17 Burst results for "Chase Jarvis"

"chase jarvis" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

14:32 min | 9 months ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Hey what's up to a fire nation. And here's something interesting about yourself that most people don't know sure happy to be here fire nation. What's up I'm chase and the thing that you probably don't know about me. Is that in second grade. I used to perform magic tricks in front of my second in grade class and had a weekly Comic Strip that accompanied my magic show. Have you ever thought about revamping comicstrip. Oh my God no but that is a great wait. I'm GonNa give you full credit in a year from now when this thing is crushing. Now I've I've some friends that are really in the comic scene and I have not. I think the gap between my my second grade. Well just confess my second grade characters. Name was Clyde somewhere between a one of those old ghosts that used to chase Pacman an and maybe like grover so it was not a good looking character. You know I'm thinking of like all the Marvel Universe the gap between gene. We're my second grade comic strip in what would be required significant but I'm an optimist so a year from now credit you are I. Will I love it. That's the point of this question. Is this kind of bring people into awareness of something that you know they might not know about to Chase Jarvis. I know you are pretty much an open book especially when it comes to creativity and today's audio masterclass is all about creative calling so it's GonNa dive in because you do believe that. Creativity is innate in everyone so can you expound upon that. Yeah happy to do it. I mean just like walk into any first grade classroom right and say who wants to come into the front of the room and draw me a picture. How many hands go up everyone yet? Literally every hand goes up and it's not even a question it's So what we know about creativity in the sciences is clear that little empirical experiment is something that everybody can relate to as well. But we know is that we're creating machines and where We have this innate power or to make reality around ourselves by changing. I guess that's what you have to believe. If you WANNA make your way in this life is that you need to be able to affect outcomes To create not just in the sense of drawing and painting and sculpting are those are great examples creativity. But I'm thinking about creativity with a capital C so my goal with the book and this conversation is to help people understand that creativity creativity. The definition of creativity is much larger than we thought. And like we're co creating this moment right here totally me like if and when you realize realized that the cool thing is if you can acknowledge pre simply that everyone's creative and just on those basis these empirical experiments and realized that we do have agency over our lives and then Kinda step to beyond that as it you realize that creativity is a muscle. It's like a habit. It's like any other muscle that the more. Oh you work at the stronger gets then it's it. It falls pretty simply on point three. which is that? It's literally through creating anything on a regular basis that we strengthen that muscle that we can create everything in our lives. So you know the goal then if you step back is why. Don't we use this muscle. Why don't we think and talk more about this muscle that we have to create a masterpiece out of this one precious life that we've got a love that phrase creating masterpiece and there's one life that we got and.

Chase Jarvis Clyde Pacman grover
"chase jarvis" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

02:37 min | 9 months ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Been with a certain on trust like I think so much of the world So it's a willingness to do that and then a a method for managing of fear so those those two aspects and I think what the world teaches us that mistakes are bad. I mean just go back to any simple childhood memory where you did something wrong when you made a mistake in the mistake was punished and what we're taught that making mistakes is bad so that we should avoid. Ah But we really should be taught. It's not about avoiding mistakes or error recovery. It's about making mistakes and actually being able to recover quickly from and to me. That is a again just doing this in real time here. I'm trying to answer the the big questions of life from from home. I think that that process for me is is as sort of a willingness and I I believe it comes about from when you make a mistake. Recover quickly just a couple of times. There's a part of you a light. Switch the Flip Arman says. Wow I actually learned something really valuable. I got comfortable be comfortable being uncomfortable and now I'm better because of it. That experience France is just one click greater than the shame that you would otherwise have felt in a world that told you not to make mistakes because there's a world where the shame is outpacing the the the other aspect and at some point when your ability to make a mistake in recover is one. Click north of your Shane. That you'd feel for making mistake to me that this. Oh my God this is this is actually. This is the secret. I love that I love that because that is what you were talking about earlier is actually the mechanical part of giving yourself health and earning the right to say I can do difficult things right which is like Oh. I have the ability to respond to whatever happens next in life whether I purposely put myself there or some shit happens in like I'm in the middle of it and I didn't. I didn't plan. I didn't you know whatever and I'm thinking natural disaster all the way to medical health to Something on the side of a cliff may be taking a picture that you purposely put yourself there you know whatever whatever. The mechanical part is with experiences that ability to say. Oh I we're hold on..

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

32:00 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"A pre digital where not recommended not not in some kind of scholastic setting you're walking the earth and keeping a journal when you're really getting y and so again in the particular lies universal I'm talking about my story right here but you know I want I believe that everybody can see it was in an attracted the curator's from the Matt and the Moma and they all came by to see this thing because it was totally absurd and yet really how the art world that kind of expression so it was fun you know my answer to her she's like a here which can you point out some of the and I was like you're the matter how they got there they were there and which is true for all of us like I don't know how you got to where you are in this case you're the arbiter you're making the decision about what's going up that with the the Gary v message of scour out there and like do a ton of stuff for free like say yes to everything those somehow you gotta find a mix works where you're still valuing your input while also trying to build your pedigree free or cheap never never in between yeah like having the Seth Godin thing was about public speaking it's either full fare free great I didn't know said that he's a dear friend I was just talking to him the other day great guy we're GONNA do a thing in New York together on the twenty four th on the book drops for your full price and I think free is fine because free gets you folio connections experience and those are valuable things but what's the worst is what you rate five thousand dollars I have eighty bucks okay that's the worst because then you've you know you've been taken what you've posted as your value in Bern did verses sang GonNa do this because I'm going to get something out of it and here's my requirement I will make creative decisions and if you don't like it you can't use it or whatever the paradigm that you established push for your work is I think they're reconcilable I don't think it's either you know value yourself or don't I think it's okay to find other aspects of value to place on you and your work besides money yeah I think what happens with a lot of young people is they they do end up I'm doing a lot of free stuff as they should is there learning but they don't then also learn the skill of of knowing when to say okay now is the time hey me or they start at these very micro amounts and they're afraid they don't WanNa alienated anybody or or like one off and so they ended up toiling in this netherworld where where the work isn't valued even though the quality of it is is would Dante eight that totally true and that is a learned skill and the only way you learn is through practice and and this is why I advocate action over intellect like if you're sitting around trying to figure this out and make the perfect chess move like that's not how it happens you make a lot of little imperfect moves you learn a little bit of a lesson and then you move on is trying to make the same mistake more than one or two times ideally on but it's the action it's the doing that actually creates the learning and very hard to and it's it's great to get information from the internet or your mentor or whomever but learning actually doing that part is incredibly valuable so you know again I think it is reconcilable the you can sell value yourself and you can still work for free and I do believe in connections and and I I would you choose to use the word community you're building a community of people who are there to teach you to learn from you to be supportive for you to support and that's all valuable and I think that's something it's wildly overlooked in talked about it specifically creativity is a quarter of the book is about the benefits of community in how it's wildly overlooked as key to success in anything even if you're a solo artist or whatever like whole sorry aw slew of people who make this possible this experience that you have created possible so and you know to keep that thread and maybe put a put up a period at the end of it I think it's reconcilable I think that experience is the only way you can navigate it and I understand why you'd WanNa think about it before you entered it which I encourage you to do but in the end you can't actually be paralyzed if you're just so precious that you're not willing to do anything for free you're getting no work that you'd be assigned yeah yeah yeah and any extrapolate this to away from photography to anything that you want to move into that's the that's the big conundrum right is like how do I start something in a worldwide have no experience whether it's get a job or shift gears or you want to move to a new career you were like how do I start when hire me yeah I think the this subject of preciousness one that that doesn't get enough attention in our discourse like when you don't have a tremendous amount of experience but you're overly precious about what you're doing and you tend to overvalue yourself and you missed up right because you're not you're not you're not objectively judging the the business landscape and one of the things you talked about in the book is like not being like just just make the next thing just keep moving on moving on like I have a friend who's a very successful screenwriter and his whole thing is like as soon as you finish your script like very easy you know we're in Hollywood here and a lot of people that are in this world like they get there so precious about their thing and they can't move onto the next thing and they're just waiting to hear it sells or they get very caught up in all these extra analyses that they have no control over so his thing is like you just immediately start the next thing so you're immersed in the next creative project and you're divorcing yourself very mindfully purposefully from the results of your creative Alpa Yup the judgment ends up being really toxic aspect of of any creative output and I do mean create the capital see like you know we we started to judge soon warhol had a great like when everyone else's busy judging your work ego making the next thing right right let them judge it on well on this subject of community building i WanNa get to that because that that is kind of an exclamation point in this second act break that is the Chase Jarvis movie you basically realize all of your dreams go from this fledgling photographer working in a ski shop to working with these huge brands and like I said earlier commanding huge budgets and you know like helicopters and the the craziest stuff you can imagine like this is your dream realize you have everything you ever aspired to have you are a successful probably beyond what you could have ever predicted for way beyond and then it took this other tragedy which you you touched on this avalanche to really recalibrate how it was that you were living so maybe dig a little bit deeper into that what what I've come to know is that I feel like there's two arcs in a life there's an arc where you're accumulating wisdom knowledge friends connections perspectives and at some point most of us know not what or when there is a shift I think this is really a beautiful shift if it's possible to like okay I have enough my fear sense my my biology I can override my allergy and start to think in terms beyond just me and that is one thing as a whether parents probably understand that or people who used to be a one woman shop and now you have many employees are like whatever the analogy of the experiences there's some part you're like wait a minute and again we can choose that or things in life can choose it for us and if you're if you're sort of ignoring it then you're going to get a lesson and my lesson was is it turns out this avalanche and despite living as you said the the what I had carved out as my dream sort of like as soon as you have something when you don't have anything you've got nothing to lose and then when you have something you have everything to lose you have a life you have community you have re sources money reputation all these things and so the sort of fear instinct survival mechanism biology on your kicks in and then you stay in that mode versus this sort of open mode I'm trying to be in just being aware of our own mortality ledeen creativity and all this stuff and so in my universe icon is bad avalanche and somehow got out and I remember it's a little bit too movie script easy but like straight up that's how it went down and I I just did an interview with on my podcast with a guy named Ben who was one the Nike athletes that I was actually filming when it happened well no one was hurt by the way right correct yeah minor minor every everybody got away and Alaska mass I'm talking like entire mound face ripped off like and that's not fill multiple football fields fifty feet deep like there's not a thing you walk away from and I remember talking to Ben and we literally never talked about it like when I was reunited with the rest of the athletes and the not and we look we actually we have the moment of me being caught in the avalanche on film and then the in who's filming that like Osha and they dropped the camera and they run and it's it's very dramatic scene and then the next piece of footage is the person goes and picks up a camera and you know this sometime later because whatever escaped and then I'm reunited with the group and I skipped with the group and the camera's running on me and they just say WHO and I'm like do not tell my wife about that is right but that is literally the extent that we talked about it right in the moment it's so so over so you have to minimize totally and so fast forward that night and honestly the next several weeks but that night in particular like doing is sort of like as soon as you you get there you think you're a false summit you see some if you're a climber you okay cool crest the mountaineer like only to realize that this is the I summit and there's a whole nother mountain buying that and to me that was deciding to try and paint a bigger picture of what was possible for hi experience and that was trying to help other people I just been given so many gifts or earned so many gifts through that journey that I'd been and it was like wow this is the thing that like what if we could like reproduce this and give this gift to other people the message so that that is in part what inspired me to do the the the iphone APP right that was the first iphone APP that shared photos to social networks it was like I started creating rules and platforms for other people to try and tap into what I had had the chance of experiencing I mean it wasn't wasn't a complete departure because I've been sharing when you've been blogging and transparent about this journey all along but it was more in a pissing me about how to contribute scale right so you create you gotTa tell this story you create this iphone APP that's camera I know it's painful dude a lot of people haven't heard it the best camera predates instagram but in many ways extremely similar to the earlier versions of Instagram blow to photo there's filters you could scroll through all the filters at the body we created all yeah he comes he becomes the of the year it's getting written about and all the tech blogs near Tinus covers it this is what you know the people who work at apple or using thing and your position Steve Jobs Schiller all those people quoting it talking about it they use the name of the APP was best camera after a phrase I've popularized the best cameras the one that's with you.

