17 Burst results for "Charlotte Bronte"

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

06:13 min | 5 months ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Shall my name is Charlotte Bronte jump filling in for Chan up that dahling Glenn? She's an award winning columnist. I want to leave that out with the Chicago Tribune. Thank you so much for being on the show this afternoon and giving us some time on your Friday. You know, we were talking before the break about your column and about the Adidas HR chief stepping down because of a lack of diversity at the sneaker giant that benefits from billions of black dollars every year. And, you know, one thing that always got me was that you know, I'd apply for a job or a promotion. And you know that I've got all the boxes checked, but, you know, somehow I didn't qualify. But you know, my white female counterpart of my white male counterpart would not have all the qualifications admit Yet they be given a chance. You know, I don't know how many times I've been in the room or read an email. And they said, you know, he doesn't have the degree doesn't have the experience, but we believe in him, and I'm like, dude, I'm sitting right here with the degree and the experience. How can you not believe in me? What? I've put sweat equity into this station? It's the old black tax write where you know you have to work harder. It's one of the things we learn as African Americans. Early on our parents, teachers that because the way America is set up those with privilege Are the ones who read the benefit much more really easily than we do. And so we go in with that understanding. And we do the work and we do what we have to do. But there's only so far we could go. You know, you're right. I mean, at some point, it's going to be incumbent upon them to make make the next step. And that's where diversity play the role in companies that are committed to diversity. Then, um, you know they seek out Ah, talented minority and they give them opportunities to compete in the workplace and when opportunities for promotion. Alive. They give them opportunities to compete for those promotion. Nobody's asking for handouts. Nobody's saying give up this Give us you know, Give us that we're saying allow us to compete. For the position using the same criteria that everyone else competes with. And we can do it. One of the things I talk about in my column, If how doing the construction? You were talking about a period? Shortly after slavery where the majority of black people were educated, because, as you know they could slaves could even they weren't you know it was against a lot of them. They will be beaten if they learn to read And so on and doing reconstruction that was one of the most prosperous times for African American in the United States. Black were holding high elected offices that were business people everywhere. And when the white people got out of that What did they do? They came back with Jim Crow Law. That don't hit that growth and put African Americans back where they felt like they belonged to settle. It's not a question of whether we can do it. The question is whether we have the opportunity to do it. Do you think our Children I wanted? You know, every time I tell my son, you know, just do your best and you'll be rewarded. Girl Got it. Swallow. Cause I'm talking down the troupe of my own experience. That is not the America we live in right now. But you know if we want to look for a bright spot in everything that's going on now At least we're talking about these things. And when have we ever really had these kinds of Dale? Never. What And so you can't even began to solve problems until you're willing to acknowledge that you have a problem. And then talk about how you convince me those problems and that's why he's being at the nation right now, and that's a good thing. I don't know what's gonna happen down the road. But I can't say that in my lifetime. I have not seen this much interest and even acknowledging that we have a problem in this country. So I'm gonna I'm gonna take that. For what? We'll take what we can give her right now. Right now, Right, Dolly! Thank you so much for being on wciu radio for hanging out with me on the chat. Hartmann's show for sharing your insight and your wisdom I have long Been a fan of yours. How you have not been afraid to speak Truth to power in your columns in the Chicago Tribune, how you've pointed out racism and racist behavior and in oftentimes given solutions, and that's the one thing I like about you. You know, we've got these, You know, Twitter journalists who get on and talk about what the problem is, but the one thing that I like in your columns is that you always have. You know what could be a possible or several solutions to the problems that we're facing. When we talk about racism in corporate America in society in our everyday lives on our jobs in our churches, you know in our communities. Thank you so much. I appreciate that. Really. And you guys stick around. Don't go anywhere. It's to 43 89 degrees on the Chan Hartman show. We have got a young man who stumbled across an article in Pittsburgh and when I read the title, I read the headline. I read the piece. I knew I had tohave him on the show today. He's up next. Chad Hardman. It's Jamie. Progressive Number one number two employees leave a message at the cage. Aimee, It's.

