are some of the things that you wouldn't have done when your parents were alive living in that house? Will you know, all the innovations? What has with parents, and my father was a very when he was younger was very repressive. Capricious? Punitive? Incomprehensible distance person. And I've free myself from that is of ours. Whatever freeze oneself from any such influence. Fairly early. But one was always aware of the things that would trouble either of them and all of those things were gone. I mean, I could say or do or think or or go meet or talk to anything and anybody the way I wanted to. I was three there as I was anyways, I was anywhere in the world. And it was a it was a sort of desolate freedom, of course, when you were going through your parents possessions and figuring out what you give away with what to throw away. What did you decide to keep? Not very much. My father was a minister, and he asked me to burn all his sermons. That was I mean, they were terrible, sir. Why do you describe them? Finished a sickness, you know, and they never you never even have periods in your poems. That's really funny. Roll dash like Emily Dickinson. And they were there was they were very unoriginal. You know? And he just obviously you'd want them kept. Did you want to keep them for yourself? Or did you obey the wishes? I did want to keep some. And I wanted to keep various cars fondants that my mother had there that were marked burn this random. You know, it's at that moment, you're very good to do what they wanted to. But I kept strange things. I kept things that my mother was growing in the garden. I- potted them up and took them back to the apartment grew them in New York. Oh. One or two last bits of clothing that we're hanging in the closet. Very little, you know, they they weren't people who had much money. And there was nothing of great value there. And odds and ends the few small things from my grandfather. I mean, the penknife from my grandfather little tiny things like that. That would have made nothing to anybody else. And all the other thing that I kept from the house. I gave my sister all the furniture that we we divided everything up quite accurately. And I kept all of the papers. So there were diaries and debut looks and count books and all sorts of stuff values later. When you say used, you mean used in poems. Yes. Using palms and used in trying to in writing. Unframed originals and oh her she was an orphan her far father fathered worked for the Pennsylvania railroad, and he had passes for all the railroads that existed in the very beginning of the twentieth. Century ceased to exist is wonderful taking out his book of passes and seeing all the all of the non existed railroads that he could ride free. Sounds wonderful. I still have them. Yes. The late poet w s Merwin speaking to Terry gross in two thousand eight more after a break. This is fresh air. Aw. Let's return to Terry's two thousand eight interview with Pulitzer prize winning poet w s Merwin he died last Friday at age ninety one your father was a minister what were you taught about God? What did you believe about? God. When you learn the catechism and. But it was mostly of proscriptive. Thank you. Couldn't do we. There was no card playing in the house. No, dancing and not much of anything that was fun. Gradually gradually all showed off you got better about it. I then he and he became a chaplain in the second World War went overseas. And so. In my early adolescence. I was free of that. And. Manage to sort of get along with much better in later years. But he was pretty remote didn't know how to be a father. Did he know that you became a poet? And what did he think poetry was was was frivolous? No, he didn't. He thought it was. He thought it was fine. And when I felt that I was in effect, a pacifist at the end of World War Two. And I was put in the cycle ward and the Chelsea house naval hospital. You were you was. Yeah. You were putting the mental ward for being a pacifist. Yeah. Because I listed you see when I was having teen in all of these. Oh of this. About it come later, and I finally asked to be put in the Brig because I said I've made a terrible mistake. And I should never miss that. I don't really believe in what we're doing. And. So I was instead putting cycle would. And I was pretty lucky I guess, but he came to the Chelsea hospital and talk to the chaplain there and came to see me visitor and said you must follow your own convictions. I thought that's pretty good. You know, he's never said that what what year was this that you were put in the cycle war..

