8 Burst results for "Chatelaine magazine"

"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

08:10 min | 8 months ago

"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on The Big Story

"Like daytime lifestyle television tracy more started as host of city line twelve years ago. She was the first black woman to host a Canadian daytime lifestyle show the reaction to her debut was ugly comments said I notice Tracy keeps wearing tops that reveal her shoulders, her shoulders arms enhance look a bit masculine and feminine that Does Not Look Attractive at offer women. In my opinion scientists discovered when comparing white women to black women overall black women feature slightly more masculine features. Twelve years later though, tracy is still here. For Top female TV PERSONALITY TORONTO GOES TO Tracy Moore she's been talking about health and fashion and recipes, and everything else. You'd expect on that kind of show for more than a decade now. And today she's talking about anti-racism about white supremacy on a lifestyle show this day. When we talk about race people get squeamish. There are some who don't understand why we have a black history month in February or scowl at the idea of it. So we want to talk about it and about the reality of racism in Canada. Right. Now in twenty twenty in a space that's traditionally been considered out of bounds for anything political or difficult. and. How is that working out? What has it been like trying to find a way to be yourself and a space that the industry has? So often told you is not really for you how do you push these hard topics on to an audience that might not WanNa hear them an audience that might want this to be their safe-space well as it turns out, you just do it. Jordan he threw. This is the big story Tracy Moore is the host of city line. She also hosts a podcast on this network called city line real on race, and this month she graces the cover of Chatelaine magazine Tracy. What are these past few months been like for you exhausting it's been a mix of exhausting and I would say exhilarating I can't say that there has been. A time in my forty five years of living that I've ever seen this level of openness. When it comes to conversations around race, we've been talking about race I mean there's a black woman I've been very cognizant of race since about five years old maybe even before then and it's conversations that we've always had within our families and within the communities so to be having these conversations publicly. Is Pretty. Amazing. How much more? Direct are these conversations now than they've been in the past, I used to dance around them completely I think I've had so many situations where I was with people who were not black and anytime I would try and sort of innocuously just dip my toe into something around race. The response was always extreme fragility extreme defensiveness, dismissal trivialization. You learn really quickly that these aren't the sorts of conversations that people want to be having outside of your community. So. The conversations that we're having now are completely unprecedented. There's never been a time when we've had this openness of talking not just about police brutality, not just about anti black racism but all of the things that come along with the legacy of colonialism like Color Ism and feature is and microaggressions, and the conversation is way open than it's ever been. Does that apply to your show as well? Because you? Know, it's a it's a daytime lifestyle show, which is not typically the place that you find. You know really direct challenging conversations about race to be frank I mean maybe maybe I'm wrong about that. You are not wrong about that and as a matter of fact, as a daytime television host where we talk about paint projects and diy has to do with your kids and great recipes you can make with the family. It's been a very odd space for me to try and navigate. This has always been a huge part of my identity and it was not the sort of thing. That I could sort of show up at work with and right now there is a real will to have these conversations in show and because I've had so many years of trying to sort of have the separate bubbles. Social media is the place I would go to be very real about any issues that I feel very passionately about. In the show is the place where I went to make people smile now to have these worlds colliding is there is like a feeling of liberation with that. But. There's also always a feeling of me checking myself. Have we gone too far is the audience ready for this and what I found is I mean after speaking with my parents there late seventies, early eighties and we had a great panel discussion. We're back in studio about gender pronouns they said to me. Wow, tracy. That was amazing. We actually we learn something we didn't know we didn't know that they or their or them is a pronoun that. We should be actively using didn't know and I thought to myself why my underestimating the audience, the audience, these are smart people. These are intelligent people they can handle it, and if they have an intellectual argument against it, that's healthy. That's dialogue we can. We can have those conversations in show because I do feel it is sophisticated audience. So yeah, we're getting into it. We've talked about white privilege on the show which gets a lot of people's back up. we are going to be talking about colors on the show we have talked about representation of black and indigenous fashion brands. We've talked about representation of black and indigenous beauty brands. We've had a lot of conversations on the show that we wouldn't have had even a year ago, and I'm really proud of that when you talk about white privilege and other topics what kind of. Feedback do you got? We get a lot of denial my the response I. Get a lot is well, I don't see color I'm colorblind and that was how sort of we were raised in the eighties that was the thing to say that was the teacher said that was the thing principal said that was the thing that you heard caregivers. Why don't see I don't see that you're black. I need you to see that I'm black I. need you to understand don't treat me differently because of it, but I need you to understand that the world does their systems at play that are treating people differently they're different realities that exist all at the same time. There are different privileges that are allowing you to walk through life differently than I can walk in differently and they're not just racial their wealth privileges class privileges. They're all sorts of privilege exists out there, and we need to be very aware of where that privilege lies so that we can use it in order to. Make things a little bit more equitable if your audience has has largely responded to these conversations and they've been ready for them, why do you think that lifestyle journalism has traditionally been seen as kind of a really non-political space or even just as a woman space and these conversations haven't been happening there we haven't had the will we haven't had the global will to start waiting in to these areas and I. think that things flipped suddenly and so drastically after George Floyd's death I think we're in the middle of Cova D- I think that people were understanding this feeling of.