America Chicago Tribune Chan Hartman Adidas Charlotte Bronte United States Chad Hardman Black Pittsburgh Jim Crow Aimee Glenn Jamie Dale Hartmann
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It's a little bigger than a matchbox but definitely smaller than a playing card. A miniature booklet entitled the Young Men's magazine written by a woman who usually wrote much bigger books the young Charlotte Bronte now. That tiny treasure has just fetched almost eight hundred eighty thousand dollars Canadian at auction in Paris. That's going home to England. Thanks to years of effort by the Bronte Society. Rebecca York is with the Bronte Society. We reached her at the Parsonage Museum. Charlotte Bronte's former family home in allworthy England. Rebecca why did the brunt society want to get its hands on this little book so badly. Oh well a number of reasons really You know the society has one of the largest collections of bunch midtable in the world and the little books awesome and most iconic things in that collection. And so in this particular series of the magazine of that shot created. There were six books digitally and we know that because the number dated and the museum already had four one of them was in a collection called the law collection and the entire collection disappeared in the nineteen thirties. Nobody nobody knows where that is. And then there's this this last one that came up for auction yesterday it also came to auction in two thousand eleven and the Budgetbattey went to auction that time and were outbid And it was devastating thing so this was a second chance to bring it home to Howarth complete the collection on sort of finish that that story really and you had support into because you you didn't exe- this disappear for a second time and not get it so you had some pretty high powered people people trying to help you get the the pull of. Yeah that's right. And of course we have an Judi densch as our president and she very kindly decided yes she would agree agree to named this campaign and the Known in love the world out of a and from our twitter feed alone. We know that our high profile people that looked Bronte's Dante's and so we were very fortunate and able to harness some of that support and love. We'd be overwhelmed by members of the public from all over the world either remembering a visit to the museum remembering to Howarth but also just remembering reading Jana for the first time. This little book was written by Charlotte Bronte and. She was of course best known for Jane Eyre but she wrote this created this little. This little book is the magazine when she was fourteen eighteen. That right that's right. She was fourteen So the children. The children encouraged to Read very widely and they were given access astute writers like Byron and they also an family subscribed to periodical magazines. And so the Bronte's created to these tiny little magazines which facsimiles of things that they've seen so this particular a series of content page it says edited by Charlotte Bronte. Hey and Adverts in short stories so it is a radio early an indication that Charlotte wanted to be a writer she wanted to be published. I there's the perfect mate magazines. All of it is you're describing a magazine but we're talking very tiny here aren't we. I know. Well that's that's because Mister Bronte or the children of some toy soldiers and the children created an imaginary world that a habit it by these soldiers near the soldiers names. UNFO- these magazines created to be of the size for those soldiers to read and hence the not the term young men's magazines. Those young men were those soldiers and also because of those Byron influenced tokes out the Sometime contents intents were bit racy as you might say and so they all cemented by making them that size too small Faux Mr Bronte thereto. Well they and their their actual stories. It's not just that they're they're made to look like when you're making things for for for in a doll's Dell's house or for for children has to appear to be something. These are actually written as if this one. There's a handwritten story or stories in these books. Right that's right. That's and that's what makes it really exciting these proper stories in minuscule handwriting. You know you need a magnifying glass. Even struggle and this particular Killa books that we acquired yesterday has four thousand words in it and in particular one of the stories is about a merger who is haunted by his victims. This is seen as described as having a fire in his head that sued burning so bright violent feeling in his head he sets his bed cuts and some fire. Now anyone who's ever read. JANA will recognize that as a nose being Of Mr Chester's bed curtains under under the bed funding state in China so again really early indication. That's an Charlotte's themes that she was trying and planning with as a young teenager with things that stayed with her and then she made them tug memorial work but she was writing these byronesque stories. He's racy stories when she was fourteen. Mr Bronte is he was just very forward thinking logical in the material he let his children read. They obviously were brought up and to some extent by the servants and the housekeeper who would have told them not bits of gossip from the village. So yes I think that's what's extraordinary and the fourteen year old. They wouldn't have been expected to be writing about an adulterous dalliances illegitimate children but some meditate. Well well obviously there are people around the world as you point out. Who would love to be able to see this little book and all the Little Book? So where will they be able to do that. So so the museum is hoping to receive instable decide of Christmas as a missing documentation and small matter of paying to take place first and then. The museum closes every January full maintenance and conservation and cleaning and the new book beyond display when we reopened. I put in February. It hasn't been transcribed fully or any of the works inside it published as of dispension so up see the access as well for scholars and researchers who probably wanting to stop looking at but the museum and always have con- display as I said that most iconic items in the collection loved by visitors absolutely just lovely Rebecca. Thank you if I welcome bye bye. Rebecca York is with the Bronte Society which just successfully purchased the title called the Young Men's magazine created by Charlotte Bronte at auction in Paris. We reached Ms York at the Parsonage Museum. Charlotte Bronte's former family home in in Haworth England and we posted more on that story including a photo of that little book on our website. CBC DOT CA slash. Ah.