Merwin Pulitzer prize Terry gross president Pennsylvania Chelsea house naval hospital national book award United States Europe Chelsea hospital Scranton David New York Vietnam Cooley editor Emily Dickinson Merlin Les
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:14 min | 1 year ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"World Service right here on WNYC, AM and FM New York. Coming up in two of the history of the last days of the Palestinian leader. Yasser Arafat also Lee Harvey Oswald immortalized because of the assassination of JFK, but what was he doing for two years in the Soviet Union? And a man who remembered the Duke of Wellington's funeral. I was aroused by candlelight to reach Fleet Street, we adopted usually means of locomotion to the city I've seen the I a news summary. DPC news. The Ukrainian president petro, Peru who is parliament to vote on whether to impose martial law for sixty days after the seizure by Russia of three Ukrainian navy vessels Russian special forces opened fire and took control of two gunboats under tug as they tried to pass through the catch straight off the coast of Crimea Moscow says the vessels had breached its territorial waters. The UN Security Council will meet later to discuss the incident. A Chinese research. Scientists says he's helped create the world's first genetically edited babies hygiene quiet of Shenzhen says he altered embryo DNA for seven couples and one pregnancy has resulted so far his claim has not been independently verified bought if true it would be hugely controversial and a world. I Britain's Prime Minister Theresa may will warn MP's later that they will cause division and uncertainty. If they reject the Brexit deal negotiated with the EU all opposition parties, and dozens of conservative and peace and said there will vote against withdrawal agreement next month. It was approved by e you members and Sunday police in central Somalia CEO shebab militants attacked a religious center, killing a cleric and nine of his followers. A police spokesman said the gunmen and a suicide bomber targeted the sufi Muslim shrine in the city of Galkayo. Hundreds of Australians have been moved from their homes due to push fires in Queensland. The authorities say about forty fires burning across the state following a heatwave thousand-year-old. Chinese scroll is to be auctioned. In Hong Kong today amid speculation it could set a new record for an Asian art work. The school was produced by the hugely influential soon dynasty artist Susha, BBC news. Welcome back to part two of the history. Our with max Pearson still to come Lee Harvey Oswald in the Soviet Union and the Duke of Wellington's funeral. But before that we're going back to two thousand four and the last days of the Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat ever since nineteen sixty nine Arafat had been chairman of the PLO the Palestine Liberation Organization. The nineteen seventies and eighties were spent away from the disputed occupied. Territories. But from one thousand nine hundred four after the Oslo peace accords Yasser Arafat was chairman of the Palestinian National Authority. When he became seriously ill in two thousand and four he was airlifted from his headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah and flown to a French military hospital in Paris, where he died thirteen days later, one of those at his side was the Palestinian envoy to France Leyla Shaheed, and she's been speaking to Luisa Delgado about his final days this year. Yes. Donald day Palestinian. The Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat has died after leading his people for more than thirty died on the eleventh of November between four and five in the morning. Very early in the morning Leyla Shaheed had known Yasser Arafat since the nineteen sixties was one of the small group of Palestinians who were with him during his final days. I got a call maybe a week before he actually came from my prime minister who told me that the impressions of all his doctors were that it was a more grave situation than just an infection in his intestines. And that now he really needs to go to a hospital Butler was told Arafat was refusing to go. He was worried that with relations with the Israelis so bad if he left the West Bank, he'd not be allowed to return could France intervene. The prime minister asked me if I could ask President Chirac whom Arafat like I said, of course, I try and very quickly. She said, of course, we will. So I guess because he thought he could have a guarantee through she attack that could be treated and come back. He didn't think he was going to die. Leyla Shaheed had I met Yasser Arafat when she was a student in Lebanon. He was just emerging as the leader of the Palestinians armed struggle will ready organizing attacks against Israel at the time. Pilo was a very small umbrella organization. And so we had very very close relation with all the leadership were very good friends by the time of his death. Almost forty years later. Yasser Arafat have become an international figure. He was both loved and reviled to his supporters. He was the father of Palestinian nationalism to many Israelis he was an unreformed terrorist responsible for decades of attacks, including the suicide bombs that killed hundreds of Israeli civilians in his last years. The brief optimism of the ninety s that had followed. The Oslo peace accords had by the turn of the millennium given way to yet more violence and hatred for the last two years of his life. Yes, Arafat was blockaded by Israel in his West Bank headquarters in a virtual prison cut off from the rest of the world. Even in those conditions. Leyla Shaheed says the aging Erafat tried to continue to look after his health because at affect wanted to leave. So he never drank coffee. Of course, thank alcohol in ever had heavy needs in the evening. He only had Honey with T and a bit of cheese. He was very very careful about his health. And I remember he was so careful that when he was besieged Knight used to go very often to to get instructions for my work. He would tell me would you mind Leyla instead of sitting and talking across the table that we walk around the table. You know, I can't leave my office here in Atlanta. And you know that walking is very important for a man of my age. So we used to walk to work for like forty five minutes around the table. And we keep on talking and discussing whatever he wants to discuss you saw yourself, of course, the conditions. He was living in this tiny compound that was crammed with with people when you got that call saying that he needed hospital treatment were you surprised by was not surprised? Of course, what I was very surprised about is when I asked them what sort of medical equipment. Do you need the plane? That will carry him to Paris and immediate. They said everything that deals with black problems. So we knew that there was a problem with his blood and something else surprised Leyla Shaheed to when a few days later. She met Yasser Arafat military airport near Paris. What took me terribly? And this is what I was that his skin had clocks for like when you'll get burned up in the mountains, and you don't protect your skin. And then you have clocks like this. Yes. Yes. And I told him Obama. Why did you sit in the sun? And he said Leyla what certain you know, I have been besieged in my office for two years. What are you talking about? So I got very ashamed because I thought he had not seen that she had this skin problem. But he did have the stomach problem too. Didn't he? And the doctors asked him to describe it. What does he say Arafat said and he put even date? He said I started feeling I couldn't keep anything in my stomach. I had very strong diarrhea. Dehydration. I couldn't eat. And the doctor said that the x-ray showed that. Difficult to remember he said that from the throat to the end of his interested. It was bird than like they had swallowed something that burned all his emphasis despite that they later says during his first five days in hospital. Yes, Arafat was in good spirits sitting up in bed talking to his young daughters in Tunisia receiving calls from foreign dignitaries, even instructing his finance minister. Salam Fayyad back in Ramallah about paying Palestinian authorities salaries. And Salam Fayyad Layla this is actually a talking to me about the exact accounts. We have he saw aware of everything I said, yes, he has no jobs nothing around him. No oxygen. No, nothing. And I hope you'll be fine because he thought and we all thought and the doctors thought that it was going to be so, but it wasn't so on the third of November two thousand and four. Yes. Arafat fell into a coma from which he wouldn't recover they work as three. In the morning, and they said, please come because he's very agitated. He was dictating in his bed and already unconscious, and they said, Chris, please just come because we need to have a scanner. We need somebody from his rounding to be there. Tomorrow at six the doctors will come and study as a result of the scanners, and when they came the next morning for the waiting very eager to hear. And they said we can't see anything that justifies the state. Neither infection nor bacteria nor leukemia. Nora HIV, like they pretended and they put him in a deeper coma in order to keep on trying to find out from where it came why the system was suddenly going completely bazaar in the days that followed Leyla says there wasn't a test that the French doctors didn't do that isn't one singer. Specialists or one single exam including people who were specialized in problems of poisoning. They brought from outside the hospital. The only manifestation was the fact that the blood plates fell even when the blood was daily service and two days later, the same thing happened to the new blood he had so they said that it's like an intrusion in the body that we cannot locate or analyze or even name. Yes, Arafat died in the early hours of November the eleventh two thousand and four every organ fell one after the other stopped functioning the reason that they wrote on the this certificate of Yasser Arafat is undetermined reason for that. So I asked them what is undetermined they say we have not been able to locate specific disease. And of course, this is what I'll typically made the doctors thing that there was an intrusion of something that came from the outside whether it is a poison. Whether it is an infection. We'll never know. Yes. The Arafat's body was flown to Cairo where he was given a state funeral. His body was then flown back to Ramallah where he was buried, and we crowds of mourners in two thousand thirteen his body was exumed and test. By Swiss scientists found high levels radioactive polonium in his remains. Scientists said however that the results were not conclusive Luisa. Delgado was speaking to Yasser Arafat's longtime friend and associate Leyla Shaheed before we move on. I like to draw your attention to this week's history film on our website. It tells the story of an ambitious attempt in the Netherlands in the nineteen seventies to set up an electric car share scheme that's more than forty years ago. And we're still trying to get that sort of thing up and running to see that story search online for BBC witness films. Next. We've got something of a treat for history. Buffs as we bring. You the oldest recorded memories in the BBC archive there from a man who witnessed the funeral of the Duke of Wellington, the British general who won the battle of Waterloo in eighteen fifteen the funeral ceremony held over one hundred and seventy years ago brought London to a standstill as far as recorded oral history. Goes this is about as far back as anyone can go. Claire bows reports I remember my father coming home. And saying that you can state. This is Frederick Mead. Speaking to the BBC in nineteen forty at the time he was ninety three years old. He was casting his mind back to when he was just five years old during the reign of Queen, Victoria. Then the death of Winnington, Victoria, proclaim. He was the greatest man the country. Ever produce. The Duke of Wellington was honored with a state funeral. Something usually reserved for royalty. He lay in state for four days at Chelsea hospital in London, and tens of thousands of people came daily to view his body. I live in Chelsea at the time. So that local interest was added to the excitement. I remember being shocked to learn the five persons with cutch today at the gates of the hospital on the day of the funeral itself. Frederick needs parents had hired seats in.