Tracy Moore TORONTO Canada George Floyd principal Jordan diy Cova
"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

09:33 min | 1 year ago

"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on The Big Story

"Work. I'm still really sick. Sometimes it takes two two times to do that with the medication so I gave him two thousand dollars more and then he's better and the next day he says and early on our relationship he said you know the only thing that really matters to him is his dog and his ex has his dog any wanted his dog. But that's because I have a dog and Anyway so the next day after his out of the hospital he says My Ex's coming through Toronto with my dog. Can you help me get to get my dog so I get him to Toronto and then he gets there and he says her flights delayed he has to stay overnight? He needs me to book them. A hotel so ibook on a hotel and he sends me an email with the last name back tour and I know a mess who bear so I asked. What's up with this? And he said Oh this is my business partners. Email and mine. We share it so he had march that tour on it when I knew a mess. March Huber and that was the first indication that I had been had. What did you do well Before I had dated him I researched him online but I couldn't find any documentation on him but I didn't have the right name right so now that it had this new name. I researched the name so he ghosted me after that so I never heard again from him after that conversation and researched them online and then I seen a facebook account for him and I was like. Oh my God. There's actually a facebook account so I look and that I my stomach sunk buried deep as I seen one word in. It said beware and it was a pitcher he had shown of him so. I knew it was his account. I sent a message to this person. I wasn't good at using facebook at that time and I didn't even know what Messenger was but Now I know how to use it but I sent a message and a person gets back to me and they actually come up on my screen. A picture of them which I've never had that happen before and they didn't actually know that they were on my screen they wanted to be left onerous but for some reason they came on my screen and she told me how she was taken for more than twice as much money as I was taken and she was very upset because she truly loved him and that you know my money was taken and I was mad but I wasn't in love and like her face was so upset and so I was impacted by her reaction and I'm a firefighter so I see a lot of death and destruction and stuff like that so then another person comes online. It's another lady who's even more devastated. And she lost around forty five thousand dollars and she was you know beside herself and just their faces and their reactions and it just made me really think. How dare he do this to one person much less more people and then? I thought I bet you. He's doing this all over the place. I'm going to start a campaign and this is where The tables start to kind of turn. So tell me what you did With the help of these other women who were also victimized by him at the very beginning. I wanted everyone to make sure they filed police reports and a lot of times. Because it's he said she said the police are kind of you know they don't really have too many laws that you can pin criminal activity on him if you if you gave him money so but we still want the information filed so that you know when we have fifteen or twenty people saying the same thing. Then that's not A. He said she said that is planned. Coordinated con artist so we filed with crime prevention Canada Crime Stoppers Canada Valor Candida. Then we started the media campaign so we had a big media blitz with TV newspaper radio. Chatelaine magazine just did a very nice Lengthy professional article just last week. You know we're going to continue on to try and keep this in the media. We have did an entire social media campaign and we have an automated form to collect information from victims. How many of you been in contact with so far At least a dozen a dozen. Yeah with the last Chatelaine article we got to so. It's not just women. It's not just romance scam. We have some gentlemen that were offered courses to get onto the oil rigs to work on the oil rigs and he left with their money. There's two immigrants in different provinces so the tricky part is he has victims in multiple provinces. So it's hard for people to be connected and different languages as well so. The website created is bilingual and That was difficult because I'm not French but hopefully it's good enough to so another scam as is. He has people that speak English as a second language or really. Don't even speak English very well. He befriends them. Offer them an employment contract and then goes to the bank and says he's going to get them on his company Credit Card and his company bank line of Credit and instead he goes on there's and then he charges up their accounts and before they know it. They don't even know where the mail is going. They don't even know that this has happened until it's far too late. And everything is overdrafted. So with a dozen victims Some romance scams as you mentioned but also job in and bank scams Investment Scams to he wrote a forty five thousand dollar check to somebody for an investment. And have we found him? Where is he is he on the run so we found him in Ontario after the media campaign so the media's been outstanding the they have supported us since last March when we decided to take action you know to go from victims to survivors so we found him in Ontario and we called the police but the police said they could not arrest him in Ontario because his warrants for Quebec and Winnipeg? Wow and we just thought if you had a warrant a candida that it would be good for all of Canada but it is not the case So we have to catch him in Providence. He has a warrant so that makes it a little more trickier because he moves around. So do you know like where he is right now but nothing can be done? Is that what's going on No we're not one hundred percent no areas. We found him again in the summer and we found him. Abc and on our website to stop the march madness dot com. We have a video clipping of our encounter with him It wasn't a planned encounter So it didn't go as we as we would have liked it to go but thome out so One of the girls just ran into him. Just walking through a door and You know she she asked him you know where her money wise and everything and he was at the Salvation Army in BC and He worked there so they they allowed him to go inside and kept her outside in between the double doors so by the time the police got there and everything got straightened out. He had escaped out the second story window out. The back of the Salvation Army was away. Yes it is crazy you know. I had told the ladies if they go around. Look for him. You better bring all the copies of the warrants that you have because people will just think you're a woman scorned right rather than a somebody who's really been taken advantage of and that's why it took so long to straighten everything out it's unfortunate but You know we think we have a lead on them. Now we're not gonNA talk about it because We have a plan and so we're not done yet. We have a couple of plants. Hopefully the media will let us know if they see him anywhere. You know he always goes to Tim Hortons. We have pictures and videos of him on our websites. Stop the March Madness. Dot Com and Hopefully they share the stories with their family and friends because the next victim could be somebody they know what we will share your story and the website and you'll have to let us know if you get any leads and manage to find him on the right province. I know well yes so we need to change the law right. The law needs to you. Know if it's somebody who's had multiple offenses than the law there needs to be a law for that and there isn't and the police can't just you know make up something and arrest people. So yeah thank you for sharing your story with US Andrea Vat was Andrea Speranza. And of course that was the big story if you would like more we keep them all locked in our digital box at the Big Story. Podcasts DOT CA. The boxes actually locked. It's free for anybody. You can also talk to us on twitter at the big story. Fbn You can also add the big story F. B. N. When anyone asks you for podcast recommendation just like Florida. Loyd did thank you Florida. Great name you can also find us in every single podcast application. You could ever want to us as always give us a rating. Give us a review. Give us five stars by back against the trolls. Thanks for listening. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. We'll talk tomorrow..

