20 Episode results for "Charleston West Virginia"

In West Virginia, A City Left Behind Broader Economic Recovery

WSJ What's News

09:57 min | 2 years ago

In West Virginia, A City Left Behind Broader Economic Recovery

"Discover Milan Italy with WSJ magazine and into Garay. Join WSJ magazine editors for behind the scenes access in Milan. As you meet the city's most influential taste makers dine at top restaurants. Visit the private villas of lake coamo and much more book. This once in a lifetime trip at integrate dot com slash WSJ magazine or call six four six seven eight zero eight three eight three. With what's news from the Wall Street Journal. I'm Anne Marie for totally and New York. The US economy has now added jobs for one hundred consecutive months, and we'll see the latest snapshot of employment on Friday with the release of the February jobs report. But despite a strong economy, many are still being left behind. The Wall Street Journal's Sarah Cheney spoke to residents of Charleston West Virginia, the city long dependent on coal face, e you know, businesses closing they see a lack of corporations they see their friends leaving at the same time. A lot of people are holding onto a sense of hope that things will change. We'll have more details coming up, but first here are some other top stories. We're following more military women are seeking healthcare. Putting new pressure on the department of veterans affairs to expand services. US officials say the number of women using the veterans health system has tripled since the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In began. VA health officials testified before a house committee last week that the departments work to improve services, including gynecological care and mental health treatment for military sexual trauma advocates say more improvements are still needed women. Make up sixteen percent of active duty military about half a million of them rely on the VA for healthcare. The Wall Street Journal took a deep dive into letters written by General Electric's chief executives now that currency. Oh, Larry Cole has issued his first shareholder letter the conglomerate has had three CEO's and as many years longtime leader, Jeff Immelt left, the company in two thousand seventeen and John Flannery was replaced in October after a little over a year on the job. The journals analysis found Imos letters were the longest and cults released last week was the shortest Immelt. Also used more catch phrases like industrial internet and additive manufacturing for more on the rhetoric as GE has been breaking up its conglomerate check out the analysis on our website wsJcom, sue. Baru has issued a recall that could affect to two point three million of its imprison and forest or vehicles after finding that certain chemical compounds in cosmetics like perfume or in car polish could cause parts to malfunction the parts potentially impacted include a brake light switch involved in starting the engine. Another potential malfunction could cause a vehicle stability warning light to flash unnecessarily Subaru said last week that it has received one thousand three hundred ninety nine complaints about the issue since twenty thirteen but no reports of accidents still to come. We'll take a closer look at Charleston, West Virginia. Join the Wall Street Journal and National Geographic on one of five unique land expeditions to Israel and Palestine Columbia, South Korea, China or South Africa along the way, you'll enjoy exclusive access to pioneering journalist scientists and business leaders in each country and game profound perspectives on the past present and future of our world book this once in a lifetime trip at NAT GO, expeditions dot com slash W, S J or call eight eight eight two zero five five six to one. The nation's booming economy has left some places behind including Charleston, West Virginia, which is struggling even amid a strong jobs market. It's another sign the nation's economic recovery hasn't reached everyone joining us from Washington with more details is Wall Street Journal reporter Sara Cheney, Sarah as we prepare for the latest jobs report coming out on Friday, your piece pieces a timely reminder that not everyone is seeing the benefits of a strong economy, even as officials tau too, strong, jobs market and rising wages. Tell us more about Charleston, West Virginia, and the people you met while reporting their shirt, so Charleston is a city of a little less than fifty thousand. And while I was there. I really saw signs that the the city was struggling which you know, we oftentimes talk about how this jobs recovery is benefiting a lot of places that weren't doing while before but since two thousand ten Charleston. In has lost people from its its payroll. So it's employment has gone down. And the broader state of West Virginia has seen its working age population decline and a lot of this has to do with the state's reliance on coal so Charleston is in the metro area where there are a fair number of coal jobs. And basically as Cole has gone out of favor that has really hurt the city in the broader state of West Virginia, and then on top of that, you have different demographic factors, for instance, the workforce in West Virginia is less highly educated than a lot of other places. And so that creates a challenge in keeping and drawing in new workers and one of the problems here as you allude to is the west Virginia's dealing with a flight of educated young people who are moving to other. Dates for better job opportunities. What do experts say that West Virginia needs to help keep up with the broader economy, what are some of the solutions? So it's not easy given that the state has been dependent on coal for so long. So if you have a resource base to Konami that's already subject to booms and busts, but on top of that coal. Unlike natural gas is increasingly becoming obsolete, and so basically extra say that boosting the number of jobs in industries like advanced manufacturing and technology can help retain some of these graduates, and we do see that in the West Virginia university area. So in Morgantown the unemployment rate there is lower than throughout the state, and they typically do a better job of providing these these sorts of opportunities. So if the state more broadly. Can invest in in these sorts of jobs than that will help sort of create a cycle in which people stay in and more people. Come in any other unique economic trends, you found there that you can tell us about. So even though an increase in an advanced jobs would be very advantageous for West Virginia. We've sort of seen the opposite occurring employment and lower wage industries, so largely service sector jobs his grown nearly fifteen percent from two thousand one to two thousand sixteen and the same time jobs in higher wage industries have declined by about three percents and knots according to findings from West Virginia center on budget and policy, and then one theory as to why that might be an analyst there said that we've seen a rise and low paying service sector jobs at the same time. There's been a decline in high-wage Cole, John. Soap cool jobs pay about twice as much as a typical job in West Virginia. So that could help explain the the divergence there, Sara what's the message people from Charleston West Virginia want to send out about the realities that they're facing as we look at the broader economic picture. I think that the residents, and I spoke to several who live in Charleston, they largely are very cognizant of the sorts of economic challenges. They face that we discuss they they see, you know, businesses closing they see a lack of corporations they see their friends leaving at the same time. A lot of people are holding onto a since of hope that things will change, and there are many people who live in Charleston, and who live in West Virginia, and even people who leave West Virginia who say this is a great state, and we see promise here we see beautiful geography we see since. Community that might not exist in bigger, cities and states. And so I think there there are wherever the challenges but hoping for change and finally, Sarah as we keep in mind places like Charleston, West Virginia who are struggling to keep up. We're also looking ahead this week to the latest jobs report. What is the expectation for February's report? We've seen back toback really strong jobs reports receiving you know, payrolls rising way more than expected this point in the expansion. The unemployment rate has been hovering around four percent, which is not a record low. But it is well, and so overall I think expectations are for another solid report. However, we could just given the fact that we've seen such strong job growth the past couple of months. It's expected that there there might be a little bit of cooling. That's. Wall Street Journal reporter Sara Cheney joining us from Washington DC with more on Charleston, West Virginia. Sarah, thank you so much. Thank you have a good day. And that's what's news. I'm Anne Marie for totally in New York for the Wall Street Journal.

Charleston West Virginia West Virginia The Wall Street Journal Sarah Cheney Sara Cheney West Virginia center Larry Cole West Virginia university Anne Marie Wall Street Journal and Nation US New York Washington lake coamo Milan Milan Italy reporter VA General Electric
"Does The Boredom I Feel At Work Mean I Need To Move On?"

The Ken Coleman Show

41:05 min | 9 months ago

"Does The Boredom I Feel At Work Mean I Need To Move On?"

"Thanks for listening to the podcast of the Ken Coleman Show. You can catch the show live every weekday from twelve to one eastern on Youtube and one to two eastern on Sirius Xm, Andrew Local radio station. If you'd like to ask me a question, you can talk to me. Live any weekday from twelve to two eastern by calling eight, four, four, seven, four, seven, two, five, seven, seven, setting the pace on the pursuit of happiness. This is the Ken Coleman show where you discover what you were born to do and how to make it happen. Now helping you get unstuck on the path to your dream job Ken Coleman. Live from Nashville. Music City USA. You're joining the conversation about who you are what you were born to do where you want to be. And how you can get there eight, four, four, seven, four, seven, two, five, seven seven folks. This is different kind of talk. Radio we. We got callers that are calling in not angry. There on purpose. They are ready for a change. They know that they were meant for so much more. Whether they're stuck scared confused. Doubtful. Fearful It doesn't matter. Were all created for a purpose. You have the answers I. Don't it's my job. Pull them out of you. That's what we do a conversation about what it is you created do it's not too late. It is doable. It is not a myth. It is not a lottery. It is possible. I've done it. You'll hear some of my journey in the answers I. Know what you're feeling I know what you're experiencing. And, we do this show for you. Our philosophy is simple. You were created to fill unique role that means you are needed, and that means you must do it. Somebody out there need you to be you. The methodology, just as simple. Your sweet spot, the intersection of what you do best in what you love to do most. That's talent and passion. is where. The answer to the question. Why am I here? That's where it lies multiple roles multiple jobs multiple careers. If you will in that sweet spot, but it is in fact a sweet spot where you feel great meaning. Because you're good at the work and you love the work. And the results of the work matter deeply to you so. If. That sounds like a conversation. You WanNa have welcome aboard spread the word. Why don't you eight four, four, seven, four, seven, two, five, seven seven? Let's go to Charleston West Virginia where Sasha is on the line Sasha. You're on the Ken Coleman, show. Hi Ken. How are you? I? AM LIVING THE DREAM SASHA. How are you? I'm doing doing good. How can I help? Well I have been struggling for quite a while with job. in optical and I am of an optical department, and basically I love optical but I hate management now. Doing this for about eighteen years. and just the last couple of years. It's just I don't know it just have lost interest, and so it's actually affecting me at work. to where I'm not complaining that I need to do and so just a really struggling I like optical, but I don't know that really. Area that I want to stay in, or you know to pursue some other things and now wait now. Wait a second. You're talking yourself out of this and you've given me some great information. Sasha what I what I heard you say. Is You love the space the industry? You love the work itself, but you don't like management. You. Don't like the position you're in probably I'm guessing. Because of either leadership above you or the people that you are leading. This is difficult culture. Maybe there's some toxically difficult people in. It's made you go. Just. Stick do this anymore, am I? Am I sound in close to the she yeah. And clearly I have issues with my some of my leadership and I just It's kind of become a toxic environment. Yeah, okay, so now listen so you're dealing with build up. You feel like you're burned out, but it's not burn out because you're very much alive. Which you've got is build up. This is one of the five causes a up that I talk about all the time on the show, and it's Talk Society of bad workplace culture, and you just no matter how much you love the work eventually. You just think you don't love it because you don't like being around the people so I. Think you're doing the right thing in the wrong place. That's my diagnosis. Let me put to the Test Sasha. If I could magically snap my fingers right now and remove the poor leadership. I put in healthy leadership above you. And I and I had an as a result of that it. Fix The culture issues. Would you be happy to go in every day? Yeah So here's the deal. We need to get you in a healthier environment. And within the optical field, you bring a lot of experience in a lot of value to the table, yes or no. Yes I. Do okay, so this is. I know, but here's the deal. You need to start looking today today, Sasha you're looking for opportunities and other optical offices whether again be retail situation or even a doctor's office that's got a healthy culture and people have been with Dr or been in this place for a long time, healthy place, and and this doubt was going to say well. I don't think that exists. That's a bunch of garbage. A lot of people in the Charleston West Virginia area that are helping people with their eyesight. You have a lot offer, so don't quit. Don't resign. We need to step into this next to be seamlessly, so go find it. You're doing the right thing. Sasha in the wrong place route. Quick, real, quick, little teaching, moment here for the rest of you. We get this call a lot. I expect we will continue. Continue to get this call and I want this call because I want you to be able to discern what Sasha said. She loves optical. She loves that feel of that industry been in it. Eighteen years loves it really enjoys it, but she doesn't like what's going on in her current workplace, and then yet she called me going I. Think I want to do something else. That would be a grand mistake. If she did something completely different, and it was outside of sweet spot now if Sashi wants to pursue something else to center, sweet spot so office managing things like that in a different field, I'm fine with that because she loves the function of the work, she does and the space in which she does it, so the analysis here is if you're doing the right thing in the wrong place. Don't say all I need to do a different thing. No I need to change my location. That's the difference. That's how that works. So, what do you do in this situation? Sasha could go to her leadership and say hey, I think we got some toxicity going on I. See this this and this. How can I help with this? Do you see this? Do you see it? And also think that it's a problem. You got to have a conversation of leadership and leadership says sorry I don't see that, and they get a little insecure and a little defensive, even though you going with the right posture and humility St-. You're not attacking the leader. You're saying I'm syncing this at the workplace. Do you see this? You're you're asking questions and giving them a chance to identify with what you're seeing and feeling if they don't see it, that's a problem if they see it and they don't want to fix it. That's a problem, but that's what you do first. Then the second thing is you know okay. This isn't a place for me. They're not gonNA. Fix It so I gotTa Start Moving on. And so you begin looking at you. Go find something else before you step out. Don't let a toxic leader also push you out of the tree too soon. Be Big girls and big boys. And be grateful for that opportunity and hang in there. Until, you move somewhere else. That's what you do when you're in a toxic environment, but you love the work itself, so there's the prescription doesn't need to create all the things Zayed's. That's why I'm explaining this to you. Folks. A lot of you're dealing a lot of Zion. Your chest is tight over the stuff. Now. Be Hopeful you can get out of there. And you don't have to change industries. You love the work. You just don't like where you're doing. Be Free Fly. This is the Ken Coleman show. Folks? The unemployment rate has skyrocketed, and because of that the job market is more competitive now than ever before. If you've been laid off, or you're just looking for a change, it's important that you're taking advantage of every tool out there to help you. Stand out in the hiring process. That's why I'm so excited to announce. That might get higher digital course his on sale now. This is an online course with over an hour. Worth video lessons that will walk you through how to stand out from the competition in your job search. We'll talk resumes. Cover letters preparing for. For interviews and so much more plus get immediate access to my resume how to win the interview and how to follow up after the interview plus career clarity, all of these are get higher guides. All you need is a computer tablet or phone to watch, and you'll have access to unlimited replays of each lesson. If you're going to be looking for a job, you must do everything in your power to prepare, and this course will help you do just that go to. Ken, Coleman Dot Com to buy the get higher digital course today. That's Ken. Coleman DOT COM. Shining the light on your path to fulfilling your purpose, I am Ken this is the Ken Coleman. Show so excited to have you with US hallward new folks well. We're not really that new. been doing this thing nationally on Sirius, Xm for years now here we are on your radio station and Boil Boyer. We have fun. Different kinds of radio show. This is talk. RADIO IS GONNA. Lift you about less than in two other men and women who are in similar situations that urine. They're sick and tired of being sick and tired of going to work on Monday. Enough is enough. They WanNa get on purpose. They want to do the work that they were created to do and live the life they were created the live, eight, four, four, seven, four, seven, two, five, seven seven. Let's go to Chicago on our affiliate W. C. G. O.. is on the line Janet. You're on the Ken Coleman, show. Numerous combet, how are you? I'm doing great. How about yourself I am living the dream? How can I help? Um is an honor to speak to you this afternoon I was calling on behalf of my husband. I was actually introduced to show through the Dave Ramsey show, and I truly I fell in love with My husband currently has a PhD in educational leadership. He works at adviser for College. However he's been trying to advance his career and he had managed to known for his directors. And currently has been trying all over who get out battered job about why he loves to do like he's very passionate education, but sem lie, either he's way he doesn't have the. Experience the leadership is. All he's overqualified. Or sometimes it shows he doesn't hear back. I told him we'll buy you lie I. Don't know what you're not doing right. If you have to look up a facial resume is or His job, he's making all the connections to whoever he needs to make connections with, but nothing coming out of it got you. I don't know how to navigate it well. Let me ask you a couple of questions. I wish he was on the phone. But. Let me ask you this Did he get the PhD in Educational Leadership. December of last year. Yeah, so he's new to the whole thing, so he got a PhD. What's the dream job if he if I was sitting with him right now and I could stand my fingers and give it to him. What would you really want to be doing? Right now you want to be like a college professor. And he's currently flies or for a college. Yes okay well. What does that mean an adviser? Um He helps students with a condemn ix. Base and I like the academics par into financial part like careers like they should go into how much money they need on. What kind of a professor would he want to be meaning? What what subject does he WANNA? Be Teaching. Right now the humanities and like career. Corsi okay all right and. and has he been applying within the current college or university system that he's attached to? He's currently apply two dollars an outside as well. Okay all right well. There's a couple of things here and again. This is limited advice because I don't have him on the phone, so it's like you're answering on behalf of him. But one of the things he's probably doing wrong if he is that he's got a work more personal relationships so instead of just applying for things cold. Is he you leveraging the relationships? He has where other professors who are more tenured than he is. Maybe his dean. People that have respect and have a personal relationship with somebody who is hiring that position even if it is in another college is they're going to bat for him, saying he is a great candidate for this. Has He done that? Or is it just been? He's applying. I. Know Like what his versity he is. He has Saddam. Derek relationship with to the deans was like they'll be like. Hey, the APP tie alike via one of those job here you should apply putting away for you, but there will apply and do a lot. Okay, but we have to like heard anything. Oh! Did they put a word. Like his current job, initially like they had a position like panned, but the they were GonNa give him for something where I think like the out just how they have been. organizers said he can be advising and. Being a caterer like a teacher at the same time, so they trying to fix that, and now is on hold, but like he can be acquitted back forever. Yeah, no, no, no, no, no, okay, so here's the deal. The bottom line is he's doing some of the right things again. I I, you know. I'd like to know how aggressively he's working, his personal relationships and connections. He might have to Step out of the university that he's in college. He's in as an advisor. Maybe he has to teach on the community college level, but if he wants to be a college professor, he's in proximity and I teach this. At least he got the PhD and he's at least working as an adviser, and he has those relationships. This could be just a function of he needs to put in his time and pay his dues I didn't just step right into the national radio show so I think it's a combination of. Is he willing to teach in a community college system? Get that professor experience has to ask himself that. Or is he willing to just hang in there and he's in the right place. If you had called me and said he just got his PhD. Buddies not getting. You Profess Oriole positions I would say try to get an adviser position, and he's done that so i. think vice here is he needs to be patient, and he needs to be more strategic in leveraging his relationships. And this is not just I'll put it in a good word it's they're recommending at the highest level. They say this is the position. He's gotta use all of that momentum. And all those relationships to get better opportunities, and then he needs really work on how he's interviewing. You know he needs to try to get some feedback in that school system and the college that you're at right now. Where he's been turned down, he can actually get that feedback. He needs somebody to give him that feedback. because he's in the family. So there's some things you need to do better. That's fine, but he doesn't have a lot of experience right now. Just got the PhD I'd stay where he's at. Let's go to Belinda who's on the line in Dallas Texas Belinda. You're on the Ken Coleman show. Hi Ken. I'm so excited to finally get to talk to you. How are you well? That's very nice I am living the dream Belinda. How are you? Good, good okay, so my question is that oil's down to this question. I'm just like this specialist is. I've been that for this past year. I'm in my eighteenth nineteenth year of biting mole education. I have a master's in school administration, and like I said this year I served as a dyslexia specialist and I have loved that experience. Here's the kicker. It's a thirty minute commute so it's an hour to and from and I even though I'm saying I'm happy with what I'm doing. I'm happy with serving You know my students both in middle school and elementary Even though I am happy with that. It's been a great experience I sometimes or I think I'd rather say. I feel like I'm not in my sweet spot. I feel like I can do so much more. I've got so much more potential so it's that plus like I said my commute to let me ask you this. What are you want to do i? Think you know if no? If there were if it were just me making it happen today boom here it is what is. My first instinct is to say that I would love to the sign. Spanish learning pro- program I would love to do some I. Don't Know Translation Some book translation movie translations from English to Spanish and then of course I mean I already do on the side i. do drive it voice lessons, because that is another of my maters so I do private thing lessons. I do private tutoring academic. Belinda Belinda. Let's! Let's stick with what you told me. because. You know exactly what you WANNA. Do I think you need to stay in the education system? Let's remove the commute because that's wearing you down. And let's just change that part of your journey, which is causing a lot of stress. Let's get you back closer to home. Stay in the education system because you do enjoy it, but let's begin to look into how you can do on the side what you're doing with voice lessons and let's see if we can move into a full time position in that translation area. I would look specifically at that, but stay where you are in the education system. It's your stability, but let's move back closer. This is a temporary move to get back closer and remove the commute. You get to ex- hail. Then you begin to look. How can I what moves do? I need to make to ultimately get to what I WANNA do that. First instinct is exactly what you WANNA. Do WHO's doing it? Use the proximity principle. This is the Ken Coleman Show Song. What if you could be one hundred percent confident that you're doing the right thing with your money? Well folks now you can't with Ramsey plus we took our best tools and teaching and put them all together in one all access membership. You'll learn the proven plan with Financial Peace University. You'll budget with the everydollar. APP and you'll track your progress with the new baby. Steps Up, plus you get a whole lot more. Go to Ken Coleman, dot com slash, plus and sign up for a free trial of Ramsey plus today. That's Ken Coleman Dot com slash plus. Celebrating with you as you step into the Dream Job, cure any on as you run in your lane. I'm Ken! This is the Coleman show welcome. Eight, four, four, seven, four, seven, two, five, seven, seven, eight, four, four, seven, four, seven, two, five, seven seven. Hey, coming up next segment. You need to stick around new data. This is really interesting, especially for who out there who are self employed or want to be self employed. Or, you got the side-hustle. That's got you Kinda in between. This is really really interesting data. The college degree. And Self Employment What's the connection? What's happening? What is the trend really fascinating? Really fascinating because I am all for college education if it is necessary, I do not think that it is a right of passage for every young person in America Oh. You just need to go do it. It's just good for you. That may be true, but that doesn't mean they need to do it. especially with the skyrocketing student loans. And with the skyrocketing cost of college, and then the other trend were college. Education is becoming less and less important in this. Current work environment by the way going forward. It's going to become even more irrelevant. Criticism folks. I'm telling you I've see what's happening I'm paying attention. I see what the trends are. A massive shift coming now it's always going to be. On some level certain careers if you will. we'll, we'll need that higher education. But I think it's going to dramatically different so there you go so coming up. We'll do that next segment. Eight, four, four, seven, four, seven, two, five, seven, seven. Charleston South Carolina where Adam is on the Line Adam here on the Ken Coleman Show. Hey Ken. How are you? I'm living the Dream Adam are you? I am fired up glad to talk to you again. I liked that. Also. We've talked before. Yeah, I actually called about. A year maybe eighteen months ago. Okay, So at the time, I was in the military I. Was Kinda conflicted between Whether any stay in for another eight nine ten years, and actually retire or get auto stress, those dealing with anxiety, depression and Tom Physical issues and everything else and just wasn't happy. And you know. Your your advice was obviously you know, get out. You know you don't need to state. You don't owe them your your life and your happiness. And Naturally me and my wife, you know we. We struggled with it and The army made the decision for me and You know decided the to medically discharge me. just because my. Process was GONNA. Take too long. And so after that it's just been. The last year has been pretty much a hundred miles an hour after you know getting to that place that you were talking about and so I wanted to call and Kinda update you and and then say thanks. You know I don't feel like a lot of people not an not enough people do that I think. Wow, that's awesome. So what are what's the path right now? What are you? What are you heading towards? so right now. What I'm working on I was able to get a position local municipality here round Charleston as A. Coordinator which is what I. Did in the army basically doing mapping for like parcels and managing streets, and so forth in for the city. had an issue really getting a job You. Know you were talking right after the break about from jobs, actually do require that degree and because of my time in the military, even though had eleven years of experience. I didn't have my degree finish probably graduating next spring you know I've been overloading semesters and everything talking. Just get it done and have it done, but you know a lot of. It's not just from experience, but. So I struggled actually getting a job because of that and you know. Luckily I got a severance from the military that really funded Emergency Fund for the six months that I was unemployed. I, I followed your advice a lot with as far as networking. I I had a kind of a transitional part time job with an engineering firm that. Doing work for them and. They just didn't have enough work to the justify on full-time that but helped. carry that six months to nine months. working with them and then I actually I. Believe you know at that point. You know God intervened and said Hey. You know it's. Even doing all this work. Time to throw you a bone. They actually reached out to me the position at now. They actually reached out to me and said hey this. Position. Is You know just recently come available? We have somebody leave unexpectedly and Your background is specifically what we're looking for. You know when he then that's great and so now and put you on the path towards what you ultimately want to do correct. Yes so! It's basically everything has all the great things that I enjoyed about what I was doing the military doing. Geographic. Information Systems Still it. I love it. It's work that I enjoy. It's very detail oriented very. Creatively, fueled. So. It's It's all the great things that I enjoyed without the other issues where you know my physical limitations. Don't get in the way I. Love it and so add awesome. It's time to celebrate. I, mean hey. You're not in the dream job yet, but you're on the path and way to go buddy. It feels good, doesn't it? How's it feel it? It's amazing. The the Difference in mood and. Different, even just in the amount of time. You know I get to spend with my family. versus what I was doing. You know it's a love it. Hasn't been fantastic and I said I wanted to call on and say thanks, 'cause you know having been listening to your show. You know I wouldn't say that I used all the you know techniques and stuff you talk about like proximity principle, but I definitely use like for my networking when I got that part time job. One of my old bosses that I knew in this area actually. One of the ones that connection with the hiring manager that position so unknowingly. They didn't I didn't know. Nobody knew that they knew all of us knew each other, but the one person came up and they said Oh. Hey, I know that guy, so it works and the proximity principle works. And The web of connections work I want to say a big. Thank you Adam to you for your service You're a great American. Thanks for calling into the show. That's what it's all about right there, folks. That's what it's all about. I really enjoy that I like that because the the feel and the mood and connection. We want to have you the audience. We want you to call back. We want you to call back and say hey I talked to you a year ago or six months ago or three months ago or six weeks ago. We don't care two weeks ago and we talked about this. And I went and did it, and this is happening, so we have our dream. Scream a great chance to say hey, if you start listening to this show. You are stepping into dream job in the near future or even two three years from now we want you to call in and scream. I'm living the dream and we want you to share these celebrations like atom because it is Adams. Celebration. That will encourage so many people that are listening may encourage you, and so you call in and saying hey I was here. We talked I've done this and now I'm here. That's what encourages people as much as any advice I might give or any encouragement that I might give the to hear your story so I'm taking a moment to say hey, that's what makes this show unique. By the way we got a tweet yesterday. Madison somebody was listening to the show and said they wanted help one of our callers. That's the other thing that's happening the we want a community of people who are listening in and being encouraged. By others there being equipped by hearing, these phone calls. That's why you listen. And then we're helping each other. We're cheering each other on. That's what we need. More of people who are on purpose and people who are encouraging others and cheering others on. That's what makes this show special. Is You and your story so? Going to put that out there. I'm going to remind you from time to time. You can email the show. Ask Ken Coleman Dot. COM, share your story celebration I'll read it on the air. You can reach out to us on social media on Instagram at Ken, Coleman, on twitter. At Can Coleman on facebook. Just search the Ken Coleman show. Reach out, tell us hey, coming up some really interesting information for those of you who want to be self employed. This is the Ken Coleman show. So you want to be self-employed. And you're wondering what the barriers are. You're wondering too. I need. The college degree to win in small business, particularly my small business. What's going on with this whole idea that? The college degree is. Your passport to success. Well. I'm glad you asked the question. Context here folks welcome back to the Ken, Coleman show one number two a fan of college education win. It is absolutely necessary when it is required part of the plan. If required. They'll do it. Save a lot of time and a lot of money. But it's GonNa require shift among you parents, and even some of you adults who've been it's been drilled near head that the only way to be successful is to get a degree. Well wait a second specifically. Those of you that want to start a business, or you've started a side hustle, and you want that to be your thing or you just been dreaming about an idea. Fresh books did a two thousand Nineteen Self Employment In America report. Someone to share some data from that report. College education is becoming less of a prerequisite for success as someone who self employed the percentage of self employed professionals with college degrees has decreased. In the last couple of years in two thousand, seventeen sixty four percent. Of Self employed professionals had a college degree. Sixty percent in two, thousand eighteen, and now in two thousand, nineteen, fifty six percent of self employed professionals. Have, the college degree. Now, It doesn't mean this. They point this out in the study. They they're not saying. That these people who are self employed aren't getting educated where they getting education Ding Ding Ding and this is the point. I'm always making on the show. There are some very interesting data points in this study. How much those with and without college degrees earn. And what we're saying here is you can learn your trade. Learn Your Business. In the trade in in someone else's business. So. Let's look at the disparity between high school and college graduates. Not there anymore. Their report this report that I'm sourcing fresh books. Two Thousand Nineteen Self Employment In America report. This report reveals there's no difference in the revenue of the businesses that have been started by people who have a college degree and people who do not have a college degree, no difference. Now this is significant when you look at the exploding numbers of Americans who want to be self employed by two thousand twenty one. Fresh books is saying that twenty four million Americans want to become self employed by twenty twenty one. I can tell you I've seen multiple pieces of data recently. Folks where generations Z.. That's the mosaics that's below millennials, they all. Shouldn't say that that's an exaggeration. High percentages of them these are kids right now. In high school middle school are thinking about starting your own business running their own business. That's the dream job for a lot of Americans. A lot of you is to be self employed why freedom flexibility. And a little bit more control. Over your decisions obviously. Some interesting data here self-employed Americans are happier. Ninety six percent of respondents say they're happier. Self employed than they were working for someone else. Seventy percents that they have better life balance. Fifty, five percent said they have less stress and are healthier fifty four percents. They're healthier. And twenty seven percents said they spend more time outdoors traveling so interesting stuff here. Here's the point, folks. You don't necessarily have to be college educated to win in business. That's what they're saying, and that's not really a shock to me. Let's go to billions on the line in. We're Mississippi Billy. You're on the Ken Coleman Show Hey thanks for taking my call sure. How can I help? By the way it? Well, you know I'm always not sure billy. It's like it's like A. it's like a fanatical test. Every time I call out one of these cities. But. Thank you for the crashing. How can I help well? I'm currently home on a long way. I'm a construction worker. After I got a degree in music or years ago. I am. In proximity with somebody at a project, two and a half hours away from all. and. The thing is. I don't hey what I do for this company I own issue for the time ban is. Don't say Bane. Gov I want to do the rest of my life. Yeah, so, why are we talking about that? Let's talk about what you're in proximity to. What is it that you're trying to get in proximity to or in order to actually do it? Well you happen to know somebody. Get hired on with this company. Because this project coming up up to your project, you okay, okay. Hold on, hold on. Hold on, so I'm trying to figure out. What are you what? What's your question for me today? Because I'm trying to figure out. Are you trying to figure out your sweet spot or are you trying to figure out how to get on with this company? situation is from the way all and then two months prior I was home on a medical aid. I'm trying to get stay on with this company for the time being and figure out something new for me to do for war. Okay, how can I help you? I really don't know where and how to begin. Wait, a second. You have proximity correct. You said that earlier on you know somebody that works at this company, but they're not in your local community. There are a couple hours away. Set Right. Yeah I was wanted state. Yeah, I'm a little nervous, but. It's I. WanNa, stay work in bacon the money. For the time I god and then change their construction career to something. I got it okay, so we're all, but what we're talking about is you've got. Are you willing to drive? If it's is this cup? Where's this company is? Is it away from you or is it in your area? It is a way. It's a travel construction company. Okay, can you do that and with your medical condition? Can you actually travel and do the construction work? Can and like I was saying. I don't mind doing it I've enjoyed doing the work edge is I. DON'T WANNA do that no I get I. Get that, but right now. We need this stability until you figure out what it is you were created to do. Is that correct? Yes well then I would work that relationship. I'd worked at relationship big time and say hey. What do I need to do? to get an interview and who else to you know in that company. You know who does that contact. You have who they know. Are they willing to vouch for you? Here's my question. Just take a shot at this. What are you want to do if I could give it to you today? What does it you really WanNa? Do No limitations. No money issues just boom. I. Give it to you do. I'm in thank, Office mark. Okay you love that kind of work in an office. What kind of work what are we talking about? I don't know I'm still trying to discover that okay, so here's what I'm GonNa. Do for you billy. Here's what I want you to do over the next week to ten days and this this is very simple to do. You are in Discovery. States at a stage one of realizing the dream. You need to today. Right out the things you do best of all the things you do well. What are the things you do best, your top talents or skills or strengths? What do people compliment you for? What has always come easy to you? That's on one side of your page. That's under talent on the other side of the page passions. Won't you to write down work that you enjoy you do what you enjoy to do. Of course you do. What are things that you look forward to doing? What are things that? When you're in the middle on, you feel great and when you're done, you say oh, that was really awesome that matters to me. You need to list those two things out. Go Talk to somebody who are truth tellers in your life. Couple people. Three four four people make sure that they verify the list. Now you call me back. And then I'll help you from there, but you got to be clear on who you are before. We can figure out what you WANNA do. Our time is almost up, but before I let you go, you matter, and you do have what it takes. Thank you for joining the conversation until next time. This is the Ken Coleman show press on. Thanks for listening to the Ken Coleman Show. For more, you can find the show on demand wherever you listen to podcasts and watched the show on Youtube. You can also find Ken across all social media by following at Ken Coleman. Hey, folks I want you to check out our other Ramsey network podcasts like Christie Reich show. Hey, all I'm Christie right? You know it's so easy to feel stuck. He live life just going through the motions. Doing Laundry Carpool lines and a whole list of commitments that bring you know joy we say yes, to what everyone expects of us, and we have no energy or time for what we want and let's be honest the most of the time. We don't even know what we want. Why don't we live like that? God certainly never called us to. You know I believed the life God has for us is. Is Bigger and more amazing than any of US realize. That's why I want you to check out the Cristina show every week we will fire you up to break through. What's holding you back and inspire you to create a life you love and are proud of each episode will help you build confidence in yourself, and the God that create acute subscribe to the Christy Wright show wherever you listen to podcasts.

Ken Coleman Ken self employed Sasha Dave Ramsey Charleston West Virginia Ken Coleman Dot Youtube Nashville America Coleman Dot Com billy Coleman Belinda Belinda US Test Sasha
NPR News: 01-29-2020 2AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 01-29-2020 2AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. The impeachment defense team concluded closing arguments by insisting the abuse the power and obstruction charges. Against President. Trump are politically motivated congressman. Adam Schiff. The Democratic prosecutors suggest trump's lawyers are being dishonest they come in to the Senate which they refer to as a court and they say the house should have sued in court to enforce subpoenas on witnesses like John Bolton and they go oh to court and they say the house may not sue in court to compel a witness to testify majority leader Mitch. McConnell has told Republican senators he he has not secured the fifty one votes that are needed to block new witnesses in the impeachment trial. Meanwhile president trump is coming off his first campaign rally since the start of the case as. NPR's Joel Snyder. Reports trump used the New Jersey event to attack Democrats and to urge his supporters to give him a second term. The President appeared inside a Pat Convention Center in the Jersey Shore Beach town of Wildwood and predicted that Democrats will face a crushing defeat to November. This November we're going to win back the House yes we are going to hold the Senate and we are going to keep the White House. President was in New Jersey at least in part reward word Congressman Jeff Van drew who left the Democratic Party last month to protest impeachment. The Senate trial is now turning to senators questions. The president's lawyers have wrapped upped their opening statements and senators could vote as soon as Friday on whether to call witnesses trial Snyder. NPR News a group of Americans evacuated from Wuhan and China because of the corona virus. Outbreak has arrived in southern California where they'll be screened for signs of infection. Nearly Twenty nations have confirmed cases of Corona virus including five cases in the US more than fifty nine hundred of those cases including one hundred and thirty two deaths are in mainland China. The spread of Corona virus in China's affecting some major automakers facilities in and around the epicenter of the outbreak as NPR's Camille Domino's ski reports carmakers are weighing their next next steps. The new corona virus emerged in Wuhan which is a manufacturing hub. Many foreign automakers partner with Chinese firms to produce cars in the area. Yeah General Motors and Honda are among the companies with plants. There so far production has not been directly affected because facilities. Were going to be closed anyway. Okay for the Lunar New Year holiday but the Chinese government has extended the holiday shutdown into next week and carmakers might decide to keep their plants idle even even longer if the outbreak continues Major. US automakers also say they have restricted business travel to the affected area Camilo Domino NPR renews on Asian Stock Market Shares. Are Mixed down nearly three percent in Shanghai and Hong Kong you're listening to NPR News Minnesota based three M says it's laying off fifteen hundred workers as part of its global restructuring. The announcement comes less than a year after the company said it was cutting two thousand jobs three sites a slump in manufacturing and a trade war that has slowed growth in China for making the decision West. Virginia has seceded from the river from the state of Virginia in eighteen sixty three but now lawmakers in West Virginia are offering some counties to leave Virginia and enjoyed them as Dave Mitch. West Virginia public broadcasting reports the offer now dubbed Vex. Brexit highlights political differences between the two. Virginia's purpose Liberty University President Jerry. Falwell junior joined west. Virginia Republican governor. Jim Justice Tuesday to announce their shared supported. The idea. Falwell pointed to gun uncontrolled proposals in Virginia. As a reason to take the invitation seriously many counties are taking a long hard look at escaping the barbaric totalitarian Tyrian and corrupt democratic resume in Richmond those trampling on individual rights throughout the state justice. WHO's up for reelection? This year says his State would welcome anyone with open arms officials in at least one Virginia County have said they are not interested in the offer for NPR news. I'm Dave Mystic in Charleston West Virginia the magnitude seven point seven earthquake struck in the Caribbean between Jamaica and East Turn Cuba late Tuesday. It could be for felt as far away as southern Florida aftershocks rocked parts of the Cayman Islands. There are no reports of injuries or major damage. This is N._p._R.. News in Washington.