Charlotte Bronte Bronte Society Rebecca York Parsonage Museum Paris Byron England Howarth Dell Jane Eyre allworthy England twitter Judi densch Budgetbattey Jana Mr Chester Ms York CBC
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It's a little bigger than a matchbox but definitely smaller than a playing card. A miniature booklet entitled the Young Men's magazine written by a woman who usually wrote much bigger books the young Charlotte Bronte now. That tiny treasure has just fetched almost eight hundred eighty thousand dollars Canadian at auction in Paris. That's going home to England. Thanks to years of effort by the Bronte Society. Rebecca York is with the Bronte Society. We reached her at the Parsonage Museum. Charlotte Bronte's former family home in allworthy England. Rebecca why did the brunt society want to get its hands on this little book so badly. Oh well a number of reasons really You know the society has one of the largest collections of Timoteo in the world and the little books awesome and most iconic things in that collection and so in this particular series of the magazine of that shot created. There were six books digitally and we know that because the number dated and the museum already had four one of them was in a collection called the law collection and the entire collection disappeared in the nineteen thirties. Nobody nobody knows where that is. And then there's this this last one that came up for auction yesterday it also came to auction in two thousand eleven and the Budgetbattey went to auction that time and were outbid And it was devastating thing so this was a second chance to bring it home to Howarth complete the collection on sort of finish that that story really and you had support into because you didn't exe- this disappear for a second time and not get it so you had some pretty high powered people people trying to help you get the the pull of. Yeah that's right. And of course we have an Judi densch as our president and she very kindly decided yes she would agree agree to named this campaign and the Known in love the world out of a and from our twitter feed alone. We know that our high profile people that looked Bronte's Dante's and so we were very fortunate and able to harness some of that support and love. We'd be overwhelmed by members of the public from all over the world either remembering a visit to the museum remembering to Howarth but also just remembering reading Jana for the first time. This little book was written by Charlotte Bronte and. She was of course best known for Jane Eyre but she wrote this created this little. This little book is the magazine when she was fourteen eighteen. That right that's right. She was fourteen So the children. The children encouraged to Read very widely and they were given access astute writers like Byron and they also an family subscribe to periodical magazines. And so the Bronte's created to these tiny little magazines which facsimiles of things that they've seen so this particular a series of content page it says edited by Charlotte Bronte. Hey and Adverts in short stories so it is a radio early an indication that Charlotte wanted to be a writer she wanted to be published. I there's the perfect mate magazines. All of it is you're describing a magazine but we're talking very tiny here aren't we. I know. Well that's that's because Mister Bronte or the children of some toy soldiers and the children created an imaginary world. That what happened to it by these soldiers near the soldiers names UNFO- these magazines created to be of the size for those soldiers to read and hence the not the term young men's magazines. Those young men were those soldiers and also because of those Byron influenced tokes out the Sometime contents intents were bit racy as you might say and so they all cemented by making them that size too small Faux Mr Bronte thereto. Well they and their their actual stories. It's not just that they're they're made to look like when you're making things for for for in a doll's Dell's house or for for children has to appear to be something. These are actually written as if this one. There's a handwritten story or stories in these books. Right that's right. That's and that's what makes it really exciting these proper stories in minuscule handwriting. You need a magnifying glass. Even struggle and this particular Killa Book that we acquired yesterday has four thousand words in it and in particular one of the stories is about a merger who is haunted by his victims. This is seen as described as having a fire in his head that sued burning so bright violent feeling in his head he sets his bed cuts and some fire. Now anyone who's ever read. JANA will recognize that as a nose being Of Mr Chester's bed curtains under under the bed funding state in China so again really early indication. That's an Charlotte's themes that she was trying and playing with as a young teenager with things that stayed with her and then she made them tug memorial work but she was writing these byronesque stories. He's racy stories when she was fourteen. Mr Bronte is he was just very forward thinking logical in the material he let his children read. They obviously brought up and to some extent by servants and the housekeeper who would have told them not bits of gossip from the village so yes I think. That's what's extraordinary and the fourteen year old. They wouldn't have been expected to be writing about an adulterous dalliances. Illegitimate children but Well well obviously there are people around the world as you point out who would like love to be able to see this little book and all the Little Book. So where will they be able to do that. So so the museum is hoping to receive instable decide of Christmas as a missing documentation and small matter of paying to take place first and then. The museum closes every January full maintenance and conservation and cleaning and the new book beyond display when we reopened. I put in February. It hasn't been transcribed fully or any of the works inside it published as of dispension so up see the access as well for scholars and researchers who probably wanting to stop looking at but the museum and always have con- display as I said that most iconic items in the collection loved by visitors absolutely just lovely Rebecca. Thank you if I welcome bye bye. Rebecca York is with the Bronte Society which just successfully purchased the title called the Young Men's magazine created by Charlotte Bronte at auction in Paris. We reached Ms York at the Parsonage Museum. Charlotte Bronte's former family home in in Haworth England and we posted more on that story including a photo of that little book on our website. CBC DOT CA slash. Ah.

Charlotte Bronte Bronte Society Rebecca York Parsonage Museum Howarth Paris Byron England Dell Timoteo Jane Eyre allworthy England Judi densch twitter Budgetbattey Jana Mr Chester Ms York
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