Matt five thousand dollars fifty feet
"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

12:06 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Ahead of me was world class and they just happened to see me when they saw him and always this is the new younger kid coming up I I just told myself a whole set of stories was supposed to be there but you know what there was you were there and I think that is being played out in your your photography career you did not you didn't probably your skill set at the time and you just you made it until you made it and you were able to establish yourself in a manner that was unconventional a million readers blog I remember stumbling upon your blog around that time yeah and you were doing something no one else was doing which is basically taking people step by step through your process as a means I've educating a whole new crop of young aspiring photographers which really set the stage or prefaced what would come with creative lives sure and you know what I was terrified the whole time because I didn't do it right I didn't do it the establishment I didn't do it and it was only you're honest with all of that totally and that is to me the cool thing because wherever you are in your space right now whoever listening you're there you're supposed to be that that was your path and the cool thing is the world's of established paths and the paradigm on how we get there and that there is only one track that's largely being exploded I would say to your benefit and if you're looking at it from the perspective of this is to my demise that anyone can you're in the wrong head space so you're you're you're you're looking at the world through the Lens of zero sum game and that's at odds with the premise of this book which is that creativity is not only abundant it's infinite and to explore it just creates more of it which is an abundant perspective it's it's it's an abundant mindset yeah and you know you characterize it accurately I found myself maybe before I was supposed to be there at a place and I was like okay I got there and all the while I was battling the same head stuff that we all do but somewhere in there just enough it was like one click above like break bravery had one click above shane uh-huh and and it was just enough to keep going and I guess I'm living proof that that's all you need right so now when you go on to I mean there's just a billion instructional videos on every the most detail tiniest little aspects of not just tarver any any we're using geography is the baseline but it's anything but when I when I like watch a Peter MacKinnon video that example it's impossible for me and I love what he joining I think he's brilliant and very engaging but Peter MacKinnon doesn't exist without the example that Chase Jarvis set like you created the foundation for the Peter McKinnon's of the world to be able to do what they do all that is very very large and very it was the C. You know for sure because it was it was before Youtube even was I think that's true and even like conception leising that is still like Oh Jeez and I'm aware of it and it'd be like Oh that ball or even like in appearance in a proud way not totally Ebi also being sponsored as photographer that didn't exist I brought sponsorship from action sports where I was a photographer watching athletes get free gear and then start to be paid a living wage and I'm like wait a minute why can't I apply that here and I remember the first time I started like pushing on this with the camera manufacturers and they're like and I'm like I see you know famous photographer acts on the back of a magazine posing with a cannon camera and then can reach out or Nykanen reach out and say we see the work you're doing we loved it and I'm like okay cool like they are willing to do that and it's like what do I get oh you what do you mean when you get you get to pose with camera in the back of a on a thing and I'm like we're giving you expect totally and I'm like I got a million person army over my shoulder here I think I can actually make an impact on what it is you're doing and you know of course when the time you're ahead of the paradigm people started throwing rocks and without a need to unpack all that same as you mentioned about sharing what was in the black box or whatever was unconventional and it would become normalized over time to me in in a positive way like information wants to be free and now we take it for granted so it's really hard to uncork that look backwards the same is true for mobile photography like my industry through tons of rocks at me when I was saying this one megapixel camera was actually more interesting than my hundred thousand dollar digital Hasselblad right and that it was blasphemous completely blasphemous and then it was like well wait a minute let's end of like fighting over the same size pie let's make the bigger pie with you know billions of photographers rather than just any million of US toiling in the corner trying to protect small thing that's going to get out of the cage anyway let's and obviously again not popular but me that was just a a a a pattern that I continue to see unfolding today in different areas of culture like let's go there and let's blow this up so if we could reinvent it in whatever image we want let's try it yeah respect for the snapshot I can't remember exactly what you said but you put it really beautifully something along the lines of we can all appreciate the high art that is what is created with that Hasselblad and a lot of auctioned value but let's not overlook the beauty and the artistry and the authenticity that comes with the would've downgraded snapshot of everyday life taken by somebody who's not a professional that there is something truly valuable about that and to the extent that how the Internet is making that widely available that's something to be celebrated and respected as a legitimate art form rather than the other way around and again and what is it I hang on the basis coke is it makes me feel better being willing to be misunderstood for long periods of time is sometimes required to make your way in the world and you know with all of these things that we're talking about here in photography in particular we're using these again this is sort of a metaphor but the same is true for everybody in all their different areas as of life like you were misunderstood as a fill in the blank when you're in a band in high school and you had long hair what you really wanted was themselves in the story of the part being misunderstood starting to you know breaking something open even if it was just your relationship with your parents or or or whatever so yet the the whether it's sponsorship and photography or learning teaching creativity on the Internet or adding people to Val doing a gallery show where people actually value the snapshot that was a fun little I I did a show in in the ace hotel lobby invited ten thousand photographers from all the world to submit images and I hung a fresh show every day for thirty days using those images and really cool on I remember there's a woman who was the curator at the met at the time for Photography Mia Fireman was her name she's like oh I hear there's some really famous photographers hanging and is true. Some of the best photographers in the world had submitted images also true dogs had submitted images and five year old kids and submitted images and I hung them right next week but that's so beautifully subversive and and really is your version of the people that influenced you from Warhol the Basquiat these are people who you know you've talked about this we're very Meta in making art about art in the way that kind of banks is most famously doing right now making a statement curator from the met. Why don't you tell me yes and it it actually started on a nice got a scowl from it was actually is a little bit of a light bulb in it it actually created a friendship we we had lunch the next day station total right yeah and it just underscores the point of like doesn't not but but it begs the question of like who who gets to make the decision about what is art and what isn't yeah and if you tie it back to you know the themes that were exploring here in the book doesn't matter you got there you know just claim claim who you are where you are what you are and move forward right so you sell your first photo ninety four yeah I think you're working in a ski shop you've done your research after snapped an awesome photo for five hundred bucks in Paris he's and this fast forwarding all the way to commanding massive budgets and shooting with fortune one hundred companies Nike everybody basically Ed Bowl Apple Apple Yeah we want I wanNA talk about that too one of the things that that is kind of hallmark of how you established your career was too really value yourself right and I think we're in this disposable economy now where I don't think creativity is adequately let alone financially appreciated we think that well he took a picture I should be able to use it wherever I want however I want and we don't think of the inherent value of of what's entailed here and you're somebody who's always been very deliberate and making sure that US alice your own value and used your experiences voice bees to encourage other people to do the same and so the question I have about that is how do you square that you know get in with you know people who can advance your career and just be a team player like I think there's wisdom in both of.

Nike US Warhol Paris Basquiat hundred thousand dollar thirty days five year
"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

