35 Burst results for "Chatham House"

"chatham house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:00 min | 2 weeks ago

"chatham house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The BOE is pushing down on rate expectations and what you're talking about, which does seem to fit with market pricing a little bit more and expectation of many more hikes to come. Why is there that disconnect? Well, it's purely my speculation. I suspect they were trying to nudge the markets over the yield curve down a bit in order to protect mortgage lending here. We don't have 30 year mortgages like you do in the United States. And so it was quite a shock to a lot of people when interest rates went up even to 3%, and then of course the mortgages are not priced on short term rates, but on medium term rates. And those are those are hitting 5 and 6% for the mortgage by the time you add the credit spread. So that I know that U.S. rates for mortgages are even higher. But the perspective of households here is that if their mortgage rate goes from where it's been sort of 2% up to something like 5 or 6%, that is a very significant hit to household budgets and therefore to consumption. So I think maybe the Bank of England was trying to give a message to the markets not to overreact to what's happening to interest rates at the short end and inflation right now. I'm interested in just following up on this idea of rate speaking at 5 to 6%. If we're looking at rates at 3% now and mortgage rates for people at around 6% how high de mortgage rates go if they peak at the level that you're talking about. Well, I don't think mortgage rates themselves would go beyond 7 maybe 8% although that would be pretty extreme. Extreme for anybody younger than about 40, some of us have faced mortgage interest rates of 15%. That was quite a few years ago and quite a different situation. So I think it is a risk for certainly for the housing market. We're seeing the beginnings of falls in-house prices. They have been extremely high. So a fall is not necessarily a bad thing, but it does mean it puts the squeeze on household balance sheets, which themselves are pretty strong, but they too could start to look weak. If you were on the NPC now, what would you be voting for? I think I'd be voting for a gradual increase but continual increase in interest rates as we watch the inflation figures very carefully. I don't think I would have voted for any more than the 75 basis point increase that they put in place at the last meeting, but that was really necessary as your audience knows 75 basis points is kind of the standard unit these days that central banks tend to move with, I suspect it'll depend a bit on what the fed does, although the Bank of England says that it takes into account international comparators, but doesn't put a lot of weight on them. I think that's probably not so true. Having had a hit to Sterling when we had the mini budget problem. If the fed moves at 50 basis points at its next meeting, which I think is the main expectation, I would suspect the Bank of England will do the same. And maybe follow a bit in the slipstream, although it won't be presented that way. Dan, if we did see mortgage rates go to 7, 8%, how would you characterize the recession that the UK economy would then be in? We were talking to our colleague from Bloomberg economics earlier who was suggesting this might look like the 90s with quite a shallow recession, but if mortgage rates go that high, would it be shallow or would it be fairly deep? I think there would be a fiscal reaction if interest rates went that high and perhaps a reaction also on the part of bank regulators. Even in the last recession in the back then the global financial crisis, banks were encouraged to show forbearance as it's called. That is if you told her actually we're going to have a lot of difficulty paying for that higher mortgage when we have to refinance our two year fix. The banks should give households a little more time. And from a fiscal policy side, the government would stop in and with step in and support that kind of forbearance on the part of banks. So I think it would, if interest rates do it, if mortgage rates do indeed stick at somewhere above 5, 6%, then there will be a reaction on the part of other policymakers to dampen the effect that that would have on a certain percentage of households. After remember, it's only about half of household owners in this country who have a mortgage and of that substantial proportion have a two to three year fix on it. So we're not talking about a huge number of mortgage holders who would be hit by a rapid increase in mortgage rates. Okay, Deandre. Thank you so much for your insight, distinguished fellow at chatham House and one of the founding members of the Bank of England. Okay, dean Julius, thank you so much for your insight, distinguished fellow at chatham House and one of the founding members of the Bank of England's monetary policy committee. Thank you for joining us on Bloomberg radio fascination to hear your insights as we have that latest figure on the UK economic growth showing a smaller than expected but nonetheless a contraction in the last quarter of .2%. This is Bloomberg. Markets, headlines and breaking news 24 hours a day at Bloomberg dot com, the Bloomberg business app and good book quick take. This is a Bloomberg business flash.

Bank of England BOE United States fed NPC Bloomberg Dan chatham House UK dean Julius Deandre government monetary policy committee
"chatham house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:37 min | Last month

"chatham house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Around blaming it, blaming rising yields on kind of global factors was simply not true at least a factor of it was definitely not true. And then this morning the telegraph article from Jeremy Warner around why Brexit was a bad idea and over the past 6 years has done real damage. Is this a moment of real change where perhaps a bit of reality check for Britain? I think that folks are now going to start being very honest about what Brexit has cost and what pregnancy Brexit has benefited us and it's about time we've all been chatting about it behind the scenes and now it's coming out to play because I think that all of this started this low growth regime started with Brexit. And so with trust and saying I want to do supply side reforms, it's back to all the damage that Brexit has caused the economy and I think that folks probably speak about it like we are today like we're seeing in the front page of the paragraph is good news. Yeah. Selena, we've been talking about the damage for Brexit for a while. Yes, but yes, it is sort of seems to be at least out in the open in the telegraph and elsewhere. But sine, thank you so much for your time. Yeah, that's sending us into a global head of private capital advisory at Raymond James speaking to us there. We'll have plenty more on this story throughout the program this morning of course we are waiting for that statement from the Chancellor we're told it's coming this morning, although we don't have an exact time just yet. Coming up in the next hour, we're going to be speaking to Simon Fraser, his deputy chairman of chatham House, managing partner of Flynn global. He's worked in the diplomatic service. He was also in the department of business in the past as well as a very interesting to get his views on where things go from here, how does the government retain restore credibility and how

Jeremy Warner Britain Selena Raymond James Flynn global Simon Fraser chatham House department of business
"chatham house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:48 min | Last month

"chatham house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Her as well, will at least give that kind of semblance of stability, which is what the market needs more than anything else. That little bit of confidence that things can move beyond this kind of grinding that we've been moving through in the past couple of weeks. Paul will be watching the guilt markets very closely later on as well. Of course, the first day of trading without the Bank of England's guardrail given that the intervention bond buying ended on Friday. What should we be watching out for when that training gets underway? Yeah, well, look at the look at the far end of the yield curve, those 30 year security in particular, which is where the BOE seems to be providing most of the liquidity in that an inflation linked bonds as well. Now, I think there was definitely a large increase in the BOE purchases in the second half of the week and for that, maybe you have Bayley to thank for being quite emphatic about the idea that it was only for a limited time scale and people had to get done what they needed to. The big question is the thing hanging over us now is was that enough? Did they manage to raise the cash that they need to and if not how disorderly markets might be if there's still more for setting to come? Yeah, absolutely. We have to see whether the Bank of England has to enact more intervention or what that really is still the big question in markets what was that enough? Thank you so much, Paul for being with us Bloomberg's executive editor for Asia markets Paul Dobson and always great to get on bond markets too. Of course, don't forget that this morning we have a fantastic lineup. We're going to speak to sir Simon Fraser's deputy chairman of chatham House huge experience in government. He joins us just after 7. He was permanent secretary in a number of departments in the UK, also Mike wood MP conservative MP will be joining us just after 8 a.m., so we will get a live reading of what Tory MPs are really thinking. This is Bloomberg

Bank of England Paul Bayley Paul Dobson sir Simon Fraser Bloomberg chatham House Asia Mike wood UK
"chatham house" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

04:47 min | Last month

"chatham house" Discussed on WBUR

"I sit here looking at the most clicked and most watched and most commented upon posts, it's the main story I've been seeing, Iran protests. Under Iranian rules, which are based on the country's interpretation of Sharia law, women are obliged to cover their hair with a hijab and wear long loose fitting clothing. Doctor sanam wakil is deputy director of the Middle East and North Africa program at think tank chatham House. She's also author of women and politics in the Islamic Republic of Iran, and she's been talking to newsdays, James copnall. While in Iran, women are required to wear a veil. And required to dress modestly covering their arms and legs, technically also not supposed to wear makeup. And through the years since 1979 and the Iranian revolution, of women and how they dress, has waxed and waned, depending on which type of president reformist versus conservative is in office. President rice today is a conservative and because women are more flagrantly challenging the head scarf law and in many cases being quite liberal in how they're wearing their head scarf. The government is pushing back and this morality police from oftentimes rounds up women detains them in the past has even been violent to them. This is the context. Does the actions of morality police also quite often depend on things like, for example, the social class of the women that somehow the rich get away with things that poorer people do not. Well, I think it's hard to say, I think young women, particularly in urban areas and wasn't Tehran when she was picked up, are targeted more frequently. And that's where the morality police is out in sort of heavy forest. But the outcome here is that the government might be forced to be more accountable. It is suggesting that there are going to try to pursue what happened. There are very clear calls from reformists and reformist politicians inside Iraq that it's time to abolish the morality police. I'm not sure that's going to be the outcome, but that would be a very clear goal and a victory. Should that be achieved? Miss ammoni allegedly had some hair visible under her headscarf when she was arrested by those so called morality police in Tehran. Sarah, which is not her real name, is a fellow Iranian, and she's been speaking to James Reynolds on BBC OS. I was terrible because it happened to other people during the last years. They named exceeded more than hundreds. But the difference for her was that she was quite young. She was visiting her family here in our culture, we call them guests. They're not okay to hurt your guests while learning in your city as a strangers. Now it's a kind of strange feeling. I don't know if you saw her appearance her clothing. It was quite right. Nothing to be concerned about. Even in their stupid Islamic rules, but they took her and their insult her and they bitten up her until death, and this is not something that acceptable for no one in Iran, even the religious one. They are shocked and then tell me about your decision to join protesters. This is not my first time. I've already done every protest that happened in Iran. This is a deep decision behind all of this protest and this is overthrowing the regime, the Islamic region. This is the constant decision that we keep in our mind and be joined every protest that's happened that take place and every city. Those protests of course come with a real possibility of physical danger to you. How do you deal with that? In our culture, the death is a part of life. So you're going to die. The matter is the time of that. And the reason for that if I'm going to die for a good reason for my people for human rights, that would be honor. Our post featuring Sarah on Facebook reached a 100,000 of you and more than 400 of you either shared it or left a comment. Zari says Iranian women are redefining what it means to be fearless. I have nothing but respect for them. But echo replied, every country can not be like the west and the west is not a perfect place. And Mars being says these poor women, I hope it's a chain reaction across the region

sanam wakil Republic of Iran James copnall Iran President rice chatham House Tehran Miss ammoni North Africa Middle East James Reynolds Sarah Iraq BBC Zari Facebook
"chatham house" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"chatham house" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"First a look at what else is happening in the news. The UN has accused China of serious human rights violations in a report into allegations of abuse in Xinjiang province. The EU has agreed to suspend a Visa agreement with Moscow, making it more time consuming and costly for Russian citizens to obtain entry to the block. And family members of the victims of the 1972 Munich Olympics, massacre, have reached an agreement with the German government over a compensation payment. Stay tuned to Monaco 24 throughout the day for more on those stories. But first to Ukraine, we're inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency are trying to visit the zapper Asia nuclear plants currently under Russian control. Antony froggatt is a senior research fellow at chatham House and co author of the world nuclear industry status reports and Olga Tokarev is a monocles Kyiv correspondent. Thank you both for joining us Anthony if I can ask you first. This is the biggest nuclear plant in Europe. What's the situation there and how sensitive is it? It's yeah, I mean, as you mentioned, it is a huge power plant with 6 V VR 1000 reactors. Two of which are set to be in operation. And what we've seen over the last 6 months is firstly Russia taking control of the station while the Ukrainian operators remain in place. But we've seen shelling of the facility itself and the International Atomic Energy Agency reported continually

German government Antony froggatt Xinjiang world nuclear industry status Olga Tokarev UN Moscow International Atomic Energy Ag Munich EU Monaco Olympics chatham House China Russia Asia Anthony Europe
"chatham house" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