Mostly Lit Podcast

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

"Of you know, I should be means do next book. Sorry. Can I just say real quick yet? So I know you guys say this all the time. But it's winter. And I like, you know, what book I read every winter if you don't know. Wow. I'm actually going to look out here because this friendship is okay. This week. No, you gotta tell me what book I read ever winter every time this is period. Wow. No. Sways persuasion. If you say, it ain't it'll be book. I read every winter is. Jana Charlotte Bronte. Awful not book that one and obviously comes up every time because I actually like always and I'm looking forward to reading I'm going to read this on the twenty first Friday, the twenty December I asked I starting, and it's basically it's a novel by the English writer, Charlotte. Bronte published under the pen name. Correct. Bell on the sixteenth of October not eighteen forty seven. And it's a book about this young woman could Jane Eyre, and it kind of involves her growth into this adult adult life and her love for a man could miss the Rochester, the brooding master of thorn filled hole. And if I think it's like a phenomenal book because it kind of as the page says it revolutionized phrase fiction in my it focused on sort of Jane's, moral and spiritual development, and it's very slow book. It's a book doesn't have like action packed movements. By just I say say. How do I say it say? It's thought source of marrow. Ing it's the you know when you dig and you dig into someone's thoughts allow all the time actually just in Jane's head asked. Why love about too, and it's so nice because it's the pain. I remember reading it when I was young clouds light. It's just the pain young woman. She's not beautiful. She's not out of this welts smart. She's no. Interesting in a way that makes us stand out as a protagonist. She's just a young woman even her life, and she suffers misfortune and she encounters love, and I remember the way that she realizes. I think I love about Charlotte and the way that she writes is that she. She catches Diallo can almost the way that USC wild does in its it sometimes sarcastic. But it's it's always filled with something deeper in that she says something or Rochester something, but there is another underlying meaning to it that the Rita has to discover and the way that. That she writes the love stories at one day that BIC almost like paying and they're playing this tap tactful game in not they wanna tell the passan how they feel the conquest Talat, and it builds up any bills bills bills to the point that you can't hold it anymore. And it's just like oh my God. And and then Rochester says something along the lines of like you on my equal something. That's something that you really like. Yeah. If I this buildup of tension stood up attention, and it almost mirrors my life, actually. And it's just like it's just like you with somebody. And you want to tell them how you feel and these these little passing moments that Charlotte and Austin actually captured so grace fee as what I love about nineteenth century. Vermont's is that it's not like. Yeah. Li- oversee gang, gang hipster. I mean, it's just like communication is dialogue, and it's a build up, and you get to another scene, and it builds something more and build something more than you have this climactic scene where it's like all of these things have built up to. And this is what Jana has because it's like playing playing playing playing hoop something something something something something and then bang..

Jana Charlotte Bronte Charlotte Rochester Jane Eyre Diallo Vermont writer Bell Li USC Talat Austin one day
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"We are even a misogynistic world, right? It's it doesn't just because you're a woman who directs a movie or just because you're a woman who writes a movie doesn't mean it's feminine, right? You have to twist yourself, fit yourself all your life. Like like Virginia Woolf in room of one's own. Has this whole thing about how like even even Charlotte Bronte? She said, she's not really making purely feminine work because she's like hiding her paper under her sewing or whatever. And so that's what I mean when I say I saw the piano and it had some like like a fact on me when I was sixteen there. I did this interview with Trevor Noah. You know about the deuce actually it wasn't about the kindergarten teacher, but he'd seen the preview for the kindergarten teacher and he was like, I saw the previews that is it a thriller or is it like an intimate movie about a woman's mind, or is it like a horror movie? And I, I loved that and I keep coming back to it because I think it's not any of those. It's new and I think it might be new because it's feminine. It doesn't tick. The boxes were used to, but again, I don't know. I'm little confused about this. We just time for more quick ones. The lady right there on the two more two more quick ones. Very quick question. If you weren't an actor, what would you do? What would you want to do. Man, I'm really, I'm not good at very many other things. I mean, I, I'm like an okay, cook. I have a friend who's a professor which I'd love to think like maybe I like an English teacher something, but I wouldn't be any good at it. I mean, are you good at other things. So much better than you be on. So with that bad at any of. You really remember any thoughts about maybe professional ice skating. Wow. Yes. Okay. Said about Leonard cherry being in English major, and you're probably great reader if you option to book and do your movie, but not being it, what would you do? Well, I did actually just option a book and I'm not going to be in it. I'm a dappling it and I'm going to direct it and it's called the loss daughter by Elena for Ontario. It's my last question is a two parter because we're going to be out of time that's gone quick two part. I had a very fleeting role in looming tower with your husband got with your husband for the first time Peter stars guard. And my first question, which is silly questions is your husband Billy sweet as he seems. Bet my life that damn good husband. Him. What's that like for you being to people who are working all the time, very successful movie actors. That's wonderful to be with somebody who understands what you're going through. I'm married. Sometimes I'll be like, when are you coming home? I don't understand what are you coming home? Like we plan such and such and he's like Maggie. No, I don't know the answer. I'm like, oh, yeah. Yeah, yeah. My wife and I like, why are you so dramatic? Anyway. Update after a newspaper story here about this conversation Jilin halls, Wikipedia page has been revised. Maggie Chilin halls, new movie that kindergarten teacher comes out on Netflix, October, twelve. Here's the thing comes from WNYC studios. Go fan too. Well, I hear the host of future at heart, a new podcast by target and WNYC creative about people and organizations who are fighting for a better future on the show. I travel the country and meet people who are doing the work that changes communities like Mary Anderson, a designer from target who's creating adaptive clothing for kids with disabilities, and Chris and Bentley Ericsson a mother and son who've inspired Mary's work to listen to this episode and others download future at heart wherever you find your podcasts.