Yasser Arafat Leyla Shaheed Wellington BBC Ramallah prime minister Soviet Union Lee Harvey Oswald Israel UN Security Council France Luisa Delgado Galkayo Oslo World Service Palestinian National Authority Somalia West Bank Paris
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To witness on the BBC World Service with me Claire bows today the oldest recorded memories in the BBC archive. We hear from a man who witnessed the funeral of the Duke of Wellington, the British general who prevented Napoleon Bonaparte from establishing a European empire in eighteen fifteen. The funeral held over one hundred and seventy years ago brought London to a standstill. I remember my father coming home and saying that you can state. This is Frederick Mead. Speaking to the BBC in nineteen forty at the time he was ninety three years old. He was costing his mind back to when he was just five years old during the reign of Queen, Victoria. The death of Winnington, Victoria. Did he was the greatest man the country? Use the Duke of Wellington was honored with a state funeral. Something usually reserved for royalty. He lay in state for four days at Chelsea hospital in London, and tens of thousands of people came daily to view his body. I live in Chelsea at the time. So they've local interests who's added to the excitement. I remember being shocked the five persons with cutch today at the gates of the first on the day of the funeral itself. Frederick needs parents had hired seats in shop on Fleet Street to watch the procession go by my parents seem to be affected by that feverish anxiety as to reaching the city you're in time. I was roused by by candlelight reach Fleet Street. We adopted our usual means locomotion to.