02:58 min | 4 months ago

"chatham house" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"It's a way of encouraging people to share freely. What happens in chatham stays in chatham, or at least it doesn't have anybody's name attached. So it's a way of encouraging people in a meeting to kick around ideas, share inside information, maybe risk sharing something, you know, an idea that you haven't quite fully formed yet. And you can trust that nobody is going to say that you're the person who said it when you get out of that meeting. Does that make sense? It absolutely doesn't also explains why he used a very clearly imitated British accent when he made that declaration. So that resonates now now I think. Brilliant. Well, don't tell us who it was because then you'd be breaking the chatham House rule. So I'm in the clear. That's the good news. And I didn't tell you who said it, so I'm good. Okay. One thing to make note of is isn't just for the press. This is for anyone who attended, including weights staff, for people running the sound, anyone who's there. Very interesting. Well, good. I have this in my arsenal now. Well, thank you guys. You'll save me embarrassment of being in another forum one day when I have to agree on a chatham House rule. Right. You'll be spreading the term. The next thing you know. Yeah, and that's chatham. Chatham House. Well, I'll make sure that my buddy on the plane knows that everything we discussed is subject to that China house. Perfect. Take care. Thanks for coming. Thank you both. Bye bye. 877-929-9673. A couple more examples of English words that are mispronounced so that they sound like Greek names, amid O'Keeffe on our Facebook group suggested the name vehicles who is the God of getting there faster. One thing I love about these is that they invert that almost cliche old joke about clothing, which is euripides humidities. Right. Where you turn Greek names into English words. Yeah, and then you start looking at these words and you can't not do it in your head. He also mentioned chronically who is the God of boring old stories. No, I love chronicles. And another one of my favorites grant was from Emmett red, who talked about the God of low power consuming lamps, and that's LED at ease. Ellie deity, oh, that one's clever. 877-929-9673 days. Hi there, you have a way with words. Hi, this is Heidi and

chatham chatham House Chatham House China Facebook Emmett red Ellie deity Heidi
"chatham house" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:30 min | 7 months ago

"chatham house" Discussed on WTOP

"Line with expectations Many economists thought the jobless rate would slip to 3.5% Instead it remained at 3.6 Most gains were in leisure and hospitality manufacturing and transportation and warehousing The numbers come on the heels of a dreadful day for the markets the Dow marked its worst day since 2020 This week's leak of a draft opinion suggesting the Supreme Court is poised to overturn abortion roe V wade has led to a spike in sales of pills that induce abortions Correspondent Janet shanley What are you seeing in terms of demand for medication abortions Is it a huge increase in demands Christy pitney is a telehealth abortion provider licensed to prescribe the pills in 5 states and the District of Columbia 19 states have already banned telehealth abortions requiring a clinician be present when the woman takes the medication Maine is now the state with the highest COVID infection rate in the country state epidemiologist doctor Isaac benowitz says a new sub variant is spreading there like wildfire EA dot four B 5 others related to the earlier omicron variants These are continuing to sweep across the country and across Maine In Ukraine officials in mariupol say a soldier was killed when Russian forces fired on a car headed to the azov stall steel factory to help with a new round of evacuations President zelensky is that with a new assessment Pentagon correspondent cami McCormick Zelensky told the chatham House in Britain that Russia is convinced it can get away with what it's doing Here through an interpreter.

roe V wade Janet shanley Christy pitney Isaac benowitz Supreme Court Maine District of Columbia mariupol President zelensky Ukraine cami McCormick Zelensky Pentagon chatham House Britain Russia
"chatham house" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:38 min | 7 months ago

"chatham house" Discussed on WTOP

"Ukraine could spill into other countries CBS News special report Russian forces are bearing down on Ukraine southeastern port city of mariupol where Ukraine reports a steel factory that's been sheltering hundreds of civilians and soldiers has been hit by 35 air strikes in just 24 hours and there are fears Russia maybe eyeing the western breakaway region of Moldova Katarina Wilshire at the chatham House think tank Whether it's going to happen we will see because we have mixed messages from the Kremlin on this crisis for gas of surge as much as 24% in Europe today after Russia cut off deliveries to Bulgaria and Poland the BBC's Adam Easton Spring is here Summer is coming demand is low Also the Polish government took the wise decision to fill up the underground gas storage It's now about 80% full So Polish ministers have been fairly calm in their response to this news Russia's Gazprom says it cut off gas because neither country would pay in rubles CBS News special report Deborah Rodriguez members of Congress are railing about inflation and the pain at the pump but it's unclear if they'll approve any legislation that will actually help consumers details from WTO's Mitchell Miller today on the hill Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer knows the political perils of the issues and points a finger at oil companies Perhaps no sector has evoked more frustration and anger from the American people as the largest oil and gas companies and the prices they are charging But while Democrats have proposed a windfall profits tax and even possible direct rebates when gas prices remain at a certain level the legislation isn't likely to go anywhere Iowa Republican Joni Ernst charges that The White House's energy policies have made matters worse This price of fuel has been going up since President Biden took office On Capitol Hill Mitchell Miller WTO Even as Russia has been beaten at every turn in Ukraine and has resorted to war crimes a Ukrainian parliament member has a warning for other countries Ukraine is not the end goal of Russian Federation Ukrainian member of parliament Ivana klin push since Aziz And we have to very attentively listen to what Russian authorities are saying Which often is untrue Since ate told WTO in 2019 war was coming if Russia wasn't dealt with She says giving in to Russia's demand of neutrality now is not going to work It didn't work in the past either Back in 2014 when Russia started its attack we under our Ukrainian legislation were non aligned country But Russia attacked anyway JJ green WTO news Three two.

Ukraine Russia mariupol CBS News Mitchell Miller Adam Easton Polish government Deborah Rodriguez chatham House hill Senate Moldova Kremlin Gazprom Joni Ernst Bulgaria WTO Chuck Schumer Poland
Why the Old Animosity Between Left and Right Is Dead

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:29 min | 7 months ago

Why the Old Animosity Between Left and Right Is Dead

"Scott Rasmussen and Doug schoen were really ahead of the curve back in 2010 with their book mad as hell on the Tea Party movement. And they right there said, based on the data that they were analyzing, that the old animosity between Republican and Democrat or Tory and labor conservative and liberal, the tended to be functioning around economic issues, that was dead and a new political division was opening up. And that's the people versus the permanent political class. And there was this radical sense that the political class governs according to their own values, their own interests, their own concerns, they're becoming increasingly alienated from the values interest and concerns of the people. We've got data, for example, from the chatham House of think tank in Britain, that found that nearly 70% of MPs, so political class believed that immigration was always good for Britain. Whereas only 20% of the population actually believed that. So you could see this massive divide growing. And that's what makes Trump so amazing. Out of the 15 or 16 GOP candidates and back in 2016, he was the only one that tapped into that new paradigm of the people versus the political class, and that could make us that could put us against Republicans, IE Romney, every bit as much as it could pit us against

Doug Schoen Scott Rasmussen Chatham House Of Think Tank Tea Party Britain Donald Trump GOP Ie Romney
"chatham house" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:05 min | 9 months ago

"chatham house" Discussed on WTOP

"Samantha Devin associate fellow in the Russia and Eurasia program at London's chatham House tells us about the youth and inexperience of the Russian forces The Russian army that is going into Ukraine is made up mainly of conscript not only constructs We do have special forces there are the so called Wagner elite forces there are some Chechen brigades but the bulk of the army going in there are conscripts These are young boys who are badly trained Many of them seem to be from the pictures we're getting of the prisoners of war seem to be from the Central Asian parts of Russia These are parts of Russia where the population is of mongoloid origin So they're not the Slavic brothers that the Ukrainians and Russians would see each other as These are boys who are going in there some of them don't even know they're going to war Some of them thought they were going on an exercise And when they realized that they were having live munitions being fired at them they first of all did not understand what was happening And this is again typical of the Russian warfare when it starts going to war in its near abroad or in its own territory The soldiers themselves don't have a clue what they're doing And that is a big tragedy These young boys the Russian boys are dying in dishonor The Ukrainian soldiers who are dying are dying heroes The Russians their parents will be lucky if they ever know how they really died and if they do get their bodies back As an analyst that looks at it from all sides what are your thoughts about some type of no fly zone Do you bristle at the west for not being willing to do that The President Biden specifically That's a really hard question because it is very hard I've been analyzing this part of the world for the best part of 30 years Of course from a real politic point of view And there fly zone is inviting disaster It's inviting direct confrontation with Russia There's an emotional side and emotions are running pretty high in Europe right now where people are thinking how can we really watch a country being destroyed on our borders But there's something really interesting that I would like to say about this no fly zone It would clearly put us on the path to confrontation with Russia or get as much closer to real armed confrontation between NATO and Russia with all the implications of that can have And there's something else I think it was two days ago Jens Stoltenberg the NATO secretary general said NATO will not be implementing a no fly zone over Ukraine The next day Vladimir Putin continued with his threats saying if anybody no fly zone will be considered to be an act of war Now if he was really serious about deescalating the rhetoric he would have answered Jens Stoltenberg's declaration by saying I'm glad to see that NATO has decided to refrain from the no fly zone He could have found a way to also have more conciliatory rhetoric Was he ups his rhetoric This again does not bode well for any negotiations.

Russia Samantha Devin Chechen brigades chatham House Russian army Eurasia Ukraine Wagner London army NATO Biden Jens Stoltenberg Europe Stoltenberg Vladimir Putin Jens
"chatham house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:06 min | 9 months ago

"chatham house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A very good morning from London I'm Caroline Hepburn Welcome to Bloomberg daybreak Europe this morning So the sanctions do seem to breach a fortress Russia The ruble plunge more than 30% against the U.S. dollar yesterday Companies form oil and gas to loan accounting carmakers are rethinking or severing their ties to Russia So one big question are Russian markets now uninvestable if so for how long In the next few minutes I'll be joined by a couple of excellent guests for more details Bloomberg editor for international government roslin mathison will be here with the latest on the ground Let's save it to his head of the Ukraine form at the Russia and Eurasia program at chatham House is also my guess in the next few moments Right now an update on the markets though as we do every 15 minutes here on Bloomberg radio So futures on the S&P 500 and NASDAQ fairly range bound a little bit off and as that down a tenth of 1% you're so 50 futures down 9 tenths of 1% stocks yesterday though did wipe out their losses on Wall Street energy producers joined a rally in oil bonds gold the Swiss franc also advanced yesterday Russia canceled trading of its stocks remember in Moscow Monday but London listed shares of Russian companies created this morning though the pictures somewhat different because Asian equities have now gained So the nikkei two two 5 up 1.2% the MSCI Asia Pacific index also have four tenths of 1% The Bloomberg dollar spot index edges higher but only a little ten year treasury yields also are adding only three basis points Yes around three basis points this morning at one spot 8 5 and WTI crude futures at 96 77 breakthrough though is below a $100 a barrel So the impact is perhaps most concerning for Europe in terms of inflation and growth but also the worries about it hitting global growth remain Right that's a look at the markets and the data check Let's bring you up to speed with the latest details on Ukraine His previously Ann Garrett.

Bloomberg Russia Caroline Hepburn roslin mathison chatham House London Eurasia Europe Ukraine U.S. Moscow S Asia Pacific Ann Garrett
"chatham house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 10 months ago

"chatham house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Given the British capital the nickname London grad Now Liz truss is the foreign secretary She says the new legislation will allow the government to target anybody who's providing strategic support to Putin And this is what she said yesterday in Britain's House of Commons Those in and around the Kremlin will have nowhere to hide We will make sure that those who share responsibility for the Kremlin's aggressive and destabilizing action will share in bearing a heavy cost Their assets in the UK will be frozen Wait a second We just heard parliamentarian doing there Yeah Exactly Explain Because there's so much skepticism about it I mean Russian money has been washing around here really since the fall of Soviet Union and there are already laws on the books but enforcement Layla has been a really big problem And that's because London is so reliant on gray money It helps drive the real estate market here the high end real estate market provides a lot of works for banks in the City of London it even helps fund soccer clubs Chatham House that's the well-known London think tank here how to report out last month and the quote was at the top was little has been done in practice to prevent kleptocratic wealth and political agendas from entering Britain Now we can't talk about Johnson without talking about how just yesterday he survived another round of calls for his resignation following a report on parties his government through when events like that were banned because of COVID-19 What did the reports say Well the report actually was incredibly thin on details and that's because the police are investigating 12 of these gatherings and they're saying we don't want you to prejudice our investigation which frankly doesn't make sense to many lawyers here in London Among these gatherings the prime minister attended reportedly attended three of them in the report would only say really excited what he called failures of leadership We will I think there'll be more details to come Opposition lawmakers again demanding Johnson's resignation the prime minister remained defiant yesterday refusing to step down And I think honestly having watched this very closely I think he can hang on for a time for the time being And he said yesterday the country needs to focus on the really big issues like Ukraine which is of course Leila exactly.