facebook Toronto Salvation Army Ontario Chatelaine magazine Florida March Huber twitter Jordan Heath Rawlings candida Loyd thome Tim Hortons Canada F. B. N. Abc Winnipeg Andrea Vat Providence
"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"Life. Stay a to welcome to the podcast. I'm your host drew pruitt and in this series each week we invite a new guest who we think can help you improve your brain health. Feel better and live more. This week's guest on the podcast is a new friend of mine jennifer. Glory jennifer was the parent expert on on c._b._s.'s steven chris show for eight seasons and has appeared frequently on canada a._m. And breakfast television her advice can be found in many canadian and u._s. Magazines such as today's parent redbook parent magazine and canadian family she's also on the health advisory board for chatelaine magazine her entertaining workshops and insightful strategies shared with warmth and humor make her a highly sought after speaker with schools corporations and agencies throughout north america jennifer has been helping children teens and families get connected for over over twenty years jennifer welcome to the brain pocket him very excited to be here and i want to thank our mutual friends stephanie the s._e._o. Thank you for introducing introducing us and they told me a little story of how your work held them but we're gonna save for okay all right and say that for later on i wanna start off with you are origin story because you have such unique background of experiences that led to this methodology that uses them not only with parents and in kids and teenagers but also for just human beings who are looking to improve their relationships so take us back to to this time period where you started off your career as a social worker and you found yourself working with what people would say would be troubled teens. Yes absolutely so this is going way back. This is probably going back almost thirty years ago. I finished my undergraduate degree in psychology and i wanted to do something real. I wanted to get out there with real families and real kids and make a difference..

jennifer pruitt c._b._s. advisory board steven chris canada thirty years twenty years
"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