NPR News President Virginia Trump NPR Outbreak China Senate West Virginia Falwell New Jersey Charleston West Virginia Washington Wuhan Joel Snyder Dave Mitch Camilo Domino NPR Shay Stevens Adam Schiff Virginia County
Into the Corn (February 2020)

AOPA Never Again

08:56 min | 1 year ago

Into the Corn (February 2020)

"Heo Pa presents never again true pilots stories from the world of General Aviation in this episode of Lanka pilot. Discovers that landing in a Cornfield is pretty exciting. Quite violent and very noisy sticker shoe on the door and cinch down. No shoulder harnesses in into the corn by Scott S. Thomas. I was on a local pleasure flight in my belong to cruise air heading from Twin County airport in hills village Virginia to South West Virginia. My friend Daniel Student pilot was in the right seat. I was the pilot in command. I plan to take off from runway one niner and make a large sweeping right turn to return to the airport. I anticipated flight of fifteen to thirty minutes. Maximum approximately five to seven miles from the airport. I was arguing back to the field at about one thousand five hundred or one thousand seven hundred feet. Ag L. in accrues configuration climbing gently. When I felt a sensation similar to driving over a rumble strip on a highway without much discernible noise change. The engine suddenly backed off to idle with a mild shuddering sensation. The propeller continued to windmill. My initial reaction was to raise the nose and verify that the throttle and mixture were forward. They were still in a gentle. Climb as I- decelerated to approximately best glide speed verified the mags on both and then left and then right individually switched field tanks applied carburetor. Heat verify the landing gear and flaps full up and re trimmed the nose judge the distance to the airport boundary and stated that we needed to have a fielder to picked out in case. The glide. Didn't look good after we stabilized. I quickly determined that we were not within a glide of the airport property and selected a field planted in corn. We had seen just behind the right wing. My reasoning was that was a long ridge of an otherwise very steep hill surrounded by other inhospitable hillsides. And all the pastures had relatively close fences and had visible obstacles rocks included and cattle. I also reason that the corn would help dissipate energy. I briefly experimented with the hand fuel. Pump starter mixture and throttle hoping for at least partial power with zero engine response. Daniel remained calm and very helpful. I initiated a brisk turn to the right which put us on a slightly high angling left base leg. I told Daniel my intentions and once I assured we were clear of the power transmission lines and towers. I confirmed we were configured for a full flap gear up landing and went left to right in the cockpit turning off any potential hazards to our landing including mags. Throttle and mixture fallout master. Switch off. I told Daniel to verify. The cabin door was ajar. At which point he asked about the wheels and I stated it would be an intentional gear up to avoid nosing over just above the corn. I realized my plan to touch down just as the field settled slightly into a bowl. The seaplane technique for water landings and swells was off and I actually went into the corn tassels seconds past that point dragging the tail the descent through the approximately six foot high corn was very noisy and short lived as it provided rapid deceleration as anticipated and we impacted knows high wings level very firmly and stopped almost immediately. Skewing about thirty to forty degrees left just as we stopped even with my experience. Flying from aircraft carriers that touchdown and deceleration is at least tied for the most violent arrest. Moment I have experienced my inertial real lap belts and shoulder harnesses. Were wonderful as soon as we stop moving. I checked on Daniel and told him firmly to get out of the airplane. He did so eagerly as he exited. I handed possibly through the first aid kit at him and followed immediately once clear. We tried to confirm that neither of US was hurt. We remain somewhat away from the aircraft and then got closer to inspect it. I did not see or smell fuel oil. Smoke or flame and so from the wing. I confirm that I had the airplane and IT systems turned off and looked for my cell phone. It was later found in the corn stubble. About twelve feet from the cockpit. Apparently having broken free of its Yo colder an exited through the lower right corner of the windshield we set out through the corn downhill. In the general direction of the nearest road. I estimate are not so straight path to the first cattle fence and subsequently cow path to have covered what is actually only about one quarter mile while walking we both called family members to inform them of our experience and that we were okay. I also arrange to have picked up roadside. We encountered the landowner at the bottom of the hill and informed him how we got there he had no idea. I called the Flight Standards District Office at Charleston West Virginia and left a message and then tried to Richmond. Virginia physio with a similar lack of success. My wife then took me to the Galax Virginia hospital because of increasing lower back discomfort while in the waiting room at the emergency room I was successful reporting the event to a flight service station operator at one. Eight hundred W X brief. Who told me that his computer entries were in fact passed into the government system and that I had therefore notified the FAA. We later discovered that the crankshaft had broken cleanly into it. Shut down all the accessories. Fuel pump mags oil pump. The instant the rear third had stopped rotating that put us in a glider with a big speed break in just one or three skipped heartbeats. I don't count the successful outcome of this. Or my previous four aviation bumps in the night to military to civilian as a result of any exceptional pilot skills on my part but gleefully acknowledged that I had many good and thorough civilian and military instructors over the years who hammered the need for constant practice and self instruction into my piloting. The result is that when something goes wrong. There's no need to think about it simply. React to all the training scenarios and execute the sequence of corrective action. You've already created. It's worked well for me. A few other thoughts mature corn is tall and thick so be prepared to be an IMC for the last six to seven feet of descent. Your flare will be on the gauges ears of corn are they easily take out. Plexiglass penetrate wood and fabric with no effort and we'll pretty much flat and then aluminum leading edge. It's really noisy. And the view is what a blender of Avocados looks like and shoulder. Harnesses are a must in front seats and really nice in rear seats. Even the S. T. seed. Retrofit kits are inexpensive insurance? The never again. Podcast is brought to you monthly by Alpa the aircraft owners and pilots association. You can find more never again stories online at Ao Pa Dot Org by tight big never again into the search box while you're there check out a OPA's mobile flight planning APP AO PA. Go as well as the many free training and safety courses from the Air Safety Institute find all of this and more at Ao PA DOT. Org The never again. Podcast is produced by Royce Earl. Thanks for listening fly safely.

Daniel Student General Aviation Scott S. Thomas Lanka hills village Virginia Twin County Alpa Virginia South West Virginia Galax Virginia hospital FAA Flight Standards District Offi Royce Earl Air Safety Institute OPA Charleston West Virginia Richmond one thousand seven hundred fee
Episode #1391: The New Phil Hendrie Show

The World of Phil Hendrie

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Episode #1391: The New Phil Hendrie Show

"Once upon a time in the west, but it's never good that that and the ugly ugly. She just what did she tell you? But we want our do you to do this. Now, just I want to get the music ready for the show. It's the the Danish National Symphony. And hi, folks, I was listening to this Margaret hurt at the Danish National Symphony doing them using of any medical ni for the spaghetti westerns. Forget western make good a battery ugly one. Okay. And what's not good? I know it's not a good ugly. But just come down. You're getting nervous. What is this garbage that ever music? I can get rid of that. Thank you. Now where is this stuff, by the way, folks? Welcome to our show. We have coach Vernon dosier joining us, and we'll be talking a little bit about Johnny Menzel and. Well, you're in what that one hold on guys. We're looking for this. Danish national simply I just pulled it up on YouTube. And then we also have Kurt queasy guy Barton from West Virginia. And they are proposing pretty radical set of changes to the state of West Virginia to begin to move them out of what they call the hillbilly era and get them into the the modern and even futuristic era. So we'll be talking with them this. I can't wait to hear us talking a minute ago. Well, we've got this. If you wanna now, this is the Danish know what Margaret why were you interested in this? I was interested in it. Because it they used chemistry when I know what I if we're going to start him with his everybody, keep your comments the used soprano. They thought they were using one of the sopranos from the the gangster movie. He's dick. But you really are slow, aren't you? Well, it's kind of singer. But so they. They have the Danish National Symphony has a soprano singer in this song once upon a time in the west. And they also have all of the instrumentation here. It is here. See this here. Phil. Yes, I hear it. Okay, right here here. Look, see, see, Phil. Why would he stay right edit? But I don't think you're getting the full import of this guy's playing a harmonica. Yes. He's playing a harmonica. Good for him. We're waiting for the woman to go. By is. Stop. Mark. My name isn't Mark triple Margaret. It was it was a little piercing. You know, it's going to be real never mind. Oh my gosh. Stick a man. Peta guy. No, I didn't. This is the Danish National Symphony National Symphony Orchestra. Danish. What is it again? I'll do it. It's the Danish National Symphony Orchestra and they're playing the song. What's the theme from once upon a time in the west? And this this like many of any Conan's compositions has the soaring vocalisations, you know, they're not necessarily speaking English. They're not necessarily singing English or Italian. It's a guttural western wind swept regurgitation, you know. It's almost like it's the wolf what does that mean? In a song. Good bad. The they go. Oh, that is a wolf that's supposed to be wolf out in the. In the in the Bush Bush desert someplace, yes. Here we go. Now what I propose because this is my meteor I've done this is the I do a tour with the national. Danish dutch. The Danish national. Feel you think this is funny. I don't think it's funny. No, it's the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. Yes. This is the beginning of the film when Henry Fonda as you know, is the bad guy, and he comes he appears there in that farm, and he slaughters the entire family as they come drifting out of the dust Acis that oh, you didn't see the film. And he sees a little boy is he going to kill the little boy to because of little boy witnessed. Don't tell me. No. I won't. He does. Die. But wait, wait. Where do you want to remind now? What did you do that? But dignity I since. What are we doing that? We're going horseback riding. The hill. Is this girl that goes? What's with you freaks? That was that was can we do this another time? You guys are lightweights. You know that? There is a soprano singer that at one point. I don't know how it goes. But it's like that. And what I propose is Margaret great the Danish. National Dutch, it's the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. Thank you. Margaret Bray tourists with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. The hell is this? I got a wind machine or something. The song goes. Thank you very much. Danish National Symphony Orchestra I would tour you see. All right. So you'd be. A special headliner said you like a b but did you say you said you'd be like a special Hitler? I don't special head headliner. I'm sorry. I got Dan. What was great? She's only gotta she'd had to start to bowl. All I'm trying to do. All right, Margaret. We're sorry. We didn't mean to yell. You is the give them some ideas. I'm getting the Danish National Symphony Orchestra. That's what it's called. Yes. Giving them some ideas. So here's the. Miss that part. Maybe it's not. But it's the part that goes. Are you gonna end your touches to? Well. That's my thinking, you know, instead of just doing the dull. Now here is the the Mississippi. This was the gal that was whistling. Is this lovely? What's your problem? I can't hear. Here's here's knocking off you guys. Yeah. That's very beautiful. And that's part of the once one time in the west. So I I do both parts. I do the message soprano it's well as the soprano, and then I do the the boss. Oh performed. Oh. And the boom and the book of the Bubba, not the Bubba. It's the. Teamster Henry is a don't ask him. Did. I say there was then there is there is but. There are variety of different Margaret proposes to tour with the Danish Dutch God, dammit. You got the disease? What's your problem? You were doing it. The Danish National Symphony Orchestra. Yes, she sings beautifully. You know, what she does sing beautifully? But wait, wait. Do they get a load of me? What is so funny? John German in here. John would be good. Are you kidding me? That sounds like he's got Hodgkinson's diseases. How dare you? I mean Parkinson's that's the one that makes you shake Parkinson's by great, uncle grand and grandfather, and my great grandfather in my grand, my great uncle, my grandfather. And my great migrate father. What's a great father? You said you're great father and into say, my great uncle, what's a great uncle agreed grand. Great. Forget it man. Let's say, hey, by the way. But if your relatives have that checked out why? Because it's in your genes, you should have in your annual physical. You should have that looked at because they're doing amazing things with the genomes. They may find the gene or they may find the little code in your brain. If they can find a brain. She's pretty good wasn't bad. Pretty good. That was up. Let me tell you something. I'm done. But I still see go see a doctor. Yeah. You want to see a doctor? But seriously, if you have that in your family, it is hereditary doesn't mean you're going to get it doesn't mean that you are carrying it actually could mean that you're carrying the, gene. But you're not going to come down with it yourself. Maybe a child or grandchild of yours weird be thinking about me grandkid saying they happen. I hope it doesn't. But it may happen. Shut up. All right. So thank you very much for that. And that's very good. So the world famous Phil Hendrie show today, we have Kurt queasy guy Barton from Charleston West Virginia to talk about some legislation. They're calling it the modern West Virginia act of twenty eighteen they are looking to pass a series of sweeping changes. They're also looking to fund a an arena in Charleston twenty five thousand seat multi purpose arena that will house initially a professional hockey team National League hockey team, they'll they weren't the NHL in West Virginia. Yeah. And all of this with an eye toward modernizing. What is heretofore been is that the right term, by the way here to four? What did you say? I said what is here to four been? Oh here to four means that from now into the future. So that's that's lame ass. So I didn't mean to say that. Well, it doesn't here to four. I thought it meant here to four before. I did. I think it gets. It Henry, you're right. That's that is what has okay. So it's not here to for meaning heretofore in the future. Yes. It is. No. It isn't never mind. Never mind. Never mind. What has been to this point? Let's say that's the term. Yeah. What's been to this point a hillbilly kind of a deal? And so they want to modernize that we also Vernon dosier. Joining us today who will be talking about Johnny Manziel. Very very interesting comments made by Johnny Manziel the quotes. And I know I list at least the cloth. It is disquieting when you do that. Because you are so much of a man, and it's much of a man as you can be and obviously heterosexual. So when you go this, we begin to think, maybe you're. Maybe doing something that nobody knows about. So anyway, that wasn't even funny. I don't know what that was. I thought it was moderately. I thought it was modestly as in well dressed up to the neck humor. Yes. It was humor wearing a turtleneck sweater. Oh, give it a rest. Phil Garris Jerry a break and everything like that. Do. Thank you, Robert. I appreciate that. What an ask asset. Geez. You wanna watch the language? So Vernon dosier. Yeah. Is going to be with Johnny Manziel was quoted as saying today that he's not an Xs and os guy. He wasn't a guy that watched a lot of film. And if the if the Cleveland Browns had done their homework, they would have known this. So essentially through this right back into the lap of the Cleveland Browns. And I think it's an interesting, you know, it's an interesting comment. But at the end of the day that doesn't save your ass, Johnny. Because what about you? What about the job? You had your the quarterback of the Cleveland Browns football league. Do you want to be a winner? Or do you want to just sit on your ass, and do what you didn't college and figure that's gonna work because you know, as well as I do you're talking. He's listening to you. You know, the chances listen to you slim to none. Yeah. I know that general I'm just pretending like he's pretending we live in an alternate universe. Where up is down and down his up and Alice's sickness smoking, a hookah and the door mouse and. Fill Henry is on talking to Johnny Manziel. Okay. You understand? I look. No, no, get it. This is an alternate. There's a rip in the universe. I'm out there in parallel dimension. All right. You're in a parallel dimension. You're still talking Johnny Manziel. It's impossible. He's listening in a parallel dimension another dimension. What does that mean? It's a dimension where Johnny Manziel would listener fill Henry what the fuck. Hey, man. General never give it up give up give up this line of thinking. Thank you. Anyway, general I appreciate that. Johnny manziel. So we'll talk about that here in the world famous Phil Emery show when we come back if we come back if we feel like coming back, which I doubt klepto mania is the place come on in get your face. What's your face on it, clipped on mania, everything that you could want for your party style? But on a face a mask on our gas mask where slacks peashooter placed in your mouth right now at kleptomaniac. There's only one thing we know. And that's your satisfaction your happiness, even if we have to the've our way to it at klepto mania, that's the place come on in. And grab a face. Your face is all important to us. Your eyes are mismatched. If your mouth is crooked. If your ears a too high. You've gotta get something on and you've got to get it on right now. That's why we say kleptomaniac nothing is too good for you. Even if you've got to feed your way too good looks. My name is Bill, and my wife, and we talked slow down slow down everything they've ever promised is good. Luck domain is fifteen Lincoln in downtown Ertl right now of scientists are working in Puerto Rico to ensure that aliens don't invade towns. Ridiculous. Doesn't it in our government spends millions upon millions of dollars every year to ensure the alien does not attack into the alien does not feed on your brain seep into your ears. Otherwise, take you over. That's why alien alien shake all the kids love it. And you will to have bombed go to the store and buy sixty eight gallons of it. It's only five thousand dollars a gallon. We'd like to rape your family right over the coals take every time you've got because you're afraid of an invasion from space right now. Thousands of scientists trying to ensure the. You don't wind up a blue blade special for alien greet here alien alien shake have bump get some today. Shake bullshit, my mom alien alien shake. Famous two hundred show at help assu go in southern California. This is a Danish National Symphony plan for a few dollars more. Gray's wants to tour with here, right? All right. So is this in in in Dane land. Or whatever the hell, they call it, whatever it's called Denmark. What an idiot. You know, it's I know what it's called. Yes. It's endangered and. That's cool. All right world famous. Phil Emery show joining us from West Virginia Charleston, West Virginia where they are getting ready to go into a late session at the West Virginia state house. But right now, I'm told that Kirk queenie and guy Barton are attending a music festival one that they sponsored in brought into West Virginia downtown Charleston. And is this a chamber orchestra Kurt is as far as you know, what is this? The court demonstration. But it is and you can hear a man here. Like. What? And all them play. You know thought that play that optical, right? So we sponsored this and we asked gentlemen. In writing they as the record to come into town and set up here in the mall, just opposite of the state house, and we're seven. You know, we got finger food and would turn to bring to win Virginia a new day, I'm old day. But a new day about is we have lived through member generations and different iterations. You know with Jinya, and it all come down to squirrel gun bay a feet and a man and overall trying to do is pick it up, you know, pick up the speed and get into a slow at least at a start jogging and instead of walking way toward a future. And we have a wide sweep and do this Bill is West Virginia the new West Virginia mountains during the act of twenty eighteen now, you mentioned the hockey arena, and we do have application we have an ownership group that sped by Hedley bussmann along with Headley busted as an industry of here. A wheeling Virginia consortium a number of money west Virginians apply for National Hockey League. And also the franchise is set up. So that the team has a nickname that uniform have been picked the Dow trinket and little tickets Waco that has guys gentle gentle gentle, very good. So you've got this hockey nut you, but you've got a group in his applying the national what's the name of the team team spaceship, and the reason, and this is something that was carefully the re what the spaceship? Yeah. The spaceship. So what is it called the Charleston spaceship? No, no, let's say the West Virginia spaceship, but that part two of the modern modernity. Yeah. Day they've been doing to the act of eighteen also going to change the name of the state now, this is all really change the name of the state, this is this cut by attention. What are you gonna change too? Well. Hold on for just a second. Because this is going way too fast for me. I should say the name of the state of West Virginia. That's an iconic name. Well, Robert, thank you very much saying conic. Yeah. It's like conic. If you wanna if you if you looking for a term that means as skewed by language, but it means s scratcher or mouth breeder or I got my finger up my rear end. Then you go from West Virginia. But we are looking at the the bottom maternity act of twenty eighteen redundant. No. It is not we wanna make sure everybody understand what we're doing virginity maternity and gonna make gonna set set say West Virginia sentence over the future. And man, I'm I'm outta here. You know, everything else is in the exhaust. We this. This this base. You've got no rear view mirrors, west Virginia's gonna strip off the rear view mirrors. We look at my hat as anyone we're looking forward. Now, you guys are proposing. First of all the name of the hockey team is the spaceship that sounds good. It doesn't sound West Virginia will because you see in the past. If I said, I wanna professional even college team with junior. What's did? I call that you come up with some jet, you know, to mountaineers amount in the Dow guy get it already mountaineer. That means we all live in log cabin. You take a look at the drive with Virginia and saw cabin. And I I want to break down and cry dry at all log cabin up and down the hill. All my driver's license. To guy is a log cabin and walking out the front door scratching waving to the camera sheet. Yeah. So. Proposing. I think we've got a very good chance is that we at least explore renaming the state. We want to change the name of the speed checks. Robert was saying west Virginia's is tonic. You know, you don't even know what conic means do. It means. It's a conic. No icon. Yeah. Give me a break. He had to tell you that never mind. Whether he knew or not the guys are write that name West Virginia is it's every bit as I kind of is the name, California or New York. How do you change the name of a state? You can't get him to stay. When you get pag people saying what you come come from West Virginia. Oh, yeah. Jed clampett. Come. And listen to story about a man all that every time. I tell people that I represent state of the union, and I talked to a lowest Besina one of our representatives haven't been seen a wonderful guy. He's a nice, man. He follows us on Twitter and we follow him. Well, that's great Twitter. Now that's about as modern as it gets Virginia gay, we got Twitter here. Now what I'm asking to do. That's ridiculous. West Virginia is a beautiful state and has one of the great universities west university of west too. West Virginia university. Oh, wow. Interesting west Virginia's gonna do you don't need to be changing the name of the state. You think that you are identified with squirrel guns and bare feet. I don't think it. I know it everytime guy you talking at Megan Philadelphia about three weeks ago. And is that in doing it also Democratic Party meeting because we were getting together the mid terms coming up, and I'm talking to say when you come from guys West Virginia and right outcome, and listen to story about a man they all danced, and it just it didn't wasn't a big thing. But the four of them started dancing in a circle. And then look at me, and they and they saw that I had a pain look on my face. Like, I'd read it took a gut shot, you know, and they saw what they done, right. They they recognized immediately. And they say what's wrong. I said it's it's getting old. It's just getting real old because wait a minute. When you said, I come from West Virginia, they broke into a dance. Yeah. What happens all the time? If you come from West Virginia, would you don't miss you. Don't know any of this. I've been trying to tell people use ban. Nobody wants to listen to when you see I come from West Virginia. Immediately people form a circle. Oh, boy, you hear that shit. I are you. All right. I'm checking right now. You'll kay. I'm fine. You didn't that didn't make you laugh forget if I come from West Virginia, and I say from West Virginia fill your big into embarrass yourself even for. Essay everybody shut up. What I'm saying is too. Yeah. What I'm saying is the idea that if you're from West Virginia, and you tell people you are the immediately form a circle and start, dancing and singing the hillbillies theme. I from West Virginia standard guy. I'm trying to tell you know, are you do you begin that call I'm asking you. What the no I do not I for you don't know you'll have from forty cents a week about what he's talking about. And anybody I did come from West Virginia. They know they hear one or two songs I want you to meet the family known as the real mccoys grand peppy Amos. And then we wanted to hold water Brennan thing, and I wanna weep or it's. Do you telling the other thing the other thing that's very upsetting? Is they break into the obscene version? You're trying to tell me that because you come from West Virginia. Everybody reacts negatively. No, no, no, not at all. Most of the time. Most of the time very friendly. They think they're being friendly. They oh, you're for West Virginia. Come and listen to what story about a man named yet? And they're doing it's like the Greeks when they put the hand, their their arms and shoulders and dance sideways. That's the dance. They do. Yeah. That only lasts about ten seconds. But they Dan sideways, and if they have a glass they throw it in smash. Man. You know, what I think field needs to fill needs to do what you need to back filters over here. What are you guys doing? We'll take. Thank you, very very much feel. Let's take a break. We'll be back with guy pertinent, Bert, Bert Barton guy, Biden, I'm queasy obsolete, Kurt but Burton. Borton birth in Berkeley ban. Someone's gonna die. I'm guy. Barton queasy guy. Kirk Wiebe will be right back famous film. Just sit down fill. Fields Philby show. Hi, this coach running dodger from Belmar kademi, and they are starting up the football camp. And they've asked me to teach it for nineteen th straight year, and I will be there, but it's going to cost, and I think you'll find it worth the Vernon dosier football camp teaches your kids how to block had a tackle had a fly. How to glide if you've got a young man who's got the moves. He's got the outside moves and get hit the interior line. But he doesn't quite know what to do with it after that like Karrada football fumble run to mommy and go get himself a sandwich, or maybe he just needs to go home and suck at the breast of his mum. I will make a man at every young man that you bring out of the man who man I'll bring the man out of the boy and the boys in the man that's the football camp there. Bill Mark Adamy this coming summer, or you can have voice stay home, and he can stay with us. You know, it's up to you. Whatever you wanna do go. It's run does IRS football camp for boys. Twelve to eighteen years of age football blocking tackling running hiking swimming, hunting and dancing coach Vernon dosier football camp at Belmar kademi now through the end of the year football. Have you ever wondered what it would feel like to be able to make yourself invisible? And just walk downtown laugh at people point at them. Grab yourself by the crotch and go well now, you can do it. Hi, Bill Clinton, and I have finally perfected the visibility juice. That general Johnson Jameson was only this close to perfecting some ten years ago with Bill pertinent visibility juice. We've taken the general Johnson Jameson goblins use one step further. I used to be general Johnson. Jason's lab assistant some of you may have known as eager, and I was high on speed most of the time then with my mind half gone, but now due to push ups a clean living kind of a life. Eating broccoli and fresh rainwater. I have built myself to become the bad ass that I am today. My name is Bill pertinent. I'll make you invisible. Bill Perkins and visibility juice. You can get a bottle or you can get the whole carton for just fifteen ninety five. I'm Bill pertinent. I wanna make you invisible. Bill Clinton's and visibility juice hit up CVS at CV at C and C E E B and BBC and BB king's. I'm Bill per you invisible. Bill Clinton's visibility juice one step further than general. Johnson. Jason's goblin juice hobnobbing with the goblin not anymore. Not as long as you've got Bill pardons in visibility juice. I'm Bill Clinton. I'm gonna make you invisible. And welcome back to the world famous hundred show. I'm Margaret grey, Phil started laughing, and we thought are you? All right. I was never not. All right, Phil. But you started go. He. All right. Let me get can. I guy Bill. I'm fine. Started. Cable. You started laughing like a dune you started like a laughing like a dune on gas. You know trouble little bit film. You guys are some funny stuff. I mean, what's funny about us trying to modernize wonderful state of West Virginia. It's admirable. I don't think you should just modernized to kill the music. But this is the good the bed and the ugly. Shield using Dari. He was just doing it for me. All right. Well, Margaret world done with that. Phase the show, aren't we? The good the bad, but not ugly. But it's the good the bad in the butt ugly. Do that after the show if you don't mind, oh, my God almost slapped my hand. So you did mystery. No, I didn't. Now by chill out. I'm trying to talk to Gert to Gerda Barton. My name is guy Barton God damn it. And then watch it. Okay. Now, what is this harpsichord music? I told you already that Kurt mass mantra in this hot Cohen expo to try to bring some sophistication of West Virginia. And so far I got a lot of people around and Bambi eaten bratwurst and in Louisiana hot. Listen to hop decor music, and they are saying around doing. Hurts. It hurts bad. Going to rename the state. We certainly get off the line. And if you don't wanna take seriously, what are you guys thinking of renaming the state? What we're trying to do fail at first of all people in the mindset that the great state of West Virginia need to have as we mentioned. So maternity the great state of West Virginia need to be brought up to speed and seen every four for the future that something that's just like a dead like if a dead animal of the road, and everybody's looking in the rear view mirror. We took out the review me as on his and we looked into place the name of West Virginia because that again refers to Virginia the civil war history of the state. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I I'm sorry. I I don't mean to be rude. Well, that was after trying to say we already know about a wizard civil war history. But we've got to change people's thinking about West Virginia, and we sat around, and we brainstormed as we named the hawk out the Hartford's and the rest of the group that is the national have to be they wanted a spaceship because. There's nothing more futuristic flying saucer. You know what I'm saying? Just you, you know, in a land people get spooked because they don't know whether there's a mu- mush in. Yeah. And I know that sounds weird point point being believe. It sounds weird. You want people to think you're your modern or that you're out there on on on Mars. What is it? I'm saying that if futures doesn't spaceship or flying saucer sound futuristic, it sounds that way to me, but I don't which one are you using spaceship? But I you know, we fail that the sports Radisson say last back to fly sauce town, even though it's you say that because. They do that that used to call the they used to call the Washington senators the net, you know. Okay. Never mind. Thank you. That's that's sounds great bring, you know. I know you I want to know and you still harpsichord expo. Yeah. This is Ricky Van Horn. How you doing Ricky Ricky's playing house accord right now, we're trying to get people. How you doing ever heard accord? Couple times. I did. Do you ever wear shoes? I got shoes on I know. I'm just kidding around. So here's what we wanna do fill. Thanks, Ricky, obviously didn't go over to look at that. I think I'm gonna modernize state and people can't even sit still for five seconds. Let's guy at a harpsichord exactly the most he wasn't playing the jazzy stuff play jazz off a lotta him playing jazz. It wasn't the most interesting. Let's get back to renaming the state of West Virginia. Now, what we're doing is only proposing that we say where open for suggestions. But I feel a great name for West Virginia is an identifiable name. It sounds like the future, but it's also rooted in the traditional past it is a heavenly body. But it is also a God. And we want to rename West Virginia Neptune. Okay. So that you've got your in Charleston Neptune. Charleston to you now. Of these towns have wheeling Neptune and the Neptune spaceship. Now, it starts to make sense. You say. The the hockey team Dame F state, you know, so the whole state that. Yeah. And so in tackling tad led to have you on the radio coming to town on that Neptune spaceship. Yeah. All the boys Neptune. But it has I'll do God just left. He's going over. He's gonna hit up. Rosie he'd he said he said he'd rather look at her cleavage, then listen to you. I love it. And let me apologize to both u n guy that you can't hang up because you should be allowed to with Phil laughing every three seconds. Wait a minute, man. You're gonna you're gonna sit there and tell me I got no right to laugh guy says he wants to rename statement Neptune. I'm begging you. Let me hang up. I'm begging you hang up. Go ahead. Oh, thank Christ. We looking at nothing. I think those guys are pretty thin skinned. I think those cats have got very unrealistic expectations. If they don't think that it is true. They don't want anyone laughing at them as they say. Hey, welcome to tune you fill every two seconds. Was he garrison fun here? Here. Even funny. You better believe I found everything funny. Everything I said was funny. The spaceship the flying saucer Neptune the harpsichord expo. You know, we'll feel it's that kind of skepticism of that powers people on their path to success, and when they finally climb that mountain they turn them out. And they look at guys like you standing at the foot of the mountain with your hands on your hips and going how did I screw up so bad down here sucking hind? What's the language? Well, that's what I'm that's what you would be doing how much screw. All. Right. I wish all the success of the world. I'm sorry. That ipod. I wish you'll come back. Some back now that's a great idea as them back. Tell them that. You're you know, you're sorry laughed. And maybe it will come back. All right. But I think we've got the gist of what they're saying West Virginia will be applying to change the name of the state to Neptune or not just that. But that's an idea. Okay. I sure as if they asked me, and I was voter in the state of West Virginia. I'd say, no, no one Neptune. Up to bitchiness Henry. What works pretty good. No. Yes. They better change change the name of that. Did you just belch it in halo? Because this is what you going change. I heard that. Yeah. Did you isn't that fantastic? That's a new skill. You got general identifying when a guy belches while he's talking. Okay. Sorry. I'm going to just say this. If they want to rename the state of West Virginia means something that isn't alliterative alliterative. You know, what I mean by that airside to okay with the letter end. So no one Neptune works very very well. And I think that's what they'll get. Now. If they want to change it to the name, but why don't they call it? Uranus. You know, how many jokes have been done like that? Are willing to write back in the world famous. Phil Henry show Vernon dosier coming up with the the trials tribulations the travails of Johnny, Manziel, Roger rut greens rings, Roger rut rings jewelry. And Roger rut rings nose rings brings you the Roger ring nose ring. The Roger artery nose ring comes in emerald ruby, ruby red sapphire and stone gold Roger rod ring nose rings. And Roger bring engagement rings of the kinds of rings that you can slip on finger. It can be a ring ring around your heart. A ring around a rosy ring around the moon. It's Roger Rodrigues rob bring on Roger Rodrigue at Roger Rodrigues rod rings right over here and ring boulevard, come on by lettering on a ring and ring around ring around the Rosie and all sixty nine states Roger around rings, Roger arteries, run rings funny. Five fifteen Rodwin boulevard of the city of ring. Good Olea ring ring Roger rat bring. When you hear the phone ring? It's Ron rod rang. Hello, Roger dering bring ring Ron ring writer rod ring ring in the days the night. I'm doing regular study very about to retire. Phil Henry show you'll wanna. Famous Phil Emery Pacific and southern California tins, and this is the music of the Danish National Symphony Orchestra and the lady going. Whoa. What's her name? I don't know. What's danish? Name. It's like Ilga. It's LC the Elsie the cow. What a dickhead? It's ill goop Luton. You know? That's not her name. No. Of course, it's not her name. But we want to give the some of the respective having that she's doing the whistling as well of the wan to this is this is the the orchestra you want a tour with how would you like it? If people said what's her name, Betty, Betty Betty? Boop. You know? What are you saying what if they called you Betty, boop because they didn't know your name? That's different. You're gonna know. My name don't worry about it. The song you'll know my name about JAMES BOND. Yeah. That's me. You're going to kick some s bingo. Don't look at me like that general looking anyway. Make your mother wish she never had you. Damn don't worry about it. But Margaret, there's no need to threaten people. Look at. The I can do that. While wall. I can do that too. That doesn't seem like takes at talent. What doesn't don't wall while shirts? Hell can't do it. Sound great. Do. I would you buy tickets for this role in a second. I would love to watch an orchestra to do all these songs and melodies and in whatever classical pieces, what is that a body hanging from Jack gonna? We're to get a guy hanging. Chad cardboard guy, she's gives you the sense of the wild west. And the guys I don't know, you know, you wrote to the west and there's a guy hanging from a tree. And you just looked up yet. I've been the west I don't think that they will. Maybe they did. I don't know fill in those days. They took a dime stretches neck from looking at your weird. All right. Thank you, very very much. So Vernon dosier joins us here in the world famous fill every she'll get before we had Vernon up. I want to mention to you that our website thirty five thousand plus hours of novelists marvelous what you having a seizure. Yeah. You didn't meet me that maybe I did it on purpose? But thirty five thousand hours of marvelous marvelous archive material from the world famous fill Henry show going back. Many generations of our radio show. I just turned over the two thumb drives to Shane. So we're rock and roll with that. I also have a whole bunch of Miami stuff to listen to you know, it's the guys you're going to have for your more bang for your buck as a subscriber then you've ever gotten from any other audio entertainment audio comedy site. I don't care who what. When where why? I don't care. I don't care. I don't care. So make sure damn well. I don't so make sure you get a backstage pass the world famous. Phil Hendrie show does go through hundred so dot com to set foot. Would you guys dock it off go to Philemon show dot com and find where you sign up to get a subscription? I don't know where it is. You know? Oh, that's helpful. Well, and then sign up. Yeah. I'm not sure where it is. We could do it on the website. If you've got a video cast, actually, I don't have it on our website. You'll find it. It says sign up. That's what it says. That's brilliant. Thank you. Do you guys have subscriptions? I was going to get one and ditman said never mind. I'll just go ahead and give you a password. But. Supposed to buy them. You're not gonna make me by don't tell me that I've got a by subscription. No. I'm not. I just I wasn't quite sure. What the policy was. Okay. Yeah. Right. I I wasn't Robert. I don't have a subscription. Are you kidding? Oh here. She is. She got beautiful voice. That is the soprano. Let's them the messy soprano SE, the mezzo soprano, you plugs. To train your voice to that high. Well, yeah. What about it? I know all about it. You're going to ask me a question. Okay. I mean, what's it like? Warm up. Yeah. General I guarantee you can get so high. I can hit a note. So high your eyeballs will bleed excuse me going. I'm getting coffees. All right with you. Okay. Sorry dolla was doing about it. Yeah. Well, I can get up. So high your eyeballs will believe you got it. Folks, world-famous Phil Emery show and filling show dot com. Let's get over now to our good friend Vernon does your head coach of Bill Maher Kennedy, Glendale, California, and always a pleasure to have you with us coach. I love hearing your stories about back in the day. You know, playing football playing for who is who are. Who are some of your better, better coaches that you played for? Well, I mean, I played I played college ball Cal State LA and a little bit at Occidental. We had. Had read having was one of my coaches, a great offensive mind. And then I went on to play in Canada. And but grandpa played for him. When I was with Winnipeg you've let's get bed before we went down to the Vikings fan. Rajak? Liz, another great one at Ottawa. And yeah, you know, I've had some good coaches of ads some bad coaches that you'd be played long enough any game, especially football. You're gonna be. Gotta have your fair share. We were talk to you coach about Johnny Manziel. I know that you were discussing Jill earlier with Phil. And you heard the statement that he made which was that had the Cleveland Browns done due diligence work done their homework as it. Did they done there? Do you use the word like due diligence? That's two year. Right. Dick, good. Boy. Oh, man can be a long interview. So yes. So Johnny Manziel said got him into they'll set. I do not do the Xs and os. I don't watch a lot of film. So if the Cleveland Browns done their homework, they would have known this about me and what he didn't say. And what what he meant to say was and they would have known how lousy I was as a football player. Yearly think that that's what he's trying to say. No, he wasn't trying to say. But he did say, and I think that is very revealing. What's that again? Say what again, the general doesn't understand what he's saying? General is the Johnny Manziel in saying, I didn't watch a lot of film. And I not an Xs L guy was basically saying I suck. Yeah. How is he saying he sucks because he saying he was too lazy to watch film too. Lazy to study Xs and os and Cleveland Browns should have known that had they known that. They would have known how much I suck. But I don't think he was saying I think he was saying I'm a great football player. Despite the fact, I don't do exercise had the Browns known that they would have dealt with me differently. I didn't terp that unless they said that later doesn't seem like that's berry. With the Cleveland Browns. What are you guys deaf dumb and blind ghetto? I appreciate your point of view. But Johnny Manziel said. I don't do not watch a lot of film to Cleveland Browns should've known that. And had they known that what he's saying is had they known that. They would not have drafted me. Said had they not known that. Or had they known that. Did they not know? What did they know it? Hey, you know, we got a proper on here. Other people not listing. Besides Johnny Menzel say he's saying Johnny Menzel said the Cleveland Browns had they known I wasn't exit exits those guy, and I didn't watch film. They wouldn't have drafted me while I didn't exactly say that. They said that they you know, whatever, man. What do you think it means? I don't think what drafted, but but some people may say they would have treated differently. How do you treat a guy differently? How do you have respect for football player? Got different say, hey, he doesn't do does watch film. But man, he's really good Alice's figure out a way to use him. I I don't know. It wouldn't be. You know? So, you know, kind of go giant definitely would not be Vernon dosier. And some of these guys think they're so great that they they truly believe that when they go to the bible to try to clean this up. But when they go to the bathroom seventy old spice is released into the toilet area. And you come in and guy just laid one. I I don't know how to say the idea outright. But what you're seeing in down guy comes into the men's room Italy's one down and it smells like old spice at it, smells, like nine flags every you know, nine. Nine flags, and I wouldn't be I nine Fleiss. Mel real good. Okay. Let's say nine flag, smells, greatest Cologne move on please. All right. I I would say, you know, some of these guys think that about themselves, and you have to disabuse them of this. So if Johnny Manziel says, I don't do Xs and os, and I don't do a film, but I'm great, you know, great quarterback. And I think that personally failed. That's what I think he's saying really, I do you gotta, you know, do everything in your power. If you're an opposing team to make sure he doesn't think that next week that next week. He's thinking I need to quit football and go back home and invested my mom and dad's diaper service. You really think? So I really think so talking to earn does your about joining those comments concerning his is his bad seasons as initial outing with the Cleveland Browns, or he doesn't do Xs and os and study film and the Browns should have known that. So you want to disabuse a guy of that any any guy that thinks he's he's hot stuff Iago give an example, we played I wanna play with the helm tiger catch. There was a quarterback forty rough riders and his name was Jerry messy. And he was a Canadian actually k p played it at but held Gill and school McGill University around Toronto at this guy thought he was great. And being point of fact, he had a great offensive line. He had one of the most amazing offensive lines. I think I've ever seen in Canada or in the National Football League. I get played twelve bene- side. So you have you always have the option of an extra band on the line. So you have your four you have to tackles got two guards. Then you've got a tight end. And then you have the option of bringing up you back or another you back. You have five six even seven men offensively on the line, and you still have five flares quarterback running back. Okay. And free wide receivers. So you can do a lot with offense. Like that that this this guy Jerry Messi who played for the Ottawa rough riders was so good and the offensive line. They had was so good at Ottawa. What are we talking about? We're talking about like nineteen sixty eight sixty nine. That they did an exhibition game season. He came out wearing slacks of blazer and like win Kip shoes not wing tips, but broke shoes and play quarterback for like a quarter that way. Okay. So that's what he did. What he got? He came out. He came out in other words and just regular street. Clothes. Yeah. He didn't. He did not wear football uniform because the offensive line was that good that. And he could read offense defense is that well peak I read the ball quick. He wasn't. I think he was he was grabbed once, but he never went to the ground the blazer he took off and put on a hanger at war that night out to dinner with his wife, and it I tell you one thing you're amazed at it. And you're also very angry. 'cause as a defensive back is defensive player, you feel like somebody just eight you. They just they just put the monkey on you, and in their mind giving their mind, you're hopping around going for it still hurts I gotta tell you can tell your voice guy is out there. What was he wearing? He was wearing a helmet. He was not wearing a helmet he came out. How is this legal? It was an exhibition. Game. And they basically dared us to tackle this guy. And we never got them. And I can tell you what it did to me. It Bev stated me I lasted another six months, and I came back to the states. I you know, what I'm done with this. I've done with us. I never wanna see another down of football as a player as long as I live as long as I'm breathing air and taking a regular dumps. Coach we get the idea of guide, but. So make a long story. So you answer the question, Robert, what would you wear and he came out in a turtleneck sweater? And I couldn't even tell you the color. Black turtlenecks sweater charcoal. Grey a sports jacket charcoal grey slacks. He had on black brogue dress shoes. He had a cream colored. I think he had a cream colored Hanky. No, actually, it was black as black Hanky and the upper pocket of his jacket. You're kidding me. Please tell me you're kidding. No. I'm not kidding. And this guy proceeded to play how he played a quarter played a quarter football. Yeah. And we'd never touched him bay. Scored did not continue that they stored once on a touchdown pass. It was it was freaky. It was a sixty yard bomb. And the thing that bothered me about it was he said hike, you know, he get the ball. We do a series of signals that did the play. It tells you the tells you the route it tells you the receiver and the snap and he didn't turn and run back. He turned and walked back. I mean. Walked when he got the staff of the ball. Yeah. He turned walked took his God took his time. Took his took his time saw the receiver. Unloaded about sixty are bomb. Touchdown. And then the next drive. They got a feel ten points out of the quarter. We're talking to Vernon dosier. This guy's name is Jerry messy, Jerry, and I take it. He didn't wanna championships because I've never heard of the guy that was the one that one year. In fact, it was like one four months period, but they had the greatest offensive line. The greatest pass protection. I think the world has ever seen. And then it went away half of these guys went to the states. What do you remember the names of these guys? Yeah. There was leeann crunch. There was Leon cronk who is the left tackle, Tom Osborne. Not to be confused with the Nebraska coach, Tom Osborne player white tackle, these guys Canadians. No, this was all all American players on the offensive line. They had a tight end name Bill Krell, and he was a Canadian they had to guards Roscoe bonds and. The left guard in a right guard Jimmy Kimble now Jimmy Kimmel field Jimmy voice with you. Just I just the name is unusual. About Phil Henry don't exactly sound like something that comes from planet earth. What's unusual about Phil Hendrie? You're kidding, right? Philip Henry, which usually is what it should be. There's a D it ends with. I e it's real weird. It scares me a little bit. I mean, I'm not saying it's a sounds. It. Sounds foreign. Okay. So getting back to the this offensive line. So they never tackled the guy never tackle them. He turned. And then when he was done he was done any walked off the field took out a handkerchief patted. The sweat off his forehead, and I was personally hurt by this. You said that you were devastated. What happened that that caused this? Well, I played safety at the time. And I it we called for safety blitz on that touchdown drive, and we called free safety on the just to get to the quarterback. And each time. I was picked up by someone. And generally, you know, if your safety you generally picked up by running back generally picked up by receiver. These guys are so good that I got picked up every time by tackle not a guard tackle at guards are the ones that pull. So man, not knowing that much about football your picked up. I it's pretty stationary. Yeah. Against protected a quarterback or or maybe a run a running play. But never did I ever get anywhere near the quarterback because I was never blocked by a breading back. And it was almost like I would run up to the guy and beat my fists against him. There's a photograph of me. I think in Toronto evening star where I'm beating my fists against Roscoe. And I looked like the biggest. Did you say very I did. Yeah. I'm sorry. I didn't mean to say that. But. You're beating your fist against his chest. Yeah. And and the caption said something like if advert does your free safety for the Hamilton tiger cats having a tough day against Roscoe conch as he beat two fifths Nell style as if he's waiting for Dudley. Do right? I couldn't read anymore. They call that your manhood. Yeah. And there I was on the front page and I called up the Toronto Star. And I said don't you have photographs of any of the other players, and they said, yeah, we don't know where they are right now. But years the best little use that for I'm basically immortalized. And you never were able to get to the quarterback. I never I never even saw the quarterback when I got into the backfield. He was you know, standing there picking his nails picking his nose. Jerry, Missy what happened to his career. Well, he got injured as soon as they started losing offense lineman to to come to the states then to defensive started getting to him, and they remembered and wasn't are came very proud to say Hamilton didn't injure him. But I forgot who chapel games out east, but really beat up on him and he wound up leaving football at the end of that season. So the very season where he hit where he was protected. So Ellie were street clothes is the same season that he was basically injured so badly hidden leave Lee. Yeah. Because he made he made a monkey out of the I told you he monkey a lotta guys man, you know, well, and you left football. I did why did you leave you angry? I was very angry. I was very angry. I was angry press for showing me beating my fists against this guy's chest. Like, I'm all. I'm so I feel it's hard for me talk. You're talking about his days there with Hamilton. And Jerry messy, by the way. There's a Lionel Messi, you play soccer, don't I know it. Okay. And and this guy and he was injured too. Don't you feel sorry for a little bit? No, not at all God. No, no. When I heard that he went out with a compound fracture of both shinbones in one game. He had to compound fractures. Yeah. On the same play. And they dragged him off to the opposing teams. I forget who was they were playing BC British Columbia, and they dry to British Columbia lions dragged him off the field because these are the days before they told you to just leave him there, and they have to splint the leg and doing that just to treat him like the garbage that they thought he was he's streaming with do compound fractious grab just oh here. Take your quarterback. It was ugly got ugly. Hell and Jerry just gave up any went back down to the states. As I mentioned, his parents ran a diaper service in Oakland, California. And you know, so I thought it was from Canada. But he went to McGill. Yeah. The family moved the United States that now you're starting to change it. I ain't Jack shit. Okay. What let's what's the language. If you don't mind, I'm not changing he went to McGill University. The family moved down to Oakland, California. The PS parents opened up a diaper service. And Jerry drove the truck for the next twenty five years. Boy, that's the story. So this man goes from being one of the great quarterbacks with a great offensive line to driving diaper delivery service truck. That's right. And and I people talk to later they caught up in the interview he said, I've never been happier. I've never been happy ending the sitting there with a little white ice cream man cap on. That's a very interesting story. Then that is in home Dinger that's one for the ages. That is a very interesting story. And and it's interesting because you do have to know what you're doing. Don't you? Well, yeah, I was never able to tackle this guy. I wished we'd played him when they offensive line began to fall apart. But you know, but that's that's a fascinating fascinating story. And and you were frustrated by his play by the excellence of the offensive line 'cause you just leave football. So that that little period how long was that offensive line together? I think you know, Kadian league season back then was sixteen games. This is back when the NFL's playing fourteen twelve I would say it's a long season that you know, feels about four or five months. I would say is you know, a good three quarters of the season and the season starts in so from June all the way on through September. And and then they had their problems and they never did qualify. For the degree Cup. You know, I'll tell you. Yeah. That that that could have been a legendary situation there. I was thinking it must have been somebody watching like in the states. Let's put all those guys together again. And see if we can't, you know, have a guy go out wearing a suit. Wearing a suit that sounds like some kind of a publicity stunt but during the regular season to this guy, just walked back or. Yeah. I mean he'd being a helmet because you had to the league said you gotta wear uniform medicine exhibition games. They they just dispense with that. But he just turned and kind of stroll back and look, and meanwhile, it's like a cement wall in front of him. Nobody's getting through all kinds of blitz being broken up heat scanning scanning scanning just wait for a guy to get open. And he had just a great arm, and he hit the guy. Touchdown. So it was scary there for a while. Nineteen sixty eight nineteen sixty eight or nineteen sixty four. What do you mean? Nineteen sixty eight. I don't remember, Phil. I blacked it out. Okay. I blotted it out of my mind the trauma was so bad. I just went God. Let you go Vernon. Okay. Thank you Fernan dosier on the world famous Phil Emery show with the story there of Jerry messy and the offensive line foot. It you know, it just goes to show you that anything's possible. You know at any period in history anything is possible. And we just talked to who witnessed a very historic three months in professional football. And it and it ruined him. He he left the game. Because he was so depressed that he wasn't able to. That's maybe coach dosier problem. We'll do Mr. Henry there was the case. I would keep working. I would keep going at it. I would just wouldn't quit. I just is he call him back. Yeah. Those are you wanna talk to him. Yeah. Okay. What's wrong Vernon? Oh, you wouldn't you wouldn't quit? And do that when you said, yeah. Well, okay. I mean, I'm a weakling I'm a lily liver. I'm you know, Olympic no market mumble. When you want me to say limp, dick. Okay. Thanks a lot, man. There's the world famous show from the Pacific in southern California executive produced by Phil Henry for Ciprian corporated all rights reserved on podcast one. Yeah. We will see you guys. Remember tomorrow night for our chat. We've got our movie and we'd for big things man happening. Very soon here at Phil Emery, show dot com. Get a subscription for three year. But get it get it, man. Get it.