Liz truss London Britain House of Commons Putin Layla Chatham House Soviet Union UK soccer Johnson Ukraine Leila
"chatham house" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"chatham house" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Community organizer Richie Harding We have people that live directly around these facilities there Having a lot of issues with dust every couple of days they got to watch their cars the noise the traffic You know it's a lot heavily a facility of this type running 24 7 It's the same story in communities across the south where in viva and other companies are cutting trees turning them into wood pellets and shipping them to power plants in Europe These plants are at the center of two debates one over environmental justice and another over just how climate friendly wood pellets actually are The industry is growing quickly because of government subsidies on both sides of the Atlantic and global rules that allow wood pellets to qualify as carbon neutral Tim Benton is with British research firm chatham House which last month issued a report critical of the wood pellet industry Framing biomass burning is carbon neutral has incentivized the forest industry to gear up to produce wood pellets for power plants in Britain the EU South Korea and beyond Power plants don't have to count CO2 emissions when they burn wood instead emissions are supposed to be counted where the trees are cut The chatham House study argues that lots of other emissions in the process don't get counted from harvesting processing trucking and shipping Trees do grow back so they're renewable but wood pellets actually burn dirtier than coal which they're replacing North Carolina conservationist Andy wood says the industry is bad for the climate The carbon footprint is enormous which is why this does not work as a renewable source of energy That is a contrived and fabricated claim even North Carolina doesn't count wood pellets as clean energy Still the industry is expanding across the south which is near east coast ports and where most forest land is privately owned with fewer restrictions And viva says it's a good corporate citizen about a hundred people work at the Northampton plant earning 40% more than the county's average wage Another 300 have jobs with trucking companies and contractors Don Calloway is in viva's head of equity inclusion and impact We pay well We're very proud of that because these are communities which have been hit hard by the move away from industrialization over the last 50 years a lot of facilities of all kinds textiles forest products industry have left these towns And viva declined our request to visit the plant citing the pandemic and county officials did not return calls seeking comment And viva does note that the United Nations has endorsed bioenergy And company officials say they provide a market for low value wood and encourage their suppliers to replant trees The Northampton plant meets state air quality standards and in August won an updated.

Richie Harding chatham House Tim Benton North Carolina viva South Korea Europe Don Calloway EU Britain Andy Northampton east coast wood United Nations
"chatham house" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"chatham house" Discussed on Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

"But it's something in the 70 to 75 range of the number of industry partners on this, you know, I think most contractors will say that jazz C two old domain command control push the department is making is a business opportunity for them. But who's really who's really the clear leader in this, you know, their bits and pieces that companies may plug into, but back to the point that you just raised my client. I don't think the market is really figured out the market investors haven't forgot who's kind of the anointed leader in this. And is it really going to be big enough to materially change the growth expectations for any one contractor? The large publicly traded ones. The last week, the CEO of Lockheed Martin gave a speech, and it was all about the network. And so there, I think you see, you know, a big prime trying to adapt to the new situation, but there's not firm guidance yet coming out of DoD to say one way or the other. To choose a winner. And again, you know, one of the things that I thought was interesting yesterday, again, because the conference is chatham House rules, but there was a speaker who said, you know, you really don't have the leadership yet in DoD to kind of push this thing and kind of get the three services all pointed in the same direction. And he raised if I recall two or three options where this could play out that maybe you need an equivalent of a missile defense agency, for example, to is there a jazzy two agency that's combatant command? But you have to have some kind of you can't just have the three services running in relative close coordination with one another. And I frankly think there may be a budgetary aspect to do this too. I've yet to see that the jazz see two line item in the Department of Defense budget. I'm aware of some of the companies that really mine the budget documents and can pull all these separate strands together. But the market right now I think is also having a little bit of difficulty is to understanding how big a market is jazzy to what exactly does it mean and who is going to really provide the building blocks for that? Is it all software? It's got to be processors. It's going to be radios antennas. I mean, everything you think of when you talk about moving data around at the speed and the security that DoD wants in the data. And I just want to follow up Jen, you were talking about Jim tackle at CEO of Lockheed giving the speech last week and talking more about is what we'll call the 5G mill idea and how he wants to make Lockheed at the forefront of that. And that's wonderful. I wrote a column a little bit in praise of Lockheed and tackled trying to make that change..

DoD Lockheed chatham House Department of Defense Jim tackle Jen
"chatham house" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"chatham house" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"To take a broader look at the diplomatic spat and why countries seem more prone to them than others. Joined now by quentin peel. An associate fellow with the europe program at chatham house quinton was also foreign correspondent for the financial times in moscow. Among many other postings quentin. I write a regular for monocle. Magazine called diplomatic spat of the moment. In which i explained how one or more countries are angry with one or more of a countries. And what it's all about now. It does strike me having written a few of these that more often than not one of the parties to the dispute of the moment is china or russia. Is that actually the case or does it just seem like china and russia getting more involved in these than most countries because when they tee off about something everybody notices will they clearly do it but i'm not sure they do it more than anybody else. It seems to me that sort of countries that do it. Most those who've got a bit of a chip on their shoulders feel they're not being respected so maybe countries in latin america. I think of to do it to each other. They want respect pakistan or countries in the middle east. It strikes me that it's much more about gesture politics than it is about the real world. It's about saying we're jolly cross but we're not going to invade you. The chip on the shoulder thing. That is something you could suggest of both china or russia in some respects. Could you know well. I think probably yes russia. You know we want respect. We want to be at the top table and we don't feel we're treated as a superpower any longer. I think on the whole the chinese are pretty confident that they are. There is a superpower but they have one particular issue that seems to get up as all the time and of course. that is the issue of taiwan. So the most recent case there when china recalled its ambassador to lithuania that mighty you have this enormous super cooling at its ambassador to a very small country and it really does seem a little bit exaggerated that does prompt. The question which always occurs to me. Whenever i'm writing this thing up for monocle magazine or indeed discussing such brew ha-has why don't countries especially big important countries like china or russia ever. Just think this is probably a bit beneath out dignity. Let's just leave it. I think it's a bit of a knee jerk. Reaction probably really and it is another tool in the diplomatic armory. Clearly it is one that says you're upset. You're angry without actually costing you very much. But i do think it's rather counterproductive tool as well because you pulling out the person who probably is in the best position both to explain what you think and to explain to you. What the country that they coming out of things so. It's not a very coherence way of behaving if we think about it though as a diplomatic tool as he put it and assume that the country's conducting these rows are basically logical actors. Does it actually do any good. In terms of advancing the goals you mentioned obviously china and it's absolutely reliable. Big red button taiwan. If you want to get a reaction out of china you press on that big red button but doesn't actually help china advance. Its ultimate goal there which is obviously ultimately the reincorporation of taiwan into the people's republic. No i didn't think it does. Identity get helps really a tool..

russia china quentin peel chatham house quinton financial times quentin moscow monocle magazine latin america europe middle east pakistan taiwan lithuania
"chatham house" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"chatham house" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Novartis is has been exploring uncharted frontiers in science for more than a century. Today the company is working on breakthrough treatments that pushed the boundaries of human understanding and biology data science and engineering to develop and deliver therapies. That help people live longer and healthier lives around the world. Novartis reimagining medicine. You back with the briefing article. Twenty four. I am articles hip weekend. Roundup a few of the stories making news in germany. Now with gwen in peel associate fellow at chatham house is europe program. Quincy spends many years as the financial times to barely and correspondent. Welcome to the program. First of all gwent in johnston on gonna will be visiting washington tomorrow and it will be her last visit first of all what is the relationship between merkel and president biden like now pursue. It's already much better than water. Mcelhatton with trump. Yeah it's dramatically. Better and relations between mecca and trump were were pretty dreadful and they clearly disliked each other intensely an i think she and biden do get on rather well i it's It's kpcc obviously considerable compliment from the american side to mackel. She's the first european government leader to be invited to go to the white as since by me actually became president. And so that's a compliment. It is on the other hand A bit of a farewell visit one wonders whether they might not be thinking. About what next. Wrangler marco species come to see boris johnson in britain. Now she's gone to see President biden and she'll probably get to france. Mccall does as she got something she's looking for. What could that be well. Some sort of international organization. I mean this. This is a woman who's obviously equally impressive scientists in her own. Right i de could it be something like the w. h. o. All sunday night. That might be anyway. This is pure speculation. I think she might want to rest okay so but if we look ahead to tomorrow what do you think what are going to be the most important things to discuss. Maybe besides what's merckel may do next. ukraine ukraine russia and the The gas pipeline from russia is a real problem area for both countries That the americans don't like the idea of this. Nord stream. Two pipeline giving direct from russia to germany bypassing therefore ukraine and leaving ukraine rather open to russian blackmail is what they how they see it so they want germany to colour. Stop to it. On the other hand. The germans have been pretty. And angela merkel herself has been pretty truculent and ninety minded about sort sorta hanging on in there and wanting to keep it open even though it doesn't seem to have much economic sense. They've got enough gas anyway. It doesn't make much political sense. It's alienated half the european union and indeed the united states by going ahead. Could there be a deal well. I'm afraid. Angela merkel certainly playing that down as she's her last press conference in germany she said. I rather think not enough. There would be a deal twenty. Let's continue with with another new story from germany. Now a very interesting announcement from german military it will be launching a new military space command. What does that mean in practice. It is interesting. And i think it goes to the heart of another Friction point if you like between germany and the us. Which is the lack of german defense spending. That germany doesn't pull its weight as a us allies in europe. Now germany is like all of nato. They're very keen to have a space element to their defense. A policy. not an offensive space element. They insist this is a defensive. One which would therefore protect all the increasing dependence that we have on satellites and on stuff winging around in space and on which we depend for infrastructure at home and for our for our military. So the fact that germany's upping it spending in this area in very much getting involved might be a very good back doorway for germany to actually say we asked andy edlow more on defense. What does it tell us about. Germany's saw space ambitions. Well germany's we know as always been pretty good on all matters of sort of engineering and so on and they should probably be much more engaged in in defense in in space technology so if they can actually push it themselves. I think it's a natural fit for the german economy. Do you think this is something that may be discussed between. Bite an mirko less. Well what countries could do together in space. Yeah i think you'd probably is. I think that might be a around. You know who did cheer them up. If this friction still on the other issues like germany and russia or indeed germany china which is the other issue because germany. It really doesn't want to get bloody minded with china And wants to keep its trade and investment going on a on a big basis. It's a very big trader with china. And you think this is also a sign off. Germany being increasingly concerned for possible future warfare in space. Will i think. Essentially i mean. Germany doesn't want to ever be seen as an aggressor doesn't like to invest in Offensive forms of of of military spending. But he's much more focused on protecting itself. And i think that's how we should understand this to this is a defense measure to make sure that cybersecurity and any interference in our space. Communications is kept at bay quainton. Thank you very much for that. That's worth suggestion houses quentin pale and you are with Form it is twelve twenty five here in london. Seven twenty five listening in new york city. You are with the briefing and finally on today's program. It's time for a roundup of.

Germany Novartis ukraine president biden Mcelhatton mackel european government Wrangler marco President biden russia angela merkel chatham house merkel Quincy gwen boris johnson johnston europe mecca biden
Merkel's Bloc Spars Over Who Will Run for German Chancellor

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Merkel's Bloc Spars Over Who Will Run for German Chancellor

"Good after from somewhat soggy. Very not sunny zurich the two leaders of the parties that make angle miracles. Conservative lines in germany have now put themselves forward to replace her. Frau merkel will stand down at september's election with the various premier. Marcus suitor and arm allow shut. The recently elected leader of the cd the christian democrats vying to fill her big loafer as well. Let's get the latest on this now from quentin peel and associate fellow at the your program at chatham house quinton also spent a few years at the f. t. as many of you know he was the man in berlin And of course has met mr lash attack from time to time. Good afternoon quentin good afternoon. Let's maybe start with a bit of a snapshot you've spent some time with mr lasted i've been in the company of mr Suitor before Maybe let's compare notes. Because the last time i was In munich at large event it was the unveiling of Of an a three fifty tons of course Airbus very much invested in bavaria. And there was mr at the center of things and really quite a quite a force Commanding the room Very much that the character that we've seen on On television probably of of late may be but look back a few years clinton maybe even a little bit more bolshie and boisterous but someone who certainly had command and presence How is this going to square when we think about Mister mister lash. Well they are a bit of a contrast rally because lash. it doesn't come over with quite the same self-confidence he seems more hesitant a little more ambiguous. He's not a what marcus urda is. He's not a real conservative. He's much more a centrist in the party. He's much more. The person who would still be a chance salah like angela merkel somebody who tries to bring the different factions together.