09:45 min | 2 years ago

"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on The Big Story

"Hey, it's Jordan, and I've podcast for you. Commons is Canada's most popular podcast about politics last season. They tried to answer the question how corrupt is Canada this time around. They're investigating our national addiction oil the currency's and featuring host Arshi man is called crude. And it's about Canada's relationship with the oil industry. The good the bad the ugly and the weird you'll find Commons wherever you get your podcasts. So go check it out. When we cover climate change, and we do cover climate change on this podcast. We get feedback. We get Email. We get responses on social media, and we get reviews, and I'm going to describe for you, the two typical replies. I is probably familiar. It is pessimistic and depressing. We have destroyed the earth with our greed. There's no point in even having children the predictions are catastrophic. And they're getting worse. It's already too late and our leaders don't care and fair enough. Lord knows I do feel that way. Sometimes more often recently. In fact, the second type of response, and this usually comes on social media is either denial or anger this winter was freezing. So how can this be true? Scientists are fudging the data the earth has been warmer than this and cool to gain in the past and any way I didn't cause climate change. Personally. What does the government expect me to pay for? And no, I don't understand that. Response, but I also don't engage within because I have learned that nothing. Good comes of yelling at people about how wrong they are on the internet. So we sat down last week after another set of bad news stories that you may have heard and we asked ourselves not how we should cover the latest round of awful climate news. But if there was a way to discuss this issue that would help us have a better conversation. If we could find a way to focus on the issue that would help those among us who are despairing find some hope and would also offer an olive branch and an invitation to talk to the people who just don't want to believe because honestly right now, not wanting to believe can feel kind of understandable. Today's discussion is our attempt to do that. And today's guest is the perfect person for it. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Catherine Heyhoe is a climate scientist, she's a Canadian who's working as a professor at Texas Tech. And she is the guest editor of this month's edition of Chatelaine magazine. Of all the magazines to guest at it as a climate scientist, why a lifestyle magazine, my favorite thing to do is talk about climate change in places in an outlets where you would never expect it so people think of climate change as this green issue, or this environmental issue or increasingly this political issue, but climate change affects every aspect of our lives. And the choices we make in every aspect of our lives can go a long way towards helping us fix this problem. So in that sense where better to talk about this then in a lifestyle magazine. So give me a sense. And maybe from a broader perspective, but maybe if you have some specific examples of the way lifestyle choices can actually make an impact because we do talk about climate change every few weeks here because it's always a big story now, and one of the things that always comes up is that the little things sometimes feel too small to make a difference and the big things feel impossible that is exactly it. And so if we feel like nothing we do will ever. Ever make a difference. Then why even talk about it because it just gets depressing? Yeah. And so so what is where is there a sweet spot? I guess where you can do some things that won't, you know, won't make you change your lifestyle and move off the grid and start, you know, using one hundred percent recycled everything, but also aren't just insignificant things that actually do make a a measurable difference. Yeah. There. Absolutely. Are so often we have that perception of while, you know, if I really wanted to live in environmentally friendly life. I would move up to the Yukon and go off the grid. But the reality is I live in Toronto Montreal Vancouver or Edmonton. And that's not the way that my life is structured or set up to be. So what can I do interestingly, I think one of the most effective things that every single person can do whether they're a student or somebody who rents so they can't make a lot of changes even in their light bulbs little in their home. Whether we feel like it's really out of our budget to go with something super fancy like plugging car. No matter who you are. And where we. Live the number one most important thing that we can do about this issue is talk about it. Because surveys have showed that hardly anybody actually has a conversation about it. Because maybe we're afraid it might start an argument with uncle Joe or next door neighbor or often, we're just afraid it would be depressing. We don't have anything positive or constructive to say. And so we don't talk about it. And here's the connection if we don't talk about it. Why would we want to do anything about it? And if we don't want to do anything about it. Why would we make changes in our own lives? And why would we encourage others to do so too so talking, but it is really the most important thing. But not the science little details. Rather talking about what we talk about in the Chatelaine issue. How is climate change affecting our lives today in the places where we live if we live in the Maritimes if you live in BC, if we live in the prairies, if we lived in cities, if we live out in the country, if we live up in the Arctic how is it affecting our lives today, first of all as Canadians and then second of all. What are some things that we can do to fix it? And there's a whole range so there's individual lifestyle choices one of the most important things. We can do individually is step on the carbon scales. Google carbon footprint calculator and fill in your life. And it will tell you where the biggest bang for your buck is so for some of us if we live out in the suburbs, and we commute downtown on. We drive ourselves. It might be our commuting. That is actually the biggest part of our footprint for others of us. It's what we eat. If we eat very beef and meat intensive diets to route three times a day that contributes a lot to heat trapping gas emissions for me, the biggest part of my carbon footprint was my flying. Because I live down in Texas all my family's up in Toronto and Ontario. I also travel around to talk to people about climate change. And so I've been investing very heavily the last couple years in trying to transition I'm actually up to about three quarters of my talks to virtual talks online. And then when I do travel somewhere to give talks I make sure I have a bunch of them lined up. I was just in Indiana this past week, and I had seven talks and ate more meetings. That I didn't four days it was a lot of work, but the carpet per print of each individual event was actually quite low. What's the biggest problem that you see when you're trying to convince people that they really need to take this seriously and make those changes in their lifestyle. What do they doubt? Well, we often think that they doubt the science that the idea that somehow science is a matter of opinion, I can decide whether it's real or not. And if you follow the headlines, especially listening to politicians, you would certainly think that's the case because that's a lot of the talking points that they use. I just don't believe that stuff. It's just not real. But when we actually look at polling data across Canada and the US cross North America, we see that actually most people agree climate is changing and most people agree. It will affect plants and animals and future generations and polar bears where the rubber hits the road, though, is almost none of us think it's going to affect us personally. So it's something. That sure I would like to care about it for future generations or people in developing countries. But if it's not gonna affect me in the places where I live my family my community. Why does it matter? So I really do think that the most dangerous myth that the largest number of people have bought into is it doesn't matter to me. And if it ever does get serious or dangerous than somebody else is gonna fix it for us. Tell me a little bit about how you have those conversations with people you're a Canadian climate scientists in Texas, how did those conversations go? Do you meet a lot of climate change resistance? I think we have the stereotype up here. The Texas is deeply conservative. And there are a lot of people there who don't believe in climate change it is. And there are a lot of people who are very suspicious of the science. But today it's gotten to the point where almost anyone can point to some way in which climate is changing around them. Whether it's hurricanes getting stronger with a lot more rainfall associated with them whether it's wildfires burning out of control, greater and greater area record breaking floods or heatwaves people. Point two, something unusual. That's happening today. So today, many more people are curious even down here in Texas, then ten years ago, when we first moved here, I'm getting calls from landowners, and farmers and producers and water managers and people who are traditionally very conservative. But they want information on what's happening. So that's kind of a clue where to begin a conversation. Whether it again is with a family member, a friend colleague neighbor or somebody in our city or area who we want to talk about about making a difference begin the conversation not with something that you most disagree on. But begin the conversation was something that you most agree on. And if you don't know what that would be will then spend some time getting to know that person or that group. I figure out what makes them tick. What do they value? What's important to them? Start the conversation with something that you genuinely share with them. And then connect the dots because we both live in this location because we are both parents because we both are fiscal conservatives who care about. The economy because of who we are. Then actually were we already care about climate change. We just might not realize it because if we are person who cares about the place where

Texas Canada Jordan heath Rawlings scientist Toronto Chatelaine magazine Texas Tech Google Lord Indiana editor Catherine Heyhoe Joe North America professor Edmonton
How we can find common ground on climate change