Virginia Woolf Charlotte Bronte Trevor Noah WNYC studios Jilin Maggie Chilin Mary Anderson Netflix professor Leonard cherry Elena Bentley Ericsson Billy Peter Ontario Wikipedia Chris
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Help I Sexted My Boss

Help I Sexted My Boss

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Help I Sexted My Boss

"Anyway, if you're not help, then remember you can send us a message on Twitter, Instagram out sex. My boss is all handled do even say, handle these days. Oh, no. Yeah, say no law coming from the person that has great fruits boots. No, we don't say I'm, they'll do it. You can send you tells of trepidation to help it sex in my bus dot com. Or you can write William Hansen who promises a hummed written reply on his own. Let's headed paper the addresses on the websites sex at my bus dot com. This episode is all about neighbors. I'm not gonna lie to, you know, watched it for years. I television showing joking on. I didn't have neighbors growing up. I've said it before my neighbors who counsels, I think explains a lot. We didn't really live near anyone. Mea, I think that explains a lot about you really. Why because I lots of neighbors we told them having to move. Yeah, we moved a lot. Yeah, I grew up in an environment where you all new you neighbors? Yeah. I used to get go, mom, Nevis. You're over laces. My mom would never buy a potato peeler Masha. Yeah, I'll save meal was sausage Amash so I used to get sent mountain abors going up, say appeal Russia, communist up. Jim on the need me to buy her a potato peeler lows now do really well for ourselves. But yeah, the time in Burnley the barometer of doing wealth yourself is having a potato peeler in Amasho, and now it's an up till when you got him. My parents just had to warming roles put in. Warming drills. Well, they the plates say, can have hot plates. How alive if what are you go? We played out without neighbors. We all knew each other, my brother and I used to reproductions of channel Ston Nevels. Plot. With ain't Jane Austen. I think we did Charlotte Bronte j. now what how is this your neighbors? Because we didn't have to play with. Ain't gonna ask you some questions on this now. Okay. First of all. Do you think now in this day and age is still good to send food around in Shushi self to new neighbors. If you live in a in a suburb, then? Yes. But I think if you live, I think there is a difference. I live in flats and have lived in flats for most of my adult life..

Twitter Jim Charlotte Bronte Jane Austen Ston Nevels William Hansen Instagram Russia Shushi Mea Burnley Nevis Amasho
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

The Bechdel Cast

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

"What a shrewd. What a heinous bid. So the rest of that scene in the classroom. So then a cat says, I guess in this society being male in an asshole makes you were the of our time. What about Sylvia Plath or Charlotte Bronte or Simone, Dubov wa, and Patrick. Our friend heath ledger bursts into the classroom and says, what did I miss and catch like? The oppressive patriot values that dictator education. It's like, okay, and he's good. And then he leaves. Again, I love that joke. He's like all caught up. Thanks. Mr. Morgan gives this monologue where he's like, oh, you're a white girl who's like rich and entitled, maybe like next time you go to PTA meeting. You could ask them why they don't buy any books written by a black man like so this whole scene, it has it all. But the thing hot. Leger enters and exit and then five. Just threw him in which the second people are going to get tired. Also. There's like there's a comment on like feminism and the patriarchy and misogyny. There's comment on race. This whole scene basically establishes how much of like buzzkill cat is because she has like strong opinions and speaks out against the patriarchy. But I do like that it's she's also kind of like put in her place of being like a privilege white girl by her teacher because it's like at the end of the day, like both of Bianca and Kat Julius styles that are both fucking rich and like a lot of the reason they can even win Julia stiles character like rebels against the patriarchy. She does it in like kind of privilege ways like hitting Joey car. It's like, okay, that's cool. And that's like putting a shady dude in his place. But also you wouldn't do that if you didn't know your dad was going to pay for the damages, right? Can't just then you have to physically hit his car, which. This. To find, you know, car to poor actually hits your car with my car because you're going to have a car. So she thinks fight your. Which. I would love to see Julius. Dr. So that's kind of the setup of her character and how like everyone else, fuse her in the whole idea, the movies, similar to what it sounds like the taming of the shrew is that like she needs to be softened up like she's too bitchy like no one likes or so we need heath ledger to come along, and you know, show her how to be nicer used to be tricked by which also such a fucking guy fantasy that like you can pay a guy. This is more realistic for women you. I feel you could probably more realistically pay a woman to seduce a man. Then you could pay a guy to seduce a woman live at abbey then on. Really off. You tricked me. Out of here which magical dick. Like a men love that notion that they think they think it's real, that they could trickle woman into falling love. It's like, that's what we do. Y'all every fucking day we're talking about this culture, trophy wife, you know, you'll big ugly as wouldn't be with that fine. Ask any woman. If you handled damn money, she gone to you. There's yes and like good for her. Great for her. I'm just tired of like, I mean, I guess some gigolos some. There are some men out here who probably could like slang it around and there's a whole industry pickup artists. Oh yeah, that works great. Doesn't it? They're always home ugly. I have a horrifying confession to make. Are you a pickup artist, Jimmy? I've been negative. You know, I slept with someone who had I woke up and I was like, oh my God, there's I'm, I'm literally next to a copy of the the game with golden boss peach. It was a really made copy of the game. It was an anniversary edition of the game to do steal it and burn it. No, I slipped out and haven't been heard from sin, but it was what God pick up, bad bed, bad bad. Well, so cat, the other thing about her is that because she's like a feminist, she's also like painted as this like frigid woman who would never want a day like asthma in the Sar. Why are there so many movies where it's a teen boy tricking a teen girl, and then he's the love interest..