Frau Merkel Marcus Suitor Quentin Peel Chatham House Quinton Mr Lash Mr Suitor Zurich Quentin Germany Berlin Bavaria Airbus Munich MR Marcus Urda Clinton Salah Angela Merkel
"chatham house" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"chatham house" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"It shocked us, he says. Because for some time there have been no explosions here. The situation is safe and people were optimistic in the streets were open. It was a time when such attacks were horrifyingly common in Baghdad. But since Isis was largely defeated here in 2017 big bombings have slowed to a trickle. Across the capital blast walls and checkpoints have been removed. In a city where life is now pretty normal and lively. People seemed stunned by the attack. Fishing around America will is in the other, Would you home? Identified yet Sorry. I saw the sadness on the people's faces, says Hossam passed him a university student who came to pay his respects his tearful as he speaks. Oi, Bea Dad! Senate. Why not 20 not concerned Sarah University about I don't know who this is the beginning of a new year, he says, and we wanted it to be good, but there is no joy for Iraqis. He fears the return of terrorism. Isis has claimed responsibility for the attack. Speak to analysts. Renard Mansoor with the British think tank Chatham House, he says, although Isis may have been defeated on the battlefield that doesn't rule out a renewed insurgency, what has been missing from the conversation. Is why Isis emerged in the first place. And you know the routes of Isis, the roots that are political based on the social economic needs of the population that feels disenfranchised. Since 2003. He says there hasn't been a concerted effort at inclusion that provision of services to all Iraqis and without a political settlement. That could represent large parts of the Iraqi population. It is very likely that groups like Isis on. Others will continue to re emerge because conflict in Iraq has been cyclical. And will continue to be cyclical. And today's blast raises questions as President Biden takes office there about 2500 U. S troops still here, and they seem likely to remain Incoming Defense Secretary General Lloyd Austin has said he is still concerned about Isis in Iraq and beyond, and that he would support keeping troops in Iraq to help the counterterror forces here. Alice Fordham. NPR NEWS Baghdad You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Coming up from K. Easy you news in Santa Cruz County. There are many indigenous communities that speak languages that are endangered. They may be in some sense forced to give up their language because in order to make a living, they need to speak.

Isis Iraq Baghdad Renard Mansoor Bea Dad NPR Secretary General Lloyd Austin Alice Fordham Hossam Santa Cruz County America Senate Sarah University Chatham House President Biden
"chatham house" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"chatham house" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Generally an essay and it shocked us, he says, because for some time there have been no explosions here. The situation is safe and people were optimistic in the streets were open. It was a time when such attacks were horrifyingly common in Baghdad. But since Isis was largely defeated here in 2017 big bombings have slowed to a trickle. Across the capital blast walls and checkpoints have been removed in a city where life is now pretty normal and lively. People seemed stunned by the attack. Fish it out American and is in the other. Would you go home? Yeah, I just thought I saw the sadness on the people's faces, says Hudson, passing the university student who came to pay his respects his tearful as he speaks well, I'll be done, Senator. I'm not 20 not Consent, said I didn't know the bottom things is the beginning of a new year, he says, and we wanted it to be good, but there is no joy for Iraqis. Fears the return of terrorism. Isis has claimed responsibility for the attack. Speak to analysts. Renard Mansoor with the British think tank Chatham House, he says, although Isis may have been defeated on the battlefield that doesn't rule out a renewed insurgency. What has been missing from the conversation is why Isis emerged in the first place, and you know the routes of Isis, the roots that are political based on the social economic needs of the population that feels disenfranchised since 2003, he says, there hasn't been a concerted effort in clay. Vision that provision of services to all Iraqis and without a political settlement that could represent large parts of the Iraqi population. It is very likely that groups like Isis on others will continue to re emerge because conflict in Iraq has been cyclical. And will continue to be cyclical. And today's blast raises questions as President Biden takes office there about 2500 U. S troops still here, and they seem likely to remain Incoming Defense Secretary General Lloyd Austin has said he is still concerned about Isis in Iraq and beyond, and that he would support keeping troops in Iraq to help the counterterror forces here. Alice Fordham. NPR NEWS Baghdad You're listening to all things Considered from NPR news. There is traffic.

Isis Iraq Baghdad Renard Mansoor NPR Secretary General Lloyd Austin Alice Fordham President Biden Senator Hudson Chatham House
President-elect Joe Biden declares "clear victory" and calls for unity

Snap Judgment

03:21 min | 2 years ago

President-elect Joe Biden declares "clear victory" and calls for unity

"After a cliffhanger vote count, Mr Biden is projected to have won the states of Pennsylvania and Nevada, taking him over the crucial threshold of 270 electoral college votes. President elect up to the stage a few hours ago to officially declare victory in front of a crowd in his hometown of Wellington, Delaware. The people of this nation have spoken. They've delivered us a clear victory. A convincing victory. Victory. For we, the people Way one with the most votes ever cast from presidential ticket in the nation. Joe Biden has said he wants to restore the soul of the United States and Americans needed to stop treating their political opponents as enemies call for unity was echoed by the vice president elect Kamila Harris. You chose hope. And unity, decency, Science and, yes, truth you chose Joe Biden as the next president. And Joe is a healer, a uniter, a tested and steady hand. One person who knows Joe Biden well as Amy Pope. She worked alongside him for a number of years. In her former role, is US deputy Homeland security adviser to President Obama. She's now an associate fellow at the think tank Chatham house and she joins me now. Amy, What kind of President Will Joe Biden B? How will he differ from the last Democratic party President Barack Obama. Joe Biden is really a kind of Washington expert, Hey, has a long history in the Senate. He knows many, many, many of the key political influencers and legislators in Washington and he's the kind of person who just has gotten to know them and build relationships with them on And for that reason, I think he's coming in at the right time in terms of trying to build relationships across the island and get something done. Do you think that he really is going to be able T turn that to his advantage? It just seems that there's so much animosity in US politics right now. I think it's going to be tough. And I think even for someone like Mitch McConnell, with whom who's the Senate majority leader with whom the president elect has a strong relationship, there will be pressures on him not to find common ground and not to cooperate. But on the flip side, there are a lot of Americans who are looking for Congress and the president to work together. Who are looking for some level of functioning capacity within Washington. They'll feel that pressure to it's hard to see how this will play out, and it'll depend frankly, about what the voters were saying to their members. Amy, I'm going to bring my guests in

Joe Biden Mr Biden Kamila Harris Amy Pope Wellington Nevada Delaware Pennsylvania Chatham House United States Washington Senate President Obama Democratic Party JOE Barack Obama Mitch Mcconnell Congress AMY
UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

NPR's World Story of the Day

07:00 min | 2 years ago

UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

"The UK and Germany are both leading democracies and not far apart on the globe. They took very different approaches to the pandemic with very different results the UK as suffered the most covid nineteen deaths in Europe Germany with a much bigger population has lost far fewer people. NPR's correspondent in each country rob Schmitz in Berlin and Frank Langfitt in London had been talking among themselves. Hey Rob Frank. So tell me what happened in the UK. were. So many mistakes a big reason is the government honestly doesn't really seem to think ahead Boris Johnson you remember he sold Brexit to the British people in two thousand sixteen with no plan on how to execute it. So in the virus began spreading here Johnson course he's now prime minister. He was slow to recognize the threat here he is on March Third I was at movie night. where I think the rush if you credit ours patience and I shook hands of everybody. So by April Johnson an icy ICU covid nineteen I was talking to you in Boyd he's a member of the scientific group that advises the government. The UK didn't really grasped the speed with which the epidemic was entering the country under are all sorts of reasons for that, some of which are to. Lack of organisational capability sometimes when there's very high uncertainty, you simply have to shut things down really quickly and frank here in. Germany. That's what they did on January twenty seven. The first known case of coronavirus was sent to Clemson ventner chief physician at the Munich Schwab in clinic we have very similar like the boys gall. Be always prepare. Then you're watched what was happening in Italy in January where the virus was spreading pretty fast and we knew that we have to flatten the curve. So even before the first case of Covid nineteen and Germany, he was working on slowing its progress and he says the German government was involved from day one asking us what do you need we? We? We didn't have to ask them for example, Germany already had a big supply of ICU beds clouds Deutsche is at the Federation of German. You know that it's been a long debate on whether we had too many intensive care beds that warned us that often obviously that debate is over Deutsche says, Germany also has a lot of hospitals. If you take all the beds in all of Germany's hospitals, you get four times more per capita than what the UK has rob. You had slack in your system in Germany there. Was Not much here because the government had been cutting funding to the National Health Service for years, the hospitals were afraid of getting swamped with Cova patients. So they sent elderly patients back to nursing homes some broad cove with them infected other residents at least twenty, thousand nursing home residents died of covid. That's terrible in while in Germany, deaths were prevented through testing and contact tracing. The health authority in Berlin district of Hong, Kong and operator talks to man at conduct with a positive case, there are around four hundred call centers like this across Germany Peters directs this one become Austin We have traffic wardens and librarians working for us. We've recruited gardeners from parks and recreation Germany had a lot of manpower and testing to infrastructure filled with labs and university medical centers across the country. You know here the government misread the corona virus they thought it was going to spread as quickly as the flu. They didn't even try to develop a testing system where we steward he's a former British cabinet minister they were very, very confident. And slightly arrogant neb beliefs that they understood this disease better than other countries, I think the lack of scientific education amongst a lot of the British political elite meant that they were very reluctant to challenge scientists but here, Germany. Frank. A trained scientist is at the helm and Chancellor Angela Merkel. gave one of the most powerful and heartfelt speeches in her life when she made a rare national address on March. Eighteenth dusted fees above in then. Comes here. I have absolutely no doubt that we will overcome this crisis. How many victims will it claim? How many loved ones lose to a large extent? The answer lies in our own hands miracle has a doctorate in quantum chemistry, and in another speech, she patiently explain how important it was for Germany to reduce the viruses reproduction rate. Her tone was always humble and deadly serious. I'm. Doing this Icefield is off that. We are thin ice. This is a situation in which caution not over-confidence is the order of the day it really different here Johnson studied classics at Oxford University. He was president the debating society and as Prime Minister he's tried to rally the country with rhetoric. We must act like any wartime government and do whatever it takes to support our economy Johnson's Ori helped win a landslide election last year, but a pandemic, of course, not a campaign. Here's where. We store again he sees himself as somebody who is encouraging a rugby team for nineteen minute match telling them that fantastic to make them play. Well, he doesn't primarily see himself as somebody whose job is to get into uncomfortable details were chew over policy and strategy but frank, it's this chewing over of policy and strategy. This technocratic nature of the German government that may have also contributed to Germany's success hunts could is senior research fellow at Chatham House this sort of doubling down on technocracy. Populism has now been discredited by the Corona Virus. He says, that's potentially dangerous. If technocrats feel too emboldened, there might be an even bigger growth populist backlash in the future some people will blame Johnson for Britain's handling of covid campaigner. He thinks Johnson's more symptoms than 'cause captors just written a book called why the Germans do it better notes from grownup country. We've descended into believing that somehow because we always muddled through in the past muddling through is a recipe that will get us through in the future. So rob where's Germany now with crow verse? Well cases are rising deaths are not that tells us these new cases are from young people, children across the country are back in classrooms, but the German government seems so far. Okay. With the dangers of this, there remains a strong infrastructure of hospital beds, testing, tracing Germany fields, prepared and Chancellor Angela Merkel's popularity ratings are sky high eighty, six percent. WOW cases rising rapidly to we've got new strictures but Johnson actually had trouble explaining them to the nation recently the last surveys Ron Johnson is under forty percent approval rating testing capacity here still can't meet demand. And Winter's coming. NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt, and Berlin correspondent. Rob? Schmitz.

Germany Boris Johnson Frank Langfitt German Government UK Berlin Rob Schmitz Rob Frank Prime Minister Covid Chancellor Angela Merkel NPR Europe London UK. Brexit Boyd Clemson Coronavirus
Lebanon: Economic Meltdown Leaves Country on the Brink of Collapse

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:08 min | 2 years ago

Lebanon: Economic Meltdown Leaves Country on the Brink of Collapse

"Hello and welcome to the foreign desk I'm Andrew. Mullah guests today, Lena Katina and Layla. Milana Allen Lena Katina is the director of the Middle East and North Africa program at Chatham House and Layla Moulana. Allen is France twenty four's correspondent in Beirut. Welcome both to the program Leyla. I'll start with you in Lebanon if one was to take a stroll through by route right now today. What indications would you see of the problems? Lebanon is having. Closed shops and bars people inside shops, doing things like asking the cashier to stop touching items when they get to a certain price on the phone to their partners, trying to figure out how many items they can afford to buy their no prices now on items in most shots because they're changing every day, people still queuing outside banks trying to get them money. People going through bins of his point trying to find food, I don't want to state situation. You know we're not chaos yet. Some people have been saying, but it is very very clear that the situation is getting increasingly discover people. Very consent.