The Big Story

09:14 min | 2 years ago

How we can find common ground on climate change

"When we cover climate change, and we do cover climate change on this podcast. We get feedback. We get Email. We get responses on social media, and we get reviews, and I'm going to describe for you, the two typical replies. I is probably familiar. It is pessimistic and depressing. We have destroyed the earth with our greed. There's no point in even having children the predictions are catastrophic. And they're getting worse. It's already too late and our leaders don't care and fair enough. Lord knows I do feel that way. Sometimes more often recently. In fact, the second type of response, and this usually comes on social media is either denial or anger this winter was freezing. So how can this be true? Scientists are fudging the data the earth has been warmer than this and cool to gain in the past and any way I didn't cause climate change. Personally. What does the government expect me to pay for? And no, I don't understand that. Response, but I also don't engage within because I have learned that nothing. Good comes of yelling at people about how wrong they are on the internet. So we sat down last week after another set of bad news stories that you may have heard and we asked ourselves not how we should cover the latest round of awful climate news. But if there was a way to discuss this issue that would help us have a better conversation. If we could find a way to focus on the issue that would help those among us who are despairing find some hope and would also offer an olive branch and an invitation to talk to the people who just don't want to believe because honestly right now, not wanting to believe can feel kind of understandable. Today's discussion is our attempt to do that. And today's guest is the perfect person for it. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Catherine Heyhoe is a climate scientist, she's a Canadian who's working as a professor at Texas Tech. And she is the guest editor of this month's edition of Chatelaine magazine. Of all the magazines to guest at it as a climate scientist, why a lifestyle magazine, my favorite thing to do is talk about climate change in places in an outlets where you would never expect it so people think of climate change as this green issue, or this environmental issue or increasingly this political issue, but climate change affects every aspect of our lives. And the choices we make in every aspect of our lives can go a long way towards helping us fix this problem. So in that sense where better to talk about this then in a lifestyle magazine. So give me a sense. And maybe from a broader perspective, but maybe if you have some specific examples of the way lifestyle choices can actually make an impact because we do talk about climate change every few weeks here because it's always a big story now, and one of the things that always comes up is that the little things sometimes feel too small to make a difference and the big things feel impossible that is exactly it. And so if we feel like nothing we do will ever. Ever make a difference. Then why even talk about it because it just gets depressing? Yeah. And so so what is where is there a sweet spot? I guess where you can do some things that won't, you know, won't make you change your lifestyle and move off the grid and start, you know, using one hundred percent recycled everything, but also aren't just insignificant things that actually do make a a measurable difference. Yeah. There. Absolutely. Are so often we have that perception of while, you know, if I really wanted to live in environmentally friendly life. I would move up to the Yukon and go off the grid. But the reality is I live in Toronto Montreal Vancouver or Edmonton. And that's not the way that my life is structured or set up to be. So what can I do interestingly, I think one of the most effective things that every single person can do whether they're a student or somebody who rents so they can't make a lot of changes even in their light bulbs little in their home. Whether we feel like it's really out of our budget to go with something super fancy like plugging car. No matter who you are. And where we. Live the number one most important thing that we can do about this issue is talk about it. Because surveys have showed that hardly anybody actually has a conversation about it. Because maybe we're afraid it might start an argument with uncle Joe or next door neighbor or often, we're just afraid it would be depressing. We don't have anything positive or constructive to say. And so we don't talk about it. And here's the connection if we don't talk about it. Why would we want to do anything about it? And if we don't want to do anything about it. Why would we make changes in our own lives? And why would we encourage others to do so too so talking, but it is really the most important thing. But not the science little details. Rather talking about what we talk about in the Chatelaine issue. How is climate change affecting our lives today in the places where we live if we live in the Maritimes if you live in BC, if we live in the prairies, if we lived in cities, if we live out in the country, if we live up in the Arctic how is it affecting our lives today, first of all as Canadians and then second of all. What are some things that we can do to fix it? And there's a whole range so there's individual lifestyle choices one of the most important things. We can do individually is step on the carbon scales. Google carbon footprint calculator and fill in your life. And it will tell you where the biggest bang for your buck is so for some of us if we live out in the suburbs, and we commute downtown on. We drive ourselves. It might be our commuting. That is actually the biggest part of our footprint for others of us. It's what we eat. If we eat very beef and meat intensive diets to route three times a day that contributes a lot to heat trapping gas emissions for me, the biggest part of my carbon footprint was my flying. Because I live down in Texas all my family's up in Toronto and Ontario. I also travel around to talk to people about climate change. And so I've been investing very heavily the last couple years in trying to transition I'm actually up to about three quarters of my talks to virtual talks online. And then when I do travel somewhere to give talks I make sure I have a bunch of them lined up. I was just in Indiana this past week, and I had seven talks and ate more meetings. That I didn't four days it was a lot of work, but the carpet per print of each individual event was actually quite low. What's the biggest problem that you see when you're trying to convince people that they really need to take this seriously and make those changes in their lifestyle. What do they doubt? Well, we often think that they doubt the science that the idea that somehow science is a matter of opinion, I can decide whether it's real or not. And if you follow the headlines, especially listening to politicians, you would certainly think that's the case because that's a lot of the talking points that they use. I just don't believe that stuff. It's just not real. But when we actually look at polling data across Canada and the US cross North America, we see that actually most people agree climate is changing and most people agree. It will affect plants and animals and future generations and polar bears where the rubber hits the road, though, is almost none of us think it's going to affect us personally. So it's something. That sure I would like to care about it for future generations or people in developing countries. But if it's not gonna affect me in the places where I live my family my community. Why does it matter? So I really do think that the most dangerous myth that the largest number of people have bought into is it doesn't matter to me. And if it ever does get serious or dangerous than somebody else is gonna fix it for us. Tell me a little bit about how you have those conversations with people you're a Canadian climate scientists in Texas, how did those conversations go? Do you meet a lot of climate change resistance? I think we have the stereotype up here. The Texas is deeply conservative. And there are a lot of people there who don't believe in climate change it is. And there are a lot of people who are very suspicious of the science. But today it's gotten to the point where almost anyone can point to some way in which climate is changing around them. Whether it's hurricanes getting stronger with a lot more rainfall associated with them whether it's wildfires burning out of control, greater and greater area record breaking floods or heatwaves people. Point two, something unusual. That's happening today. So today, many more people are curious even down here in Texas, then ten years ago, when we first moved here, I'm getting calls from landowners, and farmers and producers and water managers and people who are traditionally very conservative. But they want information on what's happening. So that's kind of a clue where to begin a conversation. Whether it again is with a family member, a friend colleague neighbor or somebody in our city or area who we want to talk about about making a difference begin the conversation not with something that you most disagree on. But begin the conversation was something that you most agree on. And if you don't know what that would be will then spend some time getting to know that person or that group. I figure out what makes them tick. What do they value? What's important to them? Start the conversation with something that you genuinely share with them. And then connect the dots because we both live in this location because we are both parents because we both are fiscal conservatives who care about. The economy because of who we are. Then actually were we already care about climate change. We just might not realize it because if we are person who cares about the place