38:29 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Taylor way is intentional designed and it's created that creativity is a muscle it's a habit not a skill it's these amazing people to to kind of an abandoned the theor the ten thousand hour rule that basically these people weren't people what kinds of experiences that ultimately inform their craft and elevated beyond their peers yeah that's so true to me that is they are crafting that you know they're they are saying I'm taking a little bit from this a little bit from that and yet to me this is a really fundamental piece of the Book and look at right now if you're the mistakes I've like hundreds of thousands in debt and student loan ten years off course doing everybody else's think ten years you think at the end of my life I'm going to say like I got you beat there but I honestly but that's part of what what why I feel like we can when when we're together it's like there's a there's a shared sort of like dominoes lineup perfectly too and create this person that is Chase Jarvis when you're working in the ski shop or you're not you're not consciously aware that this is all going into the hopper and it's going to a dividends you're like what the hell am I what am I doing here right right and that's so you know that's both I wanna be a frame it as hey you might have not intended to be where you are right now but it's never too late to sort of shift gears and whatever you have in your backpack is going to be very valuable on your journey forward because especially if you can shift gears into this act of creating the next chapter of your life rather than being the cork in the tide and that you ended up here wherever here is don't worry like to me that's a really important thing to grasp for everyone or almost everyone there's a gap between where you are and where you want to be and it's just what we need is a framework of thinking about it and then be getting there and that's part of what I tried to break into the book and it's it's primarily prescriptive but there's this kind of subplot of a memoir that is threaded through it like it's not overtly a memoir but do you divert from the prescription from time to time to go into these lengthy stories of pivotal moments in your life that helped kind of underscore the point that you're trying to mm-hmm and if you looked at them as a unit in themselves they're all things that historically would be massive diversions or things that were part of what you shouldn't do and so that's like I'm trying there's nothing more than books like okay take perfect acorn a and then if you take perfect cornet Dan you do b. c. d. and e. with it you're going to get this great oak tree f g h life is messy creativity even messier and so like through my own like I don't WanNa throw rocks other folks that through my own sort of messy path I tried to deconstruct that and deconstruct the lives of people that I admire no well and that I've had the chance is to be around or study or create cultivate with and it just so happens there's a a real pattern of recognition decide even think of your journey thing like we did what we did we recognize some stuff we made some changes the cool part is while we might be ten thousand hours or ten years five minutes or eight bucks or whatever away from what we see for ourselves the number of decisions it can be like single digit one or two three decisions away from an entirely radically different life and to me that is exciting and powerful yeah I mean I've I'm a living example of that you are as well and and I think you know one of the reasons why I also feel like we're kindred spirits is that just like the fact that our stories and our career paths in in many ways very different and our upbringings are very different there's a lot of similarities in our story in the doc dived into your path more I was struck by how similar they are so let's let's go back to the beginning all right the way back yonder the son of a cop and a mom who works in a biotech company grew up only child and I don't want to protect your perhaps nailing traffic somewhat perhaps like a sensitive and creative child who also have prowess as an athlete and maybe the first big choice that you had to make was who am I identifying with and what tribe do I want to belong to and I think this is part of like in the particular lies the universal right my story is in second grade Miskelly I'll never forget better I loved her as a teacher she was amazing and I also that was when I was second grade is like I just did my first film it was called the Sons of Zorro who we washed cars in the film developed it screened actually made more money than we spent thirty Bucks Fifteen Larry Robert Rodriguez well there you go oh and so in about that time and then I roll into second grade I'm like God this is amazing I'm performing magic tricks for my friends at school I had a comic Strip that I did every week with a character's name was Clyde took glide through a bunch of different like aspects of his life and then the parent teacher conference happened I was around because it was also an ice cream social going on and and I overheard miskelly tom my parents chase is so much better at sports than he is at art and at the moment I actually wasn't even hurt I was like note to self change gears because what we WANNA do on a one sentence and as eight year olds again we're social animals we want acceptance we WANNA fit in we don't want to disappoint and my story might be about miskelly second grade but the reality is we've always got some we got all of us have some aspect of that story and maybe it's not one maybe ten moments and there was a bunch of other moments but I I did I ran to sports and to be crystal clear at serve me very well went to college on a soccer scholarship played the Olympic developments occur team like it did everything that culture said it was going to do and yet what did I what did I turn my back on I turn my back on and I was even in cognizant of it because the thing that I chose served me well I didn't feel like I missed it but when my grandfather died whatever it was twelve something eight years ten years later dropped dead of a heart attack when I was a week before my college graduation I was just completely struck he was an amateur photographer he had taken pictures of me and growing up massacre games he and my father used to trade Shire's and and the obviously was horrible but the silver lining was that I was giving his cameras and it was like I was transported act that second grade and like wait a minute what I've always been curious about this skateboard culture gave me a little hint of it as a little skater long and it was like spray paint and punk rock and the DIY ethos on a guy I started feeling that a little bit but then it was really like okay you're going to be a skateboard are you gonNa go you know try for soccer team and so to me I made a choice then but until that moment where my grandfather died then I was given his cameras I really had turned my back on this thing largely to fit in and I don't think it's that unusual when I look back at other people's stories whether it was partying or whether it was going to the right college or there's just so many sugars and arts and must that we get in our culture and especially when they come from people we love that were that we respect and admire and what do they want for us they're not trying to get you to not be an awesome creator there we're trying to get you to be more like them more of the images that they see on TV which is average well they're afraid you know they want the best for you you as long as it's testified about the uncertainty that comes with blazing a unique path so it's it's well intentioned malevolent or anything and that's worth talking about these people are not trying there's no evil genius trying to repress you nor is culture they want the best for you of course in their own way but any fans the somehow come right it becomes more incumbent upon you to develop that sense of self that can lead you on your own union path and that's difficult and for me it came much later than it did for you but what's interesting about that story and I've heard you tell it before you lost over one aspect of it which is this what feels like an assumption like a you so you're you're gifted the cameras from your and father so obviously this was a message from the universe but it could have very easily just been like thanks and go about your way doc these things on Ebay or put them in your closet or something like that so to me what I hear and that is that that creative sensibility albeit repressed was percolating just beneath the surface and unconsciously or consciously you're almost looking for her in excuse to explore it and I think that is a very common paradigm that's part of the book exists in to me that you know again if you assume that first principle that there's creativity inside of every person and that crazy and that culture shapes it in a way that it does so that we fit into Zimbabwe's because that's easier to define and manage and again no evil genius but the school system the employment says them all those things have had a very specific track yeah until recently now it was the the wheels come off yeah and said that's the part where I'm trying to let you know that you're not alone that the thing that's just below the surface that you really feel about yourself or that you want to explore but you haven't you're not alone everyone's been handed a bunch of goods and to to be totally frank should never go away they change as you get older but there's always going to be a set of expectations and the job as a human is to navigate that to be able to develop tools to take what is helpful and repel what has not helped title and manage your own belief for yourself most of this has to do with this cool thing that I love which is intuition and your self aware Dennis and when you can start to pay attention to that that whisper that's what I talk about being the calling and I'm not saying as that that whispered that's at eighth grade when you need it to be a a hippopotamus veterinarian but mostly that there's something in there you don't have to know exactly but you just know that there's something that if you start to pull on that thread great things happen life starts to happen for you not to you and you start to be on a path and when you're exploring this unfurling it again this is to me where you everyone has felt this everyone has felt that time in their life that felt effortless whether you call it flow you're with a people doing the things that you love and then you kinda go okay great we gotta get practical got to go back to this is naive to pursue this all these other messages and n no evil genius this is just a product of mass culture and being a social species fine let's now develops tools to manage our way out of it yeah and I think practicing those tools becomes mission critical as a pathway out because what happens is over time as we age those intuitions and those instincts become calcified as we settle into this life that we think that we've chosen for ourselves and that we work double time to convince ourselves are good and if we're not happy only because yeah and I'm sympathetic to that I'd been in that situation you've been in that your version of the situation and and it becomes harder and harder to connect with that little wis that's trying to speak to you because we've constructed denial mechanism around it to prevent it from percolating up because it is a reminder that maybe we need to course correct a little bit yep and it's always there for us that's the thing that why if you're in that place of disparity you're not alone and that to me just that little moment of realizing that you're not alone hopefully is enough to kick start again the way I framed picture again go back to those books that tell you exactly how to do it you know I take you on my journey to which is like one of pitfalls and of near death Dan of doing the wrong thing and by wrong emmy not accordance with who I was and my values and it's recoverable the thing that we need to know culture and what I'm trying to prescribe is start and start small you don't have to go from zero to hundred miles an hour in fact that's GonNa make the wheels come off we need to do is listen and then start moving towards the thing yeah and the call to action is that no longer can you persist in this state of creative repression to do so is to do so at your peril and you open one of the chapters with that great Rene Brown quote where she basically says like to repress your creativity isn't benign it's like it's an actually a dangerous thing because you're living at odds with your true makeup and that's going to provoke all kinds of damage in your life in various ways so true and just look at a culture that has repressed this run by the ocean everything that park bench the car the light post who's all designed all created it was a drawing before it was ever in real life literally every everything around you was created and so if you start to think about creativity in that sense you start to say okay great you got my attention now pay attention to this creative force that supposedly I've got this is you know chasing rich Tomi I've got this force and you start to pay attention to how valuable and how important that forces and then think of the messages that you get from culture oh you know pursuing that whimsical thing that you want to create for your life that's just naive and polish the pursuing a career around creativity playing the guitar how much has you know starving artists you hear all these mythologies that like Bernie said.

Taylor ten years ten thousand hours ten thousand hour five minutes eight years eight year
"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