Milana Allen Lena Katina Lena Katina Lebanon Layla Moulana Beirut Chatham House Middle East France Director North Africa
How to network digitally in a pandemic

Talking Tech

04:21 min | 2 years ago

How to network digitally in a pandemic

"DOT com. We're in a pandemic. We can't go to conferences. Shmooze and network. So what do we do how to network digitally? Well I had a nice conversation recently with the analyst Jeremiah Al.. About just what to do, he's got some good ideas. Have a listen. So now. You WanNa. Get invited to other people's zoom sessions. And you and the goal is to obviously sometimes host your own, but when you get invited to other people's zooms, you see them and you start to network those especially if the repeating events. Like what what would, what would examples so one of my contacts? He was running. HR At a self driving car company in San Francisco and he got laid off, so he started a think. Tank and I am now part of this private group. They're inviting amazing. Cool people into that at a constant basis and I get to meet some of the world's thinkers, and they invite somebody else in return, and we meet twice a month for an hour offer ninety minutes, and and we talk about the topics of the day, and it's off the record of Chatham House rules, and so that's basically like a virtual. Salon that's that's happening in so getting invited to those and showing your face that's critical and then chiming in and being active in the comments on other people are talking, and then you and then you see if there's somebody you want to engage with them as linked in contact if it's professional, if you really really jive with them, send them a facebook friend request so yeah, that's what I'm doing an unfair. Frankly you can meet more people even faster and connect with them digitally as well. How do you get invited to assume session? you just have to watch people who are saying hosting zoom sessions, or you talk with people in the back channel, which means in private message around interesting topics and see who's leaving comments on your threads around interesting topics and say should we started digital salon, or are you hosting a digital salon or or WHO's hosting? Sometimes schedules are listed in facebook on the on the calendar, and that's one way to find that out but it's kind of word of mouth. You say it's easier to meet digitally than it is in person. Yes Here's why amplify yes, because you can quickly connect to them on linked or facebook, while you're in that session, and then you have that contact versus the awkward. -Ness of seeing somebody you connect with shake hands, and you don't ask for their business quarter you do they don't have it. You fumble. Okay I'll find you online, and then you don't reconnect so technically you can establish a long term connection. With a few clicks that you might not have of course you're missing that visceral. That human element you're passing. Or motions or the way that that handshake feels compared to where the the center that person what are they wearing? You miss that so you have to make up for it by the long term digital connections. And how important is linked? It's for me. It's not the conversational like the ongoing relationship region. That's where facebook and twitter is enabling that, but it's a way to to signal that you have that connection with them for professional reasons and also to tell your network. You're connected to somebody who you think is. Has something important to say or is important, so I would say it's less important. But, if you're out of work, which a lot of people are and you're starting your day and you know a Michael Shea was always pounding the pavement. Right so if you're pounding the payment, which you're not going to do your pending the payment on your computer on your computer, right? So where would you I? It's Wednesday morning. You're laid off the week before you gotta pound the pavement on your computer. Give me a five places. You're going to go in order. Where do you start? So I, I I've published content on my own websites. My own blogs or medium, and then I share content that attracts people. That's I think that's the really critical thing and I've been a small business owner for ten years. As I want to track people I don't want to chase them. So I. I want to publish a unique video or point of view or thoughtful analysis and I think that's really how I try to

Facebook Jeremiah Al Michael Shea Chatham House Analyst Tank Business Owner San Francisco Twitter
Kataib Hezbollah: Iraq condemns US attacks on Iran-backed militia

All Things Considered

04:23 min | 3 years ago

Kataib Hezbollah: Iraq condemns US attacks on Iran-backed militia

"There's been condemnation today from many corners of the Middle East in response to US airstrikes on five locations in Iraq and Syria Iraq's prime minister says the strikes will have dangerous consequences the Pentagon announced to these strikes yesterday and said they were targeting and Runyon backed militia group called could top Hezbollah the US blames that group for killing an American contractor in a rocket attack last Friday so what might this mean for the region and for US forces stationed rare questions to put to were not Mansur he's a Middle East analyst with foreign policy think tank Chatham house in London and he joins us now from very busy streets at rush hour in London were not mince or welcome thanks for having me the more about this group could top has belong which I mentioned is it's a militia group it's mostly Iraqis but it is backed by Iran what does that mean what kind of support to get from Iran Qatar Hezbollah is one of the several militias that have existed in Iraq for quite sometime now it's part of a group known as the popular mobilization units that have been fighting at times alongside the Iraqi state it was part of the fight against ISIS it's known to be one of those groups that's very close to Iran and the name from so many to ask are they linked to Lebanese Hezbollah which we hear so much about not formally not institutionally could've Hezbollah is kind of some people would refer to them as the Iraqi has a bottle these groups have relations with each other they have at times they share training with each other but they're in different fields no U. S. secretary of state Mike Pompeii came out and blamed Iran specifically for this death of an American contractor last week do we know you mention that they work closely with the run but how much control does around actually have over this group's activities the word proxies are often used to describe many of these militias and often times we push back and say well some of them actually have their own agendas this group could top has a ball is known to be closer to Iran in that kind of level of products in as you know it works with Iran in so far as their strategies a line that could be fighting ISIS or it could be any other sort of strategy that Iran would have been would need some local forces like these Iraqi men who make up could have his villa as I mentioned these strikes have been not well received in the region are rockets criticize them a Ron has criticized him tell me a little bit more about how this is playing in the broader Middle East the biggest thing to look out for is the relationship between the Americans and the Iraqi government in the past the American president would called the Iraqi prime minister almost weekly in the days of bush in early Obama what's happened now is the U. S. a really lost a lot of their institutional allies in the Iraqi state and so this becomes indicative of when the Americans do pursue something like this air strike they're gonna continue to face stronger and stronger condemnation by the Iraqi government the president prime minister and speaker of the parliament of all come out condemning these attacks as encroachments on Iraq's sovereignty the US is you know says this was self defense said Hey we have been warning that we were going to hit back if attacks continued secretary of state my compare secretary of defense asper came out yesterday and said if these attacks continue there's going to be a response yeah and your husband this **** for tat kind of after the fight against ISIS because keep in mind the US and Iran were on the same side and the fight against ISIS the question then came what's going to happen I mean the US and Iran are clearly two foes now just because they had this convenient enemy that kept them together doesn't mean that they're always going to be out that type of allies and they weren't allies of course however it seems that there was a norm you know in the last few years that they'd neither side really wanted to fight in Iraq neither side wanted to just destabilize and undo what they spent years re doing you know fighting isis in rebuilding the state and so the attention was often other places and I think what we've seen this week suggested that these sites are now willing to move past that norm which is to not destabilize Iraq and this could be a potentially destabilizing moment that is renowned Mansur Middle East analyst at Chatham house we have been speaking with him from London thanks very much thank you

Middle East Iraq United States
Shinzo Abe Becomes Japan’s Longest-Serving Prime Minister

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:55 min | 3 years ago

Shinzo Abe Becomes Japan’s Longest-Serving Prime Minister

"Shinzo our prime. My Minister of Japan will today be celebrating. What would have seemed a decade or so back an unlikely milestone? He is now the longest serving prime minister. In Japan's history is brief stint from two thousand six to two thousand seven added to the longest stretch has enjoyed since two thousand twelve has overhauled the benchmark set by. Juke Cuts Toro three times. Prime Minister of a very different Japan in the early years of the twentieth century. Nobody serves as long as a house without tapping into something in their electorate. So in our base case Wat- one joined with more on this Spicer David Warren Former UK ambassador to Japan now Associate Fellow with the Asia Pacific Program At Chatham House David thank you for joining us rb. Does he have a particular singular secret. Is there one thing about him which is got into where he's got to and kept him there i. It's hard to say that he does although he's clearly a competent politician in Japanese terms. And he's come to the premiership of Japan of course after a period of intense political volatility extending over decades in Japanese politics. Prime Minister for the most part have come and gone and there's genuine public Cynicism and discontent with the fragile nature of Jap the Japanese politics so in a sense he benefited from having come after a period of great great Great Tab instability and he benefited also from having a very weak opposition during this period because the opposition party which was in government government three years between two thousand nine and two thousand twelve when it was cold. Democratic Party of Japan has been itself Rhythm With factions and essentially all over the place in terms of being able to land any punches on the Liberal Democratic Party government. So you haven't any competition in the end. He hasn't much competition from outside the party. And he's given the Japanese people a sense of stability which I think they have respected. So you wouldn't say there's an RB ISM as such. There is not a philosophical cornerstone to him philosophical cornerstone to him. But I'm not certain. It's one shared by the Jersey of Japanese people originally from the nationalist wing of the Liberal Democratic Party Much of his Political philosophy is good on. We habilitation his grandfather who was prime minister of Japan in the nineteen fifties and had a very problematical record in the nineteen thirties and forties during Japan's occupation career and four in China. And he has a nationalist. I think wants to both rehabilitate Prime Minister Kitchen. Gran- grandfather's father's mutation and also to turn the page so to speak on Japan's problematic history in ways. which do not necessitate? The next generation of Japanese need having to grapple as much with the the difficult politics of apology that other innovations have had to do But that nationalism is ten uh-huh by a political pragmatism of the recognition that He needs to fix the Japanese economy. Most Japanese voices are more worried about economic issues the constitutional nationally issues and that. Whatever obeys nationalist impulse maybe he needs to ventilate them in ways which staint disturb Japan's regional neighbours particularly China and Korea He had a very different sense of twentieth century. History in in that regard with China. He's got the relationship back onto something more of an even Keel career. It's much more difficult than well. How successful do you think he has been the not very by the sound of it? IN-IN addressing those difficult relationships with its neighbors in the region often overhung as they are by a history of world war. Two Cudi of done more. Well he's been successful with China. I think it's fair to say you inherited a difficult situation with China in in two thousand twelve when he became prime minister. The previous government nationalized the disputed islands in the East China Sea. which had alienated the Chinese Government and lead to a serious deterioration in the relationship nationalism. In the sense to prevent extreme nationalist getting the hands on them relations the China very very difficult and after initial period of tension. In which are they Like some of his predecessors as prime minister visited controversial Ashley yesterday shrine intake I they has invested considerable effort in establishing more of a relationship with Xi Jinping and getting the relationship back onto who Something more bridging equilibrium. Now there is talk. All Xi Jinping making a state visit to Japan in the spring of Twenty Twenty strong stronger relationships at every level of the Japanese and Chinese governments and there is a serious dialogue not least east because both countries face unpredictable. US Administration This time so the record with China is best and Eve. When I was prime minister in the decade he bested lots of time in improving relations with China to the situation with career is much harder because There is both Business over disputed history particularly on the Korean side and the sense on the Japanese side. The taught to know how to deal with careers concerns the Japanese. This was all settled. Many years ago with extensive reparations agreement that the issue was closed is they are resentful of the Koreans now reopening these historical issues so while I think there is some legitimate criticism of days. Playing the the nationalist card in in in this area there is also the sense Career is is is stay with him to negotiate during your time says Ambassador to Japan. What sense were you able to get all obeys personal style? What what what is he like to deal with as an individual when I wasn't I'm bachelor at the time. When I was in power? He was in power for a year in the mid noughties when he succeeded Prime Minister Junichiro. Well he's only and that was a very unsuccessful time any wasn't well and there were scandals which produced the effectiveness of these government and the U. banned last year? He became prime minister. Game Justin I left Japan at the end of my ambassadorship in twenty twelve. So what do I met him Briefly socially really and observed him as one of a number of leaders of the opposition during that very very febrile terriers. I didn't his His style-obsessed hand but he is certainly Powerful politician he's centralizing politician. He's established strong central control throw of the mechanisms of government of the appointment of key personnel. he is a strong leader in those terms Some in Japan would argue that he is too strong a leader that he centralize too much that he creates a political. Is it gonNA spread by. People are reluctant to step out of line into sagres with what comes out of the center out of the Prime Minister's office that can lead to strong and stable government not one respect it can also lead to Mistakes accounting if they have in certain areas of policy where civil servants have told politicians what they want to hear other than in the objective and and practical advice.