Texas Chatelaine Magazine Toronto Lord Texas Tech Jordan Heath Rawlings Google Scientist Indiana Editor Catherine Heyhoe JOE North America Canada Professor Edmonton Maritimes
"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on The Big Story

"Hey, it's Jordan all this week leading up to International Women's Day on Friday. We're bringing you stories of amazing women issues of a quality and sexism and discussions that we need to be having. We just don't need me to lead them. So please enjoy the work of my supremely talented colleagues. I'll be back next week. We'll talk then. Metoo in late twenty seventeen. There's been a lot of conversation and increased awareness about what constitutes sexual assault and harassment, but a recent article in the Toronto Star made me realize how much work is still left to be done in the piece working wealth reporter Stara mushed ahead Sawday explores how interiors workplace safety and insurance board defines or more. Precisely doesn't define harassment as laid out in twenty eighteen ruling on a chronic mental health claim I found it to be shocking. And I think you will too. I'm Maureen Helou shot editor in chief of Chatelaine magazine in today for Jordan heath Rawlings on the week of International Women's Day. This is the big story. Or background in two thousand eighteen the WS IB extended benefits to workers who had gotten sick after long-term harassment or trauma on the job, which sounds really great on the offset. But then you hear about a two thousand eight audit on chronic mental health claims and that paints a bit of a different story that even though they are looking at these claims now and looking at them retroactively are they really approving any of them. Yes. So this is a new policy that the board introduced earlier in two thousand eighteen and since that time the numbers show that they've denied ninety four percent of chronic mental stress claims. So it's very difficult although workers do now have the right to claim for mental injuries. As a result of long-term harassment or other issues in their workplace the ability to actually win something for it. Whether it's benefits or medical treatment. Don't is is pretty elusive for a lot of people, and what's the process for filing for chronic mental health stress claims so w s I b has three criteria that you have to meet so one of them is you obviously need to be diagnosed by health professional as having a mental health issue. The second is that you have to be able to show that it's related to your work place. And then you also have to be able to show that the workplace was actually the predominant cause of your mental health issues. So the critics of the policies say like, yes, it's great that workers are now entitled to chronic mental stress, but the tasks that they have to meet for a lot of people is pretty insurmountable. And it's actually different than the test that workers have to meet when they have a physical injury. And you have a physical injury. You have to show to the board that the workplace was. Int- contributing factor. But it doesn't need to be the predominant cause of your disability or injury. So yeah, the critics of the Krahn chronic mental health policies say this speaks to a pretty outdated view of mental health as as being somehow different than than a physical disability or or injury. Who is Marjorie were dull, can you tell us a bit about her and her claims to the WS IB? Yeah. So the claims date back to set of incidents where I guess a series of behaviors that took place in the ninety s actually so I'm standing back quite a while now. But essentially, she was a was a public works worker with then the city of new peon, I believe that she was the first woman to hold this kind of job as a heavy machinery.

harassment International Women Jordan heath Rawlings Marjorie Maureen Helou Chatelaine magazine Toronto Star Stara mushed editor in chief assault reporter Sawday ninety four percent
"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on The Female Insight Zone