Patrick Kat Julius Sylvia Plath Mr. Morgan Julia stiles Charlotte Bronte tricking Leger PTA Joey Simone Bianca Jimmy
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Letters are not cursive doesn't make a signature more legal and though many may find this hard to believe cursive actually turns out to be slower than print although the fastest style is a hybrid of the two but cursive is steeped in tradition it evokes in age when american schoolchildren's sat at their desks identical postures making their loops with military precision the drills train them to join the growing legions of clerical workers pen pushers as they were called at the time but they were also thought to build character as the historian tomorrow thornton puts it in her book handwriting in america cursive instruction was intended to reform the dangerous discipline the unruly and accustomed the dissatisfied to their role in life some people still talk about cursive instruction as instilling self discipline but the only jobs that require festivity as penmanship these days are as a tattoo artist they're addressing wedding invitations so modern advocates have cursive emphasize being able to read it rather than righted and kids certainly do need to be able to decipher the letters they get from grandma but experts say that once sixyearolds can read print they can learn to read ordinary cursive in an hour without years of drills some conservatives say that neglecting cursive leave students sadly unable to read our founding documents like the original declaration of independence the mayflower compact or the magna carta but it's not likely any of those people have actually tried to do that themselves in as much as the first of those documents is illegible the second isn't written in cursive and the third isn't even in english i can understand the prejudice against print when i was growing up i thought of it as a childish form of writing that you abandoned when you started to learn grownup cursive but prince styles go back to the renaissance and over the years a lot of authors have chosen to use print over cursive from charlotte bronte and j r r tolkien to jack kerouac and david foster wallace in an age when most of.

thornton charlotte bronte david foster wallace jack kerouac
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of oriental yup this is my very best elvis the language created by the writer j r r tolkien his series of novels north of the rings i'm being taught by kimbrel even tallied he provides online tutorials on her youtube channel high elven wisdom that elvis is about more than just words she tells me it's a culture and it's also becoming kind of a way of life but elvis is a word that an adjective to describe being so close and connected to nature when i look like an alpha when i i myself as health i am in terms expressing my higher soul my higher self with a wo drapes that something velvety long elegant sometimes i wear i can wear prospect ear at times lately i have not because i have just been kind of embracing more of my natural pointed year that i've kind of always had i believe that it's a bridge between fantasy and reality which is what tolkien was trying to show with his story really there's no such thing as pure fantasy fantasy always has a little bit of reality within fantasy literature like lord of the rings wasn't always so acceptable for centuries the genre was seen as dangerous and subversive says the cultural historian michael sailor in the eighteenth and nineteenth century the middle classes were very concerned still about the imagination they felt that they really need to restrain it you know from promoting desires that couldn't be managed or ungodly thoughts same ingrained was the fear of fantasy even writers like britain's bronte sisters were discouraged from indulging their imaginations is children there was a real vogue for fairytales for the arabian nights for folktales the bronte siblings when they were young when they were children they created wonderful imaginary worlds of angrier in gondal and charlotte bronte for example wanted to continue to write imaginary world she might have become one of the great fantasy writers if she had lived at a different time but in the early nineteenth century she was advised by her father and many other writers to stop doing this that it was immature and it was dangerous.

kimbrel elvis tolkien michael sailor britain charlotte bronte writer youtube gondal
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Twisted your next game is a music parody called happily alone gail you won the last game so you win this and you are in the final round britair you need to win this or you'll have to get married we rewrote the tlc song no scrubs to be about famous women who were never married so ring in to tell me who i'm singing about ready shrub is a plant looks like bush and bush was the police at work for secretary of state but now he's painting cats breeder condoleeza rice condoleeza rice you got no religious visions no i don't want the siege of orleans two gritter joan of arc joan of arc correct get it if you're wearing scrubs if you are a nurse you to pinning ceremony day and a pledge you say oath named after me nursing oath named after this person she's a famous nurse good hint gail florence nightingale no i don't want no husband no the monarchy's no we don't want no queen bearing no we'd rather have a protestant thrown grinner that's correct elizabeth i okay you name talking to you and alice bell was your pen name gail charlotte bronte i'm sorry that is incorrect british do you know the answer one or the other can you be more specific elisabeth i very close emily bronte single single clap in the audience bramley bronx all right this is your last clue we don't got no nuns selflessly kind and charitable lack the kiss you got canonized won a nobel prize gail mother teresa yes mother theresa people don't know mother teresa's super brag technically married to jesus that's a good point puzzle you are chung headed our contestants do well then bitter you won that game you each one game so it's time for a quick game three i want to give you a category and you'll go back and forth naming things that fall into that category the first contestants will be eliminated buzz in to answer i here's your category the protagonist of doctor seuss's green eggs and ham refuses to eat green eggs and ham here there or anywhere what are the eleven other situations in which the protagonist refuses to eat green eggs and ham britair in a box in a box is correct han sorry the.