Prime Minister Japan China Minister Of Japan Prime Minister Kitchen Prime Minister Junichiro Liberal Democratic Party Democratic Party Of Japan East China Sea. Justin I Chinese Government Gran- Grandfather Twenty Twenty Xi Jinping Chatham House David Spicer David Warren Former Premiership
John Bolton, Another national Security adviser, Steps Down

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:17 min | 3 years ago

John Bolton, Another national Security adviser, Steps Down

"Used his customary method of twitter to announce the departure of his National Security Adviser John Bolton the the president said he disagreed strongly with his advisors views. Mister Bolton has promised to give his version of events in due course but he was the third national security adviser so far in Mr Trump's administration and he's described as a straight talking foreign policy hook or for more. I'm joined by Amy Pope. She's associate fellow at the US in the Americas program the Chatham House here in London and former deputy homeland security adviser to Barack Obama Amy Welcome back to monocle twenty four. This tipping point came what with the the Camp David invite to the Taliban given by Donald Trump has been bubbling for some time. I think it's been going on for a long time. You look at there have been very very public. situations where the president has directly contradicted his national security advisor whether it's Venezuela or Tehran there have been very very unusual contradictions of the national security advisers position and the fact that they've been done publicly have signaled that the president and John Bolton have not been on the same page for some time. What is it that annoyed. Donald Trump so much about John unbolting there were rumors that it was from the get-go not going to go very well given the fact that Donald Trump didn't like his security advisors moustache. It was as simple as front with this president. I would not put that out of the realm of the possible but when I really think it comes down to is that John Bolton whether or not you agree with his policies had a particular strategy and foreign policy view that governed the way that he it made decisions and that is just fundamentally inconsistent with President this president does not have any sort of national security policy he operates from the HIP he reacts he transacts and that's just I think fundamentally that was just too big of a difference for the two of them to bridge. He was the man the WHO knew US politics how it worked and knew how to get things done. That's right but as we've seen time and again the president didn't has very little patience for people who know how. Washington works if you look at the number of people who have served in in his administration to date some would say these are the so-called grownups in the room. General Mattis General Kelly HR McMaster the former national security advisor they have not lasted very long with this president president he just does not have patients process and again has little patience with strategy and sticking to a particular way of doing business he the and I don't think he likes the constraints that these various actors have imposed on him so I just think this was an inevitable here. The way that John Bolton has been described dubbed by some of the one person said he was a massive neo con on steroids. There was no doubt as to his position was there. What changes did he affect on on. US Security Policy during his tenure well certainly he's pushed for a harder stance on Iran. There's no question there likewise he really pushed this president resident on Venezuela to the point where it looked like the US was intervening in Venezuelan politics which is which is actually a significant departure from where the US foreign policy has been under President Obama for example so he was he was pushing for intervention. He was pushing for a much more military-led military-led strategy hard line policies but what I think might be more disturbing and a more lasting legacy which whether or not disposes intent is not clear here is that he's really undermined the national security process usually these decisions are brought to the president after very careful consideration by policy advisers from across across the US government and by all accounts John Bolton in his haste to be at the president's side and to be the one whispering his ear basically got rid of that structure picture and that considered process that allowed for the fleshing out of various ideas before they went to the president and in its give us an example of things where he his jumped ahead a not had things thought through well. If you look at the China trade war at the moment it is not at all clear that that was considered considered in terms of in terms of a couple of things what are the long long term effects on the US economy and that of course is very is coupled with our national security interest but also what are what is the ability of China to withstand a trade war through US electoral politics at some point this president has to decide died whether he's going to allow the softening of the US economy to impact his own chances at reelection or maintain very strong position on China and by all accounts chance that's not actually been well-considered within the White House so that's just one very tangible example. The second of course was his very public decision on the the Taliban to pull back on the meeting with the Taliban to the surprise of the American public in the foreign policy establishment and and not to have gone through through the process of negotiation of an outcome before that meeting was going to take place you mentioned the the chances of Donald Trump's reelection to what degree has the departure of John. Bolton got anything to do with the fact that Donald Trump would probably like to see himself a foreign policy dealmaker as opposed to a woman go when it comes to next year's elections elections. I think that has everything to do with it. Bolton would have the president maintain a fiercer military posture and the president has and said time and again that it's that it is important to pull troops out of situations including Afghanistan. He's one of his campaign promises. I think that's fundamentally the at odds with where John Bolton have him go so I think at some point. The president is is weighing. How am I going to do these deals that I've promised the American people bowl and as you're going to be able to do that with John. Bolton and I just think the answer is no. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on the line that was amy pope in a moment will go through some of the

President Trump Mister Bolton Donald Trump United States National Security John Unbolting President Obama Amy Pope Taliban Twitter Venezuela Barack Obama Advisor London Americas Chatham House Washington General Mattis General Kelly
France Dangles $15 Billion Bailout for Iran in Effort to Save Nuclear Deal, While Iran is 'Looking to the East'

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:20 min | 3 years ago

France Dangles $15 Billion Bailout for Iran in Effort to Save Nuclear Deal, While Iran is 'Looking to the East'

"We start today with the latest frantic diplomatic efforts to revive the international nuclear deal with iran and attempts to ease tensions in the gulf. Iran's foreign minister has been holding talks with his russian counterpart. Meanwhile his deputy headed to paris to talk about a french proposal that could be with billions of dollars tehran but he's any of this going to save a deal that the united states seemed determined to kill off. Let's speak to some vacuum who's associate fellow the middle east and north africa a program at the think tank chatham house here in london the french proposal <hes> seems to involve extending an enormous line of credit smudges which is fifteen billion dollars to iran in return for iran lifting the threat to step up its atomic work. Is that something that's likely to work. Yes it is ambitious proposal but it's one that the french are dangling in front of the iranians because what they actually need it is a greater access to hard currency in order to survive the pressure of sanctions and be able to sell their oil and repatriate their money buy a cop and of course the united states had said when they pulled out of the deal that they wanted iranian oil exports to fall two zero nine. It's currently i think about three hundred thousand thousand barrels a day. Ron wants to get at least seven hundred thousand but we would the u._s. Determined to stop that is even that much money. Are you going to actually achieve anything to say. It's unclear what the u._s. Intentions are right now. <hes> the president has said repeatedly that he does has want to bring her on back to the negotiating table. He's just pursuing a very hard line strategy in order to do so. I think that if it still does go threw it is going through with a bit of a wink and nod from washington and my reading is because a donald trump does not want iran crisis as he is about to kick off his reelection campaign for next year next november twenty twenty election. We'll meanwhile while <hes> <hes> iran's deputy foreign minister was in paris. His boss was in moscow having tools for lovers so the iranians seem to be keeping their options open awesome part of iran's diversification sanctions survival strategy. They don't wanna put all of their eggs in the european basket which has been a frustrating process and they've had to threaten and bully the europeans to get this kind of response attention and escalate <hes> also so in the persian gulf. If you recall in the summer there were attacks on drones and seizing tankers of alike and so by also looking to russia china now <hes> to provide strategic support but also economic <hes> linkages for iran <hes> it is looking to move away from just <hes> one <hes> geographic focus and protect itself also from <hes> the impact of the us we heard we heard that clip earlier at the start of the program where mohammad zarif saying that iran consider russia and china to be helpful partners and don't have that same view of europe iran has been saying it would step away from the deal will unless europe offered something significant bearing in mind that rising tension in the gulf the issues with the drones and the tanker's who's got the upper hand at the moment well it does seem that iran is putting significant amount of pressure <hes> on the international community and specifically <hes> europe but if iran does precede with breaching the nuclear deal it will lose out upper-hand really because europe does have a threshold and what they're willing to tolerate with regards to iran's nuclear breaches and <hes> it could this whole situation could quickly escalate and iran could be referred to the u._n. Security council. It's not careful so this is a very calibrated dance. You mentioned earlier that you think that the the offer from france of if this line of credit is if i if not officially than than covert he got us out of a nominal wink approval from the united states because they don't want into big standoff with iran going into a reelection year but

Iran United States Persian Gulf RON Europe Russia Paris Deputy Foreign Minister Donald Trump North Africa London Tehran President Trump Mohammad Zarif Moscow France Washington
Argentina's economy minister resigns as peso sheds value

Monocle 24: Midori House

03:35 min | 3 years ago

Argentina's economy minister resigns as peso sheds value

"Welcome to the program. I'm joined today by john everard former u._k. Ambassador to uruguay and north korea among others and victor boomer thomas associate fellow at chatham house. We will begin in latin america where argentine president maurizio mockeries political and economic woes have deepened the embattled leader having just suffered a loss in eight national election primary hi. Mary has also lost his economy minister over the weekend. Argentina's economy is currently in recession and posted a twenty two percent inflation rate over the first six months of two thousand nineteen victor. I'll start with you. <hes> first of all our macrey states numbered probably but <hes> it may be just a little bit premature sure because it for when we get to october and we have the elections the opposition candidate alberto fernandez would either have to get more than forty five percent in the first round or more than forty percent and a ten point margin over his <hes> challenge. I mccray we assume you you can't assume that just because of the results <hes> a week ago so yes he's probably on the way out and frankly probably deserves to be on the way bad but people should not jump to quick conclusions. I want to look at some of the reaction from around south america in a moment but <hes> john <hes>. I wonder what the bigger concern is here for macrey in the country his defeat in the polls or the country country's worsening economic situation at this point well. Yes <hes> worsening a very polite word down. I think to fifty five to the dollar. I i remember when it was deployed a par with the dollar. That's a long time ago course teddy enormous concern. The <hes> electoral results sent shockwaves not just with the intel community of people will our junking argentine bonds as they can but it goes the washington society. I <hes> this causes huge stress for ordinary. Ardent won't what's going to happen to their lives and how they're going to get through yet another economic storm. If you are a mountain time of say a cough my age <hes> you've been through at least four these crisis before and every reports come out worse at the end of them so they'll be widespread fear we mentioned <hes> that's a mockery is in trouble in the polls and his political days could be numbered. I'm i'm wondering about his <hes> his opposition in this election should he be named <hes> albert fernandez. <hes> i wondering about <hes> how fernandez will fare in this if we expect him to win or is that a strong prospect at this point yes it is <hes> it's not so much <hes> that that argentines have fallen in love with <hes> alberto fernandez nor indeed necessarily with his vice presidential candidate the former president cristina in a kitchener different unders. It's more that macrey has been such a dreadful president <hes> he made aras right from the start and anyone who thought not was going to be <hes> a very <hes> experienced and talented individual in presidency was seriously <hes> at era because he had very little political experience he'd been married one sorry but as we know from london you can be married for city but that doesn't necessarily early make great <hes> head of government <hes> and of course he dud he he did what you should never do and that is <hes> go to ah the i._m._f. <hes> too late if you're going to go to the i._m._f. You should do it early on.

Alberto Fernandez President Trump John Everard Victor Boomer Thomas South America North Korea Argentina Intel Maurizio Mockeries Latin America Chatham House Mary Washington Society Albert Fernandez. London Cristina Forty Five Percent Twenty Two Percent Forty Percent
Council Of Europe, Ukraine And Kiev discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:30 min | 3 years ago

Council Of Europe, Ukraine And Kiev discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The council of Europe has backed Russia's return to the body, five years after Mosca had its voting rights suspended over the illegal annexation of the Crimean peninsula. The accordion delegation has walked out in protest the council of Europe, which is not linked to the EU is Europe's oldest political body and aims to uphold human rights democracy and the rule of law across the continent will joining us from Kiev is the journalist Christopher Miller. And in the studio, we have Clinton peel associate fellow for the year at pergram at Chatham House Clinton. If you could just explain the background for us Russia. Lost its voting rights, but it was still part of the forty seven member organization. Yes, it was suspended in twenty fourteen further takeover of Crimea, suspended for two years, and then suspended itself, if you like they wouldn't come back and finally, they said they weren't going to pay any of their budget us. They actually a supposed to be about. Ten percent of the cost of the council of Europe said they would do to be suspended if they hadn't been readmitted, and that is what the votes on Tuesday, moaning Krakatoa on was all about was, whether they would be actually rehabilited it still not totally resolved. They've, there's a lot of objections to this decision. But the truth is the council of Europe is split, very badly, two to one voted for Russia, come back in, but the third that didn't, which is overwhelmingly former eastern European countries the very angry about this. Christopher what's the view from Kiev on the council of Europe? Frustration anger. The general public here really is up in arms. They've, they've called the council of Europe. I in response to this decision shameful if they've, they've called it a stock and says, and said that, you know, it's turned away from from respecting in working to uphold human rights. They've also responded on social media with memes suggesting that Russia was able to buy or bribe it's way back into the council. You know, a common refrain that I'm seeing on social media and hearing from from those who I met with an spoke to yesterday about this. It was, you know, why, why allow Russia back into the council when it was booted from the council. I four for annexing Crimea and an invading in eastern Ukraine, and it is not given back these these two pieces of Ukrainian land. Right, Ukrainians will also point to the fact that it continues to fuel the conflict in eastern Ukraine, and no recently just last year attacked Ukrainian navy ships captured twenty four servicemen which are still being held in Russia. Not to mention the nerve agent attack in the UK. You know, people in, in, in Kiev also like the point to the, the coup plot in Montenegro and Russian interference in US in you elections. And you know, they're, they're extremely angry. And we we saw somewhat measured Riyadh. Action from president Zielinski yesterday who said that he was disappointed in the move in that he had tried to convince German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Emmanuel Macron during his meetings with them last week in the French and German capital's. But ultimately was was not able to do so.