The Female Insight Zone

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on The Female Insight Zone

"Actually created my own human potential summoner series which i ran nationally across canada and i had discovered house channel on borgen and chatelaine magazine in a lot of corporate partners and ran ass successfully for about six years that few things happen in my life that weren't so fun and from that i had to really decide what i wanted to do and how i wanted to leave with my life from that place and has a near death experience had a romance that went south and then i walked away from the million dollars of investor to bill this seminar series out in the us and so from that then i got into taking some coaching training and really decided that helping others really access mules potential from the place of ease versus stress was the direction i wanted to go in so because of the near death experience that you had did that give you a different change in perspective and i don't know if you wanna talk about what happened but if you want to share with us what happened and then how that coordinated with the love lost in all of that did that change your perspective and get you into this position that you're in right now sure i'd like to say that nothing changed but everything changed so i literally had secured a million dollar investor and that i got off for lunch with some a couple of friends and i was training for half marathon at that point which was not a big deal and i was always super super healthy and a pass out a couple times after training for the half marathon and so obviously was got checked out the doctor said no you're fine just got to mentioned your plate now it's like well i think there's something more going on i ended up housing at one day in ended up in the hospital and ended up the pacemaker in my chest which.

canada us million dollars million dollar six years one day
"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on Safe Space

Safe Space

12:19 min | 3 years ago

"chatelaine magazine" Discussed on Safe Space

"You're listening to a metro podcast. Always. Welcome to save space. A podcast about the news, politics, pop culture, and anything else that comes up. My name is Mel Darrow. I'm a writer for BuzzFeed news and I'm Vicky China. The national columnist for MetroNews. We are creating a safe space here for bad takes every single week. We are joined by a couple friends who help us make sense of the world. We are joined remotely this week by Hillary Beaumont a reporter for vice news and joining us in studio is returning champion. Sarah Bosvelt senior writer for Chatelaine magazine. Welcome guys. Thanks for having us. This week. The federal government announced a plan to send Canadian peacekeepers Tamale a west Africa nation that has been in the middle of a complicated civil war since twenty twelve in twenty thirteen the French intervened. And since then UN peacekeeping force has maintained a tenuous peace. Nonetheless. Molly remains the most violent of the UN sixteen peacekeeping missions. One hundred sixty two peacekeepers who are known colloquially as blue helmets because they wear blue helmets have been killed over the past five years, Canada will be sending up to two hundred and fifty soldiers and four helicopters to serve as armed escort for other aircraft. Now, upping the number of peacekeepers has been a major promise for Justin Trudeau who said he was going to contribute at some point up to six hundred peacekeepers in nearly half a billion dollars to the UN's peacekeeping efforts, which you know is sort of a standard liberal promise. But you know, Canada has affectively been out of the peacekeeping game in a major way. Is this move just sort of nostalgia for the better days of our peace. Or is there more at stake here? Sarah? What do you think? Well, it's been really interesting how little we've heard about the military from the Trudeau government except for in the gender diversity lens. That's been a huge focus. Let's get more women into the military. Let's get more people caller into the military indigenous people and that kind of lines with the other message. We hear a lot more from the chew government, which is the gender message, but of course, heading into twenty nineteen. They really do need to take action on some of the promises that they've made and also put forward a plank that they can prepare for their election platform that they're taking military presence on the world stage seriously. Peacekeeping really has not been a focus as you say, you know, I just was looking at a list of the recent missions and they're, they're all in African countries. There. You know since Afghantistan there's really just been sort of small ventures here and there in Mali's an interesting choice because as you. I said, you know, quite dangerous, quite complicated mining interests in Mali, which interested me. It's an interesting move to send so few as well and to only send them in helicopter zone. And I think the big criticism of the the liberal government has been too many fact-finding missions with little action, a lot of dragging their heels and so not a ton of hopping on that front. So I think time is running out for them to actually show that they're, they're infamous game and that they're serious about humanitarian missions at they're serious about being a leader on the peacekeeping world stage. There's an ISIS presence there too, and so that's important to show for the election that they have some kind of presence on that front in the international realm. So you know, I think that's kind of maybe whether doing behind the scenes is going on but are, but are kinda mix them moves here. One thing that I found striking looking into this is that you know as much as we associate Canada with peacekeeping the top ten contributors to peacekeeping missions are all poor countries. They are places like Bangladesh, Rwanda, India, Pakistan, Nepal is our reputation even earned. When was the last time candidate truly was a peacekeeping nation. I think that's a great question. Because since you know since our engagement actually in Somalia, which is really CANADA'S last big agent in Africa candidates presence in the peacekeeping stage has been substantially lessen in Somalia for good reason, which is basically we send a whole bunch of white supremacists very African nation. But you know, we've decreased presence and different governments have had different rationales for doing so, but this is the lowest we've ever been present in the peacekeeping world. And I think a lot of people heard Trudeau, say, Canada is back the global community waited for some sort of symbol of Canada being back. And I think this is one way in which that's happening. Sarah, I think it's really interesting that you brought up the presence of gender diversity, and that's one way we've been approaching all of our international policy. There's a headline here that I think I'd love clarity from you on. In. It's in the Toronto Star. It's Canadian Press story says that CANADA'S Molly mission will emphasize deployment of female peacekeepers. Interesting. Well, they have to send women abroad if they're going to actually kind of walk the talk on, you know