bush gail charlotte bronte teresa doctor seuss ham gail gail florence alice bell emily bronte chung
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Alone welcome to the science podcast for march twenty third two thousand eighteen i'm sarah crespi in this week show news intern rodney dang lurs here with the story on genes that may cause morning sickness the scourge of many pregnancy entries bedrosian is here to discuss how maternal care alters genomes of brain cells in young mice now you have ronnie denver one of our intrepid news interns here on her very laissez at science hierarchy hi this story tries to answer the question which genes are linked to morning thickness aka nausea and vomiting associated with pregnancy and the more severe form how do you say this hyper amici's gravity dharam all right ronnie how common is this in pregnancy it's not super common only about point three two percent of women who are pregnant have the severe form but about eighty percent of women who are pregnant experienced some nausea in bumping i saw the range on the paper it was fifty to eighty percent that's a pretty wide range but it's a lot it's a lot it's a lot it's very uncomfortable as a person who has been pregnant and the more severe form is pretty dangerous not just to the fetus but actually to the women i found out this killed charlotte bronte a great loss to the world and someone made it very famous a couple years ago kate middleton eight middleton british royalty at this point so what makes it so dangerous what makes it so dangerous is that these women are basically unable to eat they're able to keep food down and the aren't able to stay hydrated so the becomes severely dehydrated and severely malnourished and so that's not good for them or the baby one of the diagnosing features is women lose between five to ten percent of their bios which is quite a lot.

sarah crespi nausea charlotte bronte intern rodney dang ronnie denver kate middleton eighty percent three two percent ten percent
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"And so the list fans people that you've heard of like ib wells the suffrage just and leading voice of the anti lynching movement charlotte bronte who wrote jane eyre sylvia flat amazing these people didn't get a bitch and then some women that you may not have heard of emily warren roebling who helps complete construction of the brooklyn bridge it was an eleven year process when her engineer husband fell ill and so by focusing attention on this we want to really highlight these women who didn't get credit at the time and try to make a commitment to doing better going forward to other storylines this month out to me given this women's history month i don't think this was a coincidentally time project right y'all wanted to launch during during this month at the same time we're seeing more attention on the stomach inequities in newsrooms for for women you know you look at many of the stories about this metoo movement elastic months have been about newsrooms about harassment in newsrooms as even more stories that come on that and then there's this reaction from conservative media that i have to ask you about tucker carlson over on fox is doing a special series this month called men in america and look i think that'd be great in april but don't you think he's just trying to troll people but doing it in march i have to ask myself when your producers called me for this whether they were in factual in me you know we're not joking reorganized and the thing is tucker hills in is not wrong that men are to some extent in crisis they do have higher rates of suicide women are graduating and higher numbers from college we are going on to receive more advanced degrees but the fact of the matter is men then go onto enter their first jobs out of college and they make twenty percent more salary on average something that tucker has completely dismissed and they're entering into world or men still run things they probably don't have to face sexual harassment they don't have to claim hashtag metoo and so the idea that men need more attention i think.

charlotte bronte emily warren roebling harassment tucker carlson fox tucker hills tucker jane eyre brooklyn engineer america twenty percent eleven year
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"People really perceive them to be of much lower quality than things that had been made as one piece and the still the case you know in couture work convicts that are actually certified discotheque who are like they're lace pieces that are no seems and then if there is a lot of seeming and piecing it seen as less so yes it's still a consistent mindset about how things are assembled in yet of textile workers were really angry about the declining quality i mean people at the the wages and living conditions get a lot of attention there was a lot of anger about okay now this is less good work why are you making a st work it's not as good yeah they didn't want their industry to go downhill uh and workers didn't like the that that people were being employed in the garment industry that weren't apprenticed for so a factors into that whole quality issue uh this practice was known as cordcutting and the quality of the work was poorer in part because people were actually trained to do it they hadn't gone through that apprenticeship period to learn their trade they just got put in the factory floor so while the luddites have a reputation for being anti machine and a hallmark of the luddite uprising was smashing machines debates it wasn't the machines themselves that were the problem the luddites were fine with machines as long as the people using them were trained to do it well and safely and had fair wages and working hours and as long as the introduction of machines wasn't erasing more jobs than it created or cranking out poorquality goods there are many trades people who took part in the a protest but cropper's handloom weavers a niggers who were the ones most affected by mechanization at the time were the most prominent exactly which workers were at the forefront vary based on which trades were most practiced in any particular area from the second chapter of charlotte bronte's novel surely which was published about forty years later and with set during low at i uprising quote it would not do to stop the progress of invention to damage science by discouraging it's improvements the war could not be terminate.