13:59 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Crowd is offering listeners of this show up to one hundred dollars off the first project all you gotta do is go to design crowd dot com forward slash rich role that's DAS I G N C R our own wd dot com slash ritual to take advantage of this offer or simply enter the discount code ritual when posting your project on design crowd okay Chase Chase Jarvis so by way of background I've been a big fan of chase for many years a follow his path and gorged on his content I think all the way back to the early days of the Internet's because chase it's just been posting forever amazing information and I'd always wanted to meet him I saw him as a bit of kindred spirits and I would say that today verifies that suspicion in addition to accounting chases fascinating personal story this is a conversation about the very nature of creativity we bust myths surrounding mysteries we talk about why creativity is a nate our birthrights in essential aspect of being humid and why establishing creative practice is our most valuable and urgent task as important I think to our well-being is exercise or nutrition I think it's fair to say we make a bit of magic today might even feel a new bromance coming on you guys decide so let's get into it this is me Chase Jarvis that time has arrived yes around here it's been many years in the making so true I've been looking forward to this for a very long time I'm delighted that you're here and I wanted to say before we even do any this fucking book is Awesome Dude you did an amazing job and I think it's going to inspire and help so many people so thank you breath off thank you so much really is an accomplishment when people ask me what are the most influential books in your life list is long but generally at or near the top of that list is always the war of are turning pro and the artist's way the three primers that I returned to year after year after year to stoke my creativity and refresh my perspective those are timeless works but they were also written years ago right and I look at this book as perfectly positioned to be the modern iteration rose timeless primers well that is that's huge thank you for saying that and I will also confess that those those books were influential in me and my crew we talked about on my show last year and and yet I also felt like there was a gap between where those books stopped and modern culture right and new tools and it didn't talk about a lot of both things that can set creators entrepreneurs free and also the things that trap us there's just some like constraints that are out there in the world or that we place on ourselves that didn't get brought up in some of those books I felt like there was a little bit of a gap and also you know you you you wrote an amazing book if to go deep yes and there's a ton of research and the research has takes many forms right the research is your own personal experiences your empirical experiences you look at the talk to your community all the people have been on my show on creative live you and particularly like those that conversation impacted me and you start to see patterns many start to see windows and you start to see cracks that both need to be I've been in cracks and need to be filled and so it it was a fascinating process to be writing a book about creativity and creating something is adequate upcycle on that for a second Meta's big theme of your whole Career Right there is a definitely a Meta aspect to that and I think you're absolutely correct other books they are timeless perhaps by virtue of the fact that that you can't you can't specify when they were written but our culture has shifted it and change it gatekeepers are gone tools of creativity are more accessible than ever there's more there's a democratization of this universe didn't assist back then that makes that I think has stimulated and motivated and inspired a lot of people to think about created creativity more broadly nailed and and whether that means quitting your job to be an artist or just finding a hobby or like you know being intentional about the images you put on incident grab these are all aspects of creativity and and really what you've done is brought in the aperture on what creativity means while also underscoring the importance of it in everyday life for everybody no matter who you are if you took that away I am done because over no that's exactly that literally you just sort of you know I don't even need to introduce the book because that is the the ethos behind the book that was specifically broadening the aperture on creativity because right now that these people don't know if I'm not really identifies crater I'm an attorney I'm an accountant whoever's listening and like no no no this is exactly why you and if you're if you're a creator defy that great this is like right in your sweet spot but there's a whole universe of people who are what I call crtv curious that understand that there's some power that that I can't say quite know how to grab onto it and I don't understand that a little bit more and when you broaden that definition of creativity is which to me is part of if the challenge that we've had historically with how art and creativity have been viewed in our culture when you broaden the aperture a little bit you can also sudden sink your teeth into you wouldn't find an immense and powerful meaning Yeah I think historically the word creative or creativity isn't necessarily pejorative but it's exclusionary people either identify with that or they don't or they're scared of it yeah and in truth it is it is part and parcel what makes us human it is a universal aspect of the condition of being in one of these bodies literally we are creating machine and that's part of like expanding the definition to understand that wait a minute you know my decisions on which is how to get to your house today do I go this way or that way the what I decided to do with my day and my time on a on a minute by minute basis but also on a life scale basis those are all wickedly wildly acts that have been discarded into like you know if you're thinking of neural pathways just like the base neural pathway that you always go but there's an opportunity eighty four in all of those places to do something different than when you start to realize that this creativity in small daily doses is the same exact muscle that we used to create our life it's just creativity different scale moorhead starts to go like okay I need to pay attention here right well so then if I was to ask you how you define creativity what is the response to that it's such a way that I approach it is so simple it might be painful for some people but it's the active putting two things that might not have gone together just a moment ago of putting those two things together to create something new and useful oh it it is very broad definition but that's to me what actually makes the book really relevant because there are people like this is not about changing your lifestyle this is not about moving to barry wearing a beret and smoking a cigarette Kennedy about deal totally can be but it's also does in half to be a about a new set of friends instead it's a new way of operating it's a new way of seeing what's in front of you and you just super top level like operate from the principle that a every person is creative that it's the thing that separates us from every species on the Senate and it is it's fun I just walk into any first grade class in right who wants to come into the front room and draw me a picture every hand goes up and then do the same thing with the sixth grade class and then in eighth grade class and you see that we're this is the thing that is the nate and we're training out of us so that's principle one principal to sorry and is that workers creativity every person to is the creativity is a muscle it's a habit not a skill it's a process not a product and so muscle and I guess my like the more you use the more you have to think about training or anything else right so it becomes more available to us and then if you follow one and two simple argument number three is so then all these small creative acts that we do everyday yes playing the guitar making a meal building a family writing code yes those things are literally the things that are going to give you the insight that you have agents see over creativity with the capital seat like creating the arc of your life so to me though like it from a very simple definition US have to make a simple three-step argument and all of a sudden you're at this like I need to pay attention yeah that creativity is a non depleting renewable source that it's not something that certain people are struck with but that they cultivate through deliberate and intentional practice overtime time yeah that is divorced from the results of it and all about the process of doing you've got as the book like it's not fake it till you make it it's make it till you make it so the process of being a maker in whatever form is for you yeah yeah and when you think about it like let's let's talk about it away from the sort of small C- creativity of making a meal or building a business whatever and talk about it on the life scale the people that you are inspired by that you moved by your connected to that you admire there lives were created intentionally there's all kinds of circumstances but they created the puzzle that is their life and their their arcing themselves in a particular way it's intentional it's designed and it's created it's not just you just fell into this thing one day and right and so when you start to look at ah creativity with that sort of capital on the life arc like who I am and in it doesn't need to be someone famous or fancy and the internet or or some yeah well known entrepreneur artist it can be your next door neighbor that lives in amazing integrity and and they have a A mindfulness about them real like that's not on accident that was created that person set out with a vision for themselves and slowly but surely got there there was no overnight there was no it was a creative process and that's available to you yeah we don't do you were very good at at celebrating you know the masters of culture in you know across all disciplines but we're not very good at peeling the layers back and really objectively examining the journey required to get to that a place and that leaves us as a culture with this false sensibility that these people just came out fully baked and they touched by God certainly that we're not totally and what is your what are your parents say oh go to Harvard then you know go to get this degree and then have this job and then because and that's GonNa and you're like wait a minute the people that I admire most of them didn't do any of that right in fact they lead this really disjointed like weird puzzle that they put together over time they didn't the accident didn't do why are they did it part way and then they quit or and what Parentis coaching their child to do that yeah no nobody nobody very are people are I mean that's very similar to I just put up a podcast yesterday with David Epstein wrote this book range and he deconstructs the career paths all that just ground themselves down to become great at what they do at the exclusion of everything but actually very broad lives in which they had many sitting there judging your life like oh my gosh I am the person he described I did what was prescribed and don't worry that's the culture is designed to do that you're not a weird in fact your normal and what we're trying to do here is to get you to see this framework and realize that you have some power to change it at whatever stage and take it from me I did all Oh my Gosh I did when you're in it you can't see it totally looking back in retrospect we look at your career you see all these.

Chase Chase Jarvis one hundred dollars one day
"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Real quick I employed anyone listening who is struggling with their diet to check out our plan power meal planner affordably priced just a dollar ninety a week it provides access to thousands of constant corrupted nutritious and delicious plant-based recipes grocery lists grocery delivery and access to a team of experienced dietary coaches seven days a week to learn more and to sign up visit meals dot ritual dot com okay so let's talk about creativity we tend to think about creativity as something that is reserved for the purview of a certain view those blessed with some kind of innate talent or disposition this kind of gift that alludes us mere mortals but simply not true and if you're asked this week's guest he will dispel that lie because first creativity just like any other skill or discipline is simply a practice it's a habit it's a muscle that can be built and flexed but even more than that creativity is logical necessity it is a force that lives and breeze inside all of us that when unleashed transforms lives and delivers vitality to absolutely everything that we do. Chase Jarvis is many things one of the most influential and award winning photographers of the last decade he is the recipient of numerous awards and accolades He was dubbed by Forbes as the offer everyone wants to work with and he's created hundreds of campaigns and commercials for the likes of Nike Apple Samsung Google and red bull in addition chase was a contributor to the Pulitzer Prize winning New York Times story snowfall any earned an emmy nomination for portrait of a city.

Chase Jarvis Pulitzer Prize emmy New York Times Google Forbes seven days
"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

The Ultimate Health Podcast

11:47 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

"He's earned recognition doing work for brands like Nike Pepsi Volvo Reebok Apple and red bull chase also focuses on personal work and fine art that has gained the attention of curator's in our critics mainstream audiences in celebrity circles worldwide wide. He's also an entrepreneur having started one of the world's fastest growing online education companies creative live dot com back in March two thousand ten chases new book secretive calling is available today and it was the focus of today's chat and before we get into the details of today's chat. I want to acknowledge that the month of September is pretty pretty darn special to us because that means our podcast celebrates another anniversary and this year we just past five years. That's five years of delivering amazing content every week no compromises. If you haven't gone back into our archives you may want to go back and check out some of our early shows although they do you get better and better over the years and we just want to thank you guys so much for all your downloads shares support over the years and we just can't wait. Here's here's the next five yes here's the next five would a major milestone. Thank you guys so much for coming along on the ride. It's been amazing and another good news. We have also been nominated for an abundance award for podcast of the year which is pretty awesome and pretty exciting especially in conjunction with our five year anniversary and I was also nominated for content creator of the year so if you have a few minutes we would love if you can go and give us a vote. Voting is going on until October stober night so please take some time going vote for us and if you don't know people who are in some of the other categories no problem to skip over that category and just check out podcasts of the year and content creator vote for the ultimate health podcast and vote for Mirny Wasserman and just head over to ultimate podcast dot com forward slash vote and speaking of content Creator Chase is truly an amazing content creator and here is some of what we get into today's show unlocking the power of creativity tippety creativity is where we find fulfillment the benefits of cold therapy and give yourself permission to fail lots of great stuff. This was a great conversation between Jesse Essien chase here we go with Chase Jarvis. Hello Chase welcome to the podcast. How you doing today great? Thanks for me on the show really really appreciate it so excited the chat with you and congrats on the book creative calling. I really love this read in. It's all about living a better life through creativity so where did the idea for this come from aw man a an interesting and ironically loaded question in part because I've been thinking about it for my whole life and the weird part is is that I've been doing everything but this book you know I tapped into creativity for myself after I'd had culture in most of the people in my life asked me what I was doing. I was like Oh wait. I I only WanNa WanNa do the things that are approved by my parents in culture and my boss and then I found creativity and then I started exploring it myself identified as a creator started using creativity to look my life in a better way and start building tools for creators. I built the an IPHONE APP that was the first photo APP Take pictures adequately effect it went onto be APP of the a year in two thousand nine and was used by millions of people in a really positive impact there and then I built a company called creative live which is where the world's craters entrepreneurs go to learn more than ten million people on the platform and after all that I was like something is missing in the thing that was missing was basically the explanation and some action steps on why it matters renders tools out there in the world but there's no why and so the book I've been working on it for the past. Maybe dare say between two and three years and the goal is to help people understand that creativity is not just a nice to have that it's one of the most powerful forces in our lives and creativity isn't just art. It's a way to create the living the life that you want for yourself. It's sort of life architecture and so I put that in a book along with a handful of very studied indeed steps that have I've personally employed in my life and as have the maybe a hundred or two hundred of the world's top creators entrepreneurs that I've interviewed on my podcast in research for the book so the goal is that it's a practical roadmap to unlocking the power of creativity to help you live the life of your dreams and you actually go as far to say creativity cities as important to health as exercise nutrition and mindfulness so maybe a little bit of a backtrack thinks contact so the book operates on three very very simple principles one everyone's creative by nature and by creative. I mean you can just like ask a first grade classroom. This is a very simple example but who wants to come to the front front room. ANDROMEDA picture every single hand goes up in first grade and that's both like we lack in ambitions. We're connected to who we are in a very simple way in. I want to express ourselves. That's a natural thing in the creativity instead of every person it's when you see that hand all those hands up it's undeniable the second principle is that creativity he's available and is a habit not a skill. It's a practice not a product. It's like a muscle and you know people in your world know about developing muscles. The more you use it the better you get at that particular using that particular muscle and creativity in the way that I position in the book is has that same level of potential the more you use it the more you have if you agree with one very simple statement any agreed with two based on experience or whatever then three is basically that we at when we create things on small ways whether that's smoothie in the morning or meal we play the guitar we build a business rebuild a family that we love all these things where you're deciding what goes into it and how much of accent why and what's the desired outcome when you're basically building anything those muscles are the same muscles that we use to design and create our life on the macro scale right. This is just creativity at a different scale so what I found in talking to so many people around the world in watching millions of craters learn on creative live is that that's not something it's taught in our culture how you end up with a great life is completely disconnected from any personal excellent agency that you would have over what you do with your time in high you spend you spend it with and so I'm just trying to very simply connect to those things and the point about why it's as important important as utrition and exercise is because it's that fundamental that you are creating every single day when you wake up in the morning you decide how to spend your time who to spend it with and what you're going to work on so I'm just trying to make the connection that if you can decide to spend time on the right things things that are in tune with your internal compass that that resonate with your intuition and who you WanNa be what you want to become that it becomes as fundamental as exercise because it's what a sustains life and I would say more importantly. That's where we find meaning. It's very fine fulfilment which are two of the most important things in life and I know from personal experience doing this podcast over a number years and being creative in preparing for the interviews and having these conversations the fulfillment I get through sharing it with the world is second to none. It's a really unique. I'm feeling that before the show it wouldn't be something I could barely relate to and that's part of what I'm trying to do with the book and you and I both have that experience. I think we identify as a creator you to create this podcast created businesses in apps and created art my whole career basically as a photographer so this is intuitive to us but before before that when you were wondering what you're GonNa do with your time it might not have been so intuitive so the role of the book is if you already believe as we do that this is not only does it give you agency of your life but it creates amazing fulfilment and connectedness so if you're us I want to reinforce that in give you a road map to get to the next level and if you you don't or this is new to you I wanna lay out a path where you can tap into this. Give your life a ton of meaning and again. Go back to my sort of through principles understand that that you have agency over your life and let's teach you how to build a life that you want because the lives if you look at your friends and neighbors on the Internet or a mentor that was crafted that was created their life. They did so through a very intentional series of steps in the book. I give you a framework for how to do that. I WANNA point out too that it's never too late because for me I had a whole nother career as a chiropractor before I got into this creativity and podcasting in creating information on the Internet and sharing it with people and also so the fact that you never know till later on looking back at where things are GonNa go ten years ago. I didn't even know what a podcast was and I had fully invested myself myself a lot of money a lot of time into a full education and started a career which lasted four and a half years practicing chiropractic and now I've taken things a whole nother way so I wanna WanNa put two different things out there one being it's never too late and too is it's hard to see that pass some times or at least the details of that path before you actually go uh-huh there because I could have never predicted this path in this trajectory that Amman that's so true and at aligns exactly with how I think and talk about it in the book. One of the lenses is that I use is that this journey the way it starts is your seniors of wait a minute. There's gotta be something more rate. It's this sort of a little bit of a lack of fulfillment and and this is not about some horrible like I hate this I gotta get out of. It and I don't know how you viewed Chiropractic but I was pretty happy pursuing the things that everyone everyone else was prescribing for me until I became aware that wait a minute. That's actually not true calling. What is the thing that I'm supposed to be doing? I found a way to listen to what was in my heart probably not not dissimilar to what you did with podcasting there was no map where you are here in a dotted line to the treasurer and then a circle their first of all that's fiction. That's not how life works right but I think more importantly importantly is. There's this trust that you get by hearing the stories of other people by understanding that this is doable and having someone give you a road map as tried to do in the book and then it's not really a map per se it's more of a compass. The answers are inside you and through experimentation and following that North that is north for you. You don't have to see the whole destination right you just have to see the next handful of steps or up into the next Ridge or the next six months or the next year or whatever but if you're doing the things that feel great to you and you're doing away that's not destructive or I think this is a really important side point. I WanNa make that I'm not advocating that you have to wear a beret and smoke cigarettes cigarettes move to Peres and that's not what creativity is all. That's that sort of warped idea past. I'm talking about this modern contemporary idea that we are creative read of machines and that we can cultivate the outcomes that we want in a life that we love just by simply listening to our intuition and making a plan for executing against that plan and you pointed out the fact that before you're following your calling you were happy doing what you're doing and when I was practicing chiropractic that was true for me as well and I didn't you know there was this whole other level of you know feeling that I have now that I'm actually following my calling and again. I'm still early in my career to and and the beauty of this whole thing is the evolution as we go through and continue to follow like you said her intuition and things that feel great and one thing just leads to the other and that's that's what I'm finding with my career and it's just so exciting yeah. It's so weird. This is a pattern that I noticed in my own life and it's been very very crystal clear in in my conversations with more than one hundred fifty of the world's top performers in Asia like the Richard Branson's the Brennan Brown's Tim Ferriss is that people that are peers peers friends of mine people that I aspired.

content creator WanNa WanNa Chase Jarvis WanNa Nike Jesse Essien Apple Reebok Peres Volvo Mirny Wasserman Asia Richard Branson treasurer Tim Ferriss Brennan Brown five years
"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"It's great to have on the show today. Chase Jarvis I have been. I mean pun intended. I've been chasing chase for a couple of years now tried to get him on the show and he's like no no no I got. I got something coming out. Let's wait until I have something coming out. I've got it coming. That's coming out soon and so win win this thing. GonNa come out as you're already doing a million things and then I get an email out of the blue okay. The thing is ready and the thing is his new book. It's called creative calling establish a daily practice future world with meaning succeed in work and life and I am thrilled for this conversation Chase Jarvis welcome to the podcast. Thank you so much todd end speaking of chasing or following like I love your work. It's been inspiration to me for a long time. We were Internet buddies like ten years ago career and then we got to spend some time together at Jeff going thing in at in Tennessee Nashville last year and I cherish every minute of that time together and I'm super honored to be on the show. Thank you on your on your show while back and it was one of the fun things I've ever done. Just was such that's your blast. How and we we spoke talk for like ninety minutes and it felt like it was two minutes. It went so fast. It was a great conversation so so you have a million things things going on in your world. Could you give folks just kind of the brief summary of Chase Jarvis kind of where you've been what you've done and then we'll jump into the book. Look away my own flag here. Dang thought might my background. I dropped that of everything that everybody else wanted for me when I figured out that that's not how the world works says. If you don't read your own script everybody also read it for you. and I build on on medical school dropped out of a path to professional soccer and bailed on a philosophy in three consecutive years to become a photographer. which is you know my poor parents but you know this is is a little bit of this is all relevant to the book is when you tap into that thing that you're supposed to be doing and then you're unabashedly unapologetically yourself the world starts to happen and for you instead of to you and I don't WanNa go played it because it was a really hard hard journey but I ended up becoming establishing a successful careers of Taga for and started sharing my journey of becoming a photographer listening to my creative calling you know whatever whatever fifteen years ago when the Internet was first emerging I had a chance to build a large tribe around that concept in the work and did an IPHONE APP that helped helped millions of people take pictures add cool effects and share it with social media best cameras couple of years before Instagram and and then I learned a lot about technology scaling creativity founded a company called creative live which today is the world's largest learning platform for creators entrepreneurs focus specifically on those areas and we've got tens of millions of students on the platform and that's where my podcast is hosted? You've been on that show folks Richard Branson Tim Ferriss Bernard Brown Arianna Huffington the listed the list of the people who you and I work with aspire to be more like and just amazing asset human so that's a little bit about my backstory and and what I realized is I'd become creator. I built tools for creators. Learn both the learning platform so that we can all pursue our passions and the things that drove us but I realized that I hadn't really put in place and you know why the TV is powerful and important and so this book creative calling as I think my most important work certainly the biggest thing I put out in the last ten years and out but resonates with resonates with if people and and I think there's some I think there's some real some big ideas but there's also debris grounded in in inaction so yeah well I. I think it's going to resonate deeply because it's it's born out of experience. It's not it's not theory. This isn't chase sitting back thinking. I wonder what people want to read. I mean you're basically writing writing about all of the things you've learned over the course of decades of putting yourself out there risking in the marketplace taking risks and building things and an pivoting I mean mean for crying out loud to turn from being a photographer to launching the largest creative content delivery platform in the world with tens the millions of students on creative live this a huge pivot and a huge risk you to some people might be like will of course chase can do that but I mean that's a big pivot of identity and by the way to to be clear when you say oh. I had some success as a photographer. I have a friend who is a photographer and you quoted me. I think one of your emails or something a couple of years ago and he said Holy Crap. How do you know Chase Jarvis and it was like he was blown away that I would even be like within your atmosphere. Let alone that we would have any kind of connection you know or the aware of me was kind of like because I mean you had a phenomenal and still have a phenomenal reputation as photographer but then into to serve make this leap in the creative live and now you're making a another bit of a leap into writing books and teaching people about your journey so I wanna start with breath chase with this title creative calling. That's a pretty ambitious title. Why did you choose that title. What does it mean well. I feel like title needs to say a lot and and also leave a lot of things unsaid and so for me. If you think about route creative calling we all have felt some sort of calling in our life and that's a whisper inside as sometimes you don't even know you know it's way more of a compass a map you can just hear it in the distance and when you walk toward it thinks feel better when you walk away from it things worse and to you mean the the the book is very much that's a key part of it and then you go to the creative part I believe the book has three fundamental. The principles one that every single person is creative by nature. We have limitless possibility. Unlimited capacity for creating to creativity is a habit not scale. It's a practice not a process. It's a muscle and that muscle grows and strengthens with us and if you believe when you believe to than three is where the real kick is in that is that the process that we go in creating anything whether it's a meal building a family building a business coating anything that small creativity on a daily basis is the same exact muscle that we use to create our lives lives and to you know to me if you think of that creativity not as just art but is that creativity with the capital city that in small ways we're creating every moment but those moments add up to creating our life and you here in the new pair creative with calling like doc all experienced that call right when we're in it. It's not always about career. Maybe you call it intuition and to me put those two things together you you get the life that you're supposed to be living and to be clear. This is not a rod a bed and everyone just does it overnight. It's it's happens over time and we stray straight from it and creativity and culture. Our culture is really telling us a bunch of things we should do this. We ought to do that and I'm just trying to get us. Imagine imagine if the world tuned into the things that we were supposed to be doing and we had a creative practice we all identified that we our own agent we are in charge of our own lives and we get to create created. You know life isn't about finding success either. It's about creating everyone you've ever admired or aspired to to to emulate or look like Gorby like or learn from so that you can be unabashedly yourself that you know they have tuned into that thing and so if you put does do together. I think it's that's directionally what the book is and it's also very low brow. These are big ideas but it's also super tactical. You know I to me. That's the the the middle is beige in deadly in this is not a book of platitudes and it's not it's not a roadmap of Oh this is how you do it perfectly. You wake up in here perfect and then you go to bed it because books like that are useless right. They perfect on what we know. You and I know for sure is that everything is messy and complicated and so this book not only does it chronicle my journey as you opened with but you know people like yourself in one hundred and fifty other people that I've interviewed on my podcast in the thousand teachers who've who've been on creative live like it's just a lifetime of information. I think I've organized in a way that that we can grab onto the best books I teach principals not not those sort of high pie in the sky platitude types of things and also not not like I'm going to tell you the seven things to do right now. I think sometimes that can be not as helpful either because those are all very situational right and in this book you kind of build your ideas. Is your thoughts your your. I want to say your advice but it's it's really sort of more you kind of reflecting from your experience -perience that youth you see this playing out in the lives of people who have been really successful at pursuing a crate of calling in their life and it's what you call your idea system mm-hmm. I D E A could you walk us through that and just give us a general sense of that framework of course I'm for being that classics classics have created a person who likes a lot of input and and I'm actually a reasonably structured thinker and to me like being able to organize if you have a framework rather than like you said you wake up and you do this this this that's too prescriptive. You need a framework because our lives are also different in our times times of life and our our individual circumstances but I think there's a huge universality and this came from you mentioned that I've I've basically figured out that I could identify as a creative person and a creator early in life. I've had this sort of identity my whole career and in through identity through interviewing reviewing and talking to all those folks I mentioned there's there's a very consistent application of this framework that anyone who's found success whether it's in career career or even his hobby or their life overall deconstructed into these four principles and it does follow the acronym idea so it goes like this..

Chase Jarvis soccer Instagram Nashville todd Dang Richard Branson Jeff Tennessee Arianna Huffington Taga Tim Ferriss Bernard Brown ten years ninety minutes fifteen years two minutes
"chase jarvis" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Every single moment of the day to bring creativity to your life so if you enjoyed this please share with a friend text one person text a few people <hes> lewis house dot com slash eight five three or you can use the the link on the apple podcast or spotify or wherever you're listening to this and just text one friend you think this could be held to maybe who's lost some creativity in their life maybe they're already are creative or they're an artist and you think this could help them grow in learn more money and more structure to their creative endeavors wherever may be share with one friend today and spread the message of greatness you can be that champion and someone's life life by sharing this message with big thank you to our sponsor policy genius if you need life insurance but you just haven't gotten around to it national life insurance awareness awareness month is as good a time as any to get started to go policy genus dot com you can get quotes and apply in minutes and you can do the whole thing right from your phone right now policy genius dot com check it out policy genius the easiest way to compare and buy life insurance and also big thank thank you to our sponsor ziprecruiter again ziprecruiter is so effective for businesses of all sizes if you want to grow your business you've got to have the right people on your team you need need a team players to eighteen business you can try ziprecruiter for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash greatness that's z. i. p. r. e. you see are you IT dot com slash greatness ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire if this is your first time here we do this every monday they wednesday friday we bring some of the most inspiring people and ideas and topics from around the world to help you unlock your greatness that's what this is all about constantly becoming a better human being we all fall down we all make mistakes we're never going to be perfect but if we can constantly grow learn and improve that opinion is living a good life if you enjoyed chase make sure to pick up his new book follow him at chase jarvis and tag me on instagram stories stories when you're listening at lewis house and love to hear from you over there i try to get back to as many people as possible as pablo picasso said every child is an artist the problem is staying in artist when you grow up never grow up and you can always be an artist in my mind i love you so very much tom it is it's time to go out there and do

chase jarvis lewis house pablo picasso apple spotify instagram
"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Their hands on projects. You can learn science technology engineering art and math and they're designed by experts but they're tested by kids. It's so you don't have to worry about gathering supplies and batteries and all that stuff zero to sixteen years old and each month the kid in your life gets a new fun and engaging project with all the supply so you're not going to get something open it up at seven and find out you gotta drive to the store and get something you everything detailed easy to follow instructions nations written for Kids and a little magazine and educational one that will help you learn more about that creates theme and it's good for parents and kids to do together. Jason Kiwi Co is a convenient union affordable way to encourage your children to be anything they WANNA be. There's no commitment you can cancel it. Any time. Monthly option started in one thousand nine hundred ninety five a month including shipping thing for our listeners. GO TO KIWI CO DOT com slash Jordan to get your first month free every day counts when it comes to making a difference so don't miss out on this amazing opportunity again go to key week. Oh that's W is C. O. Dot com slash Jordan and get your first month free. That's key dot com slash Jordan. Thanks for listening supporting the shown to learn more and get links to all the great discounts you just heard from our amazing sponsors visit Jordan harbinger dot com slash deals. Don't forget we have a worksheet for today's episode so you can make sure you solidify your understanding of the key takeaways from Chase Jarvis that link is in the show notes et Jordan harbinger dot com slash podcast if you'd like some tips on how to subscribe to the show just go to Jordan harbinger dot com slash subscribe subscribing to the show is absolutely free. It just means that you get all of the latest episodes downloaded automatically to your podcast player so you don't miss a single thing now back to our show with Chase Jarvis..

Jordan Chase Jarvis Jason Kiwi Co sixteen years
"chase jarvis" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Let's fill in the gap right so you're you go off on this adventure. You start taking everything you can and your your semi maniacal about tracking because you can't immediately see see what's good and bad. You know. You'RE GONNA have to do research so you're like every shot while this was like the F stop this was. I wrote down this so you knew when you saw the shots. A month later developed developed Yep you remember it. You could tell what the settings on the camera so you become this fierce autodata but you didn't go up through the quote mainstream stream mentoring assistantship. You know system where you know. In theory that is how you get made in that world you rise up through this very well all defined path not on similar to the art world the painting World Gallery System Rate Haulage right there prescribed path. This is how how you do it if you are kind of like learning on your own outside of all the pros and then you kind of start to sneak in Miami kind of like I do all kinds of examples of sneak again but yeah and you start to sell your work and you're you're selling your work essentially to the same people who are buying the work of if these people who've been doing it for decades so you're taking a very young age because who do you think you are and I think it's fascinating fascinating that you know it's a really interesting example to me of almost the power of of coming from a completely different mindset and almost not even knowing what the system is for sure and making around it had a huge role like my ignorance of what it was supposed to be certainly the catapult to my being able to become an I started living the idea that if you were the verb you could be the Noun. I had business cards cards printed up that said Chase Jarvis photographer before I had a professional camera so you end up selling you worked in relatively short order. You become a really well known photographer doing a lot of stuff with outdoors action sports and you're building this incredible career and something happens in you. That says you know This is really cool but there are other things. There are other things. Was it a gradual awakening or was there a moment while not dissimilar to my grandfather. I think you can look back and you can see very very clearly. Clearly it was a moment. I really wish. It didn't have to be a moment but this is my slow learning. You can just see like this is this is the universe like beating me over the head to pay hit tension to something and in a very similar fashion yeah. I would say I had the career that I had dreamed of. You know that was just fast forward a few years years there where I I figured out a bunch of things that helped me as you said licensed by pictures to people who were you know alongside people who are much much held in higher steam and and had sort of paid their dues cook quote unquote and I had not I think I had paid my dues in a very different earnhardt way but so let's just were there and I was aware that the the life of an independent artist was also very much `bout trying to make it and if you don't take care of your self and try and put money on the table in your pocket or refund in the table money in your pocket that no one else is gonna come along and give it to you so it's very much if felt competitive it felt very chest beady like I have to stand out and this is how you get noticed and that's a myth a well chronicled method. If your work is just great that it's going to you're going to be discovered and that's as you and I both know that is couldn't be further from the truth you have to you have to spend time sharing your work with others and that takes many forms by lightly pondering this at this point in my life if and I'm on an assignment for Nike and I'm in Alaska and again this is fast we had fast forwarded needed so to shoot campaigns for Nike for example unlimited helicopter budget in the in the mounds of Alaska the chew gas range and we'd when you go to Alaska you you sometimes have to sit there for weeks on end waiver storms to blow over and to find the perfect weather in which you go out and you do your work and as a photographer when you're doing those things you it's it's dangerous after big storms storms but you do one hundred percent of your work and that one percent of time where it's most dangerous and and I was caught in a massive avalanche ams the biggest avalanche of the season season and all the Heli ski deals and by every measure every measure. I should be dead right now. I shouldn't be here and you can you can read the story in the book I recounted accounted in in some painstaking detail but suffice to say it was another one of those moments. This is again. Life hit me over the head of the hammer sending look ground. You're really your self awareness as low. You need to be doing something different and it's not like one hundred and eighty degrees on what you're doing right now but it's a different trajectory. That's gonNA solve the things you're questioning right now. Why am I doing this. What's the what's my why what's my bigger purpose a thinking about your work about how important purposes and for me my purpose us was to find my passion and passion was great. It was delivering all the things that I thought you know friends and travel a career and then even that started to feel a little bit hollow and it's like that wasn't quite purpose and it it you know coming close to death as I came. It slapped shit out of me. It was like wake up and yeah it made me realize that I wanted to do something different and it wasn't a bigger more fancy or anything. It was just different and in part it was to share. I had felt like I tapped into like the mainframe I said Oh my gosh I figured out and it was member all the pain than talk the grandfather and the years of trying to figure out how to be good at the craft and then you make it and then it's sort of like when you make it you realize you are just getting started and and so I wanted to see if I could try and find a way to help. Give that gift to other people as well the gift of tapping into the thing that you're supposed to be doing to your wi to your purpose and that opened a whole new door for me which was sort of the next level of purpose for me peeling the onion or opening a door. Whatever now do you want me dad. Yeah I mean it it from the looking in you know it. It looks like this is the move from you as a craft person craftsperson in building a business but focused where like the center of your identity is chased the photographer tape right chased the person who can see in a way that other people can't see and capturing away other. Oh capture it to chase the guy who is moving into this interesting other phase. You describe it in your work as shortly surely did the move between two Arcs right acquisition and contribution. How do you feel like that was a moment where you started to bridge that gap not only was it like. I mean I can reduce it to ten second window telling me it was during the avalanche so when you get caught in an avalanche it looks like it's happening really slow motion and all the the footage that you've seen on national geographic or every scene avalanches happened and skier gets caught him at nine out of ten times. A skier triggers the avalanche avalanche and that was the case with me. We won't go into the details about how we were there. And why were there and we should we have been there and all those things we checked all those boxes but mother nature has a plan and when that happens what you may have heard near death revelations before but time it was like the avalanche took hours like I remember very methodically as.

Alaska Nike Chase Jarvis Rate Haulage Miami earnhardt wi one hundred percent eighty degrees one percent ten second
"chase jarvis" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

14:04 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Ben and Jerry's Cherry Garcia ice-cream when summer comes Ben and Jerry's ice cream just kinda straight up makes me smile beyond Cherry Garcia of course I'm also a fan of chocolate flett chip cookie dough. I confess to having Chunky monkey moments on occasion funny enough. I think the first time I tried it was at the Ben and Jerry's store in Burlington Tin Vermont where it all began. I remember walking in it was just like this multi sensory smile and they've got these warm and Fuzzy memories attached to it. The only challenge of course with Ben and Jerry's is keeping it in the house. I confess to occasionally stashing a pint of Ben and Jerry's ice cream in the way back of the freezer just to be sure it doesn't get devoured while I'm out out of the House. Treat yourself to your favorite flavor. Anywhere scream is sold or find a new favorite at BEN JERRY DOT com. That's B. E. N. J. E. R. ARE ARE Y DOT COM events of your life that have led up to this moment or A big part of this story be part took you there and for those listening we if he wants to really early days won't linked to the conversation. We had like years back. Well touchdown down on one particular moment. You were group in Seattle. You're you're the skate kid. You're always add. If you really soccer you end up finding yourself in college and and do well. You're playing soccer in your mind may be headed to med school after that close to graduating and something really traumatic comes in your life. Take me there so I was reasonably close with my grandparents and they live close to us. my my my parents and I was I was raised with my parents in Seattle that was going to school in San Diego at the time and it was just a couple of days before my college graduation looking. Thanks for having the family down to celebrate the last I wish I could say for years but it was more like five and Change I remember picking up the phone and and and it was my dad who had just still at my grandfather's house in my grandma just dropped dead of a heart attack completely really no forecasts. No elect wasn't having problems. You know signals whatsoever before dislike. I was gone and early in in that like I hadn't dealt with. A lot of people buying that. Were close to me was when grandparents come. Veja grandparents are starting to get older to this was like it wasn't my first grandparents that the to pass but it was certainly like out of nowhere and yeah. I like to try and find I don't WanNa go play it because I don't WanNa make it like just you know twenty four hours later. I was thinking about the upside so you know traumatic experience aside the silver lining that he was an avid hobbyists an avid photographer himself and he he collective is like a tinkerer and a little you know just garage downstairs at a workbench that had all kinds of camera stuff was always tinkering and buying the new thing and both me and my father were hobbyists and when he passed I was given his cameras and little bit of money and with with those two things I had I would say reasonably quickly decided to go explore world and teach myself how to take pictures in part because of his legacy in part because I was inspired by photography I remember looking at pictures that he and my father had shot of me and my friends young kids and not because it was photograph of us or me in particular but it was because it was a moment in time and I remember thinking the power of a photograph to tell an entire story in a one hundred thirty thousand of the second and so to go back to that moment was it was it was again both sort of one of the hardest moments of my young adult life and also I would say the thing that gave me permission it was a I like to think of these moments as the toughest moments as also an opportunity entity because whether we want to or not we have to take a really close look at what's happening in our lives and that we like the passing of someone that we care about it. Just frames frames lot of our lives around who are you. What are you doing with your time with your energy. How are you spending it with with with whom it would be really nice and convenient if we didn't have to do that if we can do it with a pasta or a Sunday morning jog and I do believe that we we can can have access to that but the reality is that for for whatever reason popular culture life we don't so it was a profound profound experience for me. Yeah I mean it. It seems on so many levels and you're one of the things that I'm also curious about so this was deeply traumatic. Somebody cared about deeply and part of you. Would you lost you gained into instant access to this love of his which was sort of shared with view through through equipment gear gear. You're on a path before that moment I was you. Were you kind of had a relatively clear trajectory mind so you saying you know I'm. I'm going to impart honor my my GRANDPA's. It's our legacy through this amazing ability to capture moments and see if I can make that a part of who I am too. It seems like at that point. This also wasn't necessarily Oh. This is my future but but what you also did was you part of that decision was saying no to the plan was saying no to this well plotted path that you are about to embark upon so when you did that in your your mind where you actually was that a hard no in your mind or was that a UNDIS- GonNa take some time and do this thing and see what happens but I kind of plan on going back to that. it was was it was the first this truth right here because there's the what I've told everyone in my life for basically most of my life and then there was you know now having a little distance from it you can connect the dots looking backwards and for me. It was a oh hell no. I'm not doing the thing that everybody else thinks I'm doing going forward. I have to figure out a new thing and to me. It was the first to step in a masquerade in a basically a show that I was going to put on for everybody else in my life to start weasling riesling out of all of the stuff that everybody else wanted me to do all of the expectations of parents and culture and friends and relatives and I knew at the moment that I didn't know that it was going to be photography but I knew that it wasn't going to be the stuff that I had signed up APP. Four very publicly at the suggestion is not strong enough of word and oppression as an is not is too big a word. There's someone there just a a bunch of inputs culturally that and you know we're talking about me right now but this is part of the book that that we're GonNa talk about over the course of the next I know shortwhile here is that everyone's got a whole list of ships for you and if you're not careful you end up living somebody elses all all those sheds or some common even worse an aggregate of all of the should of everybody else for your one precious life and at that moment to go back to your question directly early. I realized that I couldn't sign up for that stuff and this was the beginning of a way out was crack that I could then step step in to figure out what my journey was and at the same time find a way to not do the thing because I was terrified of disappointing everyone in my life people who provided for me and two things occurred to me. I remember at that time and especially now looking backwards but two things one how this is probably the hardest thing I've ever done in my life be willing to disappoint everyone else in my life to do the thing that I knew I had to do which was to it was both Cassini Asli not do what I've been talking about publicly going to medical school or graduate school and whatever and also that if this is hard for me when I'm basically a have white I male am born in the United States in the seventies assisted as a subtle at that time now how brick and the head awareness like wow this is the hardest thing I've ever done imagine if you didn't come from all those privileged backgrounds and I mean to to be after I was lower middle class and I wouldn't say super poor but not well off but had basically every other advantage it was still the hardest thing in the world to do to just grab your own life and start to drive at the way you wanted and in that moment it was the first semblance of wait a minute. This is doable not only. Is it something the thing that I want to do something that I feel like I have to do so this was right at the edge of college for your about to graduate your dating being the person who eventually become your wife. Kim gained so you're close to her and when you make this yeah it impacts your life right. When you make a decision like this and you're you're any deep relationship that will then sustain on for your kids in decades afterwards? It doesn't just affect you. It affects her for sure. I'm curious when you have moments like this how people navigate those intimate conversations and I thought a lot about this and I appreciate you asking the question and it's pretty well chronicled in the book because this is you know I'm talking. I was talking and just moments ago very generally about disappoint people but when you start you talk about a generally and it's a little bit easier you start talking about like your parents or your your spouse or your partner. It starts to get really real and I think that's probably why you're asking the question and fortunately kate nine. Were both young enough at the time and she was born of adventure. She moved a lot as a kid and she'd lived abroad and so the thought of striking out in traveling the world and living very literally beans and and tuna fish out of the can in order to make this possible for for months and months it was relatively manageable but it's a reasonable time to put a pin in that and say I've you know through my own experience as a an adult and through conversations with hundreds of people on my podcast and across creative live and we have millions of students students again a lot of input and a lot of data and there's a really clear pattern arises that that's ultimately the hardest thing that we do is to disappoint others that we care deeply about and for and for take care of us and so while it wasn't too bad on me with Kate because we were young and there was a sense of ambition and exploration and a willingness to we didn't have a lot to lose by do if I do know for the people who are listening right now that that is the thing that's keeping you from doing the things you're supposed to be doing on this world to listen to that little call so I do that voice of that. Whatever whatever you joy you've got as an eight year old or a ten year old when he discovered that thing and you thought you might be able to do it forever and then reality all the goods and the arts and the culture start shirts weighing down on you and it's not it's not a sledgehammer and it's a thousand paper clips on your back a million paperclips and and at some point you just realize you can't escape it until you can. I mean the the weight of external expectations. I think for so many of us is stifling and I think also it. I think it's important for us to probably also touched down in this part of the conversation the fact that we have the weight of expectations which very often just psychologically we very often. We don't want to deal with that. We will we will stifle so much of what we feel. We're here to do in the name of not having to quote disappoint and at the same time you know there as you mentioned different people are born of different means for sure and we'll have it's it's not for summits expectations and literally when you strip that away then it's okay so what is the process by which I go from here to that thing that I have my head for other people it is it is quite realistically much more difficult for sure more involved simply because they come from a profoundly different circumstance yeah and that's one of the things that I'm I I try and be aware of and you know the way that I like to think about it. As if we at least put the spectrum on the table then people can put themselves on that spectrum like I'm not just just because I came from maybe low economic status but all the other benefits of my random birth that and then I had navigated in by sharing that it was hard for me even that relative privilege that hopefully people can put themselves on that spectrum you know and of course there's probably a million different axes right but it's not to purport to provide the roadmap is to show that a road map can be found in all messy stuff half and the roadmap as as you said from where you are to where you WanNa be when I find is..

BEN JERRY DOT Seattle soccer Cherry Garcia Burlington Tin Vermont United States San Diego B. E. N. J. E. R. Kate partner Kim twenty four hours eight year ten year
"chase jarvis" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on Good Life Project

"So my yesterday Chase Jarvis grew up in Seattle's skateboard kid music into soccer went to college then meet this really abrupt turn when his grandfather who loved passed and left him camera and that profoundly changed changed the direction of his life leaving him into the world of photography kind of finding his own way completely bucking the system to become a big name photographer and the World Action Sports and Beyond and then moving into the world of entrepreneurship and servicing contribution where he built a giant company called creative live which has taught tens of millions of people how to essentially build creative lives and livings and his new book out now called creative calling so chase has has been on the podcast before many years ago actually in the very early days funny enough both that time and this time we ended up Yup having issues in our main studio so I grabbed our mobile ring and ran down to the hotel he was staying at and we ended up sort of jamming in his hotel. Oh tell room so you may hear a bit of a difference in the sound a little bit of background noise it is all part of the New York City experience and and we really dive in to serve reflective moment in chase's life why he wrote this book what it's all about and the really big lessons lessons that he has learned as a fiercely creative innovative also rebellious person who has completely built his own path very often going outside of the existing systems completely bucking traditions and expectations and landing in a place where he wants to turn back act now and share. This hard earned wisdom so excited to share this conversation. I'm Jonathan fields and this is good life. Project GALORE project is brought to you by chase so you're thinking thinking about buying a new home at chase. They know you whether it's a vacation home a condo in the city or a new place closer to the grand kids..

Chase Jarvis New York City Seattle Jonathan fields
"chase jarvis" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Hey, folks in this episode. It's a check in with chase Jarvis and creative live. Hey, welcome back to another episode of this week in photo today. We're going to be talking to a good friend of mine. His name is chase Jarvis. And he started a company you may know of it's called creative live, and I'm a big fan of creative live for a couple of reasons. The main reason is the business side of my brain loves what they did in terms of trying to disrupt shake up how online education was delivered. In a nutshell. They started the whole idea of watch it live for free, and then pay or subscribe later, and you can you know, sort of watch the content on demand a think as far as I know they were the first ones to do that. So they've come a long way since the early days of producing contents. And that now we are where we are. So this is sort of a check in state of the union of creative live and chase Jarvis. Chase Jarvis van welcome to this week in photo. I think this is third third or four number. Okay. Get what am I can get. I love it. I love I love chatting you chatting with you. Because you're you are almost like a the a a illustration of the Silicon Valley motivated entrepreneur that has an idea that is talented knows how to push it knows how to talk to VC's also talented photographer and push the whole thing forward. And where the company is now is sort of a testament to what you built so congratulations on that man congratulates seriously. I know how hard it is. I mean, I take that back. I don't know. I don't know how hard it is. But I can imagine how hard is just doing the little stuff that I'm doing. So where where is where is creed? Well, let's start with chase Jarvis. Where are you at now, man? What's what's the state of chase Jarvis? Sure state apace drivers is just really fired up in passionate to help creators. Entrepreneurs.

chase Jarvis Jarvis van
"chase jarvis" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Awesome. And so the study I don't wanna go to nerdy here. But the study the researchers they would wear masks when they did the research because they were afraid of the long term effects of crow hating, and this is this is true. It's a look. Zayn matters episode learn room, you learn very strange things, but the crows the grittiest bird. It's very smart. It's under appreciated. It's for handsome. It's beautiful. What is so intriguing to you about Grint? I think it's the it's our ability to push through things. It's our ability to overcome without. My I get I think I got a healthy dose of grit from my grandmother in particular. She was single mother and basically waited tables and worked in a bar to put her daughters through life and through school. And so I I took I learned that at a very young age when you're trying to put together like have you met my grandpa because they were separated, and yes, I know your grandpa very well. And I remember observing how she ran her household. And when I was when I was over there with my mom had a deep appreciation for what she had made. When I realized was, you know, through a pretty hard run and. In my own life. I started realizing I grew up very confused. I grew up a creative person I was only child and for some that means you were like spoiled. I was not spoiled. I had like Adidas with four stripes. Like the upside down Nike's. Yeah. And and so in that, you know, not being spoiled. I felt like I was trying I had to decide it was very creative. But as I was growing up, I looked at wait a minute. The creative kids were weird. And as you know, an eight year old all you wanna do is fit in. So I also was a gifted athlete. So I ended up sort of just running to the thing that I was it was easier to fit in as and it was only through sort of skateboard culture, many years later, maybe a decade later where I was able to understand that you could fuse those two things and I'd been sort of. And I went to college on a soccer scholarship, and I had. Philosophy. Yep. Studied philosophy and was on the Olympic development team for soccer. But it was really skateboard culture that put those two things together, and in skateboard, culture, like grit. The ability concrete is hard. I don't know if you guys know that concrete's very hard. And there's this sort of the ability to learn tricks in the face of like more than a skin knee, the ability to create such a DIY culture. I think this, you know, this the community here understands and grit is a core value of that community. And I think that is what helped me sort of grow and evolve and find myself so deeply identify with that as a characteristic because in many ways. What set me free? You grew up in middle-class Seattle. Yeah. You're dead. Representing your dad was a police officer and your mom worked at a biotech company, the one that I understand launched Cialis. Yes. Interesting. That's the one with the bathtub with the adults sitting, you know, and as a kid, you would go around your neighborhood as you mentioning and you'd wash cars to raise money to buy a super eight camera. So you could make films what kind of films was a young chase Jarvis making back then wash buckling films with Zora literally sword fighting films. We would cut out cardboard there was a very short. The stunt life of cardboard turns out is not long. Yes. A lot of testing. Then we realized that if you'd wrap these words in foil aluminum foil, they would last a little bit longer and may be shining at the same time. So is with those props basically started making our first films, the first film that we actually screened. Here's a site little side story. So. Saved up money bought the camera saved up money about the film hired. One of my co stars brothers Derek Charleston to to record us all the editing within in camera. He was not a very good cinematographer. But nonetheless, we I think I was age six metaphors film. It was called sons of Zorro the short version of the film is and by the way, there's another film that already exists called the sun. Zoro, this totally different get to now. Just the SS just makes it very different. And we..

Jarvis Grint soccer Adidas Nike Seattle Derek Charleston Zoro Zorro officer development team Zora eight year
"chase jarvis" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

The EVRYMAN Podcast

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"chase jarvis" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

"I'd like to start first and foremost is chase Jarvis if you had to pick one specific thing if ended put everything else aside, what would you consider as is the single most important thing to you today in your life? What's the most important thing in your life? Wow, that is a doozy round. Welcome to correct. Single mos-. Anytime like the most superlative is always always makes me pause because there's so many things to be. I guess that's the leader of just considered so many things to be grateful for. And so if you take the macro view is that it's it's gratitude. I don't think anything. You know the way that a mindset, your relationship with others, the relationship with the world. Doesn't have its roots in gratitude, and I think that's a a lesson that is underdeveloped in our culture. Of course, I think it's gaining, it's getting popularity is gaining awareness, but just thinking this morning as I was saying the word gratitude, I literally the first memory. I have this morning as this like an inhaled in sort of like it was. There's some light coming in in looking at. It was like, wow, how, how amazing is it to be able to see the just like very simple stuff like that. And I try and do that on the mornings for I'm not, you know, in a different head space because the reality is we all have to learn to control our. Inset, but I think the most important thing in the whole world to meet them would probably be gratitude because with you, can you can take on anything are are tough and most is tough, but, but I'm gonna follow in a little more. What are a few things you are most grateful for? Just the more specific better. Okay, sure. The the people be a little bit cliche, maybe at this point men from cop pop culture standpoint. But if you're the average the pipe, you spend the most time with always endeavoured to to surround myself with high-quality forward. Thinking, open communicative connected people, vulnerable people. People who are also, you know radical in their own sense of the word like their in their personality or inventiveness, or warmth or openness. I think. Those are the type of people that move me in inspire me and I'm a transplant a lot of time around folks like that. So certainly have saved people. Creativity clearly is something that I have learned it underpins the solution of of every problem we will ever know it's something toward which I have set my life goal, my north star with offer to live with a, you know, moving out of a bunch of, you know, dropped out of a career professional soccer bailed on medical school and and quit a PHD in philosophy to become a photographer, very untraditional path. You know, my poor parents, but I think that you know, I, when I realized that there's these two levels of creativity, there's creativity option sort of three. There's creates have, do the small see where you're making building in. That's, you know, art design and things like that. And there's greed Tiffany with the capital city, which is your. Our. You know, solving, huge problems and the biggest problems, whether in math, our business or life, they have creativity at a as part of the solution. And then there's, I think the the see that may be wraps it all up, which is when you realize that what you're doing is creating your life that there's a like a meta ark and you're not just a cord bouncing around in the cork bouncing around inside that you actually Amir. You know a writing your own script and that if you don't write your own scripts, someone else, all right for you. I think that's that's very powerful..

chase Jarvis soccer