how the value of women in in the military, right? Like so what I found when I reported on their efforts to market that to women was that they really did emphasize that you're not necessarily going to be, you know, kept away from the front lines. You know, you're not necessarily a cook in the back kitchen. You are, if you want to be those opportunities are there. But if you really want to be in the infantry right there with with a weapon, in your hand, you know, with the possibility of fire coming out you about as an opportunity that they wanna give to him in because they're trying to emphasize that those skill sets that women can bring to the table are actually really helpful tactically as well. Thinking about things a little bit different. Than maybe men have been accustomed to doing and socialize to do. You know, I met some women the summer this past summer who would totally be very excited to climb in a helicopter and be on this mission in Mali, you know, and they're, they're, they're doing some. They're making some good ground on on that recruitment effort. All the girls that I talked to pretty much except for maybe like a few of them where actually signing some of them were really interested in that frontline experience too. So I think the messaging is working. And I think also if they're if they're taking the seriously and they are sending women on this mission that is actually really helping that message that they're trying to send Hillary anything you wanted to jump in on. I want to echo something she said earlier. So I, I think we should be really careful to not view CANADA'S announcement of of this deployment as altruistic because of, you know, Canadian mining interest in the region. So they've invested over a billion in Mali's mining industry and also we know that Canada. Needs to look like a peacekeeping peacekeeping nation at a time, but the US is increasingly nationalistic. So yeah, we shouldn't just be thinking, this is humanitarian thing CANADA'S already spent a billion over the last decade in Molly. So we know that this is kind of a continuation of that and the helicopters I, I had heard on ABC they're, they're just replacing the German helicopters that are being withdrawn so and with the whole mission being just a year, I'm kind of just wondering this pretty modest or for mission for an incredibly complicated situation. And I guess like my biggest question is, what is our definition of success in Mali for this mission and what's the Scopus one show I, I really just think that parliament, new food to bait and defined this Google mission to avoid mission creep, and we need to know like what success looks like when it's over, what can we actually expect kind of other. A question around this is you know about the danger CHU CHU plumbing around, but also to the danger to locals there. Right. I'm kind of wondering what is in place now that would have prevented what happened in Tamale. So I my understanding is that Canadian soldiers who were in Somalia nineteen Ninety-three on a UN peacekeeping mission, HUD, tortured, uh, Tamale teenager to death, and there wasn't a public inquiry after that, but I just wonder, you know, what is there to prevent that from happening again, this is the most dangerous UN mission the world. What is there to prevent, you know, hostage situations for soldiers or peacekeepers on the ground because we know that Boko haram and other groups are really notorious for kidnapping ransom and to need in diplomats were hidden out in two thousand nine. So I'm just kind of like either just questions around safety for both people on the ground and troops or peacekeeping force like many peace keeping forces globally does not have. A good reputation. There is a twenty sixteen report from the UN that named twenty one countries with credible allegations of sexual exploitation, abuse by peacekeepers in twenty fifteen sixteen cases alone. In two of those cases are actually Canadian police peacekeepers who had served in Haiti, although the government Canadian government is aware of many more going back, many more years. So our reputation there isn't strong. But I think the idea is that if you have more women police officers who are peacekeepers warm, women who are in the military as peacekeepers than you may have a a calming effect, or you have a sort of a more positive effect on what's happening in the entire peacekeeping force. And I think that's why candidates messages pro-women seems rather odd. I think Israel you were talking about how there was a tweet during the election about like conservative say, you know, build more jails and liberal save. You know how female jail guards, you know, that's what it sounds like. But I think the idea is to outta level of calm out a little bit more against a female touch to what can feel. Combat, but is actually peacekeeping. That's that's the cultural strategy overall with the military, right? Because they reason they started operation honor, which is their big strategy to get ten percent more women into the military in ten years. And that's what I did piece for Chatelaine relief talking about a marketing the military to women because that is their huge goal. That's a big piece of that goal. If they're going to actually increase the the number of women in the forces, they have to really try harder to get them in. And the reason they want to increase the women in the forces to have is to is to make sure that they can get rid of the high levels of sexual misconduct in the military, which is is higher proportion to the rest of Canadian society. So you know that that is their their whole goal. So I came in, you know, with shot Elaine to to imbed myself with some of the women who are joining the this program that the military created to to have them. Just hang out, learn about the military, meet women who are working military ten days sleepover military camp thing. Yeah, it was. It was really just like, come on the base hang out with us. We'll basically do career tourism for you. We'll show you like the big military kitchen will show you how to use a gun how to climb up on some tanks, do the the military fitness test just to show them that they can do it and also talking a lot about why it's valuable that they're there. And the major reason they said that it's valuable there is to change the culture because the culture up until recently in the news, there's been a lot of bad stories about the culture really highly sexualize, really sexist. Really not valuing women as human beings like they were mistreated and not seen as worthy because they were not men. So that's a whole liberal strategy is to to change that by getting more women in, you know, and that's actually the attitude. A lot of women left with was like. Millimeter way to make things better is to maybe join in. Okay. Well, I think we have to leave the discussion right there, but you should check out Sarah's peace and Chatelaine. It's marketing the military to women. And yeah, it's available online. So have read.

Canada UN Sarah Bosvelt Mali Justin Trudeau Somalia Hillary Beaumont Chatelaine magazine Mel Darrow writer federal government liberal government Toronto Vicky China reporter Molly Canadian government US ABC Africa