Council Of Europe Ukraine Kiev Europe Christopher Miller Chatham House Clinton Crimea Clinton Riyadh EU Mosca Zielinski Angela Merkel Ukrainian Navy Nerve Agent Emmanuel Macron
Japan wants you to say its leader's name correctly: Abe Shinzo

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:16 min | 3 years ago

Japan wants you to say its leader's name correctly: Abe Shinzo

"At home. Japan's Prime Minister introduces himself as obey Sheen's, but in the west is, gene, so Ave. That's being the convention for at least a century. But Tokyo, now wants the west to follow Japan's way of doing things. Let's get more on this with Joe. Nielsen Reid who is a senior lecturer in modern Japan at Cambridge University, and an associate fellow at the London based think tank Chatham house Joan, get you tell us more, how exactly do the policymakers want to change name conventions, while this is an idea that has reportedly been floated by the foreign minister, taro Kono or Connell tarot, as in Japan corner vein is family name. And I think this is something of an experiment. There is a sense, in which some senior officials are exploring this idea, partly because of course the convention in Japan for years the standard practice fee like is being to use the family name. I and I think there's also a sense in which in the absence of the new era. Ray wa with the transition from one to another, perhaps Japan is starting to feel a bit more culturally self confident and wants to explore the option of making this change to reflect that growing confidence. And also, I think looking at the experience of career and China where the convention is, of course, again to use surname first. We talk about, for example. President moon Jae-in moon is the president's family name or Xi Jinping. Same idea. It's not unreasonable. I think the Japanese to want to explore this idea how long has flipping the name or. Into it. Is it a new idea? It's not something that's really been forefront, public discussion that has been some evidence that junior high school textbooks in English recently have started to adopt this convention departing from the western Newman other words, but it's not something that I think we've found has been the forefront of public debate in Japan and opinion polls seem to suggest that the Japanese public is pretty evenly divided about whether this is a good change or not. It's also I think driven by the reality that Japan will beginning a lot of international attention will, of course, be in June. Be hosting the G twenty summit in all soccer. We have the World Cup and the next year. Of course, we have the Olympics and looking ahead to twenty twenty the government, or at least some senior officials seem to be tested for this idea. But it's by no means clear up, whether this is something, the government is really pushing for or simply exploring this in a very tentative way laws are the best arguments for not changing the name order. I think it's just really a kind of practical question that this is being the way Japanese names of being. Used by western media in the past undoubtedly any change will involve a degree of. Potential. Confusion. And it's a reality, I think, for now that when, when westerners who aren't familiar with Japan grappling with Japanese name, sometimes they're not aware of the nuances, and aren't necessarily immediately aware of, which is the family name, which is the given name. I don't think this is as some people might suggest a turn towards more nationalistic Japan. But a Japan that what did you in the current context may be wants to feel that it's cultural identity gets a little bit of a boost? We saw that in the decision to pick Ray wa the first time that. Chinese characters have been explicitly taken from Japanese classical literature and used to signify new era. There's I think essentially which particular for conservatives in Japan. There's a growing confidence in the country and the desire to reflect that internationally. Exactly, you talk about radio indeed the Indians, this, this new imperial era. Can you tell us more about how that new air is at the moment being reflected in how the police feel about themselves on the country?

Japan Ray Wa Prime Minister Taro Kono Tokyo China Senior Lecturer Soccer Cambridge University Nielsen Reid JOE President Trump Sheen Xi Jinping Newman Olympics Joan London
Pompeo Makes Unscheduled Trip to Iraq to Press U.S. Concerns About Iran

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:56 min | 3 years ago

Pompeo Makes Unscheduled Trip to Iraq to Press U.S. Concerns About Iran

"Been a busy few days of the US secretary of state, Mike Pompeo made an unscheduled visit to Iraq as tensions rise in the Middle East, then he popped over to London to reaffirm American warnings to the UK government about ties with China's telecoms giant Walli will warnings bahide. Let's speak not to Jacob park steady. Head of the US Ambi America's program at the think tank Chatham house Jacob will we'll get onto hallway in a second start with the Middle East, Mr. Pompeo turn of him Baghdad unexpectedly and a trip that was interpreted as an attempt to reassure the Iraqi government is these tensions rise over Iran. It's an attempt to reassure the Iraqi government, but in jersey away, it's all attempt to reaffirm America's preeminent place in the Iraqi sort of political system, which is going to be difficult because the US commitment to Iraq is at the end of very very long logistical chain where Iran shares a border with Iraq. Iran. Shares a religion with a substantial number of the Rockies. There are huge long standing cultural political ties, they're so Iran despite having a fraction of the overall economic military and political power of the United States on the global stage has much more directly leverage over rock than the United States dies at has in a much more long standing way US could eventually decide to reduce spread between the Middle East the wrong. They'll be there. So there's a fundamental. Disparity which goes against the broad power and Iran, and I think palm pales visiting the tempt to to try to shore up the US position in the face of that. I think his works out for him. Frankly, I think the the Iraqi government is obviously trying to balance between the two, but at the end of the day, they can read them out. And they understand that you know, that the people in their region are going to stand there region. In terms of influence, and and maintaining American influence and not just in Iraq different parts of the world. In order to go to Iraq, Mr. Pompeo, abruptly cancelled plans for meeting with Anglo Markle that didn't go down very well in Berlin. No, that's part and parcel with a broad deterioration in American German relations under the Trump administration. The president has clearly decided that uncle miracle is his foremost adversary in Europe that German cars or national security threat to the United States does arly that the the Germany is leveraging its position within the EU to wage economic war on on American manufacturing Americans in general, obviously, that's the some central misreading of situation if not outright abrogations, but the fact of the matter is that's bottled something's driving particular rain. And if the few a few Germans are thrown under it in the process, he doesn't really care. So I don't think palm pale has done any damage to his. His main constituency his boss, the president by angering the Germans, but the damage to American German pies in if there, and it's substantial on this is this is just part of this is it is it is Iran, which is seems to be dominating Fulton Washington. At the moment, we have the move to deploy Achraf carrier strike group to the Middle East. We have these concerns about security potential tax targeting American interests in the region. The US says we do not want war with Iran. But but it it doesn't give that impression by its

Iran United States Iraq Middle East Mike Pompeo Iraqi Government Jacob Park Ambi America President Trump Baghdad China London UK Telecoms Walli Anglo Markle Palm EU Europe
2018 in Review: Election Highs and Lows

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:57 min | 4 years ago

2018 in Review: Election Highs and Lows

"Unsurprisingly all things considered the citizens of many countries decided that it was time to put someone else in charge in two thousand eighteen but did they make the right choices on nonstop net. Extra jet that award hundred. I should is a military scientist author and research associate at so SS South Asia institute, she considered the decision of her country Pakistan to elect former cricketer Imran Khan as prime minister. He has really brought about a new generation of supporters and voters who are very grateful. Very intolerant. To give you an example in Karachi, Imran Khan recently made a speech saying that, you know, people in job who support Nevada schrief donkeys. And then what is body follow? As did the got hold of a real donkey in Karachi and beat it up to death. So it's violence. I mean, they're very Gresley. If you watched them in social media the foul he's foul mouth. So it's almost kind of fascism that he's bringing a new fascist flavor. That is bringing to politics. That's what's different. I don't think that the taste will change is just that a new make belief world has been. Created through media through narrative management, and in this the military has a large and to play giving the view from Mexico where voters bucked international trends by electing a left wing populist is Andre Rosenthal. A former deputy foreign minister of Mexico ambassador to the UK and Sweden Representative to the UN and now international consultant on Latin American affairs. I think the first thing new president Mexico has to do is to tell the truth campaigns are one thing, but once you're in office, and once you know, what the situation is regarding the checks and balances that you have either on the legislative side, or in the media or civil society, you need to tell Mexicans the truth. If you continue to promise all sorts of impossible things like free education for everybody know exams to get into university selling off the presidential air airplane fleet traveling by car everywhere giving up the president's residence and and living in his house or renting. Little house near the offices things like that those are very populist promises, which resonate with a group of people. But they are things he will not be able to fulfil. And therefore, I think at the end of the day, his first speech his first act as president elect, even before he takes office needs to be to begin to tell the truth one of the main themes of elections this year, wherever they were taking place was an increasing disconnect between the public and the politicians. It was no different in Iraq, which was long overdue. He is NPR's. Jane Arraf, people are incredibly disillusioned with politicians and not just politicians. The interesting thing is they're disillusioned with tribal leaders. They're disillusioned with religious leaders. So there's a lot of skepticism we've seen that reflected in the turnout results in the Iraqi election, for instance, and really a lot of cynicism about whether this group of politicians will. Be any better than the next group. Even though they talk a good game. And also in Iraq Renauld monsoon academy fellow with the Middle East and North Africa program at Chatham house. Well, it's been fifteen years and the Iraqis are asking fifteen years, what have these leaders done, the political tribal religious leaders? What have they done in terms of basic services in terms of employment and the answer they're coming up with is not much? And so the bigger gap in Iraqi society today isn't the gut between Kurds and Shia which is sort of defined post two thousand three Iraq. The biggest gap is the gap between the citizens and the elite between the rulers and the ruled many sort of people from bustling all the way up to slay. My NIA have very similar demands. So what you're seeing are the Shia protesting against their own leaders and Kurds protests against on Kurdish leaders. They're tired of identity politics. They know that any Iraq since two thousand and three Kurds Sunni and Shia leaders have all become wealthy at the expense of the majority of the population. Those are the citizens. But to go back to where we came in and to try to conclude review of two thousand eighteen on a note more positive than being mealy. Glad it's all over is it possible that the tunnel down, which we all traveling has a light at the end of it. And is it possible that that light has been illuminated accidentally by the most unlikely Pathfinder more presidential than any president that's ever held this office that I can Amy pope is associate fellow at the US and the Americas program at Chatham house and former deputy homeland security advisor to Barrack Obama. So she's not quick to jump to President Trump's defense. But is the even a glimmer of good news from his presidency? So far, I think it is the role of women in society. It is the election of so many women to congress, and it's the conversation that has been going on since his election about the metoo movement about the exploitation of young women beh-. Savior is that had pretty much been accepted for decades as long as women have been in the workforce are now front and center. And that's frankly in large part due to him the access Hollywood tape and comments about how he was treating women galvanized a conversation galvanized commitment from women to engage in public life. Women. I know who had no interest in politics are now organizing fundraisers getting out getting out the vote writing speaking. That's a great thing. And that is not that we've been trying to crack for many many years. And so I suppose hats off to Donald Trump for bringing the women to the table before to UCLA, Geoffrey Howard, Jeff any optimism for us. I think the way in which Trump may be an advertently making America greater again is by getting Americans to think seriously about the role of moral values in politics. And I think there's a long standing. Tenancy to think that when you go to the voting booth you're just going to vote for your own pocketbook devote for your own self interest. And I think that assumption is is under pressure and people are once again as in all the great moments of American history in the great moments in the history of any democracy taking seriously, the idea that the purpose of politics is to provide for certain basic rights and opportunities for all. And when our institutions are subverted in when they are not being dedicated to that proper purpose, it's important to hold political leaders accountable. So if the president is able to inadvertently reawakened in people a sense of moral commitment in passion in public life. That would be a terrific inadvertent achievement.