West Virginia Vernon dosier Danish National Symphony Orche Kurt football Margaret Phil Johnny Manziel Teamster Henry Cleveland Browns California Robert Phil Hendrie guy Barton Charleston West Virginia Danish National Symphony hockey Virginia Bill Mark Adamy Danish National Symphony Natio
APG 388  I Gnu It!

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

2:48:07 hr | 1 year ago

APG 388 I Gnu It!

"It's the guy there line pilot guy episode three eighty eight. You're listening to the airline pilot. Show the few from our side of the cockpit door on captain jeff. Your host broadcasting live from studio one a at a p g headquarters in roswell georgia. Today show was recorded on the twenty third of august twenty nineteen today's episode the pilots of the miracle on the cornfield twin engine flameout crash landing are awarded heroes of russia by president vladimir putin a light twin crashes into a home in uniondale new york killing the pilot and a person inside the home more news your feedback doc and this week's plane tail all weather heather so get all settled in tray tables and seat backs in their upright and locked physicians electronic devices powered on white. Three eighty eight is ready for pushback. Is this week's episode of the airline pilot guy show. I am captain jaffa captain for a major u._s. Legacy carrier and here with me today from his studio on the english countryside a professional photographer former r._a._f. Aren't double af fighter pilot current captain for an international airline based in london captain nick. Uh yeah hi jeff. If only i was still carrying. I was just reading the script. I forgot to change sorry. If i'd be <hes> well well. I suppose i could be since i wouldn't have to officially retire until the ninth of september so i would have a few days left but they're fast approaching. Now now. I'm i'm not gonna climb into announced another flight deck and this is for fun. We can get you into the simulator and get y'all re qualified and everything else calls in just a couple of days dry. No thank you thank you all right. Well glad to see you sir. <hes> how's everything over there <hes> <hes> in england i pretty good. We're having a warm spell. After a period of a rather dubious weather the australians are over here <hes> telling us <hes> play cricket <hes> which is quite amusing but at the moment <hes> there in the lead and doing buddy well <hes> and more importantly. I've got a small shoutout. I've got a lovely email from <hes> one of my first officers <hes> william <hes> <hes> will <hes> those of us who don't want to use his full name <hes> who was on his way in an airbus to a of delhi and he happened to be going through the moscow control zone and control of ladd piped up and said do you know <hes> camp nick and he said yeah i used to wi with him so control of live very kindly passed on his best regard sun warm wishes as for my retirement and i appreciate that very much date black very kind of you and he's a shot at you and only the most gay controllers who looked after so so well when we get through that space i say thank you very much indeed palate and also showed up for my dad pump who who <hes> sir and i believe watches the show regularly and is still doing very well indeed so <hes> great heavy onboard pop and you keep going wherever hoping still to come out and see you before too long in the meantime i hope catching up with us on <hes> video well <hes> <hes> remind you of how ugly your youngest son is and how and how good he feels about how good looking and it's why grab bid you should hide allies wrinkles bits well. That's awesome mm-hmm yeah controller vlad big part of our a._p. G. community over there representing russia who absolutely yeah i don't know if you noticed a vlad if you're listening now <hes> <hes> but <hes> the last episode i put in a couple of your individual recordings of some of those moscow airports and i don't think i got him in while we're recording live but i did <hes> in post editing. I was able to get those oh yeah i just listened to show yesterday and they came through very well indeed so thanks very much indeed. So what else am i doing today. Well tomorrow is finals day. <hes> in <hes> the bowling club so <hes> having fought fought my way through all the various rounds. I'm at least <hes> working to win. Two trophies tamara sadly the championship trophy if he which i lifted last year all i've <hes> been able to do to that today's polish it in preparation for giving it back because i'm not in the final for that <hes> this year it'll go to somebody else but i am in the handicapped final <hes> which i hold the highest number of shots. I have to give give to anyone in the club which is a bit tough but <hes> <hes> so. I'm playing that tomorrow and also more of the pays so i'm really looking forward to that and perhaps helped bring home. Some silly inevitably okay that is fantastic can't wait to hear about the the results of that on the on the next episode. Yeah fingers crossed if mentioned in the so if he does well. We'll hear about it if he doesn't well. We'll just move onto something else and quite right too. <hes> steph is going to join us as soon as she gets back from <hes> <hes> work today and it's a friday afternoon where recording on the twenty third of august and a typical friday afternoon traffic that she's in right now <hes> also <hes> dana is not going to be able to join us today because he's on his captain dana birthday motorcycle trip trip ride whatever he's calling it <hes> i was looking on the community calendar and he's got a big banner on there that says that he's on something like a four day adventure on the motorcycle with a bunch of other fellow pilot harley davidson riders so he is unable to join us today. His birthday by either way is to morrow. I believe the twenty fourth of august does that make him a gin like me. Excuse me <hes> he's virgo is not of virgo the virgin i hadn't thought of it. I guess he is because i am a time which is very very app considering. They allina which will sam is right. I don't know what the crossover is in the horoscope. <hes> if it's is right around this time time of month isn't it like the twenty second i i. I would have thought so yeah. Now you very <hes> stalwart on our show carrying on not feeling well you better now. Oh i'm so much better <hes> yeah. I limped myself home the next day and <hes> basically said i think i can make it home but i i'm pretty sure i'm not going to have the stamina to do that last turnaround it wasn't a bad turnaround but it was just <hes> you know going to get me home late in the afternoon and they said oh that's good you know we can we can get somebody else to cover the tripoint those last two legs from atlanta to columbus ohio and back and i said thank you very much so i just went home and basically went straight to bed took more <unk> aspirin slash advil other an s._a._d.'s or inset wonder how you say that n._s. Aides or something like that. Anyone thinks wchs is seasonal affective disorder now. That's not then pretty sure those pills weren't for that anyway to try to get rid of my my <hes> fever and headache and it just wasn't going away and i had the best i could do what the fever reduction analgesics was to get to a low grade fever but at least it wasn't a my tapped. My fever was or the temperature was in the one hundred to two hundred and three degree range range but don't worry you know i was looking at all the all the symptoms of whatever i was experiencing and one of the things that kept popping up was <hes> meningitis they went <hes> but the thing that they said about that was pretty common on for most people who like neck pain and the fact that you can't take your touch your chin to your chest and so i tried that and i could do that. My neck really wasn't hurting so i thought i don't think i have meningitis so i decided to not go see the urgent care folks and just kinda lie low but i was like that for several more days and so so much so that i had to stay on sick leave for the four day trip that i was scheduled to do this week so i've i've been home basically since last good for you yeah that's tough so steph. Steph says it and sets and said okay. That's the way you said to say. Thank you <hes> so yeah. I been feeling pretty much normal the last maybe two three days also so thank you for asking. I'm better now normal for you. Yeah normal for me okay well. I still kind of foggy to my normal. Body confused not the i had an enhanced version of confusion in vosges when i was should've been. I'm doing the cat three then. Why did i get my f._a._a. Physical this morning and <hes> mentioned to the doctor said asked asked me if if <hes> you know anything was going on with my health since the last time he saw me in february and as a well as a matter of fact just a few days ago and so i told him about the whole thing is that i'm just assuming it was some sort of virus and he said <hes> probably so and he said that if you start getting those symptoms again then you know you need to go and have it checked out because it might be a symptom of something more serious happening with your body bent <hes> the thing that he was looking at a my but my charts going. I know i've said this before and he goes knock doc on wood but he said so. You're about to turn sixty one. This december and you're not on any any kind of medication. I said yep and he goes well. Hope you stay that way. He's a very very uncommon for somebody my age so yeah. I mean it's got a u._s._b. An excellent health and somebody is looking off to you well. I hope so oh you know. I try yeah anyway <hes> so i'm good for another six months with my f._a. A class one medical certificate certificate and <hes> my next trip is the sunday. I normally don't fly on sundays but i needed to pick up some time i ended up having to drop trip at the end of the month and i had to pick up something so leaving on sunday and it's a three day and get back on tuesday so that's pretty much what's been happening with me mostly just kind of lying around <hes> sleeping trying to kick whatever virus was going on me and and that's it nothing l. Let your body heal itself while done exactly okay. <hes> since <hes> staff is still not with us. Why don't we move onto into the coffee fund. If you're ready yeah. Let's do it. Johnny how much more coffee love coffee. I love tea a._p. Community coffee and tea and the java and me accomp- because the cut all right right the coffee found is your way dear listener to support the shelf financially and if you're if you have the resources to do so <hes> you should check it out by going over to airline pilot dot com slash coffee a couple of different ways to do it. <hes> the clock the coffee fund classic method auto pay pal where you can make recurring donations or one time <hes> contributions to the show <hes> since the last episode we've had add recurring contributions from terry lou chris randall and david liebe and a one time contribution from randy ward who was in in italy right now with his wife enjoying a nice italian vacation the other way to support the show the coffee the coffee fund patron method. You can become a patron of the show at patriotair dot com for you. Uh pledge a certain amount per episode and since lascaux no new patrons so kind of quiet on that front but again if you're interested in helping us out financially head over to airline pilot guide dot com slash coffee. You'll be glad glad you did and we will to stay on mm-hmm sad news in new orleans on well. Just a few days ago nancy parker a journalist at fox eight which is a local news affiliate in new orleans was killed in a small plane crash. <hes> the pilot of the plane franklin j p augustus was also killed. They were shooting a story in a stunt stunt playing. It's a <hes> pits <hes> nineteen eighty-three pitts s to be aircraft and just shortly after takeoff it crashed about a half mile south of the airport report and i read an update to the story that said that <hes> the pilot had radioed the tower indicating that there was some sort of problem with the engine and the airplane plane went down killing both <hes> nancy and franklin and that's the only information bill ben able to glean from that but that's one of those high profile things that <hes> and one of the sad things that you read and hear about and you know you don't like to see <hes> but it looks like <hes> you know she was making some effort to promote aviation and <hes> it all went bad and <hes> she was fifty three years old and survived by her husband and three children and didn't say anything about the age and <hes> family of the pilot of the aircraft so sad. Isn't it jeff tuesday. She's just doing her job at probably a complete one off and <hes> there <hes> the guy was a member of the of a louisiana group that on the sieg hammond <hes> i mean he was obviously well. Known affiliate could pilot. He had a fine airplane <hes> and just awful to think that they both die doing something they they both love <hes> but i guess if you're gonna go that's better pipes than some ways yeah true instead of a long drawn out illness or something <hes> but still quite ashok 'specially young i think the <hes> the pilot the guy that <hes> <hes> supported the tuskegee airmen <hes> was was an older gentleman gentleman not that that makes it any less us a tragic but <hes> the news reporter was only fifty three and i i can say only fifty three because i'm only sixty so anyway <hes> for here any updates on what caused the engine to fail will let you know <hes> speaking of <hes> engine failures and this next item be from the poughkeepsie journal dot com <hes> and also the the <hes>. Where do i get this from the aviation safety network <hes> a cessna t three zero three crusader november three zero three tango lima impacted a residential structure on south road and union vale nor new york shortly after departure archer from the sky acres airport in new york the plane i departed from gumri orange county airport new york then stopped refuel forty miles away at this airport. The sky acres airport before continuing toward the east farmingdale republic airport in new york on long island. I believe the aircraft was destroyed during the accident sequence quince one of the three occupants aboard was fatally injured. <hes> the remaining occupants survived <hes>. The residential structure was occupied by three people. One is a key unaccounted for one received fatal injuries and the last one was not injured <hes>. There were also three dogs inside the house. One was found deceased. I <hes> one puppy survived and will make a full recovery and the last puppy is still missing so hopefully we'll find that maybe it still hiding <hes> <hes> that was a twin engine airplane as i mentioned <hes> cessna ts three zero three and <hes> <hes> not sure exactly <hes> the story here. Did they mention what happened was it an engine failure. Young says not long after the succeed of plane left <hes> the airport turn john had engine trouble that went down yeah <hes> so i don't know if that is one engine both engines of fuel issue causing the engine starvation or whatever fuel starvation. We're not sure the the crash site sydney two thousand feet south of the runway so it didn't get trifle now didn't didn't so that's all we know about this one again the f._a._a. And the n._t._s._b. will be investigating the cause of the gresh. Yeah i always try to when <hes> people who really are in bold in aviation get drawn into an accident might this side of the ball. You're pensive house <hes> very sad <hes> uh-huh because they just sit and they go about their day when an airplane full of fuel plows in particularly side <hes> in a hum gonna suck very big soft spot in my heart for bora dogs <hes> for any animals because <hes> apps humans. We're often more capable of <hes> getting out of the way or sorting ourselves island. They're often left completely vulnerable in these sort of circumstances in the fact that attack. There's a puppy still missing hang. It's very sad yata and of course sadly. I think <hes> you've had a problem with your breath donning. It'll happen to you. Oh yeah yeah thank you for mentioning that greta <hes> the very very very very old dachshund that we <hes> ended up inheriting a after my wife's mother passed away back in two thousand seven. I thought it was two thousand nine but she said nope. We have had greta for longer than her. Mom had greta and we've had her for twelve years and <hes> her mom had well. Greta was like nineteen years old almost twenty twenty years old and her health. I ventured at many times last. Few months has been kind of taking up a nosedive so so to speak and mostly blind mostly incontinent mostly deaf and you know not much living much of a life and <hes> we learned last checkup that <hes> she had lost a lot of weight and she was probably in pain because of the dehydration and the lack of eating and that kind of thing and then finally only the decision was made <hes> that we should put her down so sadly <hes> she <hes> is no longer with us and and if there is a doggy heaven hopefully she'll be in doggy heaven so no no more greta a very sad thing for the family. I'm sure i used to be when i heard a yipping in the background and you had to rush off upstairs. Going let are out again. Stays on now but you know honestly honestly she was <hes> quite a handful to take care of as you can imagine and so in a certain way you know we're it's kind of a it's a nice thing that i think she's you. You know in in a better place now. She's not in pain and and it's easier for everybody here as well. You know as far as not having to take care of her or anymore so absolutely it's often a very hard decision but it's also from the best <unk> yeah yeah and i know you've had to deal with this kind of thing as well. Well this past year absolutely ross. It was easy yeah all right moving onto news item seaver seve word is really cracking on with these things. This is some <hes> positive some some happy news you know we talked about on the last show. It was breaking news in fact the <hes> the miracle on the cornfield. We're calling it <hes> the twin engine <hes> flame out of the three twenty one and they crashed in the cornfield successfully and <hes> no. Nobody was killed in this incident. <hes> this news item from the new zealand herald dot co dot new zealand and russian president vladimir putin on friday awarded the nation's highest medal hero of russia to the pilot who manage to smoothly land his disabled passenger plane in cornfield after a flock of birds hit both engines and knocked them out the experienced captain forty one year old demere yusupov said friday. Hey that a quick landing was his only chance and he was not afraid of handling it. He said he had hoped to circle the airport and land normally when one engine shutdown due to the bird strike moments moments after takeoff from moscow's jurkowski airport but then his second engine cut off moments later leaving him no choice he landed his euro airlines line three twenty one so gently in the head. Hi corn that just one of the two hundred and thirty three people on board was hospitalized. People all across russia have hailed <hes> yusupov as a hero. The accolades he said were embarrassing feels odd and i'm shy he said putin also awarded the hero of russia to the airplane second pilot twenty-three-year-old gregory <hes> a note georgi murzyn and bestowed other top awards awards on the plane's cabin crew. I didn't feel any fear again. This is the captain quoted. He told reporters in a televised interview. I saw <hes> cornfield ahead hope to make a reasonably soft landing. I tried to lower vertical speed to make the plane lands muesli as possible and clyde softly yusubov hailed his cabin happened crew who managed to evacuate the passengers. The also apologized to passengers for failing to get them to their destination which was very concerned about sorry. I didn't really i mean that was what i was supposed to do. Get you to some federal poll or did you call it s- murph some reports smith out in the crimea. I wish i quick recovery to all those injured and i wish them not to be afraid of flying. He added now. This sounds like a really nice guy doesn't it it does it was concerned about you know wanting to ever get back on an airplane. I don't know about you but i'm thinking if i'm on an airplane that crashes i'm thinking what are the chances of that happening thing again remind you i see it but a video some blake being struck by lightning three-ton remind that i wouldn't mention it to the people that were on this airplane probably not a good. Let's see the emergencies. Ministry said seventy four people asked for medical assistance after the landing health authorities said twenty-three people were taken to the hospital but all but one was released following the checkups <hes>. Let's see yusubov was the son john of a helicopter pilot. He worked as a lawyer before he changed course and joined a flight school. When he was thirty two. He has flown with euro airline. Since his graduation nation. In two thousand thirteen logging over three thousand flight hours he became a captain last year and this sounds very similar to the time line of <hes> <hes> someone we know in our a._p. G. community <hes> captain craig right didn't he absolutely he graduated from college twenty twelve and just a a couple of months or last month became captain for his regional airline and <hes> yeah that's that's cool <hes> so that even happens wins over there in russia for people people get the bug they quit a promising mid career mid life career and go for a flying job yeah definitely i should greg idea and if they're in else out that with a pretty boring profession who was turned the handle aviation. Don't leave it too late but thirty two is <hes> is built two hundred yep okay well. The article goes on to talk about <hes> a former member of the us national transportation safety board <hes> john goglia godly said the bird versus engine problem has been under study for years with no permanent fix available yet. He said a cornfield was a good place to land because it's free a big rocks and trees that could have damaged the play. I mean yeah. I really can't think of much better unprepared landing surface to land upon them a some kind of them crop like <hes> like a corn field or something like that absolutely and they've been some indication that the birds were flocking around unauthorized dommage dumps near the airport others flocking birds saudi gonna do absolutely horrible things so i'm sure they sort that out too sweet. Oh yeah i'm sure they'll be right on that well. In the short term they definitely will but they should yeah exactly right but i mean they are a problem and and whether they could feel near an estry or <hes> that just passing through and that's often the way with the big migrating flunk slang at the kennedy suit garb down the u._k. And they're starting to head north already you know and they usually around thousand fifteen hundred feet. They can be a rail problem pie though madman who very needed austria's time to money in just a bunch of geese onshore finals but he managed to get the runway so well. I'm walter is now very good. <hes> camped him with british airways. No good all right <hes> moving on autumn d <hes> a delta seven fifty seven two hundred at ponta delgada on august eighteenth two thousand nineteen gene hard touchdown causes creases visa launch <hes> this is from the aviation herald and simon rat radetsky or a decky <hes>. Let's see it was flight four fourteen from new york j._f._k. To ponta delgada in portugal landed on ponta delgada 's runway twelve <hes> this is in the azores believe <hes> suffered a hard touchdown. The aircraft rolled out and taxied to the apron. There were no injuries. The aircraft sustained substantial damage however and there are some photos here of the seven fifty seven with the very large wrinkled skin creasing and the fuselage and you know i'm not an aviation fuselage expert but <hes> looks to me like this might be yet for this airframe. I i don't know i guess maybe that's something that they can. They can <hes> fix. I'm not sure though while whether it's going to be economic that's the problem blah yeah. They can fix almost any airplane if they throw enough money at it but i'd end about the age they're crafter not what it's worth is now but <hes> that sorta order damages in the indicative of a major airframe <hes> major structural damage so yeah you don't get type two creases and falls in the skin light that without something severe <hes> having occurred underneath so. I think you're right jeff. I think that will probably louis strip the parts and it may well end up being <hes> something the fine can practice on or maybe <hes> beer cans yeah yeah. Oh i'm sure if you <hes> if you look at that website that sells you bits of aeroplane. You'll fail to see <hes> <hes> some fifty seven two hundred. They're a by some of the skin and as a back tank they go. That's possible looking at the weather conditions there. <hes> let's say first of all <hes> eight thirty eight z that would be probably early in the morning for that flight. Would it be <hes> <hes> yes. It would have been in the morning but not a not a conditions i would consider <hes> difficult on the wind varying a little bit of wind really on each twelve knots mainly across steady and no sign <hes> assent scattered <hes> tea or is that supposed to be scattered <hes> yeah gutter the houses scattered up full. I felt for many it might be tiring but it's certainly there's no mention of any cumulus nimbus or anything about oh no build up so i would have said that straightly benign <hes> but it sounds to me like it might have been the hanley problem yeah yeah puch. There was a fault with the aircraft that you never know but anyway <hes> nothing really stands out to us as far as extreme weather conditions here. You're not going back to the <hes> you know. The the possibility of you know whether that airframe is going to be used again or repaired or scrapped apt <hes> i guess maybe another consideration would be whether or not it ruptured any of the pressure bulkheads of the airplane and that that's the case. I hear that that's pretty much. It's the death knell yeah yeah that will most certainly you don't really want to <hes> i. I hate to think of flying in a plane with a re pad bad about had because <hes> you know you think of the accidents that have occurred and <hes> years down the road with that crowd that <hes> whether pressure bulkhead specially especially fatigue found someone awfully accident so i'm supposed if they do everything fine and boeing a pretty good at that sort of thing now they'll come up with a fix if they want one but the other thing is <hes> you know who's going to go out there to fix it <hes> it's it's not like it's near a major maintenance centers. May why not be even worthwhile sending the guys out right look at this. It's a lobster eater. Yes you hear that music that means for my side studio in south carolina. She's a doctor skydiver. Grammarian runners strength training junkie v._a. Connoisseur and commercial multi engine instrument rated pilot. We know her as dr stuff. Hey guys good to see you. Thanks for thanks for waiting to start the show for me. You're welcome probably the start of the show. I'm right on time. I would not be here on time to come on now. We've planted that way right. I know i'm just feel bad. I'm good. I'm good just finished up with work and looking forward to relaxing and not doing work for a couple of days to excellent excellent. Hey as anything unusual or interesting happened with you. Let's say between now and the the last time we recorded the show last thursday. I don't think so okay well then. Let's move on with item. <hes> beyond say yeah well you know we had some issues some technical issues with this <hes> new <hes> streaming service that were experimenting with and but luckily hey we can hear her today. So that's good of course it was you were you were <hes> panelists number four last time so hopefully <hes> you you know who knows what what's going on but don't be number four. You don't be nosy but i can hear you just just fine and see you just fine and that's that's good that's <hes> so we are having issues with adding staff but honestly we weren't gonna have stuff on with very long anyway because she was busy and final preparation for this big trip that she was undertaking and <hes>. I'm assuming that that it all happened and wanted you. Tell us about it. I'd be happy to i did put out a couple crew logs. I have one left to do to kind of tie it all up but i might get to that a couple of years from now. Three croutons were public. You're like alum never see one for years and then three come along wanted wanted. Hey take what you can get pointing out. Yes this was a kind of <hes> just a funny thing to do something to do. <hes> for a long time my dad and i have been going back and forth between <hes> who will be the first person to put their feet on the ground in all fifty states and for a very long time. He's been in the lead <hes> by quite a bit. He has only had the state of hawaii for the past several years. They actually needed to get to which doesn't sound that difficult but hawaii's a long way from the east coast of the united states so <hes> finally he <hes> the opportunity came up then he books booked a flight and i said okay <hes> where does that leave me in this race. Oh i still have eleven states to get to now honestly at that point said there are absolutely no way that i could pass god okay you win <hes> <hes> or whatever not stuff never never say never never surrender never die now so i started looking like well all right well. They're kind of all in a row. I and they in a row. I mean all the way across the country that was organs sort of idaho montana north and south dakota oklahoma kansas mississippi kentucky west virginia and maine. Get them all set eleven. Do that include arkansas' no. I've already been to arkansas okay fair enough. Arkansas' is the different yes. I've been to little rock for a conference actually but one of close <hes> so yeah the goal is to get it done in a weekend because he was arriving in hawaii on sunday evening. I think local time in hawaii at the time he arrived was like seven twenty year seven fifty pm which is like one twenty year one fifty in the morning the next day here on the east coast so that was was my deadline so i left here <hes> almost immediately after i talked to you guys on thursday last week and i took a flight out to portland oregon which i assigned was going to be my starting point and then the the following day had a series of flights that took me to bite aho montana and north dakota with intermediate stops through seattle and salt lake city get from one of those states to the very easily without going through kind of a major city and once i got to north dakota i rented a car and drove to south dakota and back just to say they're just about an hour's drive each direction and spent the night in fargo. North dakota got up the next morning. Another series of flights went the two that took me to a ultimately wichita and memphis occupy went. Wait stuff memphis tennessee. That's not a state that you need to go to that so to get to wichita had to go through denver so i had a nice little stopover in denver got to wichita which is in kansas kansas which was one of the states. I needed same thing as like in north and south dakota rented a car drove to oklahoma turnaround my back to the airport in wichita and then i was going to go to memphis which is actually very close to the border of mississippi and also arkansas or or kansas as nick lake seagal. I didn't go to arkansas' her arkansas. <hes> flew from wichita through dallas to get to memphis and my plan from there was to rent a car hard drive south across the border into mississippi drive overnight through part of <hes> tennessee all of kentucky and into west virginia virginia. Excuse me i was going to go as far as huntington west virginia to catch another flight which would ultimately take me to maine via charlotte and got off the plane in memphis and found that my flight from huntington west virginia to charlotte had been cancelled though that was not a good thing do so <hes> which airline cancelled your flight american airlines boo do probably have sure which regional regional for sure and i don't remember which one doesn't matter so anyway and they they said well no worries. We've already <hes> saved you a seat on this other flight if you would like it leaving from charleston west virginia going through d._c. And getting to portland maine at like four thirty in the afternoon on sunday well. Let's not really ideal because i have plans in maine. My bait plans to meet up with mica who lives in portland. It's been the day with him. <hes> do some sightseeing around town up some of the athol mentioned lobster. The nice local beers like well if i get there at four thirty i'll have time to catch is my flight back home but not enough time to do anything so i started looking real quick. This is all we're like taxiing to the gate and before i even get off the plane i see that there's a flight <music> out of charleston west virginia at the same time as my original flight was supposed to leave out of huntington which is like five thirty in the morning except that i'd given myself take time to drive to huntington. Charleston is like another hour east well to calm vassar. Ask the other problem so i was supposed to return the rental car to huntington west virginia so like well okay well. This is only gonna work. If i can take the car to charleston instead of huntington that was originally a one way rental one way rental correct the rental car counter. I said hi <hes> i ever relation. They need to make a change and the guy goes. Oh are you taking it out of state and i was like yeah and he's like no no. No you have to stop taking it out of state. I'm not changing the state. I just need to change the city so we can do that and then it was like geography lesson for this poor kid trying to get him to know where charleston west virginia was look at my come from america yeah the poor poor immigrant now when you say say like charleston in this country most people think of south carolina carolina and then add only editors confusion because i handed him my driver's license which says south carolina i know he was very unsure where i was trying to go for a few moments there but we got it all squared away okay. I really don't have time. He's he's like how about this car is like that's fine. I don't even think that's what i rented but i don't care. I don't have time to argue this like up to get in the car. Go <hes> so did that made my stop in mississippi and that i was like okay. I've got just under eight hours and i'm looking at the time like that. Puts me there like an hour before. My flight leaves barely if i don't stop but i'm going to have to stop because i'm gonna need gas. I'm going to need like of his illogic break. I'm sure i'm not gonna eat apparently i. It's like stop. Stop in <hes>. Where was i going to stop somewhere in tennessee nashville. Maybe get food tossed. Those plans would go into the biscuit gravy breakfast place. We went to the nashville biscuit company like like eight o'clock at night nine o'clock at night twenty four hours a day. Okay fair enough though but <hes> long story short i've made it <hes> shoutout to <hes> dispatcher mike for he was at work. She chatted me for a while during that drive which was very helpful and awake <hes> because i'll tell you what most of that drive in kentucky was along the bluegrass parkway which is different than the blue ridge parkway and they were not a lot of vehicles out there from the hours of eleven p._m. To about three a._m. Little quiet very quiet while nice kid you could do one hundred and fifty miles an hour because there's still plenty the of state troopers all along way counters people also. I was really terrified about hitting wildlife because i passed lots and lots of deer. You're not too far from the side of the road. There was no speeding it did drive right very good speed limit and got to charleston west virginia returning. The car was a breeze because there was no in there to actually talk to because they weren't open yet but just left the car in the parking lot. Put the keys on the key box got to the <hes> the t._s._a. Check in and it looked like there was only one line it wasn't terribly long but it wasn't moving okay and then after standing in line for like take three or four minutes i was on one of the <hes> wasn't even a t._s._a. Officer it was <hes> was it just like some security personnel and the airport. It was like oh by the way there is a t._i. Way pre check line way over here that you can't see from where you are if you have pre checked and i was the only person that moved great well excellent <hes> see i've made my flight. No problem promptly passed out. Don't remember any of that. Flight spent a couple of hours in the charlotte airport which was great because i just dropped my bags back at my car and then i went back to the lounge out a nice comfy chair slept for a couple hours got on my next slate and spent the rest of the day in portland named with mica eighteen lobsters. <hes> you know what i think. We might have actually some audio regarding that sure okay here. We go well. There's only one way to start this and i've gotta tell all a._p. Listeners that dr steph has a great eight piece of tail. Okay let me explain that. I'll let steph explain that i think you're referring to the three lobster tails that i just consumed absolutely positively. You just managed to do it. I think you may have even outperformed our good friend. Captain al you have eaten three entire entire. Lobsters plus plus a few of the clamps. I didn't quite get through all of them but i had to try them. I mean i'm here. I'm in maine might as well right absolutely absolutely and you should just take a bite of the corn just to say you had to complete thing. I will do that definitely so yes. It's dr steph and it's your main man. Mike and we are here at ocean farms here in gore main the scene of the crime. We're dana and i last met and now where i have brought dr staff. Who is is a lobster eater extraordinaire yes to be fair though i have never had authentic maine lobster like this before it's always been in a hesitate to even say in here like red lobster or better legal seafood <hes> but not necessarily not these same experience at all this is this was very special and wonderful and thank you very much for the recommendation and bringing me here or fortunately the restaurant is pretty close to empty so that no one has heard you say that but lobster is very much like surgery surgery. Did you notice it's see one. Do one teach one and now you're ready to teach it absolutely is <hes> it was definitely an educational experience for for me because as i mentioned my previous even though it was fairly extensive <hes> lobster experience has all been at <hes> prepared for you establishments schmidt's and this is definitely the authentic deal where you just have the lobster and yourself and you got to figure it out now just one last thing because this is going to be very short short but what we really need to say what you're doing in maine and what does mean mean to you in terms of the number fifty so main gene. Oh i was gonna say something about being last place here but that's not fair at all. Let's let's rephrase showy. <hes> knows head to do with a little trip. I took this weekend in an attempt to put my feet on the ground in the eleven states that i had not yet been too so i started <hes> three and a half days ago thursday evening in portland portland oregon that other portland maybe we perhaps should not say anything else about and ended here today in portland maine with you and it's so wonderful call the c._u. And it's only been a few hours but we've had a great experience glad to be able to watch you eat some lobster which we have some photos of. We don't know if jeff will use them or not but we'll we'll certainly send them to him and thanks so much for coming to visit our absolute pleasure. Thank you so much for having the <hes> making the time to <hes> show me around today and for a few hours of good conversation and <hes> we'll have to do it again some time because this was not nearly enough time to catch up and enjoy each other's company and hopefully we will so as i sign out specifically for pilot pip this is you're not creepy main man mica citing off. Eh and it's dr staff for the airline pilot now. He's just dallas. That's all tied. Oh that i love that was to say things. She's going to have to press the button. You mean that mute button. It's shows up in a different different place on this new stream yard. I mean to be fair. It's like right in front of me but i'm looking for in the corner. It's just too easy now. That was a wonderful time and again my thanks to mike oh for joy me round and for <hes> accompanying me will i had to try the authentic maine lobsters and we had a very nice. I saw the picture there was from a local brewery could bears good i._p. Excellent stree- loftus them with butter or what now well i mean there is butter on the side like melted butter that you could dipper spread on slide down <hes>. I'm sorry i i hope i hope that you use that melted butter a little bit older. I mean you really the the lobster itself is so good. You don't really need to add much to it. Oh good point so there's only i've yet to do. I would love to <hes>. I think jillian. I will probably head out that way one day because i think it'd be a lovely idea. Well we know somebody. That's a very gracious hospitable post a really yeah. I can't think of his uh-huh lives up in that area somewhere. I can highly recommend genesis not creepy mica definitely not creepy <hes> <hes> something else. Oh i was gonna say my dad did make it to hawaii. Okay here either loved too late. She cried. I almost feel bad. I'd like a little bit so now what would have kept him from if it were me if i were your house. You just left a couple of days. That's what i've changed my plans in. Oh you're going to beat me. I'll leave on thursday or friday. Instead of sunday did not divulge my plans in advance saw i would've figured it out. What doesn't he listen to the beach hurley. Not that'll teach you well. I mean i did have sitting yeah. My <hes> apparently did not venture into my office which sometimes he does because there's filing cabinets and stuff up here <hes> by nort went but i did have like little scraps of paper where i had been writing down flight numbers and times you probably somewhere we're here. We're headed like albritton out. We'll do wonder where you were like on thursday night friday. You're not there all day because what he had done. He left earlier in the week because he made it kind of more of a road tripped out west see some family members for a couple of days so he was not here or you see i would have given you a full state. When i was going to arrive a hawaii okay and you had more time and then i'll just pitch up and go <hes> in the competition starts again though because now he is officially been to one more more hawaiian island than i have to now behind again to hawaii to island kadian provinces than i have his landed at more countries more countries yeah yeah. They're more competitions to be head. Don't worry well. We know you stuff. There's always a competition to be happy. I'm kind of glad. I'm not part of your family coat with this. Oh it's it's all in good fun abigail hiber you win. If anyone reviews of <hes> you know <hes> airline experiences. There's i flew three different airlines multiple different aircraft types and feel like i should do a doing his passenger experience thing anymore. I don't think he is do on like 737. Cr j nine hundred zero two hundred zero. Seven hundred did fly on an m._d. Eighty-eight brilliant well. I hope it was a good experience. Yes there was good. I think down the back with the noise frontal as a finding whisper quiet yes yeah well done brilliant congratulations anyway. I suppose either either that many but in the united states who've actually managed to do what you've achieved is not as common as you thank. Although some people <hes> their definition of to visit a state is some more different than you know just the geographical put your feet across the border type of thing rest assured i'll probably go back to most of those places at some point see more stuff good even our kansas. I saw enough in arkansas. It's a beautiful state action. It is actually an actually one of my very good friends and actually my very first flight instructor. They live north of arkansas. <hes> <hes> and i've been meaning to go visit them north little arcs. Maybe that way up that way yeah yeah. It looks like beautiful. Area royals will excellent. Were were so happy that you <hes> won the challenge and you're you're safe and sound and you didn't kill yourself trying to beat your father now now. All the appropriate safety precautions were taken. I'm not sure what they were but excellence one speeding ticket. We're impressed. Nope okay shall we. We didn't really have a big intro segment. We were kind of waiting for you and all the cool stuff that you did and we started to say a little bit <hes> <hes> tobacco. I don't remember how much of this i talked about in the crew logs because i did most of those at like one o'clock in the morning after travelling all day so if i'm recuperating rejuvenating myself here apologized but if you're ever in if you ever find yourself with extra time in the billings montana airport you should leave the airport go across the street into the yellowstone county museum kind of an interesting little quirky place with free admission and nice way to spend a little bit time and i think there was something else i want to say but now i can't remember what was the most i mean of the eleven states that you went to know that we have people probably listening from most if not all <hes> which which one was your favorite oh this dangerous territory feared well the little of an unfair question because i didn't spend equal time in all of those places <hes> right you know certainly the highlight light was spending. A little bit of time in maine with with mica and portland was absolutely gorgeous. We saw a couple of different lighthouses. <hes> the town is really cute friendly. The people <hes> good food good beer can't beat any of that so cancun true all right well. Are you ready to move on then to weird started the news folder believable. I've been listening to circa. I'm caught up all right right. <hes> i think we were just about we just finished talking about the seven fifty seven that had the hard landing in the azores and you're trying to decide whether we thought it was going to be able to fly again or if the if it's going to be totaled airframe pictures don't look they. They don't want it now. Looks <hes> not promising anyway. We can move on to item. E plane erupts in flames flames after a failed takeoff at oracle airport and that's an <hes> a believe northern california yeah <hes> cessna cessna husna <hes> five sixty x l citation excel suffered a runway excursion after an aborted takeoff at oroville airport in california a fire broke out in the grass besides aircraft after all ten occupants have been evacuated <hes> or had evacuated the aircraft the fire spread and engulfed the aircraft was being operated by delta private jets and <hes> you know one of the news articles here kind of makes that sound like the the the reason why they stopped the the the takeoff was because it was on fire but i think that the fire came about as a result of the aboard aborted takeoff gough and subsequent runway excursion and looked very very dry up there <hes> the pictures that i saw so in if you have some hot breaks aches i can imagine it would be very easy to start the grass fire and eventually you know engulf the airplane and fire as well l. but we're not sure exactly yet. They're still doing the investigation but the good news is that all of the passengers made it off the airplane and including cluding <hes> the <hes> the pilots <hes> as well so no no fatalities on this when i say important. Didn't it really i. I mean losing. The aircraft is a real shame. I must've meant when i saw the video <hes> i was thinking to myself although safety personnel though there and everything around them the grass is on fire does not i. She looked very a safe area to be so <hes>. I'm assuming dale and managed to get away from the area without any injuries. Sir sir i guess well handled <hes> but not nice to have uh-huh runway excursion on then have a big five spread of not just around the aircraft that goes around the surrounding area of the few yeah so again <hes> no idea yet <hes> why the pilots made the decision to abort the takeoff but <hes> <hes> i think the the airplane claim was pretty much destroyed <hes> and hopefully we'll learn something from this after the investigation by the way <hes> just an update on the other <hes> citation incident was a landing incident the one involving <hes> the race car junior yeah dale jr. <hes> up in <hes> elizabethtown <hes> tennessee <hes>. I guess there are some surveillance wants video that shows that the airplane came down <hes> and touchdown a ride around the landing threshold area bounced once bounce twice and then on the third bounce it <hes> the right main gear collapsed. The right wingtip hit the runway. I think it was only about a thousand feet from the end of the runway. At that point ended up excursion you you know doing an excursion of down embankment up an embankment through <hes> some chain link fence and a lot more so <hes> it was must have been quite wider ride and luckily everybody got out of that alive but <hes> still no no indication of why <hes> they they suffered the the the bad bounce victimizing how often those bounce landings of mishandled a <hes> people try to salvage <hes> situation when the aircraft is now in a while back up in the air again at a much lower speed than it was when it made the first arrival <hes> and very few so winning at that point to go while i need pilots around from him because that's anyway anyway. We're going to salvage the situation surprising how many position trying to make a bad situation goodbye trying to make a second landing quite obviously you're a lot safer could in the power on getting the airplane flying again. I think there was something in the narrative about the tried to go round after the second best after the second so now that for the first one but after the second tried to were unable to do so successfully and how they made the attempt on the first you know after the first balanced perhaps they would have been more successful at least a pile of cush cushion the second bound so they ain't gonna minded gutless list i mean all right and then now finally item f- in our news folder <hes> this again from from the aviation herald and simon <hes> decky <hes> this was something that occurred on the sixteenth of august and n- maasai mauri mariah masai mara somewhere in africa. I think it's the maasai mara is is located generally prasada howlin maasai mara okay maasai mara and <hes> kenya leave and it was a havilland dash eight two hundred registration five yankees era lima mike performing scheduled scheduled flight number one from nairobi wilson to masai mara ki ki schwa- tembo landed at <hes> keach wa timbo airstrip in westerly direction at about eleven o'clock local time but collided with a number of news which are also known as tastes good news while these are world willoughby so good news and wildebeest. We'll do you knew guy go new new. I would've said you i i so. I knew that going to well now. I don't know you know. I think we have some audio from the from the area. <hes> let me see if somebody was had a field recorder shortly after for this accident i i the gun nights good nature in resume so apparently it's canoe. That's that's from one of the news on the scene that actually wasn't killed the unlucky one and then he felt like bursting into song about it yeah well. You know. I didn't really say what happened here. Did i yet <hes> yeah well. We talked about the strike strike on the landing or new strike. <hes> caused the left main gear to collapse in separate from aircraft. The left propeller impacted the ground ejecting one blade. The aircraft veered off the runway one way there were no injuries i beg to differ. The aircraft sustains central damage another just sleeping. Those are just sleeping often that they included the pictures of the <hes> no. I guess i didn't mean to include that. Did i have not had a picture of the news uh-huh well anyway but it's nice to see the time tracks didn't to upset them too much right anyway no human injuries or fatalities. Unfortunately there was a loss of two of these beasts <hes> as i sat in my the title of this news item i knew it to the damage to the plane to. I didn't do it all right at the show. This week could be going to it. You want it to be it. Yeah i can with a canoe okay. Let's do it don't use the poor deceased once. Please live canoes. They're okay with that. I guess now it's time for us to move onto your feedback. The incoming message a right item one from brett fry remember we we met brett fry at oshkosh. She's a producer of the a._p. G. and <hes> let's see he's hey there. It was great to be able to meet you all at oshkosh this this year. It's fun to see the reactions of the first time visitors <hes> like you were this year l. k. so it was interesting for just to see the reactions from those of us who had never experienced oshkosh before so <hes> he's when i was working slash volunteering in the south forty parking working airplanes we had a great view of all the aircraft arriving on rome with three six including when the c five arrived. I had only heard brief comments the next morning about this fire that they had on the c. fives breaks after landing <hes> there is a video in this link that shows the event as we all know there are many incidents and events that occur each year at oshkosh and it seems that nothing is out of view of some recording device and then he gave us a link to an adult web article goal which has the recording in it and we'll put that in the show notes for you all to see and basically <hes> it's taken from the vantage there's point of the nose <hes> area of the airplane <hes> pointed back and it looks like the one of the right main <hes> wheel assemblies assemblies on the c five got a little bit warm and was on fire and fire truck arrived in sprayed it in put it out and so apparently <hes> they say that it it wasn't too extensive because the c five continued to go on static display there at the show so apparently they weren't too concerned. It must not have done a lot of damage no but we were <hes> there were a few of us who are waiting for the <hes> the the short takeoff landing showed up and they had to and they ended up canceling that portion of the show because the fire rescue. You folks were tied up with this incident. This is what was happening. Then whatever night that was thursday night which was ashamed because we've made <hes> <hes> there's a long walk yeah it was. I guess yeah okay the next night. I went back on friday night and saw the short on that will twice. It was way too far for an old man. What a mile hike. It is immoral activities. It was a mile from the bus stop yeah. I'll give you that g._p._s. Data from from my watch kids i was kind of interesting because we were sitting around for a while and we didn't really know why they were delaying from the start of the short takeoff landing competition where you watched a bunch of guys with flying lawnmowers mos- kind of fun that was amazing actually with how little powered parachutes that thing is that was neat and then after that they had the <hes> the r._c. Models out there doing crazy things. Get mad skills very old very it professionals yes. They brent was nice. Meeting you up at oshkosh hope to see you again sometime in the future and thanks for being a producer the show <hes> i'd number two from ham radio jim. He's also producer <hes> he says. I thought you'd all find this interesting especially captain nick this is ben so far my only life experience with g aircraft. I had a ride in a piper cub when i was ten years old out of maddock airport. Only one north dome were that is nil denver is ask around the globe to on one november. Oh okay. I don't hello what does that mean. It's g airports <hes>. It's a long island east hampton. Okay or wait gotcha. That's the name of the airport so it'd be left kilo to one of new york long island okay long. I long island where they drink. Tea is on long island. You don't want to drink too much long island. I mean yeah the ici that'll get to you pretty quickly <hes> anyway <hes> he says seventy-three jim <hes> whiskey to november sierra foxtrot and i'm not a ham radio guys who can't come back atra jim with my call sign seventy. Three's means <hes> <hes> in <hes> goodbye and good wishes and that's his coal. Yeah what's yours. <hes> mike von johnny beck uniform and one sikh you okay seventy three's and he sent a link to a show <hes> something like the history guy or something like that <hes> a the gentleman who does youtube videos on various things in history and this one happens to be on the venerable piper cub and so i will put that link in the show notes for you all to watch it if you so yeah took a look at that very professional very impressed nice play and the he great speaking voice and but sal the good show but <hes> he's. I think he's got a fairly professional team that helps him out. I may wrong because it does seem very well produced and he wears a bowtie yeah. That's why isn't it. That's very professional if it it wouldn't go with my teasha but i take whereby ties lots of neurologists is that right i the vans people live tied dipping into the brain. It makes this. That's the neurosurgeon. I think there are a little different but said okay. I don't know it seems to be a fashionable amongst them. Ni- i think a neurologist same deal with people who are a bit <hes> oh i i shouldn't go there sean really i'll start right now. We'll do it tutorial after the show about what neurologists do and who they take all the people that would grab hold of their a ties and try and strangle them no okay so i can't see why they would wear bow ties then nick getting angry feedback from dot com. I'm just making an observation. Just i know the number of neurologists they all all seem to favor the bowtie very spooky looking yeah all right moving on autumn number three kevin jeff. You've inspired me to start my own aviation youtube channel and it's called many aircrash investigation where i analyze is an aircrash or incident on each episode since you flew the l. ten eleven. I'm sure you'd love the story about an l. Ten eleven crew that landed a crippled l. Ten eleven let let me know what you think so he did send us a link to his youtube channel many aircrash investigation and he has several videos already and he only started a few months back and let me play a little snippet of this one that he thinks i might be interested in hey. This is the story of delta airlines flight ten eighty. This is the story the of bravery skill determination and outstanding airmanship flight ten eighty begins on the ground at san diego international airport on the twelfth of april april nineteen seventy seven today there were flying and that's a little snippet for you and if you want to this is a very good story by the way and yes we knew all about it <hes> those of us who flew the l. ten eleven. This is one of those things that they tell us about while we're in training now back in nineteen seventy seven april i was getting. I'm very that was like the last month of my high school. I graduated in may of nineteen seventy seven so obviously i didn't hear about this. <hes> i don't recall hearing anything about this <hes> when i was in high school but <hes> <hes> several years back but it is a great story sorry and thank you for telling it run and check out all the other great videos. He has on his youtube channel many air crash investigation instigation. Let's move on item for from craig who is also a producer coffee fund qadri member. I crew any thoughts on how an airliner roughed up by. Severe hailstorm could be repaired in the field or was it possibly just a matter of inspection and end sign off until it could be returned to a hub clear skies until wins montana's craig. This is chris roman from missoula and he it gives us a link to this article. <hes> storm damages commercial planes at billings airport in this is from the billings gazette was just there. Oh that's right that. Did you see the airplane damaged airplane there while you were there no okay. It was a lovely nice day not a cloud in the sky. Oh okay okay. <hes> you know that that are there that airport i've been into and out of many many times is up sits up on top of a plateau yeah little bluff area or bluff. I guess <hes> frontier and alaska airlines both had planes damage by the hailstorm that battered much of the region on sunday evening. Both planes were supposed to the juicy. I've highlighted that that's an f. Journalist there that misspelled small town. It's both planes were supposed with with a d to depart sunday night instead they were roughed up enough by the hail and wind that crews were required to keep them grounded overnight while they repaired the damage. Judge said kevin clone billings airport administrator. The alaska airlines plane was repaired early enough on monday that it was able to depart by the afternoon crews. We're hoping to repair the frontier aircraft in time to get back in the air by monday night. The storm moved through the area at about seven pm sunday and left a wide swath of damage fallen trees and branches knocked out power to about fifteen hundred residents and emergency crews responded to a car wreck in the heights reports of people trapped in an elevator anyway it goes was on tells a little bit more about the damage of this storm caused but the thing that we're concerned about here or what craig is concerned about and pilots should be concerned about this as well <hes> the hail damage. What do you do when you're jet is damaged by hail on. Is it really possible to repair it and i would say yes <hes> they go out and and do a full inspection and any areas that have been a significantly damaged. Now you know you might see some some little dense here and there that may not be something that a mechanic would consider significant as far as affecting airworthiness but there are and i don't know what the what the parameters are as far as you know how a big of a indentation is required or where like if it's on this part of the wing. It's okay but it's on the leading edge of the wing probably not <hes>. I don't know all the details tales about that may be a air maintenance technician listening to the show might have more detail about that or may be one of the <hes> fellow house here might know something about <hes> that sort of thing that <hes> yes <hes>. They're not just paying lip service to repairing these things. Are they really do require <unk>. A full inspection and repair is necessary. They have to do it. I believe unless i get some kind of special permit like a fairy permit or something to you. Fly the airplane back to a maintenance base but yeah it's already show they will have very specific <hes> size diameter of the indentation depth position in <hes> in their <hes> requirements <hes> and they will measure those very carefully mark them are locate them on now. The configuration in deviation list are so that they can be inspected on further flights <hes> and each one will be individually measured checked and what they often do they get seven little guys with hamas who come out turned they fix their pilot in the singing a a whole and they're always very happy to go to work and they get on the inside there and they tough out all the little dents and they're fixed and off you get no idea idea that it was the southern dorks excel hail damage. How long were you waiting for that. That was awesome elite license engineer so she knows all about that stuff. Seven guys and hamburgers and there's going to be a rewrite of that story now uh-huh the mine dried out. What are they gonna do. They know it just got me thinking. I wonder how often stuff like this really happens. Especially some of these airports like billings or even denver <hes> storms with significant hail happened quite often in that part of the country and that's that's a pretty busy airport with lots of aircraft and <hes> yeah. It's a good question craig how long it takes to <hes> fix that kind of damage and get those aircraft turned back around so they can continue to operate flights. Apparently is my car. I'd wanna get fix by might dealer pretty quickly but it goes an airplane's made much much tougher stuff. It's aluminium instead of stale so an air dynamics on your car or not quite as important as the aerodynamics on airplane yeah. He's all the downforce. He can get on his most most. I can say oh. This reminds me of an incident that occurred several years back at acme airlines where <hes> the f._a._a. Was trying to pull a captain's opens certificate because he was out at a place. I don't know let's say oklahoma city. I'm not sure if that was it or not but somewhere in the midwest they had a a significant storm run through the night before there was some hail and he did a preflight inspection of the airplane airplane and was satisfied that there wasn't any hail damage however he didn't look at the top of the tail of the airplane that we fly it was a <hes> i think it was a seven twenty-seven in this case a t tail <hes> which would require a cherry picker or some kind of a vehicle that has like a crane kind of thing that gets you high enough up so you can actually inspect the top surfaces of a detailed airplane and <hes> he didn't wasn't able to do that or didn't arrange for it or whatever and when he got back to atlanta <hes> apparently the f._a._a. Gone involved and basically said that he flu or potentially flew on air. Were the or potentially airworthy airplane <hes> and everybody was like were really. I mean how's was. He supposed to know you know so. How are you supposed to. I mean here's a hypothetical question but say you're at a small airport. That doesn't have equipment like that. You know way to assess it looked at everything else and it looks okay but you go all no. I'm not gonna do it until the company or the airport or someone gets the appropriate equipment out here. That seems reasonable to me to if you if you're inspecting everything else that you can actually see and i think it would be reasonable to assume assume that <hes> that surface would not be damaged as well <hes> but and that's what we were all thinking at the time thinking well okay that doesn't make a lot of sense <hes> apparently apparently <hes> the union lawyers got involved in the company. Actually <hes> defended the pump the captain in this case and anyway. It's one of those things that really ah makes me think every time i go out to an airplane in i know aura here that there was some kind of a big storm the night before and <hes> the thing that's also. I'm very the thing that i'm also very sensitive about is <hes> the damage to the control tabs on the elevators of the of the mad dog because we've we've talked about in the last couple of years a couple of incidents involving <hes> the control tabs and damages to the control rods that control the control tabs on the elevator elevator and how you know they're in a couple different cases where either the airplane wasn't rotating for takeoff and another case the airplane was rotating before the crew <hes> called for it and both involved damaged control tabs <hes> for the elevator system so when somebody tells me that the there was there's a lot of win the night before or i know that there has been a lot of wind the night before <hes> for instance just a few months back i think my first officer probably thought it was it's crazy but <hes> we were in wichita and it was a very very high wind kind of a of that storm that went through and thinking that the you know in the back of my mind i was thinking of these incidents where there was some damage that one in no willow grove <hes> michigan near ann arbor with the michigan basketball team and and and pep band and other people affiliated with it. We're heading from ann arbor or <hes> willow grove airport to <hes>. I think it was washington