chelsea london wellington bbc world service today queen
"chelsea hospital" Discussed on The Chris Moyles Show on Radio X Podcast

The Chris Moyles Show on Radio X Podcast

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"chelsea hospital" Discussed on The Chris Moyles Show on Radio X Podcast

"Lame please toby okay that sure about that was going on chelsea hospital the last drink to be consumed by your last night once a pint of cell he might sake are saw tonight the mind boggles taibbi yes bob's father has four children rights momo potent mu that's three of them but here's the full amy me white mo mo mu so me me too is bob's father has four children bob the names his right well done i'm often yes bob morning ball next question i have three apples if you take away to from me how many do you have i have rea sites to wait for me how many do i have well the big of his one off over it's going to be right so i have three apples yeah if you take away from me yeah how many do you have how many while i have to is right while paul very good going hey typing oh no pulls height six feet yes he's an assistant in a butcher shop right he was size nine shoes right he's six foot tool size nine she's what does he way he weighs meet correct he works did you my you covey vice with your hands yes which letter of the english alphabet sings flies and stings will no no no no going on so what the answer is surely the one off the right but which is bay right yeah all right now while we're not subject which bays produce milk the booby the booby finally we found my level nine all the numbers yes from one to one hundred yes which have let's a in the spelling there isn't any then gave up and you guessed it took twenty thousand workers yes to build the taj mahal writes in twenty years how many workers would be required to build it in ten years forty thousand taj mahal kind of built again i'm afraid so calm give you that and that's lucky already mad at myself some fortunate i'd like types taibbi what what kind of room has no doors and no windows no does coined of room yeah does no windows i know in can let me the question again this is good okay so taibbi what kind of room has no doors and no windows not a great room do you know that mushroom mushroom oh very i'm ready for my show you really obviously okay so what is coming up on the show today we're gonna play some music okay place of music what kind of songs and yes we'll get a lot i'm good readouts tweets that don't know he's got all webley three all right that's just tweets of england's fifteen wilco out much extra time with the first match in this run being the nineteen sixty six really ooh stop banning all about say you are all right in ten malt doesn't seem to mind scott now he seems all right about it then they said this money is getting swept up in it yeah so they oh right no one cares you even did night insects thanks dominant crumbling walls he's old i wasn't mine nice to meet him oh guess begbie bogging on prominent even go why you love see usually yeah he's gone now oh no he was long do you know what i'm actually very happy i'm not very angry but comrie toaff me a voice whether you would you very angry very very question i'm over the moon okay so what did you what did you get him last night and what was your reaction when you know when we want them penalties angry yeah babo domo y'all today will end right cuomo cuomo just realize got she's wisely speak hatful yeah call mao domo eight on jeff right no jeff oh no not just take it was amazing i coleman oh mate do you think it is genuinely right okay ball's coming on so what's your prediction fish waiting game right see the question loads of what being done around me around my in my house ans ams everywhere flying now there's a mouse a wish i could give you my multi humane mousetrap i might and design intestinal ajay also it sounded like us give me a multi humane mouse trap that you've made in this on technology i own yeah it was it's just not noise proud of all.

chelsea hospital taibbi toby twenty years ten years six foot milk