President Trump Iraq Karachi Imran Khan Chatham House Mexico America Donald Trump South Asia Institute Pakistan Jane Arraf Nevada Prime Minister Deputy Foreign Minister Scientist NPR UN Congress
Japan's new defense guidelines highlight military ambitions

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:38 min | 4 years ago

Japan's new defense guidelines highlight military ambitions

"Japan currently has an exclusively defense oriented, military, policy, and pacifist constitution. But now in the face of increased Chinese capability and aggression new guidelines of an issue, which may fundamentally change this. John Nelson right is a senior lecturer in East Asia at Cambridge University and an associate fellow at the Chatham house Asia program, John thanks for joining us this morning. The national defense program guidelines is a policy document that outlines the nation's defense objectives for the next decade. As such must address the new reality in the security landscape. And this was signed off today aircraft carriers seemed to be the most contentious part of this. Can you tell us what that contains? Yes. This is a commitment on the power to the Japanese government to reequip its existing destroys the clouds destroy to allow them to carry vertical takeoff aircraft in the past. They've used helicopters. And this is raise concerns and some quarters of this is effectively the beginning, Japan acquiring aircraft carriers the equivalent the government has been keen to challenge that association and the language that's being used describing these as so-called multi-purpose operation destroys reflects, I think sensitivity in Japan, and in the wider region about this enhancement of Japan's capabilities, but enhancement undoubtedly is these ships will not only have the capacity to be equipped with f thirty five fifth generation fighter planes purchased from the United States. But also, I understand. There will be some possibility that American planes might be deployed on these ships at some point. So there's no doubt that Japan is increasing its whose production capabilities, and it's increasing its digital work in a more flexible fashion with the United States to deal with the growing challenge particularly of China in the region. US driven. I mean aside from Trump's buy America policy Japan has a security treaty with the US which involves Japan providing defense in the US maintain strike capabilities. But I mean, neither in the present. At the present time have the firepower necessary to counter China the distance. This is why these these multipurpose vessels a needed. Is that correct? That's right. I mean, I think this is dealing with the basics reality. China's increasing defense capabilities in the East China Sea where of course, Japan and China have a territorial dispute over the so-called son, Cinco de L U islands. But also more broadly in the South China Sea. Where course, we know the China has been acquiring aggressive force protection capabilities. And of course, building its own out Fisher reefs as a means of asserting its maritime, dominance, Japan is worried about this. They point to China itself of courses, acquiring a aircraft. Carrier all of this. In addition with other elements in the national defense program guidelines designed to increase power capabilities not just aircraft carriers, but the acquisition acquisition of long range hypersonic missiles, all of this. I think is an attempt to deal with that basic news to TJ reality. Whether we should be concerned about it. I think is another question. Japan's defense constitution remains in place. Although prime minister, of course, is looking to revise it. And the attitude on the part of public opinion and critically, of course, other parties in Japan opposition parties and the government's own coalition partner. Komeito remain still very cautious validating the challenges that basic normative commitment to defensive security policy. Is the US in driving this? Well, the US is under Donald Trump. Of course, it has multiple objectives. You mentioned, of course, the economic relationship. That's hugely important. Mister obey is under real pressure from Donald Trump to sign a bilateral trade agreement. He's reluctant to do that. He's concerned that this will open up pressure on Japan to open up Integra, cultural sector, and as part of that we've seen in this new defense policy from Japan a commitment to buy American one hundred thirty five fighter planes at one hundred million dollars a piece that's a huge commitment in terms of financial outlays on the part of the Japanese government. The hope in Tokyo, this will offset some of that pressure from Donald Trump, whether willow not of course is another question.

Japan China United States Donald Trump Japanese Government South China Sea East China Sea East Asia Chatham House Asia Cambridge University Tokyo Senior Lecturer John Fisher Reefs Prime Minister TJ Komeito
What will House Democrats fight the Trump administration on first?

Monocle 24: Midori House

04:29 min | 4 years ago

What will House Democrats fight the Trump administration on first?

"Guest today are Jacob para killers deputy head of the US and America's program Chatham house, and Michael Goldfarb, the journalists and broadcast welcome both. And as promised an extended look tonight at the first US midterm elections that anybody bother candidates unusually punk tilles citizens and friendless cranks has ever cared about. Not for the first or last time president Donald Trump's in addressing effect on politics has not had quite the outcome. He might have desired. The Trump has failed the vote as a big victory. This is a little like hailing Eric Trump as a future Nobel prize winning physicist. I e an active heroin optimism, though, Trump's Republicans consolidated their grip on the Senate. They did lose the house of representatives that press conference from which we played a clip at the top of the show is ongoing as far as it's possible to tell Trump has not yet started hurling the actual furniture at the assembled journalists. It does seem to be only a matter of time. Jacob does Donald Trump actually have any reason to celebrate. I think the the Senate is I mean, he has reason celebrate it's not unpredictable reason celebrate the Democrats did pretty well in the Senate relative to the number of races that were actually up for election. Relative to where those elections were being held many of them being in states that went for Trump just two years ago that said the looks like depending on the outcome in Montana. Arizona it looks as though Mitch McConnell will be commanding at least fifty two and possibly fifty three or at a stretch fifty four votes, which means that he will have an even freer hand to pass through nominees from Trump, whether those are future cabinet officials federal judicial appointments even potential next supreme court Justice. So that is a reason celebrate and if he's thinking in longer term since the twenty twenty and twenty twenty two cycles quite as rosy for the Republicans. It gives them a little bit more leeway. It means that the Democrats have to work that much. Harder to take back the Senate and potentially face a second term, President Trump with a unified Democratic Congress. But the house is a disaster for him. There's no sugar coating that on which subject Michael that is the one thing we do definitely know for sure is that the Republican party no longer control the house of representatives. How constrained does? I mean, obviously constrains any president. But this particular president how constrained is he likely to be by Democratic Congress. Well, it depends first of all let me put a caveat in on any outsor- here. It depends on if if the Democrats can get themselves together and had some big if. And and behave in a you know, like they have a backbone, and it's not clear, you know, what? I mean, Nancy Pelosi is the speaker of the house in coming in in theory. But she may face the challenge, she's seventy eight she knows more about where everybody's skeletons are hanging, and that's very useful. But you know, there has to be a changing of the guard. Sometimes having said that let me answer your question. Andrew the house, oh has become the battleground going back twenty five years to nineteen ninety four when Newt Gingrich and led the Republican charge on the contract with America congress. Most people listening to this probably still in grade school when that happened, but it has more than set the tone for the following quarter-century. They have accumulated power in the house to do two things in a really important one is subpoena. Power. And I can I can envision a sequence where Robert Mueller who who's been. You're not related. We are not no he has been decorous point during this election because he's a decorous kinda guy. He's a Republican of the old school Mueller will eventually produce his report the Democrats control the house now, they control all the committees. If there's a question about banking. You will see subpoenas about banking? If there's a question about Trump's relationship with the Russians you will see the foreign relations committee subpoena hang him about that. They will tie her up in more paper than Donald Trump's lawyers used to tie up people trying to get paid by Donald Trump back in the days when he was just a real estate developer.

President Trump Chatham House Senate Democratic Congress Newt Gingrich Michael Goldfarb Robert Mueller United States America Republican Party Nancy Pelosi Deputy Head Mitch Mcconnell Jacob Heroin Nobel Prize Arizona
A guide to Zimbabwe's 1st post-Robert Mugabe election

Midday on WNYC

06:38 min | 4 years ago

A guide to Zimbabwe's 1st post-Robert Mugabe election

"Field Can't speak Just incredible I believe in a, good beat the guys Two on the biggest stage. Of all Three weeks Elsewhere Qatar has denied allegations in a British newspaper that it broke campaign rules by running a secret black operations campaign to sabotage rival bidders for the twenty twenty two. World Cup the Sunday Times says it has documents that show how Qatar used an American off and ex CIA agents to generate fake propaganda about. Its rivals the Nigerian football federation is investigation investigating an allegation of bribery against coach. Sallisaw Yousef the national team coach was caught, on camera taking cash for men posing as football agents who requested to be selected for a continental championship Yousef said the money was. A gift the players were selected on merit and he doesn't believe he's broken rules on accepting. Cash payments Riyadh Morris has limped out of Manchester City's pre season friendly against by Munich. And Miami the sixty million pound signing from LeicesteR was substituted with a, leg injury In the first half of a young city teams three two. Win over a strong by Munich side elsewhere Shaquille scored brilliant overhead kick on his. Liverpool debut in a four one friendly win, over Manchester United United manager Josie Marino defended the result by saying the lineup hey selected was not even thirty percent of his squad. On the line of August many of them are not going to be here so this is. Not this is not our squad reinforcements you are you are saying plays that old like. To buy I would like to add to the squad that's another thing But this is. Not my squad, this is not even off of, my squad this is not even thirty percent. Of my squad And, Lewis Hamilton was grateful for the wet conditions as an unexpected pole position. For today's Hungarian, Formula one. Grand prix his Mercedes teammate voluntary tasks, will start alongside him on the front, row of the grid Hamilton's nearest. Title rival Ferraris Sebastian rattle will start in. Fourth place but still believes that he can wait Tomorrow Zimbabwe. Is holding. Its first election since Robert Mugabe was ousted in, November. International election, monitors have been allowed in for the first time since two thousand and two knock stratego is from Zimbabwe, in the fellow, of the Africa program at Chatham house he's recently been in Zimbabwe and. He joins me now in. The, studio so nuts how important are, these first elections in post Mugabe's Zimbabwe Well I thank you very much for hosting. Me I'm this elections are really really critical a lot of people are feel? That is maybe the most important elections we've had, either since nineteen Eighty-one since two thousand for the first, time neither Mugabe or the late Morgan Tsvangirai contesting. So we're really going into. New territory here in terms of election, and this huge election fever in Zimbabwe yeah you were there just a few weeks. Ago. Can you, describe the scene there that you. Saw people? Are just so excited both in? The cities and in the rural areas? And both, both candidates have got a a big following but really in terms. Of what's happening in Zimbabwe now it's all about elections and with regard. To the actual elections a lot of it is really about the economy that's that's the number one issue exactly I mean excitement leads to too high expectations doesn't it no. Matter who wins this election, can they live up to those expectations I. Mean it. Really will be a big task to fix the economy Absolutely and that that may be I think that. Will be a challenge for. Who whoever wins whoever forms the next, government because they may be a crisis of expectation some really huge promises have been. Made. By all, contenders in this in this election. And that? They will fix the economy especially? The cash crisis within weeks or just? A couple, of months and it might take a little longer than that Yeah I mean. Unemployment is a massive problem as well isn't it Yes although bear. In mind a lot of Zimbabwe's, economy is in the informal sector so peop-. Some people actually working but a lot, of it is inform allies. But, in terms of the formal economy it has shrunk for sure now can you, just take us through the the two front. Runners. And. The election, just tell us a little bit about, them okay Well the the, two frontrunners are the current incumbent who's the president Emmerson, Mnangagwa who is Zanu PF he, was Robin is right and men mnangagwa's is. Positioning himself as a reformer he was, with them Gubbay but he's. He's, actually done quite a lot in terms of trying to bring the economy forwards MS Broughton is putting some new laws and. Legislation Against him is Nelson Chamisa who was Morgan, chunky rice right and is really courting the. Youth vote and bear in mind a lot of sixty around six percent. Of voters under forty five so China, says hoping to really get a an electoral bounce from from that but if I may just. Very quickly mentioned there are a lot. Of other contenders and they are for. Women presidential candidates contesting which, is a, I in Zimbabwean electoral history so there's a lot of new things happening in this. In this election so it's all to play for As you mentioned that size of a portrait portion of. The electorate is is quite young To the to the issues that, they care about are they different from do they differ from the rest of the electorate For the young of it is about jobs, because we have a situation where a lot. Of young people have got they have got to grease their well-qualified well. Educated but they've, been unable to find him claims so either they, leave the, country or they go into the informal sector so for them a lot of. Issues about who can? Provide jobs Shami says made a lot of promises And it remains to be seen whether he can. He can do that but even within. Zanu PF there's a strong youth element there as well so for the young people it's really about jobs in the sense of a future, within the country rather than outside okay excellent NextRadio, from the Africa program at Chatham house I. Know you're going to be staying with us in the next hour so. We'll be hearing, from you again for now it's coming up to, five thirty, GMT you're listening to weekend.

Zimbabwe Robert Mugabe Contesting Sallisaw Yousef Africa Qatar Chatham House Riyadh Morris Morgan Tsvangirai Munich Nigerian Football Federation Lewis Hamilton Bribery Zanu Manchester City CIA Shami Sebastian