d._c. Where they were doing like the one of the call that a the final four kinda thing whatever march madness kind of thing l. yeah <hes> willow run. Okay thank you liz <hes> and <hes> the <hes> <hes> the airplane had been there for a few days and there were some really super high winds up in that area <hes> during that time and apparently the wind and the the the the way that airplane was parked up against between two buildings or something like that and the wind flow around the buildings just kind of enhanced the <hes> the the amount of velocity the wind <hes> in did some the thing was you know as we know <hes> or most people know from listening to the show the <hes> mandar nothing the m._d. ninety but the man the m._d. eighty through eighty eight <hes> is a has an unpowered elevator and so just kinda flops around and and in the wind and the wind and it can left one might be up and the right one might be down and it's kind of crazy anyway there's nothing keeping for moving and apparently this had been when exposed to a quite a lot of wind and was banging up and down and apparently <hes> i forget which side was the rider left <hes> but one of the control arms for for that <hes> control tab which is actually controls the movement of the elevator had been damaged and they were rolling down the runway and they you told the yolk back for rotation and nothing happened and that was one of those situations where the airplane was not gonna fly and would they yeah well past v one when they realized that there's no way the european was gonna fly so they had to abort the takeoff and you know miraculously. Nobody was killed in and i'm not even sure an anybody was seriously injured <hes> but it could have been a huge tragedy <hes> had that airplane actually gotten off the ground or if they made the decision to stop up even later that <hes> so sasha difficult decision that i mean <hes> we talk about bonnets have to make the decision of v eighty one losing an engine but after make a decision after v. one <hes> just a requires real courage. Yana in this case was like <hes>. There's nothing else i could do really right leaving about. I'm just saying like the startled factor there. Were you expect a you have no reason otherwise suspect the airplanes not gonna fly except that it doesn't respond to control inputs. You're giving it so we do control checks and stuff and there's nothing that we showed you because there's like a little tab. The only thing that's moving <hes> connected to our controls and there's no kind of electronic display that shows the movement of these towns and there is nobody outside outside looking to see if the tabs actually moving in response to the control input so what i did because i knew that the night before there was a lot of wind and these stories are still in the back of my head thinking that that's what's going to kill me is that stupid control tab on the elevator of this mad dog and so when i did the walk around i ended ended up calling on on the cell phone of the first officer and as a note this is crazy but i explained what i was going to do before i left the cockpit and so he pulled the back and and then i can see the tab was moving in the proper direction and they pushed it forward. It was both at the tabs. We're moving in the proper direction and that was you know that satisfied my <hes> concern regarding whether or not that there had been any damage to the control tab of the elevator in this case but <hes> i mean. I think that's a really wise thing to to do. Though why wouldn't you if you have the ability to do that in check it before you go. There was any concern at all yeah. So i know probably looked foolish doing it. <hes> you know i'm still lynch then to think about doing something and not do it and then have that be the problem as a lot more foolish and is like nothing in our books books say anything about doing that sort of an inspection but you have to use your pilot brain right now we do shows and we we see an awful lot of accident incident reports arts and <hes> you know you can't help but you know started thinking about these kind of things anyway just thought i'd throw that out <hes> so do we thoroughly answer craig's question regarding the <hes>. I seldom and i said nice little tornado going on in that picture. Yeah i saw that is that actually from the the storm <hes> from <hes> from another storm as severe storm. Yeah not sure which one well yeah. That's pretty severe actually okay <hes> speaking of severe storms. Hopefully my power stays on. There's a impressive about of lightning on the radar heading my way okay. Hopefully you'll keep your electricity <hes> hoops but if i disappear all of a sudden that's probably what happened. Okay we'll hang in there stuff. I mean i'll be here. Okay we'll be able to see it. Just sounds like you'll be finishing the show all on your right now. I have great faith. The power power will stay on yeah. Okay <hes>. I'm getting <hes> internal communications. That says that <hes> that nick wants us to do the plane tail right now or but it's coming up to eleven o'clock at ninety okay very early tomorrow soapy. I think that'd be great idea. Knock it on the head and i'll then i'll say when we finished. I'll say mica pies. You're very good. I have not even thought about that. Thank you very much. <hes> how how how <hes> what's the word i'm looking for not rude but <hes> insensitive insensitive of me not to think about the fact that you're up really really relate cheese yeah no problem until normally i have a hassle i just i don't wanna to in the morning but perhaps not tomorrow no day very good very good so here we go so we're going to play this week's episode or installment of the plain old pilots plain tales here we go. The pilots played all weather headlock. It's twenty years in the past and lucky chuckie. <hes> is a dusty fly blown kenyan frontier town that is a long way from the tourist images on african safari. Choose news the m._a._c. consul of the takao. No wonder the streets and the place stinks foul garbage john excrement but flies flies off the committee says dangerous here as it is trout has decimated cattle hood so the desperate to kana have mainly become bandits robbing anyone careless enough to risk travelling at night and a few days before a driver was shot dead ed and his passengers robbed arrows so at wal with the neighboring tried to posada nightly gunbattles can be heard in the the distance as an ashtray here with a few buildings offices in compounds one with a poom and above six o'clock sharp an attractive blonde can be found there sipping g._m._t. While the ice sitting hug gloves first us clowns she looks out of place petar easy man on familiarity marks as a local. She's well spoken with the classic classic british accent. If the well-to-do minorities direct and her style betrays upbringing she's a product of the british empire self sufficient and capable born in england but brought up in nigeria father was a mine manager at eighteen she married an army officer and had two children by him but at twenty one she left him and married an older chap who owned his own aircraft a craft. She was keen to learn a flyer but i knew husband said that she would be an awful pilot. She was terrible at maths. Eventually she persuaded him to let her try and despite having to mull children by the age of twenty five she hadn't he gained a pilot's license falling in i love with her instructor along the way and having another child by him a girlfriend described harris stunningly beautiful with natural control grace a very open and honest character who wouldn't try and hide anything even high lovers. She took a commercial examiners and flight test in england flying out of gatwick apple and landing sandwiched between boeing seven hundred seven's. She needed money eight to keep her children in boarding school so she started bush flying something she loved initially for flying doctors on the police say a wing building up experience and learning to find the half hidden strips that were ahead destinations flying curious dotted and honest with kenya kenya flying freight. This was followed by a job for kenya air charters taking wealthy white hunters out into the sedan bush in a beechcraft baron fifty five good years she says staying in hunting camps for a week or more and floating down the nile on river barges searching for lion antelope an elephant landing on poorly prepared strips that would difficult to find particularly just using a simple map. She learned in her trade. Flying the bush the hard way the careful pilot meticulous about looking after her aircraft she knew that flying in some of the most just remote parts of africa killed many slapdash aviators who took risks there was enough excitement to be found without the additional l. thrill of risking and engine failure through paul maintenance. She continued to progress gaining her instrument rating in nineteen seventy in in qualifying on the island. Come on chee as take seneca an cessna four zero two to name a few despite a measured should approach to flying. She gained a solid reputation for being able to work in the worst of conditions and earned a nickname that would stick with her for life. All whether heather heather stuart's meticulous attitude didn't always prevent the unexpected she she experienced the usual problems that africa with throw away flat tires flat batteries broken radios and villages who siphoned off the aviation fuel left airstrips these were the kind of problems at all bush pilot suffered from but heather soon gained reputation for toughness reliability and safety that got her work flying the rich and famous film stars on the link. I think she even met the pope. If you wanna get a feel for what kind of girl she was try reading about the pioneer aviator beryl markham who captivated hemingway and wrote the book west with the night she was even involved with joy and george adamson who gained fame for their efforts to introduce lions back into the wild documented in the famous book film and and foundation bone free heather is mentioned in the follow up book christian the lion flying into cora the book read it says always exhilarating. The camp is located in a very remote area of kenya and for the last hour of the flight there are non of the cultivated patches riches or gleaming tin roofs that usually betray human habitation terrence had plan to extend the landing strip off to some pundits had expressed that concerns about its length but this didn't worry on pilot had the stewart who was an excellent pilot. It wasn't long long before we had touched down safely. She did a stint flying the lawrence of arabia film director david lean around and took into delivering cat into somalia. The mild narcotic is legal. <hes> and since alcohol is available to the muslim population. It's <hes> <hes> drug of choice. I never had enough fuel for a round trip. She said and i had to get out onto the wing with jerry cans to refuel while a gun battle between warlords bro count and they were bullets whizzing around i finished off and got into the cockpit but my plane had six bullet holes in it and one pass right through close to the back of my head missed me why that much he said spreading her thumb and forefinger offing up that made me think so when someone said go fly in the sudan they really need people there. I went with a short blond hair. Good looks and brilliant smile had that could easily have been mistaken for the hostess of an english garden party not but she was never afraid of getting a hands dirty the u._n. Needed a base for their operations into the sudan operation lifeline more than two million had died there if not by bullets and bombs then from the famine and disease brought about by war drought and flood the united nations classified the region as a state in chronic emergency. I'm was trying to fly in supplies lies. The sore opportunity to help with another pilot american called jim gaunt she said about building an strip but lucky lke chucky and she started a charter company called trackmark aviation thus began ascending point in his life from the glamour and flying flying of the rich and famous to the down to earth work of transporting aid into desperate regions of africa. Sudan is the biggest country three on the continent but for years at suffered from intractable civil warms the pilots who operated their work team conditions that will give the average bridge airline pilot palpitations panic attacks no control towers where the forecast navigation beacons right all the like. These aviators didn't have adventures. They live them on a daily basis. One trip heather was flying three c. One thirty hercules pilots to look at possible asterix to operate their crop from they got to a town cold kabo that had had an aircraft landed sunday for years and overflight showed the strip as dry and clear but underneath the crust of dry laya soft blacken the sulky foundation indication of the tells of putting the cessna four right to down but it sank through the crossing got completely stuck. It couldn't take off and nobody nobody could land that a rescue the eight a few biscuits will they had an purified river walter whilst heather radioed for food and water trump but it was three days before anyone could get the n._f._l. Had been the scene of a recent battle. The sudan people's liberation ration- army rebels at driven off the government forces. There were thousands of mosquitoes. The heat was terrible and there was always the fear that the army would come back and attack. There were many dead bodies lying about she said and you can imagine what it was lying. One of the passengers was survival expert but then he got bitten by a scorpion is in a great deal of pain. The plane with the food and water dropped dropped morphine as well and we shot him up with so much of it that he can't stand finally one of the catholic missions was able to get a helicopter to them strip the radio from the cessna and they got out. It was quite good. She said to change my clothes and have have a bomb track marks at a small beginning just me and my airplane she said but the islamic government in khartoum in who seized power declared the war in the south to be a jehan in the following years it would deny aid to southern sudan and drop cluster bomb in some churches missions and defenseless villages massacring thousands and driving thousands more from their homes into concentration. Listen tracing cancel the bush it even revived the ancient practice of raiding towns on horseback killing the elderly and men of finding age then rounding up the young women and children to sell them into slavery the work of the u._n. Began to grow and dozens of non-governmental organization. We're bringing in tons of aid that needed to be flown into the sudan. The amount they shifted exceeded the total flown during the berlin airlift heather began taking on all the pilots and at one time her company employed twenty not too she invested in lucky chunky by building a safe enclave with a bond even pool as a side note it still lab. Should you ever wanted to explore the real side of africa and they'll wrench room. The flying was still dangerous. The government insisted on advance warning of aid flights and it sometimes dispatch militia units to seize the s._p._l._a. Rebels controlled old vast areas of the south so the government frequently deny permission to fly in an attempt to stop the rebels into submission aw in response to the dire need for aid the bush pilots delivered their cargoes to the no-fly zones in defiance of cartoons threats threats that their planes will be shot out of the sky. They cooled it flying on the dark side and filed fulls plans or planned lands toll the risks were hi. Heather did a lot of flying for the catholic missionaries in sudan's western province taking the off before dawn she would land in the early light and then throw camouflage netting over aircraft to keep it hidden until it was safe to depart aw nine. These astronauts had no lighting so she would line up takeoff and aim at a single torch held up by someone standing standing at the other end of the strip. A friend recalled another a harrowing flight. We were on her caravan across ready to leave and find a group group of slaves. We were attempting to reach in another region. When a number of men came up to the plane carrying a youth who had been shot a number of times times during a raid he was barely conscious and had lost copious amounts of blood and with no medical assistance available and he had a few hours to live. I'll fly him to nakae as it was affectionately named on the red cross hospital there heather said at the time lucky had the largest field hospital in the world but i need someone to come with me. While i fly the plane. Jane volunteered the the task and in the end. It was decided that the young man's mother should come with us. We'll never describe what we endured on that flight blood continue to run down the floor of the aircraft as we sought to administer morphine and check his vital signs. We felt so helpless at one point. He opened his eyes and his mother went to the site. He had a huge wound onto his arm on. The blood was escaping rapidly. There's duct tape tape in the rear compartment had the yelled from the front and we wrapped the wounded it watching as the bleeding somehow stone five house later we arrived in lucky where the boy and his mother were whisked off to the hospital from the estrin later we happened upon him and and he had recovered though with the loss of the use of his arm heather invited us to the hospitality camp. She ran that just off the single strip rip treating us to a sumptuous dinner and her best room. Even they're exhausted from the flight. She constantly looked out out for others. Heather stewart spent years flying. People like us into some of the riskier situations and on many of those occasions goes to park her plane with us for the night in case something serious where to occur she slept on the ground with us endeared the heat the food food the massive scope of human suffering and the shed grief at the senseless deaths of hundreds of thousands she helped testified slavery assisted others flying in emergency supplies and workers and constantly used lucky cam to assuage the pains wins heal the wounds and recover the spirits hatha tried to stay neutral in her opinions about the conflict to avoid getting caught up in the causes but she admits to flying medevac for wounded guerrillas when called upon i always carry a jar of vick's <music> smelly chest rob with me she said am i put a little in each nostril. The stench of gangrene can be overwhelming and a small plane. It's dangerous flying. It's quite a buzz really add much rather do that than fly a bunch of tourists to look at lyons the one thing she wouldn't do was deliver weapons possibly as a result of her decision as dried up cited the money and the company shrank back down but have kept flying. You wanna her efforts. The missionaries brought to rome for a private audience audience with john. This protestant woman of dubious morals a multiple marriages knelt and kissed the pontiff spring to cover her basis. We laughingly admitted she later flew the archbishop of canterbury on tour of south sudan the dying peacefully of leukemia in her home in kenya nearly a year erica h seventy she left many full of admiration nations and the world is a sad place without her and another great plain tale. Thank you captain nick well. Thank you to jersey being left on team for the great suggestion because i had never heard of <hes> all-weather heather and <hes> you know as i dug go into how story and it wasn't easiest story <hes> to research this one i ended up to buy book because there was a single chapter in there which had an account <hes> all <hes> and i thought well that's it's worth spending the money just to you get that little piece that will give me more detail of hunt life but she sounds like an unlikely character to do that sort of thing being but ideally suited to it because i suspect that with her flying skills which were on her commonsense and her drive <hes> and fearless approach to life in kenya and more importantly in the sudan somalia malia during that awful complex <hes> she did an awful lot of good <hes> and regardless of what sex she was she was a fantastic bush bush pilot and much admired so when i found out about her life i really <hes> took an interest and belt. I had to tell that story because i think she was one remarkable. <hes> lady an amazing pilot as you say regardless artless gender <hes> an amazing pilot great story and i do have a question though <hes> did they change the formulation of vicks because i don't think that that vicks is a horrible smell strong odors mental yeah. It's a mental menthol kind of uh living. It's a it's an unpleasant smell but it's <hes> it's all she had to try and hide the stench of the things she had to carry him. Her cannot imagine this. What gangrene must smell like must be horrible. It's not yeah you had the opportunity <hes> pleasure. Yes oh letting displeasure from medical school. You kind of get exposed into that sort of thing yeah. There's a smell ever forget no. There's there's several full. Infamous smells the in the medical field that once you smelled you will not forget ever right yeah well. Sorry sorta ended on that note. Thanks for reminding me of all no no. I i just i during my this woman. I thanks very much for zhou seeing who who we love anyway because she sends in great favor a great support of the shown an actually for a rare rare occasion. She's not in the chat room tonight so he's not watching live which is a shame. I hope she gets to hear this under realize what a great story was. She revealed to me so that i could talent on delighted available to that exactly i'm sure she will listen and she will. Thank you in due course for scher us. Thanks josie okay well nick. I am going to direct you now to leave us because we've had it with you. Gone my pleasure to ta- take an early bath as they say when you leave the field of play before your time go for nearly baath because <hes> potent tomorrow playing my finals at the ball club so <hes>. I need to get some sleep on. It's it's it goes fast approaching midnight by the time i actually get my head on the pillow so yeah. I'm gonna wish you you guys will and you had the lucky to staff to give expert advice on the remaining feedback. I'm sure she is quite capable of filling mount place more within capable than case. We're in good hands berlin anyway. Have liberty show guys expectations for much on your on your by okay and then there were two. Oh jeez sorry. You're stuck with us yeah. You know i can think of worse things yeah. I could too all right well. Let's see let's go back to where we left off offer. I think <hes> grow number five. They'd be the next one. You're right greetings p._g. Crew and the world's okay assed airbus us guy <hes> too bad. We didn't do that just before nick anyway. It's your favorite millennial tom from pittsburgh reporting from the opposite outside of the fire hose of part one twenty-one training. I'm happy to say i'm officially through my first typewriting typewriter. The types rate type rating off. I o e and a full-fledged first officer on the jungle jet a <music> but can only find my applause. Imagine it mattering. It's coming in. It's just awesome here ago taylor congratulations on that he says although i am sorry to say i i haven't been able to catch up with the show lately as i've been busy trying to keep up with the jet. I'm starting to catch up with every layover and long set. I have and <hes> you know what i think. We can give them a break since era cut for him to come back to catch up but right. I i mean that time off. That's fine yeah. Let it go. You will allow it. We'll let it go this time. Okay <hes> let's see i've been traveling a lot even to atlanta and one of these days. I'd love to have a meet up with y'all also like to say congrats to captain nick on his retirement. Such a long fruitful career finally comes to an end and and enjoy your retirement. I know a little late but i'm playing catch up here again. I turn to you guys for some advice for anyone just getting off low time at their first airline. If you could go back to your low time selves at your first airline. What would you tell them. I look forward to hearing from you guys again. Hopefully having a meet up. Well sadly sadly. I'm the only airline pilot here. That can really answer that question tom. <hes> perhaps maybe you can remind me staff on <hes> the next show when dana and nickelback circuit if we think about it <hes> if lizard kind of did may be the can keep that in the year and the koran that <hes> in okay so let's see if i could go back to my initial self <hes> at the first airline <hes> this is the acme airlines by the way is my first airline and only airline one of the lucky ones so i got <hes> <hes> hired out of the air force and right on into <hes> a major legacy carrier which i'm very fortunate to have. I've had that experience <hes> and i think that the only thing that i can advise recommend is to to try to keep track of everything that's happening to you. <hes> i never kept a diary and didn't even keep a log book. Actually a logbook would probably be a good first step <hes> and not necessarily kind of record all the exact details about the exact take time like a typical logbook but more that the block of the logbook where you put like notes remarks in things up if i maybe log is not necessary may be <hes> like keep a some kind of a ledger or <hes> or journal or whatever you call it where you could or even something on your computer in to to keep track of to to write down you know something about not every single leg of course because you know sometimes and you'd you'd be hard pressed to think of anything that was worth writing about on every single leg but you know on on each trip. There's always something odd or unusual that happens or maybe something that at the time doesn't really seem important talk or significant in your life that <hes> ten twenty thirty years from now it might be kind of fun to read something that you wrote that long ago and bring up you know some memories from <hes> from that time so <hes> just something to consider sitter. I'd say just <hes> because you when you're at your age right now and you're starting off <hes> you don't realize the significance significance of a lot of the things that are happening to your now and you will understand it once you're older. That's the only advice. I think that i can give yeah. <hes> you know there's kind of a famous <hes> this has nothing probably generalized too many professions but there's a <hes> or maybe not i don't know <hes> famous line from a book called the house of god which is kind of a interesting read <hes>. I'd say even required league for anyone going into medicine <hes> before they start there in turn. Your <hes> at one of the rules is <hes>. I check your own pulse. So before you you get excited worked up about something you check your pulse and then it's kind of like the wind the clock thing and the okay for or not sure i quite understood stood what that meant. We know what the significant of check your own pulses so just before you know before you start getting caught up in the need to do this. Though so severe present was a situation that seems a little overwhelming. Just take a moment to take a step back for half a second remember. You have time most of the time think through it logically early and that's really important. I think that is important. I just had that much okay and and <hes> our producer in the background there has already taken care of <hes> making an effort to revisit this on on a on a future show so that's good <hes> hopefully that gave you some. You know some advice tom and hopefully so you'll receive more and congratulations again or your your progress <hes> item six from moshe aw <hes> in israel moshe in case you haven't yet seen it attached as the terrific field guide to know thames produced by the ops group <hes> creators of death to notams dot com. I expect god will be especially used for useful for captain. Nick who in his retirement has plenty spare time to seek out and photograph no dams that are in danger of extinction and again this is from <hes> moshe greenberg born in israel and <hes>. I have a <hes> the p._d._f. Of it in our show notes staff. I don't know if you had a chance to look through it but whoever came up with this <hes> field guide to notice as a very very good sense of humor. It's really yes. I funny. I have seen this. I've read through a little bit of it not real. I just read a little bit of the forward for the last hundred years the know tom has existed without fear of predator unchanged and unchallenged it has lived freely in our aviation ecosystem blissfully unaffected by technological development that has long seen the demise of other primitive species such as morse code the telegram and lorenzi navigation no thames to will disappear take advantage of their abundance while you can with field guide you can embark upon your adventure finding the multitude of varieties that still exist <hes> so that's just a little <hes> a little taste. The next page talks about for an a another little snippet here the crane not him no thomas construct construct us a nice latin <hes> version of the crane not very common in europe and north america the crane note him as part of the larger irrelevancies family relevance. Most airports are near cities. Most cities airports have construction so there are a lot of cranes. These are at most few hundred feet high and usually very far from the runway nonetheless any crane with an uber distance of an airport is is added to the note and system and then has an example <hes> this one from <hes> lima india mike echo milan obstacle crane rain erected with f. w. f. l. w. characteristics carousel foreign characteristics p._s. N. w. g. s. dash eighty four four five two four five four two three two point nine zero north zero zero nine three nine zero four point seven five five east elevation a._g. L. ninety eight point four feet thirty meters goes on with some other. They've given some helpful. <hes> <hes> diagrams are <hes> at diagram pictures of different types of crane so that you can identify if i like that. They've included the crane. Yes which is actually a bird common cranes tower crane truck crane terrain whooping crane after then it has a little section for your own notes <hes> and then have some nice <hes> some nice quotes from various people this one in american airlines pilot or an american pilot. I'm sorry i'm not going to read it because it does have some foul language in it like i like the quote from donald trump though <hes> missy further down such as that make no towns great again yes donald trump captain air force one well you know we've talked about 'bout no thames in the past on our show many times actually in how <hes> so much of what is there is completely irrelevant and and even the n._t._s._b. The national transportation safety board chairman robert sue malt himself <hes> during the <hes>. I guess they were discussing the final report of the canadian air canada near crash at san francisco <hes> and they were one of the things they were discussing was no tam's and again here's his quote. No dams are they're just a bunch of garbage that nobody pays an an anti so. We have that so really do need to check out the show notes. Let's hear to <hes> get download the field guide to notams from the neth death to know dams roop people <hes> very very funny. Thank you moshe for vergara giving us that lincoln reminding us of this great piece of literature now. It's very funny at definitely drives home. The point of how ridiculous a lot of no temps are yup it really does. It's a great read. <hes> seven from producer steve an interesting development in the investigation of this light aircraft crash <hes> a fairly extensively earlier in the year correct. Yes <hes> the soccer or the footballer. <hes> emiliano sala allah <hes> was the passenger the single sole passenger aboard a small commercial flight <hes> single pilot and he says an interesting development <hes> might you might want to mention <hes> clearly. We don't yet know the root cause of the crash but the hi c._o. Two in the in the passengers clearly a big red flag. I now we've done the co two debate to death but <hes> or before are so probably not one to dwell on but it does serve as a reminder of the potential dangers of c._o. Two poisoning in general aviation again this is steve hurst and he gave us a link to this article and <hes> as i said or as steve said they found that the footballer emiliano salah how was exposed to high levels of carbon monoxide prior to a fatal print plane crash in the english channel. A report has revealed he was twenty eight and the pilot david edison fifty nine crashed on the twenty first of january while traveling from dante's in france to cardiff. I'm not sure that announced dante's you know i've. I've lost it in the other n._a._t._o. Pronounce it <hes> but i'm not gonna say eight either so okay. That's my church. <hes> toxicology tests on salah's body showed c._o. Levels in his blood were so great could have caused a seizure unconsciousness or a heart attack <hes> so steph so you're the doctor here <hes> to me not a doctor. <hes> looks like a fifty eight percent level of carbon monoxide dockside <hes> oh no no. I'm sorry that's what <hes> oh yeah. He did have a level of fifty eight percent. That seems really high to me. It is really high yeah. That's not normal. I mean i don't know what a normal amount would be. Would i would think it would be like single. Digits at most may be very close to duro yeah wow so they still haven't found the body of the pilot ibbotson that <hes> they do where the the wreckage of the airplane is and i think they're still trying to get funding to bring the thing up service yeah nantes yeah. I'm not the i don't know i can't. I can't make that sound quickly. I know how it's supposed to sound that. I can't do it correctly. Okay thank you so. What do you think stuff. You think that this is <hes> a i. I think we probably don't know for a at was part of of their final report or hard. This was just an intermediate a we found this <hes> yes. Certainly you know this was a piper malibu. I believe leaps odell system engine <hes> so certainly could produce carbon monoxide if you had faulty heating or ventilation or something along those lines <hes> yeah and if you're you're exposed to high levels of carbon monoxide like that that's really can result in a situation where you're <hes> not able to think clearly unconscious and would not be able to continue to safely no pilot and aircraft and could result in a crash <hes>. That's one possibility of what may have happened here. <hes> i'm not sure how else you end up with such high levels of carbon monoxide in your system if that was not a significant contributing causal factor <hes> but we'll see. It sounds like we're mike. It's more information again in the future. Yes i had not read the update on this <hes> steve so thank you for making us aware of it and <hes> hopefully they'll get get whatever is necessary to retrieve the wreckage of the airplane so they can inspect it more closely to see if that is perhaps <hes> one of the causes of this tragedy. I don't know we'll see. How did you see did you say c._o. Two level at some point okay so carbon monoxide. Yeah okay carbon monoxide to see oh. I coulda sworn i was reading something that said you may have been. I was looking back. I just wanted to make sure we <hes> okay <hes> sometimes. It's just easy to resolve steve said c._o. Two okay <hes> so the oracle is self. I think has just c._e._o. Yeah downright and sorry. I was not even paying attention to those. You'll writing down into the the article to look through it. Yeah you're right. It's a carbon monoxide not dioxide soaring c. o. Oh steve you didn't do well and kim chemistry digital. We're just getting steve back up to fifty percent here twenty. You're better than that. Yeah i'm just we. We knew what she meant. Everyone knew what you meant. It's all good so i didn't notice she was the one and the tara <hes> <hes> honestly you were reading through that and i was actually looking down the article and i wasn't paying attention to you. I'm sorry i was my close attention to what i was saying. Either which is normal. It is here to pay attention to one or liz. Actually she's a whiz eight attention. What are you taking about carbon dioxide. It gets very distracting. Sometimes when i'm trying to read things i see all these messages going on from thinking okay. I'm not gonna look. I'm not as as usual. I've done a lot of preparation for the show <hes> <hes> so and by that i mean i've done zero preparation. Yeah we know we understand your sarcasm so as you know as jeff like starting learning to read the <hes> whatever the commentary is from whoever sent in the the item of interest. I'm actually reading. The item of interest for the first time for the first time yeah collided we. Can we take whatever we can get here. You're era fast. Read okay <hes>. Let's move on to item number eight <hes> robbie my name's robbie. I'm an aviation enthusiast interested in getting involved in aviation. I'm interested in taking flying lessons of some variety when i have time but i'm leaving my home in westchester pennsylvania just outside of philadelphia or virginia polytechnic institute and state university and i don't expect to have a lot of time for anything other than studying and drinking beer speaking of which i plan to study aerospace engineering since there are so many interesting in topics tracks that pertain to it none of this is particularly important to the podcast so i'll get to the important stuff i i'm not asking any questions today as i only discovered your podcast a month ago and i've only gotten through episode fifty eight a chuckle every time i hear someone saying that they are working to catch up because they have a lot less to work through than i do and i'm not going to bother answering your questions about show length favourite weather app etcetera the only purpose that will that will serve to you and your listeners is a trip down memory lane for anyone who has listened to the early episodes the two topics that i have been building up to with the the deliberateness of a cow meandering its way about do relate somewhat to both the past episodes and the present i i'd forgotten that the boeing seven hundred seven had been ungrounded for awhile not long after its debut yeah they had all those battery problems of course a seven thirty seven max aircraft groundings are not directly comparable but it makes me you feel better overall about the eventual return of the seven thirty seven max aircraft to everyday use the other topic i wanted to bring up was the following article i saw all this morning which can be found at the link and then he gives us a link <hes>. Let's see in the the title of the headline of this link is flight attendant. Forty-three contracted measles on flight dies after battling the disease for five months so going back to robbie's feedback here just yesterday i was listening to episode fifty eight in your rambling on and on and on no just kidding. You spent an appropriate amount of time on the topic anyway you were talking about. Two british airways crew members who have both died at forty three and <hes> posthumously accused. I said that right posthumously posthumously accused arrow toxicity city. I think that's what it was called to be the main cause of their death again. They're not entirely related but it's still close enough that i felt like i could take up some valuable podcast time well. You can always take up valuable podcast time robby <hes> obviously i won't be in pennsylvania very often in the foreseeable future and even if i was i'm underage but in downingtown downingtown or as downington probably never been there as philadelphia. There's a call downingtown. I want to say yes. You have has been recorded. My answer has been recorded has been recorded. I will be corrected in due time. If i am incredible more time. No please downingtown ch- downing took the <hes> the judges say judges say yes that is correct. Okay 'cause very good. We don't have any judges. I'm just making them now. At many things i did live in that area at one point in my life hyphen. I really should know i have an excuse. I have never heard of that town in. I've never lived close to philadelphia in philadelphia anyway. He said admittedly not very close close to philadelphia. There's a craft brewery called victory brewing company. Which i've been told is superb in. Yes i can verify that victory. Brewing is awesome. <hes> <hes> particular that i've heard are the dirt wolf my mom's personal favourite your mom good taste which is a w._p._a. And has a bit of a grapefruit taste to it. Hop devil a regular i._p. Being must give hop double. That's a good one and golden monkey. Belgian style beer not tried that one <hes>. I also hear that you can find some of these around the country of your lucky so keep an eye out. I think i can get them at total line here. In <hes> <hes> alvarez i'm eager eagerly awaiting to hear your response which i probably won't get to for another sixteen months your question your show as amazing and i can't wait to listen to the next three hundred twenty ish episodes so i can ask you all of my questions right now. I have enough to fill a whole episode committee. We should do that wishing you clear skies unlimited visibility and tailwinds when appropriate and again this is robert. Excuse me robbie gould e and the <hes> the article that he refers to staff <hes> again is the flight attendant <hes> for el al <hes> was working on on a flight in late march when she contracted the infectious disease measles and then she was hospitalized and <hes> she he died this week following a five-month battle with the infectious disease rotem a multi a forty three year old employees for el al passed away on tuesday after contracting measles at the end of march and following into it falling into a deep coma the washington post reports she was flight from new york's john f kennedy international airport to israel around the time she began to show symptoms of the virus. She was later hospitalized after developing encephalitis an inflammation of the brain caused by the disease according to the outlet <hes> days after landing in israel. The israeli ministry of health released an alert about a measles patient onboard an l. l. flight from j._f._k. Into israel on march twenty six to twenty seven but did not mention specifically whether she was exposed to the illness while on the aircraft at this time or at the time officials also could not confirm where where or when she may have contracted the virus but noted that she did not appear to spread measles to anyone else on the flight according to the report from the washington post medical professionals were unable to speak with her after she fell into a coma but eventually got in contact with her mother there who verified that her daughter had received the required vaccines as a child still the vaccine from her childhood may not have been strong enough to prevent her from crying. Contracting the virus as patients were given a single dose of the vaccine in the seventies these days israeli medical officials recommend giving children one dose when they're twelve months old and another other one when they're in the first grade what they say one year old but that'd be easier told months never get that like when you have kid and there's how old is your child away eight four from <hes>. I feel like that happens outside of the we like to say year year and a half yeah i just i was at the places that's more news i eighteen hundred dollars a year and a half right eighteen months you know those parents have just been counting every single month though if it's their only their first child or their only child pictures for instagram with the cute little number. I'm just no and that's why they do that. The clothing and all against <hes> yeah okay so one does when they're twelve months old and another one when they're in first grade in a statement to the jewish press spokesperson looks person for el al expressed their condolences to her family said they were properly handling the matter accordance with the health ministry's guidelines <hes> the company is bowing its head over the death of a member of el al's aircrew the spokesperson told the outlet the company will continue to act on the matter in accordance with the health. Ministry's is guide lines once the case became now on the company acted to vaccinate the company's aircrews the spokesperson added the company shares the deep grief of the family and will continue to accompany the family which was very nice of them to say that and to do that <hes> so what do you think stuff <hes> you you know you hear about these measles outbreaks and such <hes> yeah so we've. We've definitely got a problem with that right now. With some of the trend of <hes> parents not choosing not to vaccinate their children or at least not keep up with the he suggested timeframe for vaccinations recently because of other fears which have since been mostly since bit completely debunked. I should say <hes> but it's really really really important that people get these vaccinations especially for something like measles. Measles is really highly contagious. <hes> <hes> something like it can live up to two hours in airspace where an infected person has coughed or sneezed on a plane with someone who happens to have a measles infection and and they call for sneeze air around them as virus live for up to two hours and that can be enough for you to become infected if you are not appropriately vaccinated against the disease but we should also say something about the fact that it's not necessarily as as serious as it was for this flight attendant as far as getting the lights and i mean no no no but i mean it does have the potential to be that way and the the the point i'm trying to make is that there is a vaccination for it that is highly effective and especially if you're going to be <hes> kind of working in close quarters especially for folks like me working in healthcare medicine <hes> and really just for everyone should be vaccinated against this particular paris now the m._w._r. I think is the vaccine the they referred mumps and rubella harder m._m._r. or m._r. Thank you m._w._r. Is the military welfare and recreation department am which has nothing to do with paxon's interestingly. I just pulled up the c._d._c. Here and it talks about <hes> planning for travel and <hes> <hes> protecting yourself against measles says most measles cases in the united states result from international travel <hes> <hes> so make sure you're protected. If your trip is less than two weeks away and you're not protected against measles. You should still get a dose of the vaccine okay there. You have it. That's from a doctor okay. Thanks robbie and and good luck with your college education and hope halftime or naptime fun at where where did you say was going <hes> selena polytech or something like that. What is that <hes> virginia polytechnic institute and state university. Okay all right moving on number nine nine in <hes> this is from anthony and also <hes>. Let's see this is <hes> he gave. There's a link to an article for mental floss. Dot com was enjoy reading their stuff and he says and you drones are problematic all the best of the best crew through anthony s in west caldwell new jersey and he <hes> this link to mental floss magazine mental floss dot com a refers to to <hes> in nineteen fifty-nine the u._s. Postal service attempted to deliver mail via missile for missile if he prefers yes s. fear from if you're british right is that the way they would say missile in the late nineteen fifties of future was up in the air. <hes> the space race was okay in the late nineteen fifties. The future was up in the air excellent. The space race was just getting started and the u._s. Military was working on missiles that could reach around the world and even to the moon the u._s. Government didn't just see new flight capabilities military priorities though it also thought that the abused carry mail as we recently learned from today. I found out yes. The postal service wants tried sending letters by missile mail in june nineteen fifty-nine the u._s. Navy sent three thousand letters. Here's on a guided missile toward a navy naval auxiliary air station mayport florida launched from the u._s._s. barbaro a submarine that was stationed one hundred miles off the us coast in international waters the thirty six foot regulus one missile made it to mayport in twenty two minutes whereas fast asked that is pay fast held to metal containers that was supposed to be the missiles warhead chamber the letters onboard were copies of a letter from postmaster general arthur summerfield to then president eisenhower vice president richard nixon individual representatives of congress members of the supreme court the crew of the barbaro and and more the letters carried regular mail stamps not even airmail as the a. p. story that day noted okay turns turns out. There were soaking wet because they were a submarine. I mean come on now. I'm just going to marry. The postal service heralded it. As the first successful delivery of mail by missile there had been previous attempts like a swatted nineteen thirty six delivery on a rocket powered playing across a lake between new york and new jersey despite several attempts that one never fully made it <hes> made a successful delivery but delivery quote unquote was a bit of an overstatement. Most of those letters had to be sent by regular mail service at a post office in nearby jacksonville since the three thousand recipients weren't sitting around the naval base in florida waiting for their letter well why not i don't know i mean come on. It's going to be here on this day. You're going to have to go pick it up. You watch out for the incoming missile. They should have known. I mean if they had known that a missile was bringing their mail. They may have actually shown up. I would have asked me my mail. I made even like nope. I got a postcard coming today going to have to go down to the naval station it will be. Let's see now that we can now that we know we can do it. Summerfield filled told the press we plan a series of discussions to determine the practical extent to which the method can be used and under what conditions it never did become practical as we now now now summerfield success successor. J edward day killed the program pointing out that letter sent from the u._s. Barbaro ended up taking some eight days is to reach their intended recipients. Not exactly rocket speed <hes> anyway so it goes on to talk a little bit more about that yeah yeah well. That's interesting. I have no idea that there was a point at which they were considering sending the mail air mail but missile nail rocket mail rotman eh rocket l. donna nano okay <hes> tim sent us. I'm not tim jim jim malloy this little bit. I'm wearing my <hes> year crosses uh-huh ha. I can always tell a vision range in. I can see there's riding. Do you hear that going on in the background right now. It is absolutely just coming down cats and dogs. They're pouring thunder lightning all kinds of waned. Yeah that's saga. That microphone is yeah. It is like so he's only six fifty two. It should still be daylight for another hour so it is pitch black outside right now. It's impressive to hear that's what a dynamic microphone a good dynamic migrant microphone does for you because we can't hear a thing except little boys little soundproof box right here yeah all right. We'll be safe hunker down pursue the wall collapsing on rain and everything else tree branch. Call somebody just call someone. It's fine now. You might wanna head over to this address. Go check it out. She may or may not be live. Okay item ten from jim. Just a navigator also the producer <hes> he says here is a one drive linked to a two minute feedback concerning the b a e one forty six and navigators. He says as usual feel free to use it all part of nut part or none of this audio file <hes> i had a conversation with captain nick in which i mentioned podcast about f four's that i thought he might be interested in that was the fighter pilot podcast and here's a link to that what's the guy's name nello jello yellow yellow nilo the guy that doesn't let her pilot august. The one that he's referring to isn't it. Yes servers listen to like a episode. I think dame's like jello or okay. Somebody in the chat room will though i'm sure jen probably <hes> anyway <hes> so we have a link to that <hes> jello. Thank you glenn dang being a._b. Community karst yes our right. <hes> we'll put that lincoln the show notes for nick and let's play the feedback that jim just navigator senan howdy a._p._g._a. E._p._g. cockpit crew in listeners. This is jim just to navigate her in texas. I wanted to thank the p._g. Cockpit crew in everyone who showed up at the oshkosh gathers that we had it was really a lot of fun to put so many faces to voices and meet so many new people from all over the world old single out <hes> colonel jeff who taught me a whole lot about the f fifteen e e that i didn't know sounds like a really cool airplane. I i have a tattoo feedback for a p._g. Three eighty six. I believe it was where we talked about the b. One forty six while i was is an upper hafford in england in the late eighty s there was a a one forty-six accident. A member of the british royal family was flying in what i think was a one forty-six belong to number thirty two squadron in ran off the end of the runway. There are many reasons why an airplane might run off the end of the runway anyway of course but the problem here was obvious there was a navigator on board so obviously it was the navigators fault fault that the royal family member pilot ran his airplane off the end of the runway. Obviously the the inquiry took more than five minutes to look around point to the poor navigator and say obviously his fault so some things are international. I have another similar story about a navigator who was blamed for not dying in an airplane. I'll save that one for another feedback later anyway again. Thank you for everybody who who showed up at oshkosh and milled milled around the the a._p. Luxury bus and all the people especially the a._p. J. crew who put all that together. <hes> thank you very much look forward to listening listing more. This is jim in texas a gem. It was our pleasure. It was a blast literally an osh blast nash blast yeah it was great seeing new gym at the <hes> at the show and visiting the the g. mobile palace <hes> ooh yeah yeah. It's about <hes> yeah. Obviously that was that it was a navigator is fault for that incident cleaner. Come on goes without saying and let's see look forward to the next or the <hes>. What did you say the <hes> other instance at least that he could think of where things were blamed on the navigator when clearly in his opinion theme okay <hes> moving onto item eleven which believe it or not is the last item in our current show folder. I i do have some extra stuff here and there <hes> that we can use if we want to. We may want to disseminate it <hes> early bente. We'll talk about that in a second <hes> but this is from robert and he says he's checking in from l._g._b._t. With long beach airport and he said record this quick video for your guys for you guys at unique retro l._g._b._t. Yesterday <hes> the reason why says retro because they still believe it or not don't have what do you call the jet ways and stuff the jeff bridges yeah still have stairs yeah yeah and the weather's usually great so it doesn't matter if you walk outside a little bit not like albany new york where they had air stairs for many many years including in the middle of blizzards. How's the weather in albany. In in january. I saw old ladies getting blown off the air stairs into the into the taxiways. Thank we haven't seen these. I don't know where they went anyway. <hes> back to <hes> roberts <hes> feedback. I didn't make it to the mad dog factory nearby right by that has been turned into a mercedes-benz plant but up the crew as well and <hes> soldiers play a quick <hes> snip oh. I thought i got some audio from this missing. What happens if i press a button. Nothing hang on may p._g. Crew and <hes> check with you guys. Try to stop by the mad madder birthplace here a long beach down here in beautiful california <hes> but i hope all is well <hes> <hes> see chicken with episode or too lightly but <hes> oh you guys were at oshkosh that's right so thanks for the updates up there and the about a week and a half and sunny california and <hes> maybe eight point two percent chance of rain will see out here thus catch up with you guys soon. Thanks bye okay. We'll put that link to his facebook video in the show notes. If you wanna see the the beautiful background he has the he's. He's framed it pretty well so you can see the long beach airport tower behind him beautiful blue skies and and i'm sure non humid air <hes> and that was not far at all from where i grew up. Basically i was actually mourn in long beach. I grew <hes> couple of years in lakewood which is very close to the long beach airport and los alamitos which is also very close to the long beach airport <hes>. I'm so glad you had a good trip there <hes> roberts thanks for sending that in and let me see here. How's it. How's it going out there. Purpose stunned dark still very loud and <hes> very radi and wendy. Oh okay well. We can end the show if if you'd like are we got me <hes> find afteh okay. Here's a good one four heavy their hangar one and also florida american airlines places united ninety humid service detail wants cleanups on here. We'll be ready to go see. This is awesome nice about forty minutes. An average tacky sometimes take off the air at five hours. Sir say rice found the only way out of the southeast at seven houses surly partly cloudy skies fifty five degrees. Yes i know mostly. You're gonna wanna relaxed also his k._f._c. This is only in house <music> absolutely very last. It wasn't just one thing is in west virginia. The problem is when anyway. I hear it's funny. Take notice everybody's trying to trying to transmit as well and all you hear is like the critically periodically yes i did here that has actually shook with that one. I was gonna say if we can hear it through that microphone. That's how how it's stored. I hope that there are no tornadoes <hes> avenue wow yeah that was impressive. Yeah and i'm not talking about the p._a. On ground control at l._a._x. No no no. I mean that was also impressed. It was very nice and it was interesting. He kind of let go of the button for a second and i think that most everybody thought oh thank goodness. He's realized that he has trent no he was. It's going to take a couple of air and let's continue with this. It's going to be best ground controller. Oh my god because you can imagine trying to work to do los angeles. International airport is busy place and she's trying to keep everything moving and everything else and basically he's blocking everything. Everybody's got stop like you said though not the first time at the last time a nut last time it would probably happen to any of us either nope. I'm not gonna. I'm not gonna shake my finger at that guy. Do have you done it. I'm not gonna say i've i've done it on a <hes> in-flight frequency like a center frequency which is not doesn't have the same implications right so not not as much going on a time critical wise <hes> as is on ground around control frequency at a major international airport <hes> so i have not done that yet. Yes yeah <hes> and <hes> let's see i'm looking at maybe despite what was this one here <hes> now say that one for next another show this is kind of interesting also at los angeles international airport as the last few times three miles john nine four nine one four o'clock. Let's amount of northbound one thousand two hundred six. I know <music> us. Eleven hundred seats three miles east of elliott's air airforce suzy heirs ask three miles houston l._a._x. Here's how alhassan late us especially senile and see three zero six one five t five. Just please sixteen. Are you on the call. All right. We just had a violators sounds awesome near mid air. That's <music> silence to force <hes> he's. He's he's coming coming back to nine. Traffic alert trying to twelve o'clock three miles southbound indicates one thousand three hundred type unknown. It doesn't transponder there. Nobody is talking about crafts including the traffic concerned. We gotta say says across all southbound two nine. Excuse us trying to actually start. He's amy's floors other right now right behind him on a one mile filed title to four. We think it might be a house. That's worth talking on air for right now. Good okay. Oh dryden. Stop it right there. So how three mile final final thousand feet <hes> do that math three to one it sounds to me like which is a standard that slide pout city of the glide path exactly i mean that'd be like right on three two one glide path where this guy <hes> obviously lost obviously understanding that he is being here in. Let's just make a little turnaround. We'll go back again and take a look at the airport here and <hes> to four is that those are the runways on the northern side of l._a. So he's on the northern finals in hawthorne is south east of the <hes> of the two fives pretty close to the los angeles international airport actually and so he actually in basically later in this recording it talks about the fact that they think that he finally made it to hawthorn in landed and if that's the case that means he went right through all the finals at l._a._x. And how they it didn't have a mid air there. I have no idea but terrifying as the only information i could find about this and whether it was a helicopter or whatever kind of airplane that does did they say at one point and it sounds like he was circling back around to actually like be in the way of an aircraft well. I don't think he was intentionally. Stages meanders flying around. There's been a runway here somewhere. Where's that where's that in and out burger. Everyone talks think down here. He wasn't far from that. Actually no no i know he was on the north side of the two forests. That's exactly where you have a nice view of that. Whatever kind of vehicle it was <hes> helicopter fixed-wing anyway. Just i thought that <hes> that was interesting as well. Sometimes i like to <hes> kind of check out live a._t._c. and they'll have interesting record interesting recordings and those were both <hes> on that <hes> bulletin board so. I thought that i could throw them in there just in case we needed to talk about something now. I think those are interesting yeah so check out live a._t._c. Dot net a lot of the audio that we get <hes> air-to-air or air-to-ground. <hes> audio is from that site and make a great app. Have you ever used it while you're traveling are used it. Yesterday was driving is so so this thunderstorm on this going on out here. This has been kind of the this is the typical summer end of summer south either these late afternoon thunderstorms where things are just kind of crazy and i was going back into the art actually come home earliest rate because thursdays my early day driving back into the city to meet up with friends in the evening and dan kind of stop and go traffic going back into charlotte time of day too <hes> but as you're driving north is seventy seven they were landing aircraft to the north sea getting nice view of airplanes coming overhead on final and the lufthansa eighty three fifty that they fly in flew right over my head knowing you fifty coolers 'cause that's the only one of that type that lands at charlotte currently <hes> and i mean it's usually it's like cr jason stuff landing so it stands out. It's much larger and then you bet you'd have somebody crashing to your garage oregon thunderstorm okay so anyway you can see this thunderstorm like approaching approaching charlotte from the kind of north of west yesterday and i'm watching the flight watching the flight and then isi them going around. Are those like the kind disappeared you know behind the tree line for a second and then coming back around <hes> kind of made a nice dramatic. I wish i had a better camera way to take a picture of it because it was really cool with the storm coming in and turning turning around doesn't understand what was going on because the storm look close at that point but apparently there was some pretty significant wind shear already occurring because of that storm so with the app you can up. I pulled up the tower in control and was able to listen to what was going on and and and get a little more insight great network of people out there volunteers that have these scanners sat up and then as a lot a live feed to live a._t._c. dot net. You can listen to it on your computer or your mobile device enough. You had the app and it's basically real time. I mean there's very small leg right in terms of how how fast gets uploaded. If you're listening to the live feed yes especially handy for you aviation enthusiasts in spotters and of course at various pottery you probably already know about the a._t._c. up but <hes> check it out if you haven't yet and with that i think it's now now time for us to and the show unless you have anything else stuff no nothing else here okay good show we need to end the show before <hes> staffs demise exactly pending doom here. You're tending to <hes> okay <hes> if if you want to send us feedback there several different ways to do that <hes> one of which is good old e mail feedback feedback airline pilot guy dot com where you can send us text expe- back or do like many of our community members do send audio and you can attach it to the email address feedback at airline pilot guy dot com and speaking of airline pilots dot com great website where we have all kinds of good stuff on there about the crew and the community and merchandise and <hes> the plane tales of and so much more including the a._p. G. library haven't mentioned that an while <hes> librarian tiffany maintains that so if you're looking for a good read that's related to aviation. Please check out the library and as i said many many more things there at the a._p. G <hes> website airline pilot guy dot com and we are also on the social needs fish. We head over to twitter dot com and are handled areas a._p. Crew <hes> you can find our individual twitter. Information also pinned to the very top of that page. We like to <hes> a brief conversations. They're two hundred eighty characters or less. If that's your your thing if you're a little more long winded head over to facebook dot com slash airline pilot guy and again lots of good community interaction <hes> place to share different links the articles and discuss some happenings in the world of aviation and information both of those places but if you're really looking for more of that type of thing a head on over to slack l l l l the timing pillow. Don't e yeah we it's. You're you're on man. It's your segment. Thanks jeff. I don't wanna know p._g. Listeners please join us on our slack teams. Slack is a communication coordination in an sharing platform that works on your mobile laptop or browser on slack. We share news and ideas who suggest episode in plain tales topics we plan events and beat ups ups to get into the slack team. Please email me at slack at airline pilots dot com. That's s. l. a. c. k. sierra lima alpha charlie kilo at airline pilot guide dot com or semi tweet with your preferred email address to the well and i'll send you an invitation. That's l l spell hotel india one one one echo one and see you in slap us dollars okay. Thanks so al her shit replace that i'm sure yeah and that's about it for this week's show thanks everybody for listening a big shout out to our producer liz who's back from her <hes> couple of week vacation we missed you and thanks for being back full-time for us and and thank you to all of those who showed up to listen watch the show live and hang out in our chat room and that's about it so until next time wishing you clear skies limited visibility in tailwinds take care and goblins cheers. Y'all sky talk day <music> stay. It's to be such a good good deal. I started a._p. It opened doors for them to this city <music> guy for brands. 'cause i'm always by august. Don't have the time and dan this sold play. Just fine the guy eh yeah <music>.

maine portland jeff dr steph arkansas russia new york us hawaii tennessee charleston west virginia moscow vladimir putin kansas mississippi south carolina dana president
NPR News: 06-01-2019 6AM ET

NPR News Now

04:55 min | 2 years ago

NPR News: 06-01-2019 6AM ET

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Dulles International Airport with the highest on time takeoff percentage of any airport on the east coast. I a d means I'm already departing more at fly Dulles dot com slash fast. Live from NPR news in Washington on trial. Snyder police are not speculating on a motive for yesterday's mass shooting at a public utility center in Virginia Beach impure, Serra, mccamman, reports a gunman killed at least twelve people and injured several others before dying in a shootout. With police officers governor Ralph Northerns that this is a horrific day for the Commonwealth of Virginia, and expressed his deepest condolences and prayers for the families of those who left home and will not return. SE put along with him were a local congresswoman, Elaine, Luria, and the city's mayor and police chief, the police chief says now a dozen victims in this mass shooting. In addition to the shooter who was killed by police during an exchange of fire that he described as a long gun battle between the shooter and officers. Chief Jim Cervera said, quote, I have a number of officers who are processing through what could best be described as a war zone. Severe describes the suspect as disgruntled. He says the thirties, know who he is. But are not ready to name him publicly, and even then will only do so once surveyor says a focus now should be on the dignity and respect for the victims and their families. President Trump weighing in on the political crisis in Britain ahead of his state, visit their next week, the BBC's Jessica Parker reports at Trump has told a British newspaper his preferences in the race to lead the conservative party, a characteristic, defiance of diplomatic convention. President Trump has waited right into the debate about who should succeed to resume as prime minister in an interview with the sun. He says that the former foreign secretary Boris Johnson would be excellent that he is a good guy and a talented person. He will say says he likes another contender Jeremy hunt, but he's less warm about Michael gov, suggesting that the environment secretary was wrong to apparently, describe the president's approach to Iran. Ah sabre-rattling to Missouri now where the state's sole remaining clinic that provides. Abortion will remain open, for now the Saint Louis Planned Parenthood clinics license had been set to expire midnight, but a Saint Louis publicradio Sarah phantom reports, a Circuit, Judge has granted a temporary restraining order. That keeps it in place state didn't for new, the clinics annual license after several physicians who worked there declined to be interviewed as part of a state inspection, planned Parenthood's, lawyers say the physician feared prosecution and estate with restrictive abortion laws. The clinic's medical director David Eisenberg says in granting this motion the court sent the state a message that abortion is legal and access is necessary, your department of health and senior services is supposed to promote and protect the hell of Missouri's forcing them to leave the state for routine care is the exact opposite of that mission. The judge will consider planned Parenthood's request for a preliminary injunction next week for NPR news. I'm Sarah phantom in Saint Louis, and you're listening to NPR news. Lawmakers in the West Virginia Senate are set to consider a long sweeping and controversial education, Bill today. They missed it of West Virginia, public broadcasting reports teachers and other school employees are planning to be at the state capital in Charleston to rally against the proposal, the Republican led West Virginia, Senate is hoping to quickly pass a one hundred and forty four page Bill that would overhaul the state's public education system, a draft version of the measure ties teacher and service personnel, pay raises to charter schools, the withholding of pay during a strike in a change in how layoffs would be considered West Virginia educators, went on a two day strike earlier this year, they successfully rallied against Bill with many of the same provisions with classes now out for the summer union leaders say they will be back again to try to stop what they call tax on public education, US education secretary Betsy DeVos tweeted Friday morning, her support of Republican lawmakers and their push for school choice proposals like charter schools. For NPR news. I'm Dave missed each in Charleston West Virginia acting Defense Secretary, Patrick Shanahan, speaking out on China Shanahan has told an annual security conference in Singapore this weekend at the US will no longer tiptoe around Chinese behavior. In Asia, the speech was Shanahan's, first major once taking over at the Pentagon, January pope Francis in Romania today, tens of thousands on hand as he visited one of the country's most famous shrines on the second day of his trip. It's been raining in Romania, the bad weather forced supposed to change his travel plans, instead of taking a helicopter to the shrine and Transylvania the pope had to take a three hour car trips to the mountains to get there. I'm Dr Snyder NPR news.

NPR secretary West Virginia President Trump NPR Charleston West Virginia Dr Snyder Sarah phantom Dulles International Airport president Bill Saint Louis Planned Parenthood Missouri Virginia Beach Virginia Patrick Shanahan Romania Washington US
NPR News: 04-18-2020 5AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 04-18-2020 5AM ET

"Live from NPR news Washington on Giles. Snyder vice president pence is traveling today to give the commencement speech to the US Air Force Academy's Class of Twenty Twenty and Franko or Donas. Reports CORONA VIRUS. Crisis has the vice president and the school taking precautions. President Pence was set to deliver the graduation speech via video message but announced earlier this week that he would instead travel to Colorado Springs to deliver his remarks in person. They Academy is taking several measures to protect graduates. The ceremony will not be open to the public and friends and family will also not be able to attend the US Air Force. Aerial Demonstration squadron known as the thunderbirds will fly over the ceremony per tradition. When cadets throw their hats in the air the ceremony will also be live streamed in order for families and friends to view the closed. Evatt president trump says he also plans to watch the livestream. Franko or Donas. Npr news the White House. President trump is defending his support of protests in several states. Against stay at home orders. He spoke at the daily Corona virus briefing after tweeting at three states led by Democratic Governors. Should be in his words. Liberated health experts say the rule should not be lifted. Until there's enough testing in place. Tom Wolfe is the Democrat governor of Pennsylvania. One of the hardest hit states. We all want to get back to where we all WANNA reopened as quickly as possible. The the problem is we also all want to stay safe. Stay safe as we can. So we're trying to steer a course between these two very important challenge we can try to reconcile Republicans control Pennsylvania's legislature would sent the Governor Wolf. A bill this week that would restart the process of reopening. West Virginia Governor. Jim Justice has issued an executive order to test or retest every resident and staff member and every nursing home in the state for the Corona Virus West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Care Lofton reports in his daily virtual press briefing Governor Justice said he continues to see discrepancies in the data from nursing homes and that he is quote sick and tired of it. He said frontline workers in Nursing. Homes deserved all the praise for their good work. But that more stringent testing protocols are needed shaded. We can better serve our most elderly and we've got to do better to do that entire process and what has been done. Thus far comes after several nursing homes across the state announced surges in positive cases including one in the capital Charleston. The testing will be conducted by the State Department of Health and resources with help from the National Guard for NPR news. I'm Carol often in Charleston West Virginia. According to a tally from the Associated Press there have been more than sixty nine hundred deaths in nursing homes and long term CARE FACILITIES. Nationwide this is. Npr News at least two states Florida and taxes or taking steps toward easing corona virus restrictions in Florida. The governor says municipalities can reopen beaches in parks. If they can do so safely Beach Mayor Charlie lay them says Duval. County beaches will reopen twice a day for exercise. Not for crowds were sunbathing. We're looking to keep people from just accumulating at they WANNA come out and exercise. That's great there'd been a couple of counties in Florida and South Florida and Volusia County and Brevard county operated under similar operating circumstances. And I thought great so. We're hoping to do the same thing here as well. The UN Children's agency is warning that measures to slow the spread of the krona virus devastating. The lives of millions of children around the world. Lisa Shlein reports from two Neva. Eunice F- Reports one and a half billion children aren't going to school. Because of covert nineteen as a consequence more than three hundred sixty million children are missing out on. What for many is their only meal of the day. The author of the report Laurence Chandy says lifesaving immunization campaigns also have been put on hold that will set back the global campaign and polio. By years I suspect measles there are twenty countries. We tend to run the world of put on hold. A measles. Campaigns UNICEF warns most child protection services around the world have been shut down putting children at great risk of domestic violence and other forms of abuse and exploitation for NPR news. I'm Lisa Shlein in Geneva. Joyal Snyder in Washington.

NPR Governor Justice US Air Force Academy President Pence trump vice president president Joyal Snyder Franko Florida Donas Washington Charleston West Virginia Democratic Governors Pennsylvania Twenty Twenty US Air Force West Virginia NPR Lisa Shlein
Episode #1368: The New Phil Hendrie Show

The World of Phil Hendrie

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Episode #1368: The New Phil Hendrie Show

"The world famous Phil Emery show back from the city of San Francisco, really bad. But yesterday, we had an encore show. Because of certain website work that was being done. Yes. We were talking to our Dev says they say what does that developer? We've got a start date for our new design for a website this this is drinking jungle. Yeah. This is Drake jungle from the mix tape if you're reading this. Then it's too late. I guess it's too late. Yeah. It's been too. Guy. So we have today guy Barton. And we also have Reverend Dave Casteran who talk trick. We didn't guy Barton. It'd be talking about. Obama vetoing something that the Senate passed. I don't know what it. It's gonna go on about how baba his veto shutdown. Just you know, ream the new Republican controlled Senate. I don't well. I say good for. Right. And then we also have. Yeah. Kurt excuse me. Dave Castellini deep Kesri talks about being gay. What do you mean? He's gonna talk about being gay. Closet. He's never come out and said, he's gay. So I'll say that. Okay. Three guesses film less. What is this stuff with curriculum? I don't wanna talk about Obama or Republicans. Apparently Queanbeyan are gonna go on about how you know. The Republicans were able to override a veto as so bullshit. Watch your language pays you know. What I'm really sorry general that you've got hoes got host Republican Senate wasn't able to override and Obama veto all what is with you. The old. I should you sound like a formal crossed with a river beast crossed. Watching lady. Hey, now, that's everything the two you guys are going to get into it. Every watch me. Give you all you need. Thank you. See what you do when you see something like that this thing over your hair. But. All right. Thank you. And so just another days, folks. Here's the old radio studio. Yeah. Yeah. Sure. You're. I am. Yeah. All right. So welcome to the show. Thank you, Drake. Bob's got the traffic force here this. Well, just another day out there in the neighborhood. Bob Woodson looking like got. Bowel got cars out there. I'll tell you something upside down man upside down lender band, if you're gonna make them to take off your pants going downtown because here the white saddle free freeways invisible man over there is walking along the side of the road to get hit by a car over a real affront down freeway the frosty freely clubs down free win frosty. Heidi and Frank this big in traffic. The world famous still every show frail Pacific will be right back. Probably. Every day. More and more people are coming to jurors purse, perspiration, free res res- reb resulution doing good Jerry's perspiration Frey. Jerry's perspiration free resolution. This guy couldn't talk five days ago today. He's getting up on those bigger words. Yes, at Dr Cleveland's we can help you recover from any kind of hangover. It doesn't matter. What you've been drinking? Choontu juries, perspiration tree. Very good. Yes. Dr Cleveland's hangover cures. Faye? Nice say. Anyway, go every show I got on with the on the line here with this David Chester any Reverend David chance to who's been for a long time, a contributor to our show, Reverend Castellini, you know, I guess today. We woke up to the news that Alabama has has decided that same sex marriage is still not to be, you know, I guess is is not to be trusted is not to be legal. So Reverend David Casteran joins us from the cast rainy youth cavalcade which is coming to baby a town near you, Reverend Castorina. How are you? Good morning, Phil. So this is a statement of of this is a statement of states rights, or or whatever. But I'm not gonna ask you about that. I wanna ask you. I how on this is playing with your youth ministry, and I don't wanna get too heavy with the same sex marriage. And you know, it's it's it playing Phil very very well. You know, we don't have any problem with the gay people. We do have a problem with gay marriage. But I think that the Castellini used cavalcade deals with it in an original way open myself up to every kind of experience, and I go straight into any bad house. Now castrating if I wanted to just finish a point. But I wanted to ask you Evan cast three. I could finish the point Phil. Okay. That's what I'd like to do Margaret because I know you're gonna jump in here. And you're going to make the claim that I'm gay you're saying that you go in and you you expose yourself temptation, I go into bath. Houses I go into oil rooms what is all room anywhere where there's guys on each other up for wrestling matches. In other words, a weightlifting something like that. I in other words, I don't have any fear of of of of going gay. I I go in and I- Preecha my religious my religious beliefs to anyone who wants to listen. But you are strictly you're limiting yourself to these areas where let's say you were gay. But which I'm not that's what I wanted to get to. And I know when I don't misery. I don't think she has the right. Why don't you just let the Reverend talk? All right, fine. If you want to ignore it. I'm not knowing anything, you know, as well as I do Reverend Kesselring. No, no, I don't I don't know anything. I don't know anything just because I engage in what you think is gay sex in the name of my religious ministry doesn't mean that it is I'm trying to promote a particular religious point of view. And if I am if I'm engaged in see you think in L go ahead, and I'll use the terminology fill when. No, I don't have to if I'm engaged in Felicia. Now, let's be careful the hell is this if I'm engaged in place. It doesn't mean I'm it means that I am teaching religious principle, and I'm simply using I'm using the tools at hand. You're using the tools at hand. So you're gonna you're gonna do it talked about doing a lot. But I didn't say that hold on. So you don't call it gave sex. I don't call gay sick. I tried to tell Margaret this a million times. But she keeps trying to come on your program. Tell me where I'm coming from. I don't like you telling me we're coming from. I know where I'm coming from where you're coming from. Okay. So you know, you're coming from. I think I know what you're coming from you don't know where I'm coming from. You are gay. All right. Then you're Margaret you can call me a lesbian dyke all those thing. Well, how does that feel it doesn't matter? I know. I am. Well, I know who I am what is above you. Because in my belief system and only in my belief system. Going gay is opposed to the natural order things. That's why I'm in favor of the recent rulings that I've heard about but that does not mean. That I consider anyone that goes that when it goes gay to be sub-standard or to be listening human being. Oh, boy, I can't look test. Really people are going to ask you questions. Would you mind calling me Reverend? But that be all right. Reverend people are gonna ask you questions while you're free to that. I'm not afraid of it. I just wanna get something sad here. I'll tell you what Robert Margaret everybody. Go ahead and say what you want to say, Reverend then I think Robert is next up of the question. Question. Have you got a question? No. Then who cares? Go ahead Reverend. All right. Thank you. My name is Reverend Dave Castellini. I had my youth cavalcade coming to the your area. I'm sure very soon. We're gonna be in Ventura California area where the L Pacifico is. We're Mr. Henry and his crew is I'm simply saying that to spread that word of good moral living and the spread the word of a good elevated kind of living with morality and with charity and love I'll go anywhere. And I'll do anything to get that word sprint that doesn't mean. I'm that thing you see people will oftentimes state as they're saying would you if you kill man? Are you a murderer? I'll say it depends on what I kill it. Well, if you just killed a man to spread the word of of of of good religious elevated living, if you if you kill the band to do that with that me to murder, I said that. Might make me wanna crusaders in my you know, 'cause I talked to this Reverend posting who who put that to fill a moral question. Yeah. It was like a said if you murdered a murderer man does is that right? I said it will it depends on what it is. He says what if you murdered a man this bread, the the spiritual word, I well that might make me a one of the crusaders. And then he started a home the song that I recognize. And I said what is that? He said he started home in his own said do do do do do its own. Well, it was a song. Call way back home that was done by jazz group called the crusaders. I said are you telling me that I'm a jazz? He said, no. But he said I wanted to like a little bit of what I'm about to lay on you, which is the following thing. You'd be murdering swine dragging Jewish people out of their huts and throwing them into wells. Because that's the crusaders. Did. I said, well, I would I would I wouldn't see what I'm saying. I am confused you with that question. No. But I would I wouldn't do it. I wouldn't do it. If that's what I mean. So he said would you have sex with another man if it meant spreading the word of good religious live. And I said, yes, I what. Yes. I would cause who's that? Who is killing. He said, well, it's killing me. He was making another joke. I said no seriously. I said it's not killing anyone. But it's killing it's just killing the mood. It kills off. The, you know, anybody wants to hang around and listen to what you've got to say it has killed off their interest in you, you have murdered their interest in what you've got to say, and you just turn them away. And I said, well, you know, something that's not in the same thing. I think I'd trust that. I don't know. I I haven't been. Yeah. Let's fine. I don't understand. What thing this guy? Just said not one I really agree with the general, but I have to agree with them. Wait, wait. Wait, wait. Reverend test rainy, you don't have to agree with me. You don't have to understand. I'm saying well, but they have a point you're saying that if you are murdering a guy in the name of high religious principle, that'd make you some kind of a crusader, which essentially is a murderer. And so you wouldn't do that. Correct. I think those crusaders in the middle ages were very violent and very bad people. When he starts humming that song done by the jazz crusaders, which was a banned from the nineteen sixties and seventies. I got rock back on my feet because I said, well, I wouldn't mind being that kind of crusader. He said. Well, you want to eat it. Are you kidding me? You wanna go backstage and mix it up with different races and do dope and shoot dope. I said, no, I said in the name of high religious principle. I would shoot dope. I'd mix with with with blacks admixed with Mexicans and all right. This is getting this is so racist of you. How do you figure that bless? I'm just saying he said would you if you were going to be jazz? Crusader said sure I'd be there. But not a murdering retainer. What I'm saying? You put this guy on the air Henry, and every time you do it makes me really, I just I get itchy with weird bad. I I wanna go nuts. That's probably your pro your problem their general now, I don't have the problem. All right. Here's here's the problem that I got the problem that I got is that you have a obviously, there's a a moral code that. You follow Reverend caster any and that moral code is one that you won't do anything in the name of religion, but you will engage in sex, gay or straight grant guess, and so where does that lead us you mentioning at the beginning. Hold on for buddy won't kill what about the ten commandments. I absolutely adhere to the ten commandments thou shalt not kill shat. Not you know, maimed out shout. Thou shalt not maim the ten commandments are Piccione. Well, no, not necessarily, you know, you don't know the kind of pretrial I believe in nut. But you don't know traditional. No, very, very nontraditional. You kidding? So I walk into a room full of oil up, man. You wanna know if I'm a traditional preacher? That is pretty funny. Hold on for minute. Hey shorty. Here's a guy radio on polka new. Okay. Reverend. I don't have the time for this sort of back and forth. We're talking with Reverend David Castellini here on the world famous fill in reshow gonna take a break and be right back with more as he discusses with us his views on gay sex, and how they have more and how they have changed and how they have. And this is very much in the news today because of the the ruling in Alabama, you know, Alabama, they still say that you can't get married. It's the latest. Thank you very much. That's the latest you still can't get married in Alabama. If you're. In this moment, bloody creature poster girl Phil Hendrie show filling. Showed. The world famous Phil Hendrie show. I'm Margaret Ray this then is. What's her name Maria brief? This than forget nor name. You need to know. My name. Those other types all signs of things called up my neck this when I drink too much to delirium trims, and that's when I start shaking and seeing and stuff, Dr Cleveland's hangover cures. Remember, eight eight eight five five. Hill was that. They pay them time though. So. Kester anywhere this here. Just a couple of more minutes. David. I wanna get down to the specifics here because before your your youth cavalcade comes into town. So what are we talking about here? When you say in front of a what difference is it make if this guy wants to walk into a room full of guys that are flexing and posing for photographs, you know, for the governor gay and you want to do what all we do. If you wanna make a big thing out of this. Go ahead and on just hang all. I'm telling you is it doesn't matter. I'll go in I've gone into onto the sense of of filled feature mostly men having sex with each other gone onto photographic sets. Of magazine shoots have been into weightlifting competitions gone onto you know, guys are getting they're getting Brazilian away. It doesn't make any difference. I'm not gay, and I don't engage. Engage ex. Didn't you say that you did I fed that I I would. Depending upon the you know, what I think you gotta go back to the drawing board on this one Reverend castrating because I noticed since the last time you came on this show. I think you do because the last time you came on the show with his horse done. You were you were pitching something along the lines of von? No, no, no, I'm straight. But you know, if I have to have now, you're telling me that. No, you don't know. I'm saying I will. But I most of the time. I don't. Okay. Well, thanks a lot. Oh, so you think I'm Phil. You know, this is okay. Thanks a lot. This is this is wrong. I think you I think you've underestimated me, I think. All right. How Henry this that you book that interview? I got no idea what this guy is trying to what's with that guy. Anyway, I know you wanna come on here and talk about hat doesn't make any difference about Alabama same sex marriage. Does he go out sitting for in rueful against getting oiled up doesn't make a difference? Yeah. Oh, bull crap. I we're going to be right back. We got guy bardy guy Barton and Kurt qu. Eighty coming up next here on the world fans. Phil Emery show live from West Virginia. They're Charleston West Virginia on befuddling, I guess on some kind of Obama veto. Yes. Obama veto something of the Senate tried to override a veto that was that on the Keystone Pipeline and they've able Yotam so what? Kurt quaint guy button for. This show is almost not worth doing today. Man bullshit. The only thing good about this show is Harry's razors and blades and stuff. Get a load of the plug. Another one drink. Boy, we're really pushing this out early. Called jungle this. Dr Cleveland hangover cures. We'll try this one more time when I sit down and I drink a beer, and I drink it fast. I don't get drunk. Well, maybe a little bit. I can drink six or seven. But some of you may some you may get a hangover come to Dr Cleveland's for the hangover cure. What is it speed? Hey did. Would have thinks. Is everything? From the jungle. I'd say somebody else. Queenie and guy Barton from Charleston West Virginia from the state how or right across the street from the state house there at roses, which is a favorite watering hole. I think of the guys and certainly happy to have you guys with us, Kurt and guy and tell us how you feel who do we got here Kurt? Queenie bill. You know with us. This was not going to be anything more complicated and just discussed that veto, right? Feel that we wanted us Obama's because of the Senate being controlled by Republican. Okay. So what has significant isn't that the Republican Senate can't override and Obama veto? I think is significant they said they gonna come in and stampeding on Obama and stock kicking asked him to veto this Keystone Pipeline come up. They can't override that. What's happening here is this is the first maybe not a first pissed, but a first passed Obama beat, oh, you know, dried, and the fact that we haven't been on your program for a while. We won't come in. You I'll roses here. Having gobble don't. That's that's just wanna say a load it. So you guys don't have much to talk about either had Reverend Castorina. No, no, no feel lot got elected talk about Phil. But let me ask you something instead of talking about a bunch of horse dung having to do with Obama or the Senate. What have you guys been doing? Not much. You know, we actually I've not been in in. Well, we lost a lab Basel. Tell lost got booted out. You guys aren't in the state Senate. God hold on. You know, we still commenting. You guys have been telling us that you were in the state Senate wasn't they we got voted I last election known. So we don't have jobs anymore. What's the put a token to you guys? Pay the porta talking to me, and I don't know about politics country. Yeah. I don't know about politics country gem, you probably know about diving tank blown up Avia Tang that king via Tang. You know what I'm saying? And if you're gonna start questioning my expertise, not quite you experts at all, but we had a expert in the world of politics. We talk a lot about politics everything on your program in a while. I wanna tell you about all what we've been up to and everything. All right. Well, so you guys are not in the West Virginia state Senate any longer just hanging out there at Rose's having yourselves those apple cobblers, gobble. And what is this double the couple's back to the table by girl with big breasts? This is so childish, not childish at all. All right. So tell me why I'm talking to you guys go where we went on politics that he'll I don't know. Now, you now you're pissed all you know, pissed them off you guys lost the election. You're not even in politics any longer you come on here. Telling me about Obama vetoing something in a Senate sucks or whatever. Significant don't you may be? But I'm not really all that much interest in it right now. I just had another on here Reverend three who you know, what's going on. He's confused. The guys I've ever heard sounds like somebody hit him with a frying pan before he came on the air. He's talking about whether he's in a gay sex. He's not in a gay sex engaging gay sex. No, he won't he doesn't believe in same sex marriage Matisse, still loves everybody. He straight. You know that guy been deep wreck from way back. Hold on Kurt's upset. What's wrong? About Dade Cathrine. About that queer wins on it. I didn't mean to say quip, you know, what sounds to me like, you could probably sit down, and maybe you could use a little bit of Dr Cleveland's hangover cure, some neither one of you guys making a sense anymore than Reverend Castellini. What we lost election him with union? Stuck here? Maybe I'll find my way to Washington DC eventually on the on on your program talking about the. Veto the Senate. You don't wanna talk about that? Now. I don't give a shit to be honest with you, what do you give shit about neither one of you guys? How about that go win election and get back into the West Virginia state house and tell me what's going on there. That might be interesting. Yeah. Right. You wanna find out how we're going to bulldoze checks on the side of a hill. You know, I never could understand what you took those guys will it was a very interesting point of view. It's the democratic or the liberal point of view from the West Virginia state capitol. That's fine. I don't even mind that they're not in politics any longer. What I do mind is them coming on here with some bull crap idea of the coming on with some trumped up topic about Obama veto and only want to do is talk about Rosie there with the big breasts, and the gobble what is that gobble? Did lady comes at table and gotta feed you a peach cobbler, never the real big gobble. Yeah. They give it a new name. They call it. The gobble if you order it up, and you get one of those those big boob wenches the big boot wenches something. Why did I you talk about wasting your time? Why did I waste my time this morning while I'm awfully sorry. Margaret, you know, once to have Frank coming pick you up, and what does that being pick you up? I think, you know, click. Outta here. What side here and a couple of Joe a hot Cup of Joe I haven't had one since the ship left. Yeah. And you don't want talking about you. And you're talking about the ship the it's an old phrase from fans of Iwojima. Okay. No. It doesn't mean. What you anyway, folks. Thank you very much for being a part of this whatever this was this morning. God almighty, what is happening here with you know, we've been so busy on this on this here show getting ourselves set to launch the new look of the website that I don't think we've been paying much attention to a lot of these these fools that we've had on the air here that Castellini look, Dave, it's okay to be gay, man. I don't give a damn what Alabama. Thanks, probably ought to be a bunch of over one. It's okay to begin. No matter what Al bam offense. I like that. Okay. Great. Well, we'll see we can't have that one. I tell you what we'll do is. We'll see we can't get that one copyrighted and will use it as some kind of a slogan from. For for someone somewhere. All right. Oh, I know what I wanted to mention I haven't mentioned it. We should mention of course on March. The twelfth will be at the Irvine improv. The Irvine improv for the world of Phil Hendrie the twelfth get your tickets. You folks in Orange County. Don't don't be shy. Make sure we see you guys out there boards twelve for the world of Phil Henry at the Irvine improv. We do six different character seines, and they're all just uproariously side-splitting -ly, wet your pants leaving all kinds of men, but you'll feel good. You'll laugh what's Mel too good guy. But you'll laugh so join us for that won't chew at the Irvine. Improv? Don't forget I backstage pass the world famous. Fill Henry show is at Phil Emery ratio dot com. So you gotta do is go to our website pick up a backstage pass. You can get the all access. You get to audio only. You can get a monthly get six munching yet here, but brother with close to twenty thousand hours of full radio shows all kinds of video archives. It is well worth breads. So we'll see their Irvine on March the twelfth end as the website fill every show dot com. We'll see you tomorrow with another show another God knows what another spin of the dice another alcohol into the weird ass world that is the world fill Henry's. Thank y'all. Did you get everything you want and nets chose world-famous fill in ratio is executive produced by Phil Henry for reincorporated all rights reserved on the side shown at. Played and the. And then. Now. Wait, no, brakes was crazy. They would never trae computer criminal. Next. Or we could just that said. No hits. I was always passionate layup monsters practice. On a show the number. Smoking. Papa park.

Obama Senate Reverend Castellini Dr Cleveland Kurt qu Alabama Phil Henry Phil Emery Phil guy Barton Margaret Ray crusaders West Virginia Phil Hendrie Reverend Castorina Drake David Castellini Dave Casteran Charleston West Virginia Reverend Kesselring
#252 - Indian Ocean Journeys

This Week in Travel

1:15:46 hr | 1 year ago

#252 - Indian Ocean Journeys

"<music> welcome to this weekend travel showed the talks to some of the most interesting notable notable travelers in the world as well as providing useful tips and actionable information now your your hosts Uriarte Chris Christianson in Gen Leo however wanted welcome to another episode of this week and Travel Money Garin coming to you from my mom's basement in Wisconsin where they just had some horrible storms several days of power outages more trees. He's knocked down than I've ever seen before and this is the kind of weather which does not occur in the place where my guest host lives Mr Chris Christianson in California where the weather is always perfect. The people are always beautiful. All the children are above average average. Are we doing sir doing very well. No we just have warm that laugh as usual is also from the place where the weather never changes as the people ever change Jen Leo. How're you doing great doing great? I would love to see you on an episode of Lake Wilbur Guy Gary true story I kind of was back in the nineties. My company was hired. This is in the earlier Lee early early days of the Internet to do a thing for garrison Keeler show <hes> big a-hole really massive jerk recently yeah yeah and I won't tell you this people wouldn't believe me and then all the stuff came out. I was like I told you <hes> you know. We've been doing this show now for ten years. We've done a quarter of a thousand episodes trying to put that in terms that sound impressive we <hes> we make excuses for the fact that you did the intro I with the microphone on Mute since the guy who didn't record it when I was in some cave remind we haven't changed the format of this show very much at all in ten years like we we've got the same people we've got the same format same everything we don't sound effects no but <hes> we're now changing it up a little. We're GONNA add another guest because we haven't been recording much. It's always because of our schedule right. It's hard getting all three of us together at the same time so we're adding a fourth person and you may know this person from the Internet because he's a longtime digital native in a podcast stor podcast is inappropriate travel- traveler. Please welcome Spud Hilton another blogger another podcast or added to the show <hes> someone that can help us in the the big fight against print media. Thanks a lot and another out media sure <hes> actually we just did a <hes> an episode of the inappropriate traveler when we were in Boston it was great had gary on it will. I'm going to have to do some editing because it was by far are twice as long as any of the other podcasts I had done and that was in part because of having a guest host Tasha hacker who was was pretty great too but Gary because his accidentally appropriate well no never never verged on appropriate. That's for sure <hes> but yeah no Gary Gary's definitely a good interview for podcasts. I'm sure you know yeah as we mentioned on the last episode of the show someone actually wrote Chris asking where they can find more gary episodes of the amateur traveler never hear the end of that the only thing I should say before we introduced this. Week's guest is the one change we've made in the show and I don't want us to forget. We used to have a fourth co host in the very first episodes of the show who wasn't able to continue on with us <hes> so we shouldn't forget Chris Elliott because he was it was a guest host to worry was a co host on the show. I think like Jan.. He didn't know originally when he was being asked that he was being asked to be co host and just really didn't have the time commitment. Jen also didn't know she was being asked to be a more than a guest for one week. I think I think when we started the show so ten Chris Chris Elliott is like the Pete Best of we can travel for those of you don't keep best as he was the Beatles Drummer before Ringo who actually became a millionaire from the Beatles recordings when they re issued a lot of their stuff that they did in Hamburg enough money off the royalties to actually become a millionaire from the Beatles else but wait does that make me the Stuart Sutcliffe of <hes> of this weekend travel. No you're definitely Billy Preston Billy Preston. I will take Billy Preston that is AH. That's a huge compliment. Let's get onto things our guest. This week is a real journalist. A real writer is new book monsoon postcards Indian Ocean Journey. Please welcome David h mold. Are we doing sir. I'm doing fine. I'm here in Charleston West Virginia. It's probably not as almost California but <hes> pretty Nice Day here. I mean there's I travel to places like India. People say must be hot for your here but I say now. It's pretty much like it is at home. Thanks Oh yeah. We've got a good West Virginia late July heavily Humid Day so do you live in West Virginia Limit West Virginia. Now I mean I'm nothing West Virginia native as you can probably tell from the accent. Actually my story on this is I'm from this isolated mounted community where the accent is not change since Elizabethan Times that they believe what boy with a joke. Oh I say or just watch too much public television. I'm from the U._K.. Originally that I've been in the states for forty years you did the the different way than Bill Bryson did which was to move from the Midwest Midwest to England and then get a British accent yeah yeah I've been trying to get a good South East Ohio West Virginia Jackson for years but it it it just is working. I'm sorry it it it it it the accident I think my word choices America now but the accent's is not changed as much as I would like actually what I came to the the U._S.. Many years ago <hes> as a student as a Grad student. I have to take a in the other take English proficiency test or get an exemption from the test and so I walk into this Office University of Kansas just be working in Yorkshire and I said last a needs exemption from tests swath of the doom forming student Blackley but now that was you'll carax's anymore but <hes> some kind of some kind of accident sort of hangs around here on kind of difficult to place as many travelers are where are you from is a difficult question fullness so what what drew you to West Virginia of all the places well I was. I have an academic career. They'll hire university ended list in Southeast Ohio and I quote on quote retired. I mean I kind of think of myself. These days I caught myself like an itinerant academic liquor. I kind of go with the project saw but I don't have to faculty meetings or teach formal well classes so when I kind of retard I was living out in the country my wife and I I was fed up with the wood burner so I said I wanna go toward urban area but I'm not gonna go to Chicago or D._C.. will or L._A.. So you know we went to <music> Charleston West Virginia which is a nice little city. I've been using the airport here for many years actually because it was <hes> <hes> close to me as Columbus wasn't a lot less hassle so I left to go up to Charleston Geagea Airport cool and people say so. Where are you going to today? I say I'm going to butter may look like I said the code. Is You just put it in your computer. We'll get going here. You know so it's a kind of job way I can sort of whip from wherever I am so you know why don't Chelsea West Virginia where the people are friendly <hes> the the properties cheap you know despite the opioid crisis and all of the other and eh Ev- every other issue we face here when the horrible politics of the road but you know it's it's a good place to live fascinating all right well. Let's get into a few news stories. <hes> I <hes> I wanna I wanNA talk about in you may have seen this in a couple different publications. <hes> as reported on the points guy website is that a company has come up with a new idea for the middle seat in airplanes now as we all know the middle seat sucks <hes> in what this company has any kind of have to see it to understand it. They made the middle seat slightly lower. Maybe like an intra to lower in slightly recessed so it's a little bit back and my first impression of this was this this is stupid and then as I thought about it a little more unlike maybe this is brilliant because when you actually see how like the elbows work and how people can read the the armrest than it actually is kind of make little sense. What are you guys think of this? I'm on this stupid. I'm looking at it. It looks like it's shorter. It looks like the middle lower right so it actually looks like a seat for short people i. I don't know so one of the things I gary. I don't think you mentioned yet is that the aisle seat moves and it kind of covers up the middle seat giving people more room to two board in the to give you a bigger lane in the aisle right so if the window seat person gets in first and then the aisle seat is still smooshed in over the short middle seat. There's more room in the aisle for people to get by load their overhead baggage but I would never want to sit in this seat. See I'm not sure because one of the worst things for me when I ended up in the middle seat is is shoulder room <hes> because what they will do their somebody at the gate who really gets a jollies out of I say that just for you David <hes> out of putting the people with the broadest shoulders all in the same row and if you were just offset a little down a little back a little it would be more comfortable for me on those particular instances. This isn't GonNa work because a lot of a lot of what the story re-involved is claiming in a certain order meaning getting those window people I getting you know eventually pulling out the other season getting those folks now. mythbusters did a great episode where they said here the different ways to put people on a plane was the best and what they found out was the Wilma method was the fastest which is window middle window middle. I'll do it in that order and it was actually ten minutes faster Louis. Most airlines tend to do it. Here's why it won't work. Picking up at earn like that to have people get on as with this new seat is because the airlines can't profit off of it yes. Maybe they gain a little bit of. Time but right now ever since the airline can started saying hey we're going to put people on based on them paying more money to put them on when we when they want to be on and so basically if you if you can't if they can't profit off of it somehow they're not gonNA. They're not gonNA use it and you're already paying extra to not be in the middle seat at least with United's crappy basic economy stuff. You're paying extra to just not being middle seat if the airline can't profit often. I don't think they're gonNA use it so I think they will. And although you know we'll see with this takes off because a lot of things don't <hes> in terms of getting people to change the seats but if you look at this seat this is a modern airline airline seat. This is a very thin seat of you know. If you've haven't noticed the airline seats especially domestic airline seats have gotten a lot thinner to make it it does make for more knee room but it makes you know not necessarily for more comfort and so it is the kind of seats they're going to then. We'll see they're still going to sell the middle seat for for less. It's not GonNa make the experience better but it might just make a better experience for for for passengers yeah. We'll see if anybody ever adopts it. I have a question for you. Yes you pay extra for this tiny bit more of shoulder room extra off of the discounted middle seeming discounted. I usually eat a period right. I am not a middle seat guy. I don't know if anybody is at middle seat person so because it has the sliding feature what's going to happen when the mechanics annex of that starts jamming yes good question that is a good question. You know in it would yeah there's already things on airplanes that don't work on on and basically we tried to leave Seattle yesterday and the announcement comes on he says hey there's a little motor at the back of the plane. That's Crete's drives generator and you know this generator for us has actually been out for four days so we actually need a truck to come over here and cooler engine so we can take off and right after he says that the power goes out of the gate so we're all sitting sitting there and I completely completely dark plane except for the little emergency lights and it was just one thing after another flood entire thing. I'm thinking we already have enough things that don't work really WANNA have lighting. Thank seats my guess is probably not <hes> yeah. I could see some airline may be testing this out but I don't think it's it'll be interesting to see if it ever really takes off next news story. You know you probably all heard the term Florida man and if you Florida California man got gored by the running of the Bulls calls <hes> he's a public defender in Santa Clara County evidently he was trying to take a selfie surprise. <hes> thought of the Bulls were passed them then he got gored is also true for a public defender to watch your back. You would think you would you would think a public defender will people would would have that is all around but he's on vacation. Yes so that's fine. It's all this you blame hemingway. I blame this Darwin. Is I mean right now. We have so many folks who are getting killed off for one reason or another because they're paying more attention to how they look in a photo than whether or not the spot there is the spot they're in is too dangerous to be in or the stunt. They're pulling his too stupid stupid to do and it. It strikes me as darling with and the thing is is that this is sort of the original this and standing back in the nineteen early nineteen hundred the number of people who died taking pictures at the Grand Canyon was actually epic. There's an entire book just called you know it's something along the lines or something yeah death at the great king that's it. That's a great book but you know a whole bunch of it is really stupid. People and it's is not new but in this case it's pretty much since hemingway and I the thing I never understand is like outside magazine for instance you know Nice magazine Glossy some pretty good stories except that usually half the magazine is devoted to somebody who's doing something death defying and isn't that great and their hero and then the other half of the magazine is some poignant story about one of those death to find people who tied and you're going. Oh my God we were so surprised that he died doing something. Wait for it death defying so we just have this stupid adventure sure culture that you'll we don't we we seem to like not connect the dots sometimes and the whole running of the Bulls thing is is yeah hemingway wrote about it but it's unfortunate that all these other stupid people think it's a great idea. I've had people ask me. If I WANNA do stuff like that. Now I say no. I have no intention of being a martyr for the sake of travel that that's a cause. I'm not going to give my life towards one last story. I thought this was kind of interesting. <hes> there was a piano cruise ship that left Bergen Norway and there was a massive fight on board the ship caused by a guy right dressed in a clown suit and as it turns out you can legally assault a clown in Norway. I didn't know that just the rule also because then I could understand legit the company should be taken up by the House cemetery you know I think this is Kissy for us. We we should be able to assault clowns absolutely. I think you're right <HES>. It's the funny thing about the story is <hes> the initial agitation came when somebody at some table saw the clown show up and got pissed because they had been told that this was not fancy dress just to clarify address you know everywhere but United States doesn't mean in Tuxedos it means costumes and they've been told us was not fancy dress and they got pissed when a clown showed it up and it went downhill from there so is it because a clown costume is considered fancy dress or it is considered fancy dress by by British Australian terminology <hes>. It's fancy dresses not Tuxedos and gowns. It's it's costumes. I guess everyone was drunk. This point you know the clown included so we the ship so the base too much stock what happened here you know in terms of its cultural significance. I'm not familiar with Norwegian well. I'm not sure who is on the on the boat but yeah it it might be that they had all decided to start drinking after they saw the four hundred fjord well. I'm just GONNA ask you. Have you ever seen a Norwegian clown. I haven't and I think that explains a lot it does I'm not sure what that explained but okay that it's legal to <unk> assault clowns in see okay otherwise we would see more of them. Okay I got Ya. Let's move on to talking about our guest new book monsoon postcards Indian Ocean Journey David. Why don't you tell us a little bit about the book? This is not your first book you you've had other books. I've noticed <hes> listed on Amazon. <hes> how this book came about and what the book is about well. This is my kind of ramble around the Indian Ocean stops in Madagascar country tree. That's a little bit under the radar me known Fritz bio-diversity but maybe not for some of the things that I write about <hes> move on to India Bangladesh end up in Indonesia now. How did it come about <hes> over the last ASS fifteen years <hes> I've had the good fortune to work for a number of international agencies most recently UNICEF United Nations Children's Fund and they send Me To do consulting and Training Union all sorts of interesting places like at the Gas Ker India Bangladesh and <hes> I then right about what I what I what I see as I go so a lot of my writing starts is long missile emails to families friends <hes> things that I have see and record as I encounter them because I believe in travel writing recording those list experiences even if you know this little rough often they need to be <hes> more researched or finesse latest so the really important kind of writing down when you see it or experience it so what I found and this was the case with my previous book which was on Central Asia Asia inland is at the end of you know and to five years Idaho collection of stories kind of random from around the region which I then <hes> extended some interviews more research and <hes> had had it so it's not I mean it's not a travel guide in the normal sense it's kind of an exploration of culture and history and some of the people I meet along the roads fellow academics? Excuse me <hes> some government workers people working in development and people I just kind of beat as I as I go along I mean as a as a journalist I have sort of natural curiosity and striking up conversations the people even if there's a language barrier so it's kind of an able ramble around the Indian Ocean region which I think is kind of under the radar region anyway I mean in the U._S.. We tend to focus on the Atlantic Atlantic and the Pacific as the regions of the oceans which have really really important <hes> probably because of two world wars but we have to remember that for thousands of years Indian Ocean region was much more traveled live of the Atlantic or the Pacific. <hes> I mean the original settlers in Madagascar for example <hes> came from what today would be somewhere in southern Borneo so the trade and migration happens across awesome region historically are absolutely fascinating so I kinda build in some of that research and the history of colonialism into my inter inter my ambles rambles. Let's back up here a little bit you started with you. Do some some work for UNICEF yes. I'm assuming you've got into that through your academics. Yes yeah I started working in an area coal communication for development is the use of communication and to improve health to improve education water and sanitation and things like that so I started doing workshops and traveling and then doing training and then. Sabrina research projects on that so <hes> <hes> I mean I don't I mean I I know nobody ever pays me to go to the Netherlands because they don't need be there. You know Isis like Malawi Madagascar India right here in Bangladesh so that's what I've continued to do in fact I'm off the Indian about a week's time so it's a very fortunate great adventure people pay me to go to interesting places and do some work and <hes> along the way I can write about it too interesting. I know that when we talk about those areas a lot of travelers I it it really breaks down. I think in two groups my wife for instance just as not interested India's not on her radar and I think a lot of the places you just named a really just not on the list of places she wants to go and I took a trip a group of travellers to India two years ago. I guess it was and I think we all WanNa go back. <hes> it was such a fascinating place and and such a delicious place also but you know the the people the the history there were certainly some challenges I would say in terms of being a first world person in terms of the poverty and in some of that there but definitely give me more. I think is what my reaction was. I think that's absolutely rewind. I think people who go to India either love it and want to go back even though they recognize you know the hazards of the challenges of travel all. It's just too much for them. They just take India. They come take the poverty. They can't take the inconvenience. I can't take the heat and it's just it's getting Delhi belly and they get sick which is always was an issue that wells mommy for me. I've been to India maybe eight times and every time I go I I learn more and also realized how little I know because I mean so overwhelming in terms of his history and its religion and its culture and in a sense it's not one India yeah many in India like see and Delhi is what different one from the what I would say in Hyderabad in the south and a completely different one from the North East of India which I've described in the book as India's Appalachia often neglected region which has been exploited for its results is so <hes> even of course in India was a colonial creation anyway the British sort of cobbled together together after a bunch of princely states the Maharajah's awesome so said Oh we have India here then of close it all baroque up thirty tragically <hes> so it it's a completely fascinating country and and I don't know that I can ever completely get my head around it. You know you really understand it. Defies all generalization but <hes> I mean I love to travel and even the inconveniences of travel kind of fun I as a great a quote from Thomas Travel Right I._D.. Said travel is not interesting. When everything goes to plan travel only becomes interesting when things go wrong that if you something to write about so sean while I don't look for things to go wrong lobby I've had enough of shall we say Don t travel experiences in India rather countries of the make good light those kind of things? I'm just back for the U._K.. From vacation from Spain it's completely to plan that was absolutely nothing to write about. We had an experience in India. You know how you get what you measure is. Just one of those general rules that if you if you reward people for for certain behavior you'll get more of that behavior will in the Indian rail system the one of the things that they measure is how many trains are on time and so what that means is if you're the train that's late then they no longer have any incentive to making you closer to on time and so you will always then be the one that's bumped and so once you're late you're really late and so we had a train ride from Varanasi to WHO Agra and I think we ended up being ten hours late <hes> because we basically just lost all priorities because their numbers look better you know we only had one we only had one tree that was laid. It was all really late and that's also the influence of the Indians bureaucracy the civil service the booms as cold who have their own of their own kind of targets and priorities which have nothing to do with the getting trained anywhere on time to do filling out the proper forms of the upper trouble. That's all okay. That's fine on the other hand you know you look at this gigantic train with lots of different cross cross sections of humanity on it in all different classes and and it's just fascinating that runs mostly on time you know most of the time and you know that it stops exactly in the right spot and a car pulls up and has your name on a piece of paper on the outside and you know it's all quite organized at the end and yet unorganized at the same time I it's India and I think I understand. I have not been there as many times as you are but I don't think I would understand edited twelve twenty thirty times either take makes sense. I'm sorry go ahead. No no go ahead. I was just GonNa say it's a really good point about India <hes> having so much longer history as being trade routes and having so much wealth and things in it I know I know one of the this the countries that Gary and I share as liking a lot but is overlooked his lawn and at some point because of its trade routes status in well the Arabian Sea specifically but the Indian Ocean broadly <hes> you know it was one of the major kingdoms for a long time it was it was the most important -portant kingdoms in the world at one point but now you don't really even think about it. There's all these I mean. Did you find Oman to be part of your your transit all David I have. I haven't been to a MOM SAVAII aware of its significance. I think the important thing here is we tend to think about countries you know we used to classify things country level but if we think of the Indian Ocean as a region <hes> trade where you know I mean they're the nation status the invention of the last century also so the thousands of years people really can what country they were in if they're in a country create a tool I mean they cared about trade and travel and you know the kind of boundaries we have today for a line or India or anywhere else. I mean thought from island boundaries really mean a whole lot of them. So which is why you get. I mean you know Omani traders you know settling all the way down the <hes> the East Coast East Coast of Africa or even even into places like Madagascar so you just get this real interesting listing move with those people so if we if we think about the Indian Ocean region the place of my racial trade <hes> which causes steelers today maybe a little bit more little bit more revealing evading but yeah no I mean Oman was of the fit into this whole network which predates transatlantic and certainly trans-pacific trade by by many centuries anex you make a great point that is interesting way to look at David. I have a couple of questions about the book making process so <hes> first of all in your journey. How long did it take and was it continuous? Oh No it was not continuous. I I mean I go somewhere for two or three weeks and then I come back and then six months later I go somewhere else so it's not as if I started she didn't actually I guess my earlier visits to Indonesia which is kind of weather Skorean so you know I I don't say I play around with time on face specific about when I was in places but <hes> in order to sort of put a narrative shift together it tears bill it it it is a little challenging <unk> different countries different places at different times and how go ahead go ahead. How long did it then take to sort of gather your notes and write the book and go through the publishing process? It's honestly about a couple of years I mean it's not like I do this. full-time also a kind of like podcast interviews <hes> so <hes> it yes it was it I mean I sort of got to a point and this was the same case with my work on Central Asia where I got oh I have a lot of material he'll let me put it together and then you have to be somewhat selective so for example I have some material in Malaysia Wilson quite enough for it. It and I had a whole I was gonna do something Malawi but in connection to the Indian Ocean for not not clear enough so you then you're gonNA come to make a selection kind of build build a narrative and also I think what is very important draw connections between the countries so I mean I have to think about what you know. Why should we think about Madagascar India Bangladesh Indonesia what brings together well at all in the Indian Ocean Trade and migration of important <hes> there are environmental and climate issues? Each of them have been subject to certainly monsoons which gives the title of the book also Natural Disasters Sues. I mean I went to Achebe in northern Sumatra about four years. After the sues army hit they're causing men's loss of life and destruction also the history of colonialism <hes> <hes> so you know you you one thing I try to do is to sort of show what these countries you know you know have avin commonly colonialism's very important because all four column is Indian Bangladeshi. If the British Rush Indonesia of the Dutch and Madagascar full the French colony and that colonial legacy really I think <hes> has shaped the way the country's all today so yeah I mean I have a collection stories respect. You know May <hes> to make the narrative is all about environment politics history culture migration settlement <hes> and issues like flat which <unk> places to get. I mean all of these countries have incredible social issues <hes> to do with migrations rural areas people leaving the countryside from wilkens cities incredible able overcrowding. I'm sure Chris in India you experience and traffic jams in some gravity of that is just the the whole approach to drive but yes but the infrastructure of these cities Your Jakarta Dr Valley you know it's <hes> you know that completely. They were not they were not built for you know for the amount out of traffic they have these days so at this growth in population urbanization Aleutian you know all of that kind of ties ties ties countries together. David I want to worship pitcher being British and because India was a former British colony. Do you notice certain cultural ties that may exist because I've noticed this as the American when I go to certain countries like the Philippines or Japan even <hes> where the U._S. has had a lot of involvement say the last century <hes> they're really kind of small things and I've noticed like in <hes> in in the U._k.. Today the number one ordered pub food is now chicken Tika Marsala which true and there are. I don't know if you noticed but in the new cabinet that was formed by Boris Johnson the number to the number four guys <hes> were Indian and Pakistani and there's a lot of these you know you go to India now. What is the thing that everyone is crazy about its cricket? They're probably the most fanatical cricket country in the world <hes> <hes> So do you notice a lot of these. These cultural ties these small linkages that a lot of people like if I'm an American. I may not notice I think I think I do. I mean you know growing up in Britain. I am in India. It was always there was fairly significant. Migration from India in what today is Pakistan to Britain after world will too so. I mean that you know the food was always around me down. My parents were somewhat conservative than that tastes. You don't WanNa go and have that carry stuff. You don't know what they say about the kind of black black pudding we were eating. You know I worked as a journalist in Yorkshire in the north of England and in Bradford <hes> sitting next leaves where I was based could be a large Pakistani community since World War Two looking in the textile mill so I mean that was always around me and then going back to we'll going to India and Pakistan as well <hes> and kind of looking at that colonial Lowell heritage. I mean you know you know. The British built the right away as the British created for better or worse some people would say a worse Indian Civil Service <hes> they they founded educational institutions but I I mean it's a couple of mixed legacy because at the same time the British plundered plundered plundered the continent you know they they extracted its resources. They you know British textiles from Manchester and Bradford under the local textile production. I mean you know there was a famine in Bengal which was primarily the result of colonial policy so it's very interesting. I you know my Indian friends of very ambivalent about the British colonial heritage. I mean they kind of like the British also recognize. It's the two hundred years Britain has a colonial Powell plundered the continent and there's a significant debate going on most in academic circles I'd have to say about whether Britain should pay reparations to India for all of the troubled with its calls all of the loss of life from the loss of property and the extraction of his natural resources but at the same time you know Indians you know kind of like the British Tisch they have not gotten rid of. I mean you you find still placenames kind of interesting. I mean the British kind of cool places how they sounded so they fooled or today's Mumbai on day and these places have changed but I mean I would go there. Say I'm going to Mumbai Bombay so you know they keep the old British I name <hes> you know out of out of nostalgia. Whatever Bangalore City took like ten years to change its name to Bengal rural <hes> which was a more accurate name but people still call it bangle also loses interesting ambivalence Vicks of Nostalgia and recognition from the British legacy and education and infrastructure of the same time hi I think some resentment at what historically the British did to this continent although of course talking about India is problematic anyway because India never existed before the British Vahdet India so it's a it's it's it's a it's a tough one of lots of debates of this spied? You'RE GONNA say some low low. Ah Hizbut a split here. Sorry I was on mute completely shallow question. We understand that this is not a guidebook however I know when you've done enough of this type of travel somewhere in this region is your favorite cafe. Which one is it okay to my little up from a cafe us? Oh please please do okay okay in my view. The best food in the region is in the capital of Madagascar Antananarivo which is a long what to say so. It's really cool Tampa so I mean the French did horrible things in Madagascar <hes> they exploited the population and created plantations and they <hes> you know they did all sorts of bad things one of the things that they did did leave was great cuisine so you get Haute cuisine in <hes> in Antananarivo and other Madagascar cities at astonishingly mainly low prices and so if you go in to get the <hes> Zabel Plow Fra and Zebu is the triplets cackle bears traditional hump stake I mean it's wonderful wonderful and very cheap so my favorite place this caliber play on Madagascar's. Shall we say trouble. Political history is a restaurant cold and I'll spell it for you. K. The U. Hyphen D. Hyphen ta who ta which is a recognition that Madagascar's had more political coups Eddie other Africa countries succeed defendants good atolls a great restaurant and some other really right restaurants and onto nine Areva. I have to be careful with Indian and Bangladeshi food. Sometimes they overpower me but the French cuisine medic got what is one reasons why get so many French tourists said they could eat for a quarter of what they would be paid in Paris Leon. Now that's wonderful. The reason ice cafe instead of restaurants is because often there's there's some place of refuge where if you are overwhelmed by other things that you can just go and sit and relax and have great food and then watch the world go by but but you can do that in restaurants tim so that's perfect. That was a great answer. Absolutely there's a nice outdoor seating area and <hes> Huda dials in what's called the deal the high town Madagascar and a couple streets looks kind of like France you know and if a your void some of the bizarre things on the menu like like fruit bat an eye line. I don't think I want to be back particularly <hes> this this some really great dishes and yet you can you can you can watch the will go why and and the kind of a general dysfunction of the city as well which is fun to watch too full of wonderful French causes well done if any of you familiar with the eld Citrin to see C._B.. The dish of Oh <hes> yeah the Reynaud Cottrell Four L. will those calls live on slightly battered on the streets of Antananarivo. They just keep going because <hes> and those those taxes so you know it's kind of like <hes> going back. Cuba thirty thirty years in France to see once they all French automobile industry wheezes its way around Madagascar so Madagascar is basically the Cuba of notion in that sense yes yeah no absolutely it's funny though I will say fruit bat is actually not not that bad depends on how prepared and it and it doesn't taste like chicken though I'll tell you the okay well you have to send me a good fruit bat recipe by all work cut it. You have to make sure to peel the right off before he problem I've been having before we move on David. <hes> could you give briefly talk about some of your other books looking at your your author profile on Amazon and the end. I know you have one about Central Asia. <hes> I always in Central Asia <hes> two years ago and I found it to be a really interesting place and I think tourism there's going to be it has been growing dramatically the last few two years <hes>. What's your general take on that region central yeah I mean this was my first book of this kind of genre I I I went to Pakistan <hes> former Soviet republic nineteen ninety-five like four years after the fall of the Soviet Union and things are pretty rough there have to say no in terms of the economy and travel climb and everything else when back I have a fulbright fellowship there for a year and a half and then from that point I you know for the next fifteen years I traveled almost every year to do some kind of work? In motion Russian characters styling Kazahkstan someone who's Pakistan also be into Tajikistan Turkmenistan here we stand. I have been to agree about the tourist industry here. I mean the the countryside especially Liam Kirghistan type dish astonished spectacularly beautiful <hes>. It was always difficult to get there. I think that's shame some the removal regular flights I mean when I was going there. <hes> you have to fly Moscow. Sometimes Frankfort visas were expensive and the tourist facilities when you got there were not very good. I mean around for example. It's a cool which is lodged <hes> Lake in northern Kirghistan which was like a favourite place the Soviet holidaymakers all the resorts kind of broken down the be. No investment corruption was bad but I think there's been significant investment since then so all of these countries are becoming more accessible was beker. Stan was always kind of on the tourist us route because of some icon Okada and he the ancient cities on the road but I think how <hes> especially Kirghistan Tajikistan's still a bit problematic. They have a civil war going on. For a number of years it's still lots of safes. I'm not allowed vice people to explore egis with Pakistan and Kirghistan interesting Kazahkstan's interesting as well but this probably less to see. I mean because Don's L. A. ninth largest land area already country in the world but less than twenty million population a lot of it is step Odessa not a whole lot to see but there was an interesting places a scattered around on Marty. The former capital ships in the foes of the tin shine in the southeast is a is a is a really interesting city and I as European city as well so essential Asia. We'll stop. We'll stop to attract more more more tourists. I mean the the other issue there of course is language when I first started going that nobody spoke English. I mean I kind of have to learn Russian author quickly well as I could today. More young people have learned English. It's a lot more tourist friendly <hes> than it was but you still put up with officials will try to kit you up full <hes> bribes and things a lot that I mean I it it. It's in a in a way it's almost fun. I remember once I was finishing a job and I was coming to the airport email marty. This is very typical of what happens because public officials the police are underpaid and so I was stopped by two policemen who said we looked at my passport. They said Oh you'll kind of your resident's permit. Something called issued by State Office. FISA is out of date two days out of this that will be a hundred dollar five. Let's say a really. I said it's hard to believe that they did no mandate fines for offenses like like that in U._S.. Dollars I said so. Please show me please show me in your book where it says a hundred dollar fund so we go to this office with talking and they're shopping around paperless at anyway. I don't have a hundred dollars with me and they say oh. How much do you have? I say the two hundred Tenge whatever is fifty dollars at oh that'll do fine. I mean have a shot of vodka so I mean you know that's kind of goes on you. GotTa go with the flow on it and I do understand it because a lot of these public officials at least at that time <hes> had not been paid at all or they'd be paid very little and so way they put food on the table was to you know it up motorists for traffic offenses or hit up a wondering Westerners mice like myself for whatever they could get so that level of corruption I think is still there. It it is an annoyance is probably less than it used to be <hes> but I think all of the countries in Central Asia becoming more tourist friendly and will be increasingly popular destinations for U._S.. End for European travelers in particular. I was surprised we do a trip once a year for listeners of amateur traveler and we voted on the trip for next year which was going to be in Turkey but number two was the stance number two. was you know some some trip through the stands and I was surprised that it showed up that high because it's it's not turkeys actually cheaper because because you know the the infrastructure and fewer flights and things like that it's probably twice as much to go to the stands but we that came in a strong second place it interesting that you refer to stands as if it's electorate and this is kind of where the title of my book came from postcards from Stab because come back from Kirgiz stable wherever has stopped and explained to my colleagues believe and they go oh you know because people can't place him on the map you know a geographical black no somewhere between Turkey and China took in Iran and China and ob stopped to the Oh you've just been to Stan land and actually that's nonsense because the word Stamm it's a it's a Persian word and it means land so literally lab bland when I go to Europe I tell people I'm going to the lands. They go where you're going on. I'm going to England Scotland Iceland Oland Deutschland all right then let's move onto our picks of the week and Jen you got some for us. I do I- i- scored a great flight from the hopper APP now. I've had the hopper APP before I've used the hopper APP in terms of looking looking for flights and just kind of checking out always sort of like the APP but I am a huge fan now because I needed a flight from <hes> San Diego or L._A.. To Berlin <hes> about run around the third week of August and I'd been looking at flights looking at flights they were fifteen hundred dollars sometimes eighteen hundred dollars <hes>. I don't know if I ever saw the blessed in twelve or thirteen hundred dollars so a while back <hes> I put a fair finder notification request on hopper like I searched for the flight then I said let let me know if it if it drops and sure enough last week it dropped and showed me a flight eight on through British Airways for four hundred dollars and so I went wet so I jumped on it and ended up buying a ticket with you know the Times or whatever that loosely worked for me not completely ideal but it was going to allow me to go to this conference that I wanted to go to and so I was able to get a seat for five hundred and ninety one dollars all in boom so now I'm a big fan of hopper upper and I'll probably be using that more often <hes> if I have time to plan ahead excellent Michigan. Actually I see spud has a post because his pick because he's already sent me the link to it yeah. No I <hes> what's what's happened at least in California. I can't say it's happened. Everywhere is that because a lot of municipalities are saying you can no longer use disposable plastic. Straws people are going with any of the recent variations whether it's bamboo straws metal straws <hes> one of the ones I actually like. I have a set of silicone straws that the basically you know if if you WANNA make sure they're clean you just boil them in there because they're they're impervious to compete but I did find a star a really like with a company called Kicker Lab K. K. K. E. R. Land. It's one of those land into places and they make a lot of quirky oddly redesigned things but in this case it's a it's a travel straw that uses metal uses the same principle as the old antennas on your par- It extends and basically so it fits into a spot that's only about three inches long and has a brush that also pulls out like an antenna the US for the use of the length of it and the whole thing fits it to its own little travel case that is about <music> out a third the size of a pack of cigarettes and you just pull this thing out extended throat in the region whatever it is that you're you're drinking with a straw. I personally find that I don't thank you know if water if I have a straw in a water glass at a restaurant I will drink. I don't know why it's a mental thing but I much more likely to drink enough water. If I have a strong I've been carrying this everywhere just as an experiment experiment and it and it works great and I love it so it's the kicker land travel straw set and it's only nine dollars and fifty cents and as always we will have a link to that in the show notes a little known facts buds body composition is seventy percent and sugar free red bull run as I'm sitting here looking at two of them on a little known fact but it it may not be as to our audience. This guy's GonNa. I was just GonNa ask the same thing if he's now drinking water does that mean Red Bulls off the table Brigham who is definitely a part of the Diet but there's less of it because I don't mind now that I'm not going into an office every day. I don't mind falling asleep in the afternoon so it's one of those Chris. You got something for us. Yeah I had a couple a book recommendations. One is an audio booker an audio course the both that I used before I went to India. We talked about trying to understand this complicated and fascinating country and one is the great courses a history of India and that sort of traditional walk you through from win. The various peoples came to India and the the you know who was emperor and all those sorts of things the other one was a little more interesting. It's it's incarnations India in fifty lives and it goes through fifty significant people in Indian history and uses them as a way of explaining you know how Buddhism came into or was created or or how this the Mongols came in or something but it does it through individuals and I found that an interesting approach to the history of you know such big place you got a billion people. They're almost and yet we're gonNA focus on fifty so and Kerry. Do you have a tip. I do <hes> so the the rise of smartphones is pretty much destroyed. The point and shoot camera market used to be you had pocket cameras you know could very small <hes> and you didn't have interchangeable lenses and now it seems that there's either you use is your smartphone or you have this very large camera with interchangeable lenses and there isn't a whole lot in between well <hes> there still are a few in Sony has recently come out with a new version of their model which is the Sony Cyber Shot Rx one hundred seven. It's a mouthful but the the Sony the Rx one hundred line <hes> is really probably the best point and shoot camera on the market right now and this is what I recommend to people who are looking for they wanted nice camera but they don't want to get this big thing with the lenses and they don't WanNa have to deal with all the buttons and learn the photography. This has integrated <hes> Lens. It has a a surprisingly good zoom. This new version does forte video you can actually hook it up to a Jimbo or to external microphones and and do reasonably good video with it you can actually shoot at ninety frames per second if you wanted to shoot action and so there's a lot that you can do with it in one compact unit and so it's the Sony Cyber Shot Rx one hundred seven and seven has reminisce Roman numerals just to make it more interesting. Yes uh-huh in it's not it's not cheap. It's twelve hundred dollars but if you're looking for a good camera to take on a trip but you don't want to jump in and get the you know the interchangeable Lens Type Camera. This is probably going to be. <hes> your best bet and this will be on sale within a few weeks as we're recording this in late July so it'll be in August and David. Do you have anything for us well. I if I'm the destination national re trip for you inside. Okay absolutely okay well. We'll talk about one country really have mentioned yet. <hes> Bangladesh and one of the coolest trips of I took was on along the river I mean Bangladesh is a country of rebels. The three major river systems <hes> again Jeez in India becomes the Padma in Bangladesh in the Rahman Putra Becomes Jamuna rose law along with a system called Omega and so are hundreds of rivers in Bangladesh. I mean about a third of the country floods every year but so much of life in Bangladesh revolves around the river and hi and one great way to see it is to go down to the ferry terminal in in Old Dakar. I mean ducks Hausa crazy city traffic but get down to the ferry terminal and get on what the the Bangladeshis Cooler lunch now. This is not some fancy party boat. You see popped in the marina or the French Riviera. It's kind of what we would call you know a ferryboat and take that launch either Katherine overnight trip with a cabin or during the day <hes> down the rivers to the the southern Delta region to the Bay of Bengal <hes> and it's it's it's a fascinating trip because issued a pot of see how much life in Bangladesh goes on along the rivers. You'll see <hes> l.. People carrying vegetables across the river will be people with bicycles on little boats going across cost will be small freighters delivering building materials up and down. He realized how much traveling Hamas is still dependent on the waterways and he can sit on deck and have a Nice Cup of tea. Sorry it's a Muslim country. No alcohol also and really literally watch the l the will of Bangladesh go by so <hes>. It's fascinating. If you travel at night Louis I got a cop in and it's very very cheap because this is the way that Bangladesh's Sudesh travel if they want to go work or the C. C. Relatives a take one of these one of these launches Ferrier's <hes> down to the Delta you end up in one of the southern cities each of which describes lives of selves as the Venice of Bangladesh will would you town that every city has a lot of waterways in it a delightful and very inexpensive trip. I'm sure you should probably take profit guided to with travel company company but just traveled with the ordinary people and people will strike up a conversation with you probably invite you to the home when you get to the other end. It's a it's a great way to see how rivers defy the life of countries excellent choice. Let's start to wrap things up <hes> Chris what is new on the amateur traveler this week. We just did a show about SOC- schedule I had a big hole elon the candidate map of amateur travelling we'd never done a show about Saskatchewan so we just filled in that whole desk because most Canadians don't even go to sketch on on the on the blog I actually wrote a a locals guide to taking a ball game in San Francisco and what you need to know if you're going to go to what is now Oracle Park Excellent Jen. Where can people find you online still not so much online except for on twitter at at and at bay curious mom I'm still working on my Las Vegas guidebook with Cora and really hope to have that done by in time for Tea Beck's billings excellent spud what is new on the inappropriate traveling this week? <hes> the inappropriate traveler podcast is going to have within within about three hours. I hope <hes> in interview with rich grant <hes> a man who spent thirty five years is representing a Denver tour and who has this wildly successful blog called walking and drinking so figure rich was a good candidate for the inappropriate traveler and <hes> just getting all the information behind it up. I've been getting pictures up and that'll be up later today but today is actually two weeks from now so by the time this area just to be working on something like that <hes> this working on Gary Art interview on the podcast so look forward to that coming soon and David where can people find you online. They can find my website David h mold ammo you L. D. or one word dot COM <hes> also also on facebook. I'm posting travel BLUNCK's on a weekly basis this so find David Mold will find monsoon postcards on facebook and I will link that in the show notes superfan is as usual you can find everything dash everywhere dot com or an instagram at everything everywhere where I've made the decision this week to completely destroy in Tank my instagram account by only posting quality images that I really like <hes> and it's been a fascinating experiment Yeah Yeah I. I'm not posting just the colorful landscape photos again a lot of lakes. I'm actually trying to post like good photos of people and things like that that I know the instagram algorithm hates and I've gotten the fewest number of likes on any photos that I've gotten in years and I have gotten more people direct messaging me commenting and offering to buy photos than I ever have and now I'm going to write this up because it has been very interesting staying and I think that people in the travel and tourism industry should really rethink how they're using instagram okay basically rewarding reality show tight content <hes> as opposed to the things that really drive people to travel grabble okay but gary so I'm looking at your handle which is at everything everywhere and the picture still looks stunning in gorgeous to me. So how are these pictures less than what you were doing before <hes> scroll down you will not find images of people I see two people in the first row and then I see people in the third row okay all right so sh- role down really I mean not like a portrait or anything like that. <hes> basically it's all everyone started calling the landscape photographer and I'm like well yeah. I do that but no I'm not I. I'm a travel photographer and so eventually said you know what I'm just going to start posting the stuff. I know instagram that doesn't perform instagram and we're gonNA see what happens and I wrote a long rant about it and <hes> yeah so I'm Gonna I'm GonNa keep doing that for the foreseeable future but basically there are certain types of photos that perform well and instagram and I'm just not going to do that anymore so so gary I was talking about this it hold on. I'm so excited so gary if your likes and your comments went down no comments went up. Okay comments went up up but what happened what went down likes okay so you're likes went down but you started getting offers for people to buy your photos with friends right so then doesn't that make it even more valuable because then you can monetize your work better to me but to the rest of the world like when people in the travel industry see this all they care about is the number of likes which is why they end up working with swimsuit models but yeah yeah I mean so basically like photo like National Geographic type photos don't normally do well On instagram unless you're National Geographic <hes> usually it's going to be pitchers of mountains and rainbows and sunsets. Let's just rinse and repeat just do that over and over and if you go down and look at my photos of of Ounce Rainbow Sunsets O. N.. Waterfalls those tend to do or super iconic places like a crappy photo the Eiffel Tower will will do really well because these people know what that is and they'll hit like whereas the post a photo of like you know an Ethiopian Coptic priests or to someone photo of the G._O._p.. And Coptic priests they you know that doesn't resonate with them. They don't know who that is. So if it's a picture of myself I would probably get more likes but just a good photo of someone I've met in my travels will not and Jerry Gary this as as as a thirty year your photo journalism Bung by other jobs. That was something I noticed about five years ago about your feet and your photos you were really starting to win awards and things but I noticed there were no people aw I always wondered about an asking you about that and if it was intentional or if it was just sort of what you were shooting for or if you just didn't feel comfortable shooting people or whatever it is but because I had come up through newspapers of a photo guy people was like ninety percent of what shot and it always kind of resonated with me that it was interesting that you worked shooting people so I'm I'm real curious to see how this goes. Yeah I had found the same thing as Gary that Gary a lot bigger audience than I do so relative thing but that you know that picture of the guy that we had in Morocco that I really loved the background and you know thought it was a great shot yet. Just doesn't didn't relate relate to people at all so gary you talking about a drop in only about a thousand likes because I'm looking at your stuff is consistently like three to seven thousand likes and maybe the pre skies in the two thousand range yeah but like my last two are under two thousand. I don't think I've at ride with two thousand lights in in years right and that is the one with the lowest is black and white and black and whites never do well either and then the second unless one has four kids four five kids in it and yeah it's a good idea of what will do well On instagram and I'm just not doing that but if you read the comments you know it used to be. I'd get like like great shot good job. Just these things are probably written by bots and now it's like people that are actually Rut. You'll commenting on the photo or even the photo I recently posted in Ghana. They were like Oh yeah. I was there air. You know I took that shot. That's an amazing place. <hes> someone on when when it got cross posted to facebook took a photo of the hallway of their house were they took a photo in the same place and they were on the same trip. I was <hes> back in two thousand fifteen <hes> when we were there so it's it's the quality of the engagement has gone up and I think it you know I'm tempted to write a long article about this about the concept of curing audience that you want to have the right people who are following you for the right reason and we've been so focused on the the quantity elements getting a lot of likes because that's that's all people you know. That's where the money he has to be honest. That's why people this whole notion of buying fake followers is because there's an incentive for people to do it and what I'm finding. Is that if you have if I can develop an audience that smaller but it's people that spend ten thousand dollars dollars a year traveling exotic places turn that is probably more valuable to me than a bunch of people that just click like on a photo of the Eiffel Tower over and over. I was very close to wrapping up this.

India California David h Madagascar Chris Indian Ocean Gary Gary U._S Central Asia Jen Leo United States Indonesia assault Chris Chris Elliott Billy Preston Billy Preston Pakistan Mr Chris Christianson Charleston West Virginia England writer
FROM FARM TO CITY  2nd Edition

Big Book Podcast

25:43 min | 6 months ago

FROM FARM TO CITY 2nd Edition

"Welcome back my friends to the big book podcast. My name is Howard and I'm an alcoholic sober since January 1st. June nineteen eighty eight one day at a time. This is the 56th episode and I hope you found this audio version of Alcoholics Anonymous to be both meaningful and enjoyable in this episode Story number eight in part one of the story section of the second edition of the big book published in nineteen fifty five. It's entitled from Farm to city and was written by Ethel M. One of the first female members of Akron group one that met on Wednesday evenings at King School in Akron Ohio though. She didn't get sober until May 1941 along with her husband Russ by the time the second edition was published in 1955. Ethel was widely known as the longest sober lady in the Akron Cleveland region. Around the time that Ethel got sober with the help of many male members of a there was noticeable resistance to women joining the men in meetings much of which was expressed by the wives of those men the social mores of that era were much harsher on women alcoholics than on men and there was concern about whether men would be able to stay sober with women alcoholics around wage even doctor Bob initially expressed consternation about allowing female alcoholics into a a but later capitulated, ironically turning women alcoholics, including Ethel M over to his wife and for indoctrination into the program this early grappling with the differences between the Sexes with regard to their experience with alcoholism pave the way for a program in which men work with men and women work with women and yet all work with the common purpose of staying sober and helping other alcoholics achieve sobriety. Ethel M's story is a fine example of this Noble purpose. and now part one story eight from Farm to City. She tells how a a works when the going is rough a Pioneer Woman member of a haze first group. I come from a very poor family in material things with a fine Christian mother, but with no religious background. I was the oldest in a family of seven and my father was an alcoholic home. I was deprived of many of the things that we feel are important in life such as education particularly because of my father's drinking mine was far from a happy childhood. I had none of those things that children should have to make them happy we moved in from the country at the age when girls want all sorts of nice things. I remember starting to city school coming from a country school and wanting so very very much to be like the other girls and trying flour on my face for powder because I wasn't able to have any real powder. I remember feeling that they were making fun of me. I feared that I wasn't dressed like the rest. I know that one of the outfits I had was a skirt and a very funny looking blouse that my mother had picked up at a rummage sale. I look bad. I can remember these things because they made me very unhappy and added to my feeling of inferiority and never being the same as other people at the age of Sixteen. I was invited to spend the summer with an aunt and I very delightedly accepted the invitation. It was a small town Liberty Indiana when I came to my and she knew that I had had an unhappy childhood and she said now Ethel, you're welcome to have boyfriends in our home but there are two boys in this town that I don't want you to date and one of them comes from a very fine family one of the best month, but he's in all sorts of scrapes because he drinks too much for months later. I married this guy. I'm sure his family felt that it was a marriage that well. I was a girl from the wrong side of the tracks. Definitely. I felt that his family were accepting me because it was good sense. I could do something for their R Us but they didn't do anything for me to build up my ego and rust didn't tell me he'd stopped drinking and he certainly didn't stop it went on and grew worse and worse. We had two daughters. I was sixteen When we married and he was seven years older. I remember one in Thousand when he took off and went down to Cincinnati and was gone a week on a drunk finally. It got so bad that I left him and went back home and took my two children with me. I didn't see him for a year or even hear from him. That was seven or eight years after we were married. I was still bitter because I felt that drink had completely ruined my childhood and my married life and I hated everything pertaining to it. I was about twenty-five then and I had never touched a drop. I got a job in the Woolen Mills in Ravenna. Very hard work. I looked much older than I was I was always large and I went back to work in this job. I kept my children with me at the end of the year the children got a card from their father, which I still have and cherish. He said tell Mommy I still love her. I had gone to an attorney to see about getting a divorce during that year. Then he came into town on the bomb. He had taken up light work and had a safety valve and a pair of Spurs and the clothes on his back and that was all I welcomed him with open arms. I didn't realize how I still felt about him. He told me that he would never drink again and I believed him as many times as he would tell me that I still believed him wage partially. So anyway, he got a job and went back to work. He stayed dry for thirteen years Doctor Bob often said that it was a record for what he felt was a tip-off. alcoholic We built up a splendid life at the end of these thirteen years. I never dreamed that he'd ever take another drink. I had never taken one our oldest daughter got married and they were offering at our house. Our other daughter was in her last year of high school and one night the new son-in-law and my husband went out to a prize-fight. I never was concerned anymore anywhere he went he hardly ever went to anything like that without me we were together all the time. But this night I got up and saw it was late. I heard my son-in-law coming upstairs and I asked him where Dad was he had a very peculiar look on his face and he said he's coming he was coming on his hands and knees up the stairs as I look back very broken up about it, but I don't believe now that it was with any deep feeling of resentment that I said to him the children are raised and if this is the way you want it, this is the way we'll have it. Where you go? I'll go and what you drink I'll drink that's when I started drinking. We were the most congenial drinkers you ever saw. We never route or fought we had the grandest time ever. We just loved it. We'd start out on the craziest trips. He'd always say take me for a ride Ma. So sometimes we'd end up in Charleston West Virginia or here or there drinking all along the way these vacations became quite something and he always had two weeks vacation the first two weeks of every September one year we got as far as I know. We always started out on the Saturday before Labor Day. I'm pretty near afraid of Labor Day yet one Sunday afternoon. The only time I ever got picked up for drunk and driving I got picked up in Bellaire. They threw us in the jail. I wasn't nearly in the condition I had been in many times to be picked up. I really wasn't very high. They called the mayor in so wage. And have to stay in there over the holiday. He took his $117 and let us go and we proceeded that to me was the greatest humiliation to think that I'd finally took ended in jail. My husband said that I had said, can you imagine them giving us that jail fair? And he said what jail fair and I said, well, they brought a picture of coffee and a sandwich wrapped up for me and he said that wasn't jail Fair. They didn't give me anything to eat. Somebody must have taken pity on you and gone out and got it for you. And another thing it's a wonder they didn't throw us back in because I could become very dignified and sarcastic as we left and they were escorting us across the bridge into wheeling. I with great dignity and sarcasm told them of their wives were ever visiting Akron and they too were looking for their route sign as I was that I hoped that I could extend to them the hospitality that had been shown to me in Bel Air. The next time vacation time rolled around that was a bitter lesson to us. Of course this year. We were drinking heavier and heavier and we decided on staying home and being sensible doing a little drinking and painting the house. So on that Saturday before Labor Day, I got drunk and set the house on fire. So we didn't have to paint it. I think that that was the last vacation before sobriety. I hated myself worse and worse. And as I hated myself, I became more defiant towards everything and everybody we drank with exactly the same Accord that we find not accepted a a we comforted each other my Define attitude became worse. There was a very religious family that lived down the road from us and we were on the same party line. I don't need them on the phone having prayer meetings and so forth that sort of talk over the phone and it completely burnt me up. They used a sound truck some it would stop out in front of our house and I still dead. View those people sent it they'd sit out there and play hymns and I'd be lying in there with the terrific hangover. If I'd had a gun. I'd have shot the horns right off the thing because it made me real mad. It was just about this time in nineteen forty that we met up with a R Us read a piece in the paper and he kind of snickered and said see here where John Dee has found something to keep him from drinking. What's that? I said, oh some darn thing. They've got here in the paper about it. We talked about it afterwards and we felt that there might be some time we'd need it. I thought it was a thought that there might be some hope for us. One morning after terrific drinking bout. I was in a little bar near our house and I shook so that I was a very much ashamed because I was getting the shakes worse and worse. I sipped the drink off the bar because I couldn't hold it in my hand, but I was still a lady believe it or not. And I was deeply ashamed there was a man watching and I turned to him and said I am fine hair. I carried with me all the time. If I don't quit this I'm going to have to join that alcoholic business. They're talking about he said sister if you think you're a screw off now, all you have to do is join up with that. I'll get you the password and I can find out where they meet because I know a guy that belongs but they are the craziest Bunch they roll on the floor and holler and pull their hair. Well, I'm nuts enough now I said to him but right then the Hope died that had been in my heart when we read about John Dee. Time went on in the drinking got worse and worse and I was in another bar room down the road the other way a small one and I took my glass that morning. I'd been able to lift it from the bar off and I said to the woman behind the bar. I wish I might never take another drop of that stuff. It's killing me. She said do you really mean that I said? Yes. She said well, you better talk to Jack Jack was the owner of the place. We always tried to buy him a drink and he always told us he had liquor trouble couldn't drink she said to me, you know, he used to own a merry-go-round he used to drink and then he found something that started up in Akron that helped him quit drinking right away. I saw it was the same outfit. This other guy told me about and then again she died. Finally one morning. I got up and got in the car and cried all the way down to the hems. The people who owned the bar and told her I was licked and wanted help. I thought no matter how crazy they are. I'll do anything they say to do I drove these three or four miles down the road only to find that Jack was out. This was funny. They owned this joint. She ran it down he sold for a brewery that was his job and he'd been dry a year. I don't think Jack was hospitalized. I think his entry into a a was through spending some hours with dr. Bob at his office. He brought many people into a a through his bar-room. Mrs. M said she would send Jack over as quick as he came in. He came with two cans of beer he gave my husband one answered me one about 10:30 on the 8th day of May in nineteen forty-one. He said there's a doctor here in Akron. I'm going in to see him and see what can be done doctor Bob was in, Florida, Georgia. But Jack didn't know that. That was our last drink of anything alcoholic that nasty little can of beer at 2:45 that morning. I thought I would die. I laid across the bed on my stomach with nothing but pain and sickness but I was scared to death to call a doctor. I thought when people did what we did that they just locked them up. I didn't know that anything was ever done for them in a medical way home. So I stayed awake men from a a started coming out to the house the next day. I paced the floor with a bath towel around my shoulders the perspiration running off me and he sat at the side of the bed where I was lying and he sat on the edge of his chair and looked as innocent as a baby. I thought that guy never could have been drunk. He said this is my story took a prim and I thought I bet he's a sissy I bet he never drank but he told the story of drinking that was amazing to me. Jack brought the Saturday post with Jack Alexander story. He said read this Jack didn't seem to have too much of the spiritual understanding. He said I think this will tell you more off. This is based really on The Sermon on the Mount now if you've got a Bible around one of our gifts from the family was a very lovely Bible but we'd let the Bulldog chew it because we weren't too interested in it off. I had a little testament which was very small print when you have a hangover and can't even sit still try to read small print rust said mother if this tells us how to do it. You'll have to read it and I try but I couldn't even see the letters but it was so important that we do the things we were told to do Jack said there was a meeting in Akron every Wednesday night and that it was very important that we go Jack said now you start and go to these meetings and then you'll find out all about it. I don't think that there was anything said about religion faith. Know anything about The Sermon on the Mount I had the big book Alcoholics Anonymous that had been brought to me Paul S had just called me and I remember he stressed reading the big book. I was reading it for all that was in it and I said to Russ we can't do this we couldn't begin to and Jim G had such a wonderful sense of humor. And when he came I was in tears and I told him I want to do this but I can't this is too much. I could never go and make up to all the people I've done wrong to he said, let's put the big book away again. And when you read it off and turn to the back and read some of the stories have you read those know I was all interested in this part that told you how to do it. That was the only part I was interested in home and then he got us to laugh which was what we needed when we went to bed my sides ached and I said to my husband I thought I would never laugh again, but I have laughed. Well, I said to Dad when the AAA people kept coming with these lovely cars and looked so nice. I suppose the neighbors say now those old fools must have up and died. But where's the hearse off on Wednesday night, Jack em said you meet me at the Ohio Edison building and I will take you to the meeting and we went down through the valley and I remembered reading about the Ku Klux Klan off and and how they burned crosses and I thought God Alone knows what we are getting into this time. I didn't know what they were going to do because he didn't tell us much so he came to King's school and they introduced me to marry him and Hannibal they told Annabel to take me under her wing and I shall never forget how she sort of curled up her nose and said they tell me you drink too often. I often think how that could have turned some people away because there were no other women alcoholics there then and I said, why sure that's what I'm here for and I was glad and I have been ever seen wage. That I said that and I wasn't resentful toward her either. There was a young fellow who led the meeting and that was a beautiful thing to me. He talked about his wife taking his little boy away from him because of his drinking and how he got back together with them through a dog began feeling grateful, right? Then that all these things hadn't been taken from us. They opened with a little prayer and I thought it was very fine that we stood all of us together and closed with dead birds prayer. I'd like to say here how important it was to us, then that we do all the little things that people said were important because later when Russ was so sick that I had to hold him up had a meeting out at the house when we close the meeting with the Lord's Prayer rough said mother helped me stand this was after his illness. We were in a a 3 and 1/2 years when he was taken from me. We had never missed a Wednesday night at King school for a year. We had that record. I always feel that our God Consciousness was a steady growth after we became associated with a and we loved every minute of that Association. We had big picnics out at the house with a dog. We had meetings at each other's homes. And of course that was a grand place for people to get together out there. They seem to think so too. I give a great deal of credit to Dock and Hanford changing our life. They spent at least an evening a week in our home out there for weeks and weeks sometimes saying very little but letting us say Russia used to be very much pleased because he'd suck. I think dr. Bob thoroughly enjoys coming out here he can relax and it's quiet at that time. They didn't let us know that people ever had trouble. I mean slips. I remember some time off was possibly six months after we had been going steadily to King's school that we were coming home from a meeting and saw a car along the way and a fellow in the back drinking a bottle of beer and Rush said, I would have sworn that was Jack em the next morning his wife came dragging him in before Russ went to work while I was getting breakfast. It had been Jack M. We wept and rust and go to work. Jack had been sober about a year-and-half. His wife was cussing him raving at him. I just brought him over to show you what kind of guy he is. He wants to go to the hospital and not paying for the hospital again. We were so mad at her because she talked to him that way Russ said don't do another thing today, but help him do something for him. If he thinks he needs to go to the hospital. I'll pay for him. She said he's not going to the hospital whether you pay for it or I pay for it. He's not going In the spiritual strength, I had found because of a I felt that I had made a complete surrender that I had really turned my life over that summer. I thought I had done that until Russ's second collapse and the doctor told me very candidly that he wasn't long for this world. I knew then that I hadn't made a complete surrender because I tried to bargain with the god I had found and said anything but that don't do that to me Russ lived a year longer than they expected him to live and in that year he was in bed for at least six months. I can't express what they meant to US during that year off before the end. Finally came. I had I guess made the surrender because I finally had been able to say that I would not mind too much and I realized that there was one salvation for me. Thank God. I had no desire for a drink when he died. There were two women in the Saint Thomas Hospital at that time in a room. Russ was buried on Friday and on Sunday afternoon Hilda s had invited me there to dinner Sunday night and I didn't think I could do a job. I knew Doc and and we're going to be there and all of them thought it would be good for me. But the first thing I did was to go to Saint Thomas and try to talk to those women. I sat down on the edge of one of their beds and I started to weep and I couldn't stop I was so startled and I apologized again and again for it and that woman told me long after that. That was the surest proof to her the wage program could work. If on Sunday, I could be they're trying to think of something that would help her with this problem. Then we must have something that could work. I felt it certainly must be very depressing off her that I should sit there by her bedside and cry. I feel that one of the things that I still have to guard against is that I used to be set in my way about what I considered the old-time a a dead. I have to tell myself other things are progressing in a a must to we Old-Timers who get scattered in separated and then witnessed the construction of services to get in more people down to make this thing function. We think that a a has changed but the root of it hasn't we are older in a a and we are older in years. It is only natural that we don't have the capacity to change but we ought not to criticize those who have there's another thing I would like to stress. I think it's awfully hard on people especially if they're new people to hear these long drawn-out talks. I don't ever remember that I was bored myself when we first came in and they came out to the house and talked to us about these things. I ate up every bit of it because I wanted to find out how to stay sober. Before I stopped I always was a great talker. I want to say that nobody will ever know how I Miss Annie's advice about things I would get in the biggest hitter about something. I hadn't been in town long. When one of the men's wives called me one Sunday and told me she didn't think I had any part of the program. Well, I wasn't sure I did and it was awful foggy and I wept and asked her what she thought I ought to do about it. She said she didn't know but that I sure showed plain enough. I didn't have any part of it. I didn't think I was going to get drunk right then but I remember how comforting it was when I called an and told her I was crying and I said Alice says she knows I don't have any part of the program. She talked to me and laughed about it and got me off over it. Another thing that was helpful to me. I used to think I was cowardly because when things came out pertaining to the program that troubled me I said to her many times any am I being a dog Hard because I lay those things away on the shelf and skip it she said I feel you're just being wise if it isn't anything that's going to help you or anybody else. Why should you become involved in it and get disturbed about it? So there you are. That's my story. I know I've talked too long, but I always do and anyhow, if I went on for ten or a hundred times as long I couldn't even begin to tell you all. She has meant to me. This concludes the reading of from Farm to City from part one of the personal stories section of the second edition of Alcoholics Anonymous. I'm grateful you listened long term for our 57th episode featuring story nine entitled the man who mastered fear. As always it's super easy to listen to the first and second editions of the big book including many stories not published in later editions. Just visit big book podcast.com and listen to your heart's content or download And subscribe for free to all of the podcast episodes on Apple podcasts Pandora Stitcher iHeartRadio or wherever you get your podcasts to listen to earlier chapters and stories in the big book simply scroll down the episode list if you've enjoyed listening, I'd be super grateful. If you can leave a rating on Apple podcasts, it'll help others find us and please share this podcast with your friends. And anyone you know, who has a desire to stop drinking. It may be the only version of The Big Book they ever hear off.

Jack Jack Akron Russ Doctor Bob Ethel M Farm John Dee Ethel King School Indiana Pioneer Woman Howard King Ethel M. One Akron Ohio Charleston West Virginia Apple US
NPR News: 02-06-2020 1AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 02-06-2020 1AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. President trump is looking ahead to his bid for reelection after being cleared of two the articles of impeachment senator. Mitt Romney was the only Republican to join all Senate Democrats in voting to convict trump. Romney says he believes the president's dealings is with Ukraine amounted to high crimes and misdemeanors and abuse of power. The president asked a foreign government to investigate his political rival. The president withheld held vital military funds from that government depressant to do so. The president delayed funds for an American ally at war with Russian invaders. The president's purpose was personal and political accordingly. The president is guilty of an appalling abuse of public. Trust Trust. President trump says he'll make public statement about the outcome of his impeachment Thursday at noon ninety seven percent of precincts now reporting results from Iowa's democratic acquatic presidential caucuses. The latest results. Show that Pete. Buddha jets has a smaller lead of Bernie Sanders in the race for the top spot FBI. I director Chris Wray says Russia is using information warfare to try to disrupt the twenty twenty election. Ray tells the House Judiciary Committee that Moscow is relying on a covert social media campaign. That's aimed at divide the American public opinion and sowing discord. He says law enforcement has not seen any ongoing efforts by Russia to interfere the nation's election infrastructure but he says officials remain on alert for possible election related cyber activity another group of Americans fleeing corona virus outbreak in Wuhan. China is being quarantined at airbases in California as K. Q. E. D. Sarah Husseini reports three hundred people arrive in the US. Early Wednesday aboard. Government chartered aircraft one. Hundred and seventy eight people will remain here at Travis lead. CDC Doctor Henry Walk Says Bass staff have been generally supportive of efforts efforts to seek guests through the transition. The spread of this novel Corona Virus is through droplets so for the base community. Calmer away or even more. There is no risk to the community about two hundred State Department. Evacuees have been quarantined database in southern California's Riverside County since last week. The Department Hartman. If Defense says it could host a total of twelve hundred people at six military bases including sites in Nebraska Colorado and Texas for NPR news. I'm Sarah Hosseini any in fairfield former Los Angeles County. Sheriff Lee Baca has begun serving his three year prison sentence for corruption. Mock attorneys have filed a new version to get his conviction thrown out L. saying jurors should have been told about his Alzheimer's diagnosis the. US Supreme Court rejected his last appeal in January Mauka was convicted of obstructing an the FBI investigation into allegations of bribery. An inmate beatings by jail. Guards you're listening to NPR news. The Justice Department is investigating. Mississippi's trouble prison system. Following the deaths of fifteen inmates since December details from NPR's Debbie Elliot. The Justice Department Civil Rights Division says it will examine conditions at four Mississippi prisons including Parchman state penitentiary. The focus will be on whether the Mississippi Department of corrections adequately protects prisoners from physical harm by other inmates and whether there's adequate suicide prevention and mental health care pressure pressure has mounted on the state to stem rash of deadly violence and apparent suicides. A spokesperson for Republican Governor Tate Reeves says they are grateful the trump administration astray Shin has taken a focused interest in criminal justice reform and promised to work together to quote right. This ship Debbie Elliott. NPR News Southern in West Virginia is under a flash flood. Watch until Friday amid ongoing rainfall. Governor is already calling emergency responders into action. Emily Alan of West Virginia Public Broadcasting reports state officials are anticipating torrential downpour and risky driving conditions. This other coalfields are part of a long stretch of Appalachia spanning Georgia Alabama the Carolinas and Kentucky that is at risk of flash flooding. The West Virginia National Guard. Says it's keeping keeping an eye on things here. The state is still struggling to rebuild and southern counties after flooding in two thousand sixteen damaged more than four thousand structures and killed twenty. Three people for N._p._R.. News I'm Emily Allen and Charleston West Virginia and I'm Shay Stevens N._p._R.. News in Washington.

president NPR trump Mitt Romney Shay Stevens Washington West Virginia FBI US West Virginia National Guard NPR California State Department Justice Department Charleston West Virginia Bernie Sanders Mississippi Sheriff Lee Baca Mississippi Department of corr
The FCC's Lawyer

More Than Seven Dirty Words

22:08 min | 1 year ago

The FCC's Lawyer

"Welcome to more than seven dirty words. The official PODCAST. I'm Evan Schwartz driver the FCC has a lot of lawyers to say the least. In fact there's a whole department of them called the office of General Counsel but within that department there is one lawyer to rule the mall and he just so happens to be my guest today so it is my pleasure to welcome the F. C. C.'s. General Counsel. Tom Johnson. Tom Thanks for coming to the show. Thanks for having me Evan. I understand and this is your first time doing a podcast. It isn't easy to pleasure to do it with you. All right well WE'RE GONNA start out with the most important thing before getting all that boring stuff. You are a a New York Area Sports Fan as am I But in a way we are both kind of strange because you are a mets giants fan. That's right and Diana Yankees jets fan and for those who are unfamiliar. It's usually the opposite. Usually you're a yankees giants fan immense jets fan but the fun thing is that we because because of this. We have both experienced success in our lifetimes. We've also experience just hopelessness and despair. That's whereas so many others only experienced one of those emotions or the other. So what is it like being Mitch Giants Fan Tom. Yeah well I mean as you said. I grew up with people telling me that there was something something wrong with that combination affiliations but actually went to school when I was a preschool with Lawrence Taylor son. So that's how that's how that fandom random started and my dad mets tickets growing up so that just kinda stock but my my my my my dad and my brother actually jets fan so they share in that part of your misery and guess what I like about. Both the mets and the giants is their frequent contenders. There is I mean I can. I can point to four super bowls during my lifetime for Super Bowl. Victories and five appearances and then You know on on that side at least one other appearance Oh so lots of heartache. But lots of good times as well. Yeah so I've enjoyed a five Yankees world series in my time on this earth and I've enjoyed a to AFC championship games or the jets lost and also fumble on Thanksgiving As I was sitting around with my entire family and becoming the laughing stock of the country. So that's been good as a jets fan. That's famous yeah. Yeah so I'm switching gears. How did did you get to be the top lawyer at the FCC? It's not the most obvious career path that takes one to this agency so I always like to start off by asking that question. Yeah so I had a background in sort of general administrative law and appellate law sort of the kind of law that deals with how federal federal agencies make rules and how those rules get challenged in court. I didn't have a specific telecom background but I got that background both in private practice and then out in Charleston in West Virginia I went out to the attorney. General's office out there for a year. To argue appeals and a lot of my colleagues in private practice. We're actually doing that. They were they. Were spending a year or two out in the different states to get that kind of experience. Because a lot of the states are sort of ramping up now suing the Federal Oh government multi-state litigation or filing amicus. Briefs there are lots of great opportunities out out in the states and when I found myself was was sort of the right the right types of skills that the commission was looking for because one thing that we knew was going to happen in this administration and strove every ministration as our our rules are GONNA get challenged and ultimately there's going to be decided by generalists judges so they might not be judges with just a pure telecom background and so one of the benefits of of my experience coming in. Was I sort of look at a lot of these things with a fresh set of eyes and try to figure out. How is this going to be attractive to a cord? How are we going to get this upheld court Gotcha? So that's why we hired you story. Finally this whole time. I was wondering so one thing thing that kind of sets the office of General Counsel Part is that you're not making policy you're not adding regulations or subtracting regulations are changing regulations wins. Those functions are handled by your the media. Bureau for media-policy Wireless Bureau and so on and so on. You're not doing any of that. So it's a quote my my favorite comedy office space. What would you say you do here so basically I would say that it We're responsible both for consulting the commission on legal issues. We're we're their in house counsel we help them make the orders. The the the rules as as legally defensible as possible and then we're responsible for defending those rules if they get challenged in court well one of the things I think is really interesting about the job is that it does to some extent. Lie at the intersection of law and policy. Sometimes the commission will want to do something thing and you'll find that if you if you do X. it's legally risky. Maybe if you do part of ACS it's it's less risky and so you do have these trade offs as to what a litigation risk is and how much policy you can get without taking on unnecessary litigation risk and another big piece of it is at sometimes you can help craft the policy. Let's see in such a way so that all of the different stakeholders are are satisfied. They're happy and that can reduce the chance that you get sued in the first place so I really like aac sort of having one foot in the legal sphere and then one foot in the policy sphere. The office itself has what something like eighty people between seventy and eighty between staff staff. Attorney that depending on how you're feeling on particular right and between those eighty people. Is it safe to say that the officers general counsel probably it takes a look at basically everything that the FCC does from a policy perspective we review all of the orders. All of the orders that get voted on in the open meetings is all of the other orders that come through the commission and really you know a lot of the work that the bureaus are doing as well so So yeah so we have a hand in everything which is which is great because you're not limited necessarily to a particular subject matter and you can try to kind of see the forest for the trees. I mean. oftentimes it's helpful to see how we are interpreting for example particular authority we have in the wireline space one month. And then the wireless space another month. That's happened and so having an office hours a week and sort of collaborate and make sure that we're being consistent that helps both produce better and better policy so obviously having a foot in everything or tow and everything means you're going to see so many different cases some of them are going to be interesting. Some are going to be. We probably less interesting than some. Might be just downright bizarre. I've had other employees of the on the show just share some weird stories that they experienced various in their careers. Here are there any cases that have come across your desk. Maybe it's an adjudication maybe litigation. That are just weird kind of stuck in your mind. Yeah well I guess one thing is that I hadn't appreciated before this job or my prior job in West Virginia's just some of the challenges that come when went into administration changes all of a sudden is a federal government. You find yourself on one side of an issue and then you might be on the different sides of the issue in the same case After there's a change in administration so we had to think through some of those issues when I came in the two thousand fifteen litigation that was upholding or defending defending President Obama's his FCC's net neutrality rules. All of a sudden we had a new rulemaking in the hopper where we ended up. Repealing those rules and so there was motions practices that we needed to do in order to make sure that that litigation was with stayed ultimately that we were able to proceed with with our roles and that happens actually quite a bit and You've recently talked about the interplay between federal state and local all governments when it comes to telecom regulation and all three of them play a role and not just in telecom but in every area policy area basically in government in the United States. And how do you see the roles of each of these levels of government. And then I'll ask you how you see. Those rules evolving as basically technology involves we'll certainly states and localities of an important role to play telecom law and the Communications Act anticipates estimates a role for them to play on matters of state and local concern but This is an area where what we're essentially regulating for the most part art interstate networks interstate communications networks and so. This is an issue that UH justice. Scalia explored a lot actually before he became a judge he was lawyer advising the White House on communications issues. And you wrote this piece called the two faces of federalism which he said look. Conservatives are rightly champions of federalism sort of state and local control of issues but there are issues that are truly national character were only the federal government can effectively deal with them and telecommunications is one because a lot of these network networks especially when you get into broadband networks emerging five G. networks these are regional or nationwide networks and oftentimes state or locality tries to impose particular rule on these networks. It makes either impossible or extremely costly for them to comply and deploy across multiple jurisdictions. And so this is an area where I think we've been using preemption in a targeted way EH. To actually further what I would call sort of state and local goals which is actually free up companies to you deploy network so that these communities can thrive without being without imposing unnecessary burden. Is there a particular example from the various. It's different policy battles. We've had here. That kind of illustrates that interplay. Yeah so I mean I would point to the net neutrality debate for why line I mean one of the things that I found really interesting as I was preparing to defend our repeal before the DC circuit was the support that we had gotten froms. small wireless providers particularly in rural or less prosperous parts of the country. That said that the conduct rules that had been imposed just on a nationwide level by the prior administration were preventing them from deploying because they couldn't afford to take on the regulatory Tori or litigation risk is too costly for them to figure out how to comply and in many parts of the country. These were the only option for for a wireless service for consumers and so this was just an interesting case in which you saw those roles were hurting local communities. What you're seeing today is states trying to reimpose those very same roles and I think a lesson or takeaway takeaway from this is that oftentimes at acts to the detriment of the very consumers that they're trying to serve so this principle of federalism as it's called or you're in Catholic social thought it's called subsidiarity this idea that states and localities being closer to the people ought to have a say on those issues who's that uniquely affect their own communities is that inherently in conflict with the interstate nature of the Internet. I mean does the Internet and and certain technologies as they advance and we see five G. coming online. Does that just basically mean that that principle no longer is valid in Telecom Or is it just different. I mean I think the principle is valid but I think important part of that principle is you need to look at what is the. What is the a competent authority in particular area? It's gotta be the lowest level of government that's competently able to deal with an issue. So for example you know we've had infrastructure picture reform items dealing with citing applications for five G. Services. Small cell deployments. And what we've found is yes. I mean there is an the area for states and localities to play They can determine where a particular cell tower or small cell is placed. But they can't can't impose rules that would unnecessarily delay that deployment that would make it prohibitively expensive because ultimately these are are not local networks there are regional or national networks. And so we always have to think about that balance. Is this truly an issue. That is unique to this locality or is it something that has is the spillover effects. These these externalities outside the jurisdiction of the state and that is where I think we as the FCC have the authority to sort of use preemption in a conservative manner to actually unleash private market forces to deploy these networks it's often said that anything the FCC does of any significance is going to result in a lawsuit. Is that true. I think it's I think it's often true because I do think that you've got interest that are often not aligned. I think it to some extent in here here and in the history of the FCC in sort of looking at our regulatory history. I mean the same story seemed to come up again and again where you have. Incumbent networks or incumbent technologies and then you've got new networks the the next generation technology disruptors and the problem. Ms Is that oftentimes congress very slow to update our authority to accommodate for that or sometimes own rules are written in a certain way and need to be amended ended and so you constantly have this battle sort of opportunities at least for regulatory arbitrage where incumbents resistant to change and and next generation services. Really want the change in need the change and so that's where you get the conflict a lot of times and that's why there has been a lot of litigation over over the course of the FCC speaking on a previous episode to Dell Hatfield former chief engineer at the FCC that'll saying nothing is new continues to play out. Even Venus Technology Develops and changes a lot of the same debates and a lot of the same dynamics in. FCC's past still exists today. I'm speaking of battles. What's it like to manage a bunch of lawyers so I myself am not a lawyer and I can imagine that might be a little difficult. I don't find them to be the most shy people and I imagine you might have some spirited debates about how to proceed on certain things that definitely happens. I think that at the end of the day. I'm really really blessed by the fact that I do have a lot of opinionated. Really Intelligent really knowledgeable people on staff people who both have great legal minds but but also have a really deep understanding of the technical issues and even outside of my staff to be able to draw on the expertise of engineers where we need to draw on the the expertise of economists. Definitely definitely correct that you know there are no wilting flowers at the agency. And so I think that oftentimes times results in better rulemaking better briefs and in particular. I'll say we're this. We're this comes up. A lot is when we moot do moot courts for oral oral arguments. I really think that that's where a lot of modernism litigation side. Really shine by playing devil's advocate by asking the toughest questions we you can expect to get from the other side that ultimately resulted in a better argument when we're in court this FCC was once called by a trade publication. The twitter commission mission and usually that focuses on the five commissioners including the chairman who are very active on social media. Maybe a certain policy advisor visor and podcast host. WHO also likes to tweet but it also includes you A? Why do you as General Counsel tweet so when I got this job I was actually really impressed by the fact that chairman Pie seemed so good at both having that depth of policy knowledge but also so translating it through social media that he was he was so social media savvy because I just think in this day and age to be an effective public servant to be in this field you need to both be able to have that policy knowledge but also to be able to communicate it effectively over modern forms of communication? So I I really I really took as a model and my understanding is that we do as a commission tweet a lot more than other parts of the federal government and there are some parameters. AMADOR's you need to be conscious when you're doing that but I think that lawyers are naturally risk averse but actually this is one area where we ought to be less risk averse. Yeah I mean we ought to be getting our message out to using social media effectively. So I've been super happy with the culture here on that and I've just been trying to join in on the other hand. The giants have not had a winning record since you started tweeting. So maybe there's something to that. There's probably definitely. It causes any advice for young attorneys interested in telecom maybe particular advice for those who are really attracted attracted to the idea of working at the Office of General Council. Obviously after hearing this episode. Basically everyone's GonNa WanNa work for you but if there's particular advice for those folks folks who want to deal with telecom litigation education the issues that your department deals with sure so I'll give some telecom specific advice maybe some more general advice so We have an attorney's honors program that has been a great launching pad for a lot of the senior people at the commission or media. Bureau chief Steve. Senior advisor to the chairman. A lot of our alumni came up through the honors program. So it's a two year program which you have an opportunity to act as a junior attorney in one under the bureaus and it's open to third year law students and law clerks and so that will open up for twenty twenty one in October And a lot of the resumes we get you do see. It's helpful to see someone who's taken administrative law someone who's I other. It's not essential someone who has some interest in telecommunications or technology and there are a lot of internships when you're in law school both here At anti which deals with federal spectrum at a lot of the trade groups that we work with within the industry in-house NBC NBC universal. I've seen a couple of times similar media outlets I mean there's a lot of different opportunities out there for law. Students sort of get their feet wet and so I would just encourage rich people to take advantage of those and to consider the honors program and the more general thing I was just going to say is lawyers are risk averse bunch and I would just encourage average people not to be as afraid to take some risks with their career. I was in private practice for ten years and it definitely was to say. I'm going to move to Charleston West Virginia for for a year and and just work on appeals out there no prior connection to the state was a great experience. I got to argue. Seven appeals in a year and it led to this job so so I think that sometimes you do need to follow your heart and your passion and look for those outside the box opportunities last question. Should you eat breakfast. The morning of an oral argument so so February first two thousand and nineteen was the day of the Mozilla Net neutrality repeal or argument and it was snowing that morning and I was allowing a lot of a lot of time for me to get to the courthouse house and what I had anticipated although there were a lot of people arguing with at this argument actually last five hours and so I listened to like half of. Yeah that's right you can be. You can be excused good half but at about our three. We take a short break and I was about to get up up and it was right after hearing all the other side's arguments so I needed to sort of strategize about what I was going to say but then right before they were called back I realized sized. I'm starving and I haven't eaten anything. I should've packed GRANOLA BAR and I turned to my wife. Who's behind me and said you have something to eat? And she just gives me me this blank stare and then all of a sudden it here order order council so I was a little light headed up there. I made it through okay but definitely a lesson for next well well We'll leave it there. My guest has been Tom Johnson. FCC General Counsel and anomalous mets giants. Fan Tom Thanks for joining the show. Thanks for for having me other. Follow me on twitter at Evans underscore. FCC and you can follow Tom. Tom M Johnson Junior. I think I was the one hundred Tom Johnson to sign up. Wow so unique. Find this podcast and the I tunes store. Google play. Wherever you get your podcasts please review because because we'll help others find the show? Thanks for listening. We'll catch you next time.

FCC General Counsel attorney private practice yankees Tom Johnson federal government mets Evan Schwartz Tom West Virginia giants Charleston West Virginia jets Mitch Giants New York Diana Yankees United States official
Saving the World: Stories about trying to be the savior

The Story Collider

27:57 min | 1 year ago

Saving the World: Stories about trying to be the savior

"<music> science story is the fell right. Well get it out. It was that golden moment because science was on my side the hey everybody welcome to the story collider where we bring you true personal stories about science. I'm your host host Aaron Barker and this week. We're presenting stories about trying to save the world. Have you ever set out a mission to help someone or something only to realize leader that perhaps he didn't understand the complexity of the situation growing up. I used to think that suburban living was the environmentally friendly option because as you know trees and then I did a class in college called plant biology WanNa one plants and people and actually you can listen to my story story about taking this class on our website if you search my name and story quieter dot org but in this class I learned that suburbia slices up forest I into smaller sections which means the forest has more edge to it and when the forest has more edge that means there's more opportunity for it to be permeated by things like wind and pollution and of of course people which totally changes the conditions and it also means that animals tend to Rome larger distances are more likely to roam outside the forest and be impacted hacked by people it totally transform my understanding of what it means to save the environment today. We'll hear stories from two people who set out to save the world and instead instead came to understand it a bit better. Our first story is from Lindsey Cree is recorded in April twenty nineteen at the beer baron tavern in Washington D._C.. The theme that night was hurdles so on a November Day November. Two thousand nine are received a call from my brother. I was standing in my dad's living room. He calls the tell. Tell me that a friend of mine had passed away from a drug overdose so he and I had not been close in many years <hes> probably I'd say at least three or or four years at the time that he passed away. He was probably the smartest kid in school he he was absolutely the sweetest person in school. I mean I I went to middle school and high school with him and it was it was kind of one of those things that if you had a question about any subject when you go ask him if you needed help with something he'd go ask him and he was there for everybody because of his passing a realized that that moment meant that I wanted to help people I wanted to help people that suffer from addiction because I thought he knows or something that I could have done differently could have been a better friend <hes> could have helped him at that point in her before then to get into recovery <hes> but I didn't really know how to but being in pharmacy school you know I was in my first year pharmacy school and I thought well maybe I'll learn something here that can help me help other people <hes> so that was my first year pharmacy school you know fast forward three and a half years later a graduate. <HES> I ended up working for the university that I went to school for <hes> and because of that gives me some flexibility with my job well in Twenty fifteen are heard that Charleston was getting ready to have a harm reduction program which is a syringe exchange program. I'm not sure what they call it here <hes> but I thought Oh my gosh finally because we needed one. It was long overdue. <hes> West Virginia has one of the biggest drug problems <hes> we've been number one in overdoses for years because the state was completely flooded with pills so pills came in and then eventually pills slowed down on so in the pills slowdown people started kind of going towards heroin math anything they could get their hands on and so it was a huge problem in our state and we really really only needed something so so excited. The program was started and I really wanted to help so I thought this is my way that I can. Maybe touch lives of people that MHM suffer from addiction so went to the planning meeting not knowing what to expect <hes> a thought you know I'll probably try to volunteer at least for a couple couple weeks and maybe pull my students in have must students volunteer thinking. I'm only going to be there for a couple of weeks and just kind of getting them into the group of everything little. Did I know oh I was going to be there forever. <hes> he you fall in love with patients and you just can't you know you can't stop seeing them. <hes> but you know the planning meeting. I was trying trying to figure out you know houses logistically work <hes> Howard patients can handle being interviewed in the room you know. Is this going to be a rough crowd. I just I didn't know what to expect but I wasn't gonNA. Let that stop me. I was determined that I was going to do it so first week. We were all excited. ONC- people come in <hes> our health officer at the time. He stood waiting in the waiting room like this dressed in a suit eager for people to walk in. He was so excited. The first group comes in led by this young lady so she comes in with her friends and she takes one look at him and she's like nope and she's out the door. She took off running back to her car. She thought he's a cop. This is a trap. I'm gone so she she runs out to her car gets in and our health officer runs after her knocks on her window and begs her to come back in and she did and because of that day she continued to come every single week she brought everybody she knew so all of our friends random people that she you just met <hes> that she knew used heroin or math or whatever it may be needed help she would bring them all to the health department in the great thing about the harm reduction some programs it wasn't just US handing out syringes <hes> we were talking to him about being safe so how to prevent spread of disease how to use Narcan to save people's lives <hes> Um and gave them a path actually get into recovery so everybody that she brought in was able to get that same education which was awesome so the program kept growing and and growing and the more that talked to people the more. I realized how like the the stigma surrounding addiction really affects people so the within the first week or two of the program I had a woman come in and she sat down in front of me and I started you know chitchatting with her <hes> and she just started crying so I gave her her moment. <hes> this letter kind of get it out then. I asked her if she was okay and what. She said to me was you. Were Nice to me. You're the first person that didn't treat me like a dog in years but that story was not uncommon said the more I was at home reduction. The more I heard the same kind of things when people were knew they they would come in and they'd have their hoods up. Their heads would be down. They wouldn't make eye contact but the more they started coming back the more they would kind of open up to us us so they knew us by name. We really didn't know their names because it was an anonymous program. Sometimes they told us though but more importantly their heads would be held higher they would have a little bit more self respect they had had their heads down and they would greet us that allowed us that connection to actually help them. which is what we were there for so <hes> you know like I said it kept growing and growing and growing <hes> <hes> a really didn't understand everybody's path to addiction? I mean we have this idea that you know. Everybody starts a certain certain way but that's not necessarily true. <hes> some people's path is with pills and people they start with heroin or math or whatever it may be one thing. I didn't really realize is that oftentimes. Most people are forced <hes> at a young age <hes> and I think the most shocking age that I heard was six so someone on started using it six and again that has to do with a lot of issues in the family and being forced and it's it's shocking. It's only word I can think to describe it. <hes> and I'd like to tell you about one patient. I A went out to to get this patient. Take her into the room. I had no idea how she is going to affect me had no idea what I was in for <hes> but she comes in and she's she just hard. She's cold hold. She's <hes>. She sits down. She crosses her arms. She won't look at me. She Leans back in the chair just trying to act as tough as she could and so. I just talked to her just like everybody else. <hes> try to get her to open up and eventually she did and then she started to cry <hes>. She told me that she never really opened up to anybody because she didn't trust anybody so she didn't. She had no one to trust no one to talk to you so this is really the first on that she opened up so I sat there and watched her cry and it took everything in me to keep also from crying. So you know I try to talk to her. We try to get her help and eventually you know she. She left the room and I left the room and as soon as I left the room tears I I just. I couldn't hold them back anymore. So into the nurses station stood there notch crowd because I couldn't figure out how I was going to go to the next patient like how do you move on from that. I mean it's not it's not my life but it still someone else's in like how do you just get in the next person like nothing happened bent so. I stood there in just thought about that but then I realized that the next person probably has a very very similar story and so does the next person then I never saw her again and like I said everybody's path is different and then there's this idea I always hear people say that addiction is a choice <hes> <hes> I disagree obviously <hes> but some of the stories that have heard of the reasons that I disagree so I've had people come in and tell tell me that they used to fund syringes on the side of the road clean amount and puddle water and Newsham <hes>. One Guy had one clean syringe left and he sharpened it on the sidewalk walk because he didn't want to use a shared syringe. <hes> you know mothers don't have custody of their kids families losing their homes so all kinds kinds of things that made me think that there's no way this is a choice because if it was a choice they were to stop using right. So how could it be a choice ace task be a disease so harm reduction or needle exchange programs grams. They're very controversial must state <hes> there was a lot of issues surrounding the program <hes> a lot of people that I didn't really understand everything that we did. You know thought we were enabling <hes> so we heard that quite a lot. There was a lot of things in the news a lot of bad press press and eventually program was shut down but when it shut down the first thing I thought is what's going to happen to these people people. Where are they going to go now. How are they going to get help. Never once did I think am on the right side of the fence here because there was a lot of things in the news at sounded pretty bad but not once. Did I think that not once. I wonder if we were saving lives not once since then. I wonder if we were making a difference because I knew the answers to those questions but am I gonNa hear about about that. Same Guy going back in cleaning that syringe out and puddle water. Am I gonNA see their faces or their names which had usually for the most part didn't know what am I going to see them in the obituaries. Is it going to be this week. Is it going to be next week. I don't know thank you all for listening. That was Lindsay Acri. Lindsay is an assistant professor at the University of Charleston School of Pharmacy see she provides patient care and several clinics throughout the Charleston area in his a board certified asthma educator her involvement with the harm reduction clinic located within the Canal Charleston Elston Health Department includes teaching naloxone training to patients caregivers members of the community as well as assisting with harm reduction clinic services. I'm really grateful to Lindsay from making the trip to DC to share her story with us again. She originally told the story in a show we produced in my family's hometown of Charleston West Virginia last ear but unfortunately the recording failed so I'm so glad we got another chance to share with y'all. This episode is brought to you by Xerox. Today's Xerox is is all about enabling the era of intelligent work from industry leading hardware and software solutions to workflow automation and new innovations like three D. printing and hyper spectral imaging nick. We're not just thinking about the future. We're making it. Learn more at Xerox. Dot Com slash meet to think our next story today. Is from genie purchase. It was recorded in March Twenty nineteen at the Haymarket theatre in Blacksburg Virginia. The show is presented in partnership with Virginia Tech. The the theme that night was public inspired science. I I met Miss Pauline Ray Brown and Eugene Eugene Smith in September two thousand seventeen I have I heard their story in my engineering ethics and the Public Class and Dr Edwards offer students students an opportunity to visit Denmark South Carolina on a sampling trip. I volunteered to go mainly because I was nosey. The story was was so bizarre that I wanted to see for myself. Miss Pollen an Eugene are an African American couple in their seventies and they have been complaining about their bad water issues for the past ten years they have been collecting over forty water samples jars of dirty smelly water her from their taps label with date and time since two thousand nine each a seal time capsule waiting for the day when someone would listen they drive twenty miles round trip to healing springs to fill up dozens of water jugs to use for washing their hair renting dishes brushing clean their teeth and cooking they have collected pictures and high price water bills newspaper articles letters to state reps lawyer cease and desist statements health records and even a consent order between Denmark and the state all in one binder bulging with so much information in it is bursting at the seams but the question that baffles me is how do you have bad and expensive water for ten years in nobody's doing anything think about it. The people in the town are so resigned to their fate. They don't even fight it anymore. I had to see this for myself but when we arrived arrived I wasn't quite prepared. Despite their high poverty rates Denmark was not in ruins polly Eugene had this nice clean ranch style home overflowing with southern hospitality. They had this beautiful China cabinet across from the formal dining room table that no one actually Ashley eats at they also had the formal sitting room that no one actually sits in with that couch that typically has plastic on it so you don't mess it up but in this case as they had a sheet they also had small black figurines of musicians and angels just placed carefully throughout the house their house it felt like home and they felt like grandparents and never met before miss. Paula cooked this huge dinner in her of fry fresh macaroni and Cheese Collard Greens rolls and cake and when you finish eating she made sure you got more food than you had space for Dr Edward mentioned how good the Greens were and asked her what they were seasoned with and she was like Oh just on Bacon Grease but I knew it had to be something like that. It can't be more than hers because there was nothing healthy about those grains it had to be some Turkey necks and pig feed or bacon gene. We're just this loving couple and their house was filled with joy and stories in love in abundance for all all of us but they just had bad in overpriced water and learn to live with that. I adