17 Burst results for "Charlotte Caffey"

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:04 min | 2 months ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"The jane. wetland is playing guitar. None of us really know what they're doing but their punk and then they bring in charlotte caffey this classically trained musician and she brings musicianship to the group and then they get rid of listen. Bring a genus shock. This incredible drummer from baltimore. Who is really good and widsom to shave and as a work ethic and then they get ginger. This manager who really believes in them and has a vision for them. And then when it's not working with margo they find kathy valentine who joins the group and she fits perfectly as their new bass player than they signed at. Irs records miles copeland. Who managed the police stewart copeland's rather and he has vision for them as well so you kind of a assemble..

charlotte caffey kathy valentine baltimore margo copeland Irs stewart copeland
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:54 min | 2 months ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"That's why we wanted to give it a give it a beat to see And it's one of those sequences where we throw the lyrics up to anthem. It gets its moment. Yeah yeah definitely. It's it's well. I will let you guys know that. He will not talk to us either. So he doesn't it is i think. Even though he has a radio show. I think he's a relatively shy man in the end. He ended up liking them and he gave them good reviews right. Yeah so that's that's the irony of it. I guess it was a mutual respect for two tight. Yeah exactly once we have no for sure. I mean he's like he's one of the rock critics of all time. I suppose great in the sense of i guess enormity at the very least it's also the movie to me almost felt a little bit like classically assembling crew type movie way is spaced out is is so funny because it's like okay. Belinda carlisle is the singer and then on drums. is this woman elissa. Bello and margot lavar is on bass. The jane. wetland is playing guitar. None of us really know what they're doing but their punk and then they bring in charlotte caffey this classically trained musician and she brings musicianship to the group and then they get rid of listen. Bring a genus shock. This incredible drummer from baltimore. Who is really good and widsom to shave and as a work ethic and then they get ginger. This manager who really believes in them and has a vision for them. And then when it's not working with margo they find kathy valentine who joins the group and she fits perfectly as their new bass player than they signed at. Irs records miles copeland. Who managed the police stewart copeland's rather and he has vision for them as well so you kind of a assemble..

margot lavar charlotte caffey Belinda carlisle elissa Bello kathy valentine baltimore margo copeland Irs stewart copeland
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

02:41 min | 2 months ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"I think i heard about from you. Just a when the bengals and the goes broke up. You said what about the ban goes. Is that true you to get to the bands together and just calling the bongos or the bango goes it. Sounds like something i would have done. Probably did because the goes broke up basically because charlotte caffey. Who's a wonderful person at a great songwriter was making more money than genus shock. You know who is the drummer. And she kind of resented. I think they later realized what they had and reformed and the bangles kind of degenerated through a series of things that had nothing to do with the group but anyway the point wise. I figured well you know you can take a couple of people one group and the other group and put them together. It would probably work. So yeah i would. I would say. I probably did do that time but i just want to ask you really quickly about the in the upcoming film we we were rebels. How do you feel about. Have you seen any part of it. Yet director came to me with the idea of doing good. I said look. I mean best. Yemen is going to be your baby. Want to influence. You wanna be the guy telling you what you need to do. Because a lot of people thought that somehow a we would we would control what was happening and i. I didn't want it to be. I wanted to be an outsider. Looking in basically. I said but really the story of irs. This universal is that we start off being rebels but we ended up as another just another corporation. Said that arch is interesting to me because a lot of people are gonna go through that and it's an art that's interesting for people to avoid you know so. Iran has a lot of lessons within it. So make sure that. That's what's in the story because that's really where the story is. So you have to think story. You have to think what's going to hold the attention of people whereas the garlic milkshake. I waiting to see how this ends up but it was fun to see a lot of the acts and what they had to say was fun for me. I hope we get to see it. We can't wait to see it. Thank you so much for your time. So the book is out now. It's two steps forward. One step back my life in the music business. Miles aac copeland the third. The ace stands for acts by the way. Do your brothers have other cool. Middle names ax is a great middle name. Actually my oldest son is miles. Axe copeland a fourth nice. My youngest son is named his action pakistan. Emerson soy so. Yeah acts seems to be the name that does sort of play with the family you know and here. I am mccaslin. Yeah we have battleaxes on the wall. Thank you so much for your time. It was a fun. Read really Both hollering.

charlotte caffey bengals Yemen irs Miles aac copeland Iran Axe copeland mccaslin Emerson pakistan
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:01 min | 8 months ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"And 6 80 these sports leader before we get to things like sports. What do you need? I just need to know you're quick thought on. Yeah, The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame nominees. Now that this is different than the inductees is just a nominee's Yeah, A lot of great guys get nominated they want they don't get in. It's just like the pro football like Johnny Lynch had to wait all those years. I haven't seen the list of today is the one that's catching that the one that's catching the most buzz just for people like you and me and Because they're just so cool is the go, Go's Oh, immediately put him in there without nominations. There's there's no discussion. They go right in, but they were the first all another. The first almost put him in, but immediately immediately. Okay. They're the first all female group where all the women play their instruments to have a number one album and single put him in. Okay, That's a woman. Always. I put him in. You put them on the Megatron level. Calvin Johnson, Peyton Manning. Not only that. I mean, they got their popper perfection. I mean, like a lot of there, so I don't even know how the hell they did that. Actually, when you look back because they were so young, there were kids. There were kids but their world Here's the tweet credibly. Good tune. Happy Valentine, who I believe was the Well, she drummer basis. Oh, God, I'm embarrassed. I should do Please. Charlie. Katherine confused her with Charlotte Caffey. Um, but Kathy Valentine tweets Wonderful news to wake up and find out that the go Go's air nominated to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. She says that she wrote this while you love that, she writes. The go go's are the real thing straight from the clubs of L. A all the way to the top, self taught and self propelled Rock on Sister's true and think about the abuse. They had to endure him. And it wasn't easy back then, for a bunch of young girls to get in front of some of those hostile Southern California audiences seriously more if you and I talked about it. Those are some of the most ferocious audiences in the history of live music down there, and they faced them the go Go's had to face those audiences and You want more credibility? Last thing Belinda Carlisle herself was the original drummer in legendary punk band the Germs, So if you're looking for credentials, you're not going to get any more than a go go there. One of seven first time nominees, including Ready for this food fighters in Wow. How are these guys Get a nominee for the first time Iron Maiden. See now This is the thing I like about making the metal community is not gonna like this. I'm not a big maiden guy. I don't know. And then how about this Jay Z nominated for the very first time? Yeah, he'll go into he'll go into because no. Two pots gone. Turner for the first time. What? Who? Tina Turner for the first time. That makes no sense. How is that even possible? Somebody named feel a cootie who I'm not familiar with. And then Tian Warwick, not this is rock and roll like Dionne Warwick. Maybe they're running out of people. You know what I mean? Do you know the way to rock and roll? Yes, anyway. Those are the ones that show goes in Fu fighters in Thank you very much. And Jay Z And and Jay Z into. Yeah. Okay, Drumroll, please. We had an 8 A.m. announced that we're gonna make it again here at 9 29. Yes. Drumroll, Please..

Kathy Valentine Jay Z Belinda Carlisle Dionne Warwick Iron Maiden Tina Turner Johnny Lynch football Rock Calvin Johnson Peyton Manning Charlotte Caffey Southern California Charlie Katherine
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Eddie Van Halen do the solo and beat it. So Michael was just reaching out to all the rockers to get some help or Quincy was. Of course, you got to say Michael. Is on it. Charlotte Caffey of the go Go's Is 67 today guitarist who wrote the song We've Got Handsome, deep lyrics. They're a Manford Mann is 80 years old today. And Edward Whitey Ford celebrating a birth date today. Born in 1928. He died 13 days ago, and Carrie Fisher, Princess Leia from Star word with a birth date today. Born in 1956. And Alfred Bernard Noble, born in 18 33 died in 18 96. He's the guy that established a fund for the Nobel Prize. He made his fortune by inventing TNT. Dynamite. That's how he made his money. See something you learned in my mind. I'm sorry. I need local news for that's going on around me. Travel timeto work will be severe weather Stay informed. What affects me directly. It was radio 12 Local W away. I Tony Parker for Wendy Bar, beef and Oh, my goodness. Recently had the best revise I've ever had the marbling, the tenderness, the flavor. Absolutely amazing. I'm still tasted it. I got it from the windy Bar Ranch. Which is just 65 miles north of San Antonio. On highway 2 90 in Stonewall Texas. These folks have got it down to a science all their beef is 100% black Angus. 100% locally raised in fed in Stonewall and never shipped off to a feedlot.

Alfred Bernard Noble Edward Whitey Ford Eddie Van Halen Michael Charlotte Caffey Stonewall Texas Manford Mann Bar Ranch Nobel Prize Carrie Fisher Stonewall Quincy fed Tony Parker San Antonio Princess Leia Wendy Bar Angus.
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

"Yeah. Fifty seconds in no chorus but you're at the Middle Eight So it needed some TLC and obviously got it and. became a big. That's a good song I think I like it. So at the at the same time at the textiles were going nowhere and she realized that the go-goes were gaining in. Popularity and at the end of nineteen eighty on Christmas night, she went to see X. at the whiskey they ruled the scene Los Angeles Elbow they just been released him. So she was in the middle of it, which is a good place to be because it was there that she met Charlotte. caffey. and Charlotte knew about Kathy, from the tech stones and asked if she could play Bass. Now this is a similar story to Charlotte Story and John Does Book that when she met Belinda. a little while earlier than this meeting with Kathy. Belinda asked her she could play lead guitar when when half when Charlotte only know how to play the keyboard. And Charlotte. Of course said, of course I know how to play lead guitar and when home and quickly learned how to play lead guitar will. This is the same thing that happened to Kathy because when Charlotte Astor if she could play the Bass Cathy said, she could even though she'd never played the bass before she'd only played guitar. So she went home and because Margot was sick Margo had like hepatitis or mononucleosis or something like that. They needed a bass player for the next shows they had lined up. So she got a rehearsal tape from Charlotte borrowed a fender Mustang Bass which proved to be perfect and spent three days and nights learning to play bass on all their songs and when they got together for rehearsal. The other light other people liked how she played and she knew what they should sound like when to swaying when to drive and her timing. So they really liked her and She started playing with them live with their eight sold out whiskey shows and everyone of course showed. Up For whiskey given other musicians. So it was so much fun for her because people really loved the Gogo. So it was really a shot in the arm for her to appear on stage and she said it was best time she'd ever had on stage or as a musician nineteen eighty-one began with Kathy on cloud nine meeting. Charlotte had changed her life. They got causative coverage in the L. A. Times and Charlotte asked her if she wanted to stay on of course, she did she want did she want to be a songwriter? Yes. So they had to kick Margo out. And Fats on in the documentary about how they did that you know these are all young women. They're not very good at these interpersonal things but the five event felt good together and they really wanted Kathy to be part of their band. So that's what happened. I think the thing with Margo that we learned from the documentary that Margot was a real punk. AFICIONADO and only wanted to play punk music and the go go's were at that time even going into a more pop direction. So they you know they took their need. Did she did she ate them Music Margot or Kathy Kathy? Apparently she did. So you know what matters is usually what happens You know and it's unfortunate for Margo but you know it's unfortunate for Pete. Best. Beatles without ring. So. Yeah. You. Agree you gotTa do what you gotTa do but but sometimes I'm just saying about you know being young how how? How, how it was done? Was Yeah you know it's A. Yeah it's it's never good when you know you're you're you're. Injured or Right Dick And you know somebody comes in to just you know help you out and then they end up taking your position. That must hurt but I don't know if this is in the book but I know a Karma does come back to bite Kathy. I believe she gets replaced did A in round two, thousand, twelve, one of these reunion. She got. She got hurt and. Somebody replaced got hurt the first time the Cocos broke up and she didn't want that. which will see later yeah, anyway. Anyway. So so they took their music, you know to labels, and of course, they had lots of rejections which all came from men There had never been an all female band successful enough to warrant taking a chance. So they didn't get any bites, but finally some unnamed miles copeland. who was the brother of Stewart? Copeland IRS record yet wanted to sign them to his new label. Irs Of course. One of his first bands he managed was the police because his brother was in police. So He had a certain. Amount of experience there of course. Kathy loved her new life. Now, the record deal was only icing on the cake. She got paid forty dollars a week and they paid her rent to an apartment off of sunset. And as she says, this was my time, our strip, our town. So I, thought this would be a good place to play the Song go-goes Song this town. which I believe was about. La. Yes sir. An cool. Song Bill. So let's get it. All right this.

Kathy Kathy Charlotte Margo Charlotte Story Margot Belinda. Charlotte Astor mononucleosis Stewart Los Angeles Beatles L. A. Times Charlotte. caffey. Mustang IRS Irs Pete Cathy
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

"Well you know we're the this song and The song before. We don't get along you know you can still hear the that L. A. Punky routes You know the the you know the early x, the blasters sort of thing you know the the bands that came out of the mask in the late seventies they you know there's a little bit of a rockabilly influence going on I think more. So than anything I think that's what you got out of the La punk seeing more. So than New York and and and London of which those were the only punk scenes. The exception here and there every once in a while but primarily, those three cities high the original incarnation that seventy six to about eighty, one, eighty, two, I think you know when? When the L. A. C. got a really misogynistic in Yeah. And aggressive. In any kind of just died out pretty quickly. Yeah. Although although there was always, it was always a punk element going on any underground I mean obviously it didn't come into the mainstream until the mid nineties the that you start to get, you know pop punk songs if you will. So but yeah, I can hear some of that there with those two some just want to refer people back to our the rock and roll librarian. The. Those. The podcast we did on the John Doe Compilation Book about the La Punk scene which was now under the big. The big, Black Sun I was like, Oh my God I can't remember the name of the book. Which Kathy didn't write a chapter for that but both Jane we'd land and Charlotte caffey wrote chapters for that, and it's a very evocative book about what what the La punk seems like at that time and my little sister did see she said of the band's she saw in l. a. during that period she saw the go-goes most smallest of all and that they were definitely had a real rough edge that she didn't recognize when the first album king album. I'm sure we will get into that when we get there. Yeah. I I will say that again you know our sister show of Devil's music has an interview John DOE coming up. Oh how fun I'm looking forward to that? So anyway, she was out at the clubs they were looking for musicians and one of the drummer's who answered Kathy and Carla's at was genus shock but she was wearing overalls and and she had her hair permed and they didn't think she was a good fit. So that's kind of funny like before Kathy gets into the go go's she meets genus shock and as a drummer and decides not to hire her for her band probably the. Oh but Anyway. But as soon after that will only if it comes back to haunt her later in this story. But soon, after that, she was she had gotten gina hired by the go. Go's after she had a makeover which I think is funny. So, instead, Carlin cafe hired to man Marc cuff and Dave provost, and they named their band the texts tones. the first Demo Demo included her song. We don't get along which we've heard already and Carla's friend Mary Jake Riviera Number Jake Riviera. Who was the manager of rockpile which we talked about? Book. Yeah. Yeah. The band this a crossover at the band was axed. Asked to the tech stones were asked to lend their equipment to nick lowe for the cruel to be kind music video at the Tropicana. Motel. So when you see the cruel to be kind music video, that's rockpile or Nick Lowe's music video, you can see that the drum kit has the name Tex tones on it, but drum kit that that rock piles drummer is playing. So I thought that was really funny They didn't get the tech sons didn't get a record deal, but she had a lot of fun being in La and being part of the scene. Of. Like that. So meanwhile, she visited Austin in the summer of nineteen eighty and had a fling. With a young man and then the flight back to La she scribbled the lyrics to the song vacation which we heard at the front of this at the head of this podcast on Afghan. Yeah. Yeah. Many people. Seemed to write lyrics to songs on Napkins on airplanes that she's not the first one I've heard that did that. And vomit bag right? And she said if we've had that. The words were about true life longing. So this is another example of her being able to get her own emotions into a song and So you know the text ounce kind of did okay. They recorded EP but they didn't get. Any results. So but let's play -cation by the tech tones because I want people to hear what the song sounded like before the go-goes got it and it's You know it's basically verse after verse after verse, there's no bridge and there's no. Yeah Yeah I think. The goes version is You know a a dual writing credit with the with the Kathy and Charlotte, and I think Charlotte. So when it came up with the the actual Laurel, the GO I. Does. All right. Let's the air. That's here the original incarnation. This is kathy singing. Okay. The Tech Stones Vacation..

Kathy La Nick Lowe Charlotte caffey Carla New York L. A. L. A. C. Mary Jake Riviera London Carlin cafe Charlotte Austin Tropicana Jane Marc cuff Dave provost
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Their number one debut album, Beauty and the Beat and cemented the Go Go's As the first All female Bantu right arrange perform their own songs to the top of the charts. They still hold this record to the debt to this day. What followed was an intense four years of dizzying success, never ending touring external pressures to keep the machine going, and the internal pressures of five young women trying to navigate business and friendship under a blinding spotlight. A new Showtime documentary the Go, Go's documents, the early rough and tumble days of the band as it navigates the punk scene, the magical moments they made as a group the tough decisions to keep and lose members. The forces that broke them apart in the bonds that ultimately brought them back together. Alison Ellwood that directed the film joins us today. Alison, Welcome to all of it. Thank you. Thanks for having me. So you start with the go, Go's earliest years, and they truly were a punk band. I don't think a lot of people really understand how pumped they really were. What was it about the punk scene that attracted the different members of the band. I think it was just a place of freedom for each of them. They could be. They could express themselves. They could be who they were without any judgment. It was a very welcoming community. Um and very exclusive, inclusive and they were all drawn to that. The amount of food you have is pretty incredible. Did you know you were gonna have this this treasure trove of video footage? Or was it a happy surprise? I knew there was quite a bit out there. But it was certainly happy surprised when we found certain things like the Elks Lodge thing. I don't think anyone's ever seen that footage. So there's certainly with some amazing surprises. But yeah, there's some, there's some amazing material from them. How did starting in the punk scene set the go? Go's up for success Later on being part of an L. A punk scene. What does that do for a band? I think it just made them happen up pretty quickly. I mean, it was really the Tauron, England really toughen them because they went there thinking they'd be really well received and they were not at all. It was really hard. They were spit on and bottles thrown out. Them. They you know, were opening for madness in the specials. Who were Scott bands in these guys? You know where girls from L a totally different scene. But I think it just toughen them up and it also opened them. You know creatively because they said the punk scene was so Inclusive and allowed you to be who you were that they were, you know, it enabled them to be to be freethinkers in terms of their song writing and their their musical chops as they as a group. How hard was it for them to land a record deal? It was really hard. They even though they were, they had come back from England and you know they were selling out shows and people were talking about them constantly, and they were huge. You know, no one would find them. Ginger kept getting letters saying thanks, But all girl bands just don't make any money. And so it you know. Finally, Miles Copeland and IRS came along and gave him gave him a chance. Three of the group's initial members blended Carlisle, Jane Wiedlin and Charlotte Caffey were really ambitious, and I use that as a compliment. I think ambition and women is a compliment, but it did. It was a source of tension at times and two of the original members of the group left. Can you share why these members left? Well, I think a list of the original drummer, she was sort of torn between her work life and band life, and she herself in the film says. I sort of stuck my toe and that never dove in all the way. And Margot, who was the original bass player. I wouldn't say she wasn't ambitious. I would say that she just really wanted to remain a punk band, and the evolution of the band was becoming more pop. And she wasn't in favor of that. She wanted to remain a punk band she identified with the punk scene and and, you know, so ultimately, they decided to, you know, move more towards the pop. Nothing without her, which you know was hard on all of them. Obviously hardest on Margot. My guess is Alison Ellwood, director of the Go Go's which Canal Seong on Showtime. By the way, the documentary they really had to make some hard decisions and In one case it was walking away from someone. The manager who was there from the beginning. At the time. Why did the members of goes think this was the right thing to leave their longtime manager? Well, they'll all say that they actually didn't want her to leave. They wanted her to work with a bigger company because it was just becoming overwhelming for one person to manage. But from Ginger's perspective, the manager's perspective She was, you know, had brought this stand all the way up to, you know, number one record, And then suddenly, you know, she's being told Okay. You did a great job, but we'll take it from here was insulting to her, so she just left. But the band members will all say that they actually didn't want to leave. They wanted her to work with them. But it was not a situation that Ginger felt comfortable with. And you get in the sense of the film that this this Their parting of ways still weighs very heavily on ginger. What was it like to have to walk some of these these women through some really tough memories because there's there's some tough stuff in the documentary as well as joy, but there are some tough things that are said and we lived. Yeah, there there was, You know, I mean, from the very beginning with all of them, including Ginger, too. You know, the pact that I made with all of them was, you know you You guys be honest with me and I'll tell a film that's honest and isn't a high geography but we'll have some real heart and Heart to it. And sometimes that includes warts and all. I mean, I was surprised how forthcoming that they were in the interviews. I think they were a little bit surprised about it, but they were very relaxed and conversational injuries. I've gotten to know them all a little bit. By that time, and you know, I'm very happy that they agreed to be so honest. And as we're talking about honesty, we get a sense early on in the film that mental health is going to be part of this story, especially with two of the main songwriter Charlotte and Jane, and in the case of Jane's, reveals she had a lot of depression as a kid and was later diagnosed as bipolar. How did you want to handle the issue of mental health?.

Ginger Alison Ellwood Jane Wiedlin Margot England Charlotte Caffey Elks Lodge Miles Copeland Carlisle Scott IRS director
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

"Hey. This is mark from performance anxiety here on the Pantheon podcast network. Have you ever wanted to sit down with your favorite artists and here the wild stories that happened on tour or in the studio? We get these stories for you and a lot more. Stories like the singer who was defeated three times on stage in one night. The guitarist who was shot outside a white castle by fire, Marshall? then. There's the keyboardist who got his start making instruments for trash. The band that had to sneak their tore manager across an international border. The Bass player who's almost stranded in Poland. And Front Man who's been his sixteenth birthday in an Israeli prison. Ever wonder what Bourbon paired with your favorite song got that to. This isn't a bullet point. Sound Bite interview that shows a conversation. Honored the best stories you've never heard. This is Scott Base I play Bass Club Western. This is Michael Gerard. Arm. Galvin's hey everybody. This is Chris trainer from Bush. This Bob Rock? I make records I am scarlet page everybody. I am we Are Mc, and I'm. Sorry. This is more than near listening to performance anxiety. Join. US, here, performance anxiety every week best stories and music..

Bass Club Western Poland Michael Gerard Bob Rock Bourbon Scott Base Galvin Marshall Chris Bush
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

"Wanted to course to lift I i. really felt like there was something more there like this was this was a sketch and it wasn't finished quite yet and I, it was hard. It was scary to ask her because I would never wanNA. Step on anyone's creativity or anything, and she was totally open to it, and we sat down and worked on it and really. That song is great and really just just grabbed a moment you know and it's like and I you know it's really happy. I took that risk and said something to her I don't think the dog would have made it on the record have on so..

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

"One you know one box to boost my leads and it's just very punk and varied. That's just who we are. So we didn't decide. We were going to be become pop because that's just kind of happened to us in a way. And that's why people never knew about the punk rock days because they just figured. Oh, look at this new band on the scene. I have no idea where we came. So well, you kind of made the transition in the songwriting I mean. The POP IS A. Bad Word it was more rock. Cut Hard thing too because the moat melodic it was popsy. What we were doing is what exactly? What Green Day you know Philly Joe the good friend of ours and we saw him on one of our records and he's fantastic. fucking amazing and so talented. And that's kind of like what Green Day with these. Really Melodic. But they're punky and that's that's what we founded like back. Then they were incredibly melodic that the way we played was just Wa. and. Then we re recorded it was just Richard God originally took it a little bit. He had this vision about what he you know to highlight the songs 'cause the songs on that first record or extrordinary to and in my mind and I can look at it like if I never wrote a note of them, just like listened to going out he's really like I love these songs. And So it's cool and yeah. So kind of like I think that's where people you know and then that the press started calling us America's sweethearts they only fucking new. You know like we were not America's sweethearts and everyone. Yeah no way. So but it's just so funny like that perception you know. Well what I love is that when you wrote, we got the be you introduce the sort of Surf Rock riff in there. And adjust, well, that's one of the great things about a ban you bring in all types of different influences. Craig Guitar because a reality was if it's the truth I was. Not. A guitar player in the sense of like, Oh, I know how to get found on my aunts and stuff and I was always trying to get a stain on the guitar because. And I kept it sounded too choked when I played it if that makes sense and And I had I had a twin river. You can't really get I mean unless I had a master volume on there and that one did not pre cvs it didn't have. A master volume anyway I I return reverberate, and that's how I got started playing really surfie guitar lines. and. If you listen to that I records I yeah it's all over there with. The town on and. I mean Got The kind of thing. So but that and I also love definitely I loved I grew up with all that. So it may fence push. He wrote the song while watching the twilight zone. Correct. So. Maybe a little remember. I can't remember which episode I wish I could. But then everything just sort of blew up. You know like. Just changed overnight where you went from two playing small clubs to stadiums. Here you are. You intersect with the popularity of MTV and a must have been surreal to go from. Being a punk band in the clubs twelve, some you know everyone knows you. It's sort of like beetle mania in a way. Well, it would you know we. Wanted to we have no idea our idea of my Khadafy just sell a hundred thousand records in that like Dallas it like that would be the greatest thing in the world. We have no idea that what was going to happen and to be quite honest that whole time when it was exploding and happening so quickly. It was very scary. Very, overwhelming. It wasn't like Whoa I'm just gonNA revel in this. You know I it it residing for me. I'm not speaking for the other girls I was like. Wow and I'm a little more private than all that and and luckily we didn't grow up in the age of like cell phones and you know social media 'cause that would have been brutal for us if we were just out of control and out of our mind we'd partied all the time and it was just like anything went and you know we did a lot of work. Let's put it that way we worked up at five. And but but going In, the limelight like that and. They'll probably had a lot of stress on the band at cells, and of course, anything the change of the amount of work we did with insane. It was insane and we didn't know how to say no and Miles Copeland record. He is just starting s records and you know it's like they were a baby company. We were baby band. We were all just trying like Oh. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Fine. They give these scheduled every day like five million interviews and like you know. Play are you know it was an plus on top of it? We were partying and having the time of our lives and whatever. But. Exhausting, out. Can totally burn out. So we'll just watching a documentary, all the spots you had to do. Hi, this is Charlotte for MTV. Schedule Charlotte you gotTA DO MTV Today. Be. Exhausted And we had no idea. We're just on a ride that we just were writing. It was like. We look we have. A tremendous amount of you know. Memories and and. Find and you know we don't we don't. Wish we were living at again none of us do that but it's like it was. We are so grateful that we got. We're the most grateful for is the PUNK rock scene in La because that's what bond everything and that was. Pre, getting signed and it was just something about that time of my life. That was so freeing an open and just know anything went and there were no rules and that was my favorite like that was a great time where there wasn't any pressure. Hey. Yeah. Because when he gets so big, it becomes more of a business than you yeah and the pressure and like who you're an artist, you don't WanNa think about music business. You know. But you. But now we learn that that's something you have to understand. It's important to understand it because it's part of it's part of it. You know and nowadays there's you know all sorts of aspects to it and people can it's Kinda cool. Though 'cause people can go back have gone back to doing. DIY stuff because there's so many ways of presenting yourself like Youtube or whatever you know and it's a very different world, but it's Yeah. Well as one of the main songwriters, it's gotta be so different than wanting to write a song and having to write a saw especially like pressure write a hit. Song. So that in itself as a song run or not just the band member had extra presser pressure on you. But I think with the second record you know it was. Scary. It was like, oh. Okay. How are we gonNA top that and in Kathy showed me vacation there was a song she had in her own band the tech town I said to her I said to her you know something I think with a little work. This could really like I. Felt like the chorus wasn't. I.

MTV America Craig Guitar Youtube Philly Wa. Richard God La Miles Copeland Kathy Dallas Charlotte
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

"Like that part when documentary where you say you would take a forty five by Elvis and then put on some classical music would record. Yeah, right. So do you still do you still collect records? You have records around You had. Married to Jeff McDonald at Red Cross and let's put it this way we have. Yeah. He he's a record collector. I have records I. We have a whole closet full that we call it the media closet. Not. Really. But yeah, we have things like. Collector you know are all our original final and Yeah I mean I love. My of course you know I'm sure you've spoken to people that loved that ritual when you s but get I remember specifically getting the white album because. We I went to an all girls high school. Actually the school is back in the heart high school that Megan Markle went to and in Hollywood immaculate heart and. We when we got when I got the white album, I brought it to school. and. Hadn't opened it yet. But I opened it there we like during lunch we would listen you know like in some classrooms had erected a record player. and. It was I just loved that ritual of. When you would open a wreck album and that smell similar one and take you know and they get to you get to look at the lyrics. It was just everything about that with. The? Different. But that's for case if progress you know true. But I also like how. US You make I I. Don't know if it was you but at the beginning of the documentary. someone says people automatically assume we were put together by some guy, but we didn't selves. was that kind of a reference to the runaways and other you know? And all girl bands. I thought it runaway I mean. I and run away. And I mean come on you know that was that was really cool but. We. Did Yeah I mean people just would automatically think Oh, like you know. Who is someone put them together and? With them and told them what to wear. You know that Kinda Shit and it's like now and we were completely our on like organic. Organic grown within with each other yeah. Made in a lab like as some Gimme right? Exactly. But it was cool that you also your I I mean you you were the house band at the whisky I mean, that is just That must when you were playing. When the goes are playing, there was that during your time or was that just before you joined the band I started the band like the Linda Jane Me. And ELISSA and Margot. We were the original members right and so yeah, we I would from be. When Belinda and Margot I was playing a two story. It was playing at the Starwood this on and it was the jam the Dicky's and the eyes and they came up to me Belinda Margot and asked if we're putting together an all girl band, you want to join me neither lead guitarist and I said sure Do you play lead guitar. Yeah. That was a lie because I didn't. But I figured I could learn and So we started rehearsing when I got back from I went to England briefly and I got back and we started rehearsing and then we got some gigs and our first gigs were the worst things I've ever heard in my life it was horrifying we were terrible. But. There was something there. It was like rural. We kept rehearsing and then when we got jeanine in the ban, she kicked our asses like you know like we have to rehearse every night we gotta get better. You know like really and we did and we did get better. So then Kathy joined and. Let's see Gina. Join me started in nineteen. Seventy eight M in China joined. In nineteen seventy, nine and Cabbie joined in nineteen eighty. So that's how it went. Well what's interesting about that story how you said you lied and said, you knew how to play guitar is that you went up to Cathy right and astroturf she and Kathy. Lies. Never. Play. So it sounds funny. We talked about that like the perfect shooting that that that that little alive that changed our lives now will you suspicious? They can okay. She doesn't know how to put days. How are you feeling about that? It was just that she she came in to those. She played at the whisky. There were eight shows because there for like. Let's see. There were four nights, two shows a night that we had sold out. On. The New Year's eve run for like a December thirty, thirty one to think of that. Nineteen eighty going and tiny eighty-one. She blew blew away she was fantastic and it was like that and that was just it that was. You know it felt like the picture was complete right in you know Gina having replaceable if and. Kathy replaced Margot that was just In my mind like, okay, we're this. This feels really good. Page and in the same direction. And, Kathy Still Kicks Ass I. Mean I heard her new stuff that went along with her Autobiography and while the music was good. Not that I'm surprised it really sounded contemporary and heavy in cutting edge. It was so good So it goes to show how you guys still have it. You still have that creative energy. Never went away. Yeah. But back to I. Think when you had Catholic replaced Mardo Margot was. More interested in being punked than. Moving over to more pop. Here's the thing. You're not. We're not just saying, oh, we're going to be a ban now we've always. You it's like are saying is you can take. the grow out of the punk that you can't take the punk out of the girl. We are still those girls that we were. Back. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, eight, we're still that tough. You know. Funny rockets, doubts who we are, but you know over the music was evolving and once the first record with made you know Richard God or as much as we hated it when we first heard that record. We I I understood we understood quickly that. You. Know I wanted to be on the radio I grew up with listening to A. Radio with those radio stations that play top forty but all different kinds from rock to pop to whatever you know and it's like that's the lips were back then. And I WANNA debt, and so we if we recorded the record, the way like we founded live, we wouldn't have gotten there because we were too. It was too radical because there's no way we would have gotten on the radio because we we were and so. We Still Arches I mean on live were very. Minimal setup Jane had to Marshall Amps I've got like a you know. A Fox eight, thirty and A. Cinder Deluxe and.

Belinda Margot Kathy Linda Jane Me Gina Jeff McDonald Margot I Elvis heart high school Red Cross Starwood China Megan Markle A. Radio jeanine Hollywood Richard God England ELISSA
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

"Really. I got the right before and it has a dawn on me I call him gone from break but dj bomb break, and then he went you joined ex- when we started breaking up and then I go goes we're forming at that point and I. You know they were looking for members and they knew made it. See me play and Approached me and I said, yeah sure. I'll join your band. Reformed the goes. Yeah. Now. Did you so you must have. I mean there's a line in there that the go's one of happen if. Weren't for La punk scene. So you must have it was a community, right? You knew all the bands I didn't grow up another time I grew up in east coast. So I always wondered you know what it was like in that scene, you know with the germs and acts and other bands. So you pretty much hung out with that whole. All those people, Right Yeah. Yeah. The The math the underground club to grow That one that looks kind of like Ground Zero for. I think in late seventy, seven there's A. I think that they started having shows. I know that the is played one of the first. Show there and It was a really exciting I have been in a couple of different bands prior out this. Kind of just having fun but you know the eyes of the first ones where. We got play at you know some really cool places and. We I don't know it was just a A very cool moment in time. I'm always grateful about part of that. We have so much fun I mean the mouth was just in saying it was like. You go down the stairs. That's why the fire. Department. Would always shutdown shows such a fire hazard. And it's a big cement room. So you can imagine the acoustics and there always like crazy and inevitably at the end of every weekend, there'd be broken toilets and like you know it was just an and that's where we rehearse too. So the most I remember we shared a room with the most excellent and the motels we kind of. You know rotated are. Times of rehearsing and It was a very, very, very creative, very free time. You know it was like all about self expression that the punk rock movement and that's exactly what happened there. I was. Saying how Jane said that she felt power powerful for the first time in her life probably because You know it's there's sort of this liberating creativity to it where you didn't have to follow the rules, you just express yourself. Right now no roles and that's why you know Belinda. Started thinking about forming ban they were like, well, we'll just put all girl band together. You know let's do that and and that totally appeal to me 'cause you know there was already I think four members of the band and then they asked me to join and. and. Then we started rehearsing I. Missed the first. GIG 'cause I was in England with the dicky's Leonard Phillips was my boyfriend at the time So they played they played like. Two and a half song at the. They only knew like only we only. They only rehearsed like I think to songs, and so they played one over I. Don't know it was really funny story but So when I got back from England. Shortly opted out, we started rehearsing. So that's how that. The whole thing just started, and then we just never stopped Mike Literally for forty years. God. And here, you were pretty much classically trained on piano right? I mean you new musical theory. And here you go right into the punk scene which. It was I consciously thought Oh, I could forget all that shit. You know it's like no, this is has nothing and it was. A very freeing thing because complete like nothing there are no rules. You write what you right and you play the way I didn't. I played piano and I also played like I had. Tinkered around on Acoustic. Guitar. But I've never played electric guitar until. Gave Act I. Don't know if you know Geza but he was part of the. You know he he actually recorded Don't talk to me and he lived in the house a little house in Hollywood West Hollywood and His roommate had his. The only thing he had an bedroom was a mattress. And a Marshall of Marshall amp. With a Les Paul Those are the three things that were in that room. So I was I went in there and I picked up big Itar and turn that amp up I just played an e court. It was the greatest feeling I. think I've ever had in my life and I was like, Oh, my God. So. Win Bloomington Hey you know do you WanNa join the ban we break Atari was like hell yeah. So and that's where that came from and been you know. It was just you know that whole time it's really really something else. Will you have one of the best lines on the documentary I see if I think you said something like you looked pretty straight, but you had a twisted mind. Got That's true. Yeah. No I mean you know I've been very open about my drug addiction and my you know that struggle and but as of last February right before. We shut everything down I had. Celebrated thirty five years of sobriety, real sobriety. Don't. Yeah. Thank you. Yeah. I mean I don't I don't particularly chemicals whatsoever and But it's It's You know. I doubt just what I was going through at the time so. And I managed to enjoy myself a hell of a lot but also you know Just do a life it was. It was in that was my twisted mind to was like you know had like. Figuring out how to manage that it was really a full another fulltime job dealing. So while also saw it as you didn't want to live the status quo life as a creative person, you wanted to do something different. It would. Seem, like the the normal suburban person. You'd be bored with that. Maybe yeah. But you also loved music at a really young age right I mean I. Did I did I was very I started playing piano at four but I also started listening to the radio when I was like five years old like you know back then it was like couple radio stations in La and you know it I love songs I just that's what I grew up on the songs like the whatever The. You know top forty radio station, and at that time it was amazing because there was all sorts of you know it wasn't just like, Oh, here's the the pop station and here's this. It was all mixed together. So you know. And then I saw the Beatles when I was twelve years old And the second to the last date of their American tour nineteen, sixty six. And then my next. concert 'cause I went to a crapload of concerts. Always I love music. I mean next concert was led Zeppelin. Their very first tour state and gentle was opening. So it was like this book and of. The Beatles and then you have what up Lynn Jessop Hall and everything in between you know so yeah. Well. I'd.

La Beatles England Atari Les Paul Leonard Phillips Lynn Jessop Hall Mike Literally Belinda Jane Geza Hollywood
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on Pantheon

"Music Collectors magazine since Nineteen, seventy four and you go my man dot com to find out more Charlotte caffey will be energy for this episode she'll talk about their debuted down we got the beat and the new. Documentary about the go-goes simply titled the go go's which will air on showtime in August. There's lots of the story of the go-goes they weren't manufactured in the IRS records. Corporate Warehouse Band were a part of the Los Angeles punk scene for some time their members were big part of the scene for years before the go go's were even officially ban Charlotte along with vocalist Belinda Carlisle Gina schock on drums, Kathy Valentine on Bass Jane wildland on Guitars and former members basis, margot delivery era, and drummer elissa Bella whereas punk as anyone on that scene in La. was only later that the band decided to add more of a pop flavor to their music now had kathy. Valentine on the podcast before promoting her autobiography book, WE'LL Have Charlotte you've heard angle the Gogo Story. But first, let's give a chance to save on records with this Promo. Art has value. That's right. Go to Dekel Entertainment. Dot. COM and save ten percents off at checkout with code gold mine artists like Angel, the vibrators, White Lions. Might. Tran. Andrews Steve Walls and. That's ENTERTAINMENT DOT COM. Past. Charlotte caffey calling. You. Thanks for being on time. On Rock I'm so on time all the time. So what do you think about? The documentary. First of all, I, love it I feel happy with it. I think that. Alison ellwood is amazing storyteller and really whoa the story in a way that shows who the band is not like. Not like the you know. Vh One behind the music it just showed like, oh, they fight and they have you. Know. Who Cares I mean you're in a relationship you know, of course, you're GONNA have a down to specially over forty years. So you know it's I. Loved it. I. Thought it was really really well done and I'm really really happy and excited for people to see it and it also shows are beginning in the punk. Scene that a lot gotta say that is Life favorite part because I was turned onto music specifically your band the is. That I didn't know about before now in on a record collector. I look ton disc to see if there was any is vinyl and there isn't much. There's a seven inch in Something with the dicky's when you guys played live. But YOU'RE GONNA turn onto new sounds. Well it's it's interesting because in documentary Kathleen Hanna Talked about I have no idea like that. She knew like you know don't talk to me. You know that song that was that we was on a single I B I think we were on the. Flip side of a single on what records and and I was really happy and she even started singing a was amazing and I think we've actually in the same t we even more amazing. I was like Oh, my God..

Charlotte caffey Corporate Warehouse Band Kathy Valentine Charlotte Music Collectors magazine White Lions Kathleen Hanna Dekel Entertainment Belinda Carlisle Dot Gogo Story elissa Bella IRS Gina schock Alison ellwood Steve Walls Los Angeles La. Angel
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on KCRW

"Hospital dot org's 10 is for 48 here a case here W Thanks for being with us on this Thursday afternoon. For all things considered coming up out of the break the go Go's are considered one of the most successful all female rock groups in history. Have a conversation with guitarist Charlotte Caffey and drummer Gene Shock of the Go, Go's about the new documentary that charts the band's rise to global stardom. I still can't get the water skiing image out of my head from the video I think was from vacation. Anyway, coming up next. Our president Trump tweeted today that perhaps the November election should be delayed suggestion that even his party quickly rejected despite its support of Trump being against mail in voting. More about that in the five o'clock hour right now, Look at your roads. Let's continue with the singular in Azusa. This is on send Gabriel Canyon Road. The 39 brushfire. All lanes blocked there. That's what's caused that and this is between old San Gabriel Canyon Road and East Fork Road. That fire broke out around 2 p.m. Today and has burned at least 240 acres and some evacuations happening right now as we speak. It is for 50 here, Casey ar w thanks for being with us. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. And I'm Elsa Chang Go Go's are widely considered the most successful all female rock history and they're the only all female band that wrote their own songs and play their own instruments to have a chart topping album. That was their debut Beauty and the beat, released in 1981. Now they are the subjects of a new documentary called.

San Gabriel Canyon Trump Charlotte Caffey Ari Shapiro Elsa Chang Azusa NPR Gene Shock president Casey
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Band that wrote their own songs and play their own instruments to have a chart topping album. That was their debut Beauty and the beat, released in 1981. Now they are the subjects of a new documentary called the Go. Go's. When I Spoke with the Go, Go's guitarist Charlotte Caffey and drummer Gina Schock. I asked them about the bands, duality there punk roots and their later image as America's sweethearts. Just a note. This conversation does have some pretty punk rock language in it. Well, there's many sides to all of us, and there's many sides to this band, and we started out in the punk rock scene in Hollywood. 1978 and the one continuous thread through the This entire 40 plus years is our little saying you can take the girl out of the punch, but you can't take the punk out of the girl. Go ahead, Charlotte. Yeah. You said everything I was thinking we're you know, 60 year old punks with no At the heart of things. That's where we come from the shiny happy part. You know, America's sweethearts. That was what the media called us. Yeah, that was kind of fabricated, and we were always like, Yeah, America's Sweethearts from hell. We're all really smart, really funny, focused and We put on a great live show? Yeah. I mean, it's explosive when you put the five of us together, So you guys got a tour England with the specials and madness. And that is where you found yourselves. Playing in front of a bunch of white nationalists. These guys would say disgusting things to you. And you say it only made you more belligerent, which I loved. Can you just tell me what that was like performing for people like that? It was scary. And a lot of times we come off stage in just being tears. I'm sitting in the back. So I was just getting having bottles whizzing by my head and they were spitting all over everybody and shells. You're horrible route. They you know, you can only get beat up so much, And then he turned it around. And you're like, Okay, We're not taking this anymore. We come out on stage and we will kick ass. Toughen us up made us wait better musicians. We got way tighter. And after we did that we were kind of ready for anything. Yeah, So as you guys were becoming more and more well known you started veering. Away from punk and more into pop, and I'm wondering how did that feel like? Did it feel that that was more about you guys choosing to go there or the industry choosing for you? First of all the go Those have always had pop melodies, okay, and the punk aspect was just at the root of it. But look at the other folks to do it. We were talking about this the other day like green Day, you know, and the Buzzcocks say same sort of thing. We were both of those. But did you feel the evolution was more about you guys choosing that or there was industry pressure to sound More and more a certain way. Would you care for listen to the industry? Never never happened. The way this came down early on in the go, Go's there were these more.

America Charlotte Caffey Gina Schock Buzzcocks Charlotte England Hollywood.
"charlotte caffey" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:34 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte caffey" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Player of the legendary band ex john doe who is also an author and an actor and and in all kinds of other stuff they're playing extra playing a tomorrow night wednesday june twenty-sixth at city winery and tickets around sale see winery dot com and his new book is called more fun in the new world and i'm thrilled to welcome john doe to the show john welcome to the show sir Good man. Good good, good honored. So honored to have you on the show man, really. Live up to it. That's a lot of legendary honored. I'm glad to have you on, and our you're originally from Decatur Illinois. I was born. Yeah. I think I lived there six months ago. Tennessee, tennessee. Okay. All right. Do they do they ever describe you as Decatur zone? John doe. And see if there's a plaque somewhere. This. I think if anybody if anybody can play me, it would be Baltimore because that's what really grew up in. their grade up until i went to school and you know a little bit of college and stuff yeah yeah so let's talk about how how how how the band got together Oh, God, ancient history forty nine hundred seventy seven. of billion is answered each other's sleep paper in in a classified paper called the b. cycler it wasn't you had to pay for it and and i met at a writing workshop around the same time and and then it took i don't know about eight months to find d._j. bone break to play drums yeah and the rest is history history and it's amazing you guys are still playing together there aren't a lot of bands from that era that are still together and you guys are going to be here in chicago tomorrow night yes say members all original i mean i think los lobos could claim somewhat the same thing there's a few that it's far between what kind of last punk rock band sanding yeah well god bless you man So it says here I got a bio in front of me. John Doe was born in nineteen seventy seven when he arrived in Los Angeles, can you can you expound on that. sure i mean i was of a certain age very influenced by andy warhol and i like i said in baltimore also was plans which on waters and and the whole idea of taking a cedar now to to to be you know whoever you not were born but what you were meant to do so i also love the movie that gary cooper was in called meet john doe and and so i thought plus i have a kind of unpronounceable check name and i thought what the hell john doe and dispel when you got out there what was it had you ever been to los angeles before that nineteen seventy seven actually friend of mine and i went out there and march of seventy six and then i moved there permanently in the beginning of november of seventy six so seventy seven is when things really started to happen yeah what was what was i want to get into your book as well more fun in the new world of but i wanna talk a little bit about a little bit about that punk scene in the eighties i mean what was it like what was the energy like at that time while the punk scene started in l._a. and seventy six seven beginning seventy seven so you know this book is the second five years you know we had a book out in twenty sixteen that was under the big black sun right and that was the first five years that was like seventy seven to eighty two eighty the next one is eighty to eighty seven so by that time you know people are starting to get signed to record companies and we got signed from slash to electra and the go go's were you know top ten and there were other people like lone justice which are represented in the book there you know getting produced by jimmy i being and stuff like that fairly soon after they started so things got you know big fast yeah no after after a slow start you know when i say fast it's like we've been playing since seventy seven it wasn't until eight two that we got signed to elektra but in the meantime you know we had to out on slash records which is a really small indie independent of distribution as well which was totally frustrating but in in l._a. you know on the midwest we were going maybe three to five hundred people but l. a. we could draw five or six thousand so it was pretty you know pretty schizophrenic who am i still sort of happens and this book is the latest because the other one was called under the big black sun and this is the follow up more fun in the new world this is all encompassing man you have so many contributions from so many important artists from that era the end was it was it easy to get to get these people involved and to write for for the books and stuff yeah for the most part i mean i think you know people like to tell their story if you're you know if you're at a dinner party and you say so what do you do or what turns you on you know people like to talk about themselves a little bit and it became clear that somebody's going to tell the story so why should it be us or why should it be you you know we had to do a little convincing of people but louis perez from los lobos and and then we you know and and charlotte caffey and j. wayland of the go go's and then there's other ones that people might not know chip kinman from rank and file or terry graham we played in the gun club and stuff like that so we go chance to sign a light on some people but singers and you know news issues that people might not know it goes into the whole the whole legacy part of the of the book which is another kind of angle that we took and what was it what was it was the was the scene at that time you know or even before when you when you first started of you know like the years before you got signed electro what was the scene like then was it supportive where people sleeping on other people's couches was their competitive stuff happening what was it like oh it was a really tech community and people had people had to help each other because there was there was no outside help you know very d._i._y. scene and and i'm sure you experienced that in chicago with with certain groups you know at certain times and i'm sure that wilco and and the the the people surrounding them in the band came up with the bloodshot label they all had to to work together because they didn't have a lot of outside support but you know as as time goes on the scene gets bigger and so things can can branch out and that's kind of what this book deals with yeah the first three years i mean everybody had to help each other because nobody had any dough and that was part of the deal is you wanted to live a lifestyle and that didn't mean you made a lot of money so screw it you know let's just do this thing because everybody says we can't right yeah it's the only thing that i've come close to personally as i did i did many years of theater here in chicago storefront theatre directing and acting and writing and stuff and it was a titan engineer it was that was one of those deals where you're not making any money you know sixty people are coming to see a show that you put up and then but you get help from everybody volunteers people friends it's a very tight knit community in terms of artistic world yeah yeah it's a you know it's kind of a creative explosion but that happens and you can't really force it it just sort of who knows If you could predict if you could predict that then you'd be you'd be a multi multi mogul mogul. Moguls mogul. That's it now. The book is called more fun in the new world and it's got tons of great stories counter computer bit by people who were there at that time in the scene. Great artists, and so on and so forth. John hang on. Okay. all right all right john doe is with us he is a legend xs playing tomorrow night wednesday june twenty six at city winery they've been around since nineteen seventy seven and it's amazing that the all the original members are back together and they're performing tomorrow night if you've never seen the band you should we come back we'll talk more about the book we'll talk about about john's solo records as well and then we got to get into the acting because he's been in some television shows some movies that are near and dear to my heart so we'll get into that right after we take a break here more which i knew after this seven twenty w._g._n. it's a half century after stonewall the police rate that sparked a new civil rights movement tonight's cover story on w._g._n. t._v..

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