cropper charlotte bronte forty years
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"Uh who gets remembered and how it's really a history lesson when ian read the new york times obituary you get to learn about the great things these people dead in the mark they left on the world and society since eighteen 51 i read in the article the new york times has published thousands of the two areas of heads of state opera singers the inventor of stovetop stuffing the name or of the slinky how in the massive majority of these were the lives of men mostly white ones even in the last two years just over one and five are subjects were female in the new york times obituaries so you look back at people like charlotte bronte who wrote a jane eyre or uh emily warren roebling who oversaw the construction of the brooklyn bridge when her husband fell ill he was in charge of the project he got sick she took over i didn't know that that's cooked that's it while a huge bollywood star a metabolic ido wells who campaigned against lynching yet all their deaths went on remarked in their pages until now so if you pick up the times today look at more regular features in the obituary section about women who uh have changed the world they are expanding their lens beyond women which takes me to something that great he was talking about in raising two girls yeah little girls they sit down from the tv on the weekends eternal sport it's all it's all men sports now namely you've got some winning soccer that you see every now sign you don't see baseball you don't see any women's baseball really on major network that you're gonna sit down and watch with the kids there you go i liked the term they used at the times we're going to widen our lands they actually have it on their twitter account if you go to their twitter account they they have a section this called overlooked and their great now adding the stories of fifteen remarkable women because like you said an eighteen 51 windy started the obituaries they've been dominated by white men so there're adding to that now there are so many people who go to new orleans or any other older older cities and they loved walking through graveyards yeah because you can actually learn laud hit by history it's creepy as that is i give free.

the new york times charlotte bronte jane eyre brooklyn bridge soccer baseball new orleans ian emily warren twitter two years
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"His psychology is in a a subject of endless fascination and and and debate uh ole all one can save this this is a theory thuggish one man regime that is held together by thea internally and keeps together externally through the fear he's now able to you know engendering in southkorea and japan and increasingly in the unitedstates uh the he plumped self uncles at ports in malaysia he has had sort of a out upon methods of keeping power and in alka pearn in a corner with a nuclear weapon is is a is is a very very dangerous psychology sothechinese who are the only country that really has sway in pyongyang they said to trumpjingpinginmalagaininapril said to trumpl all help you in trump's at a cow coat off the protectionist rhetoric if you help me butchina hasn't really done anything that it wasn't during before sort of mild slapped on the wrist but still plenty of trade going on between china and northkoreai don't think china wants to see a unified southkorea under an american security guarantee it does not want gi's opponents border and so china isn't really going to shift its position it's a useful buffer state uh unless i guess kimjongun goes really crazy instaed actually may be almost using these things than china might change its mind but i don't think i'd be no i don't think trump'sartofthedeal is any match for some zoos the art of war that's what worries me not only in regard to northkorea but other countries around the world is there at he increasing loss of respect for the unitedstates as a world power.

southkorea malaysia alka pearn pyongyang trump china kimjongun japan trumpjingpinginmalagaininapril
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"But i think we can learn how to cope with these much better and actually even profit from them 'cause unify in a funny way if you stand back we living in an age of abundance extraordinary abundance and we're also living in an age of great humanitarian progress where hundreds of millions of people around the world elsewhere but because of the system we set of pax americana are being lifted out of poverty the women a suddenly getting autonomy a on the scale that history is never delivered before a that children a becoming literate end so allow jess of if you look at it as the world as a whole this is actually quite a good news moment and yet at the same time you see the trump administration attempting to roll back some added that freedoms we have a net heaven joyreid for example restricting money is a for plannedparenthoodwith a 97a which provides health care for women and yet they're being closed down that as in sounded to me like an example a greater freedom i am now in eight cetinje isn't amid it's um the the gend the gender dimension to this administration on many levels is just quite extraordinary and by that i mean the the male dimension uh theivankatrump stuff about in a maternity leave it seems to be just words just yaas word just words and i'm afraid that you know if trump's days of fulltime or indie two full terms the undoing of things in america is going to take a long time to redo if if ifif indeed we then vote for an anti trump an an an in a get back to a more balanced and less irascible politics but i fear the damage that trump could do and know we haven't mentioned of course global geopolitics and the psychology of trumpin the meantime and how he responds when there's a real crisis goodness.

trump america
"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"charlotte bronte" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"So if this is ongoing this frustration a within the middle class in western economies with perhaps the exception of germany where do you see that had ended in the next few years is at on employment that frustration that lack of rising income likely to continue and to intense at pa soi think the trans will intensify but i don't i don't want to give a council of despair at all i do think that are ways the remedies complete one but the really good things we can do to give people a sense that that children will be better off in a realistic sense that children will be better off at one of which i call for for short hat hand i call a marshallplan for the middle classes really focusing on lifetime from early learning through adult retraining evening class is on the job i'm a really concerted national priority to focus on the skills of the of the middle class and and the other i call a new deal for the gig economy is that we have we have a welfare system is very outdated it's based on the job you're doing and the social insurance you pay from it such scared security pay from it and we live in economy where people helping from jumped job or ole having more than one lots of fulltime jobs and the system doesn't fit i doesn't give them the insurance against a rainy day that parents were what we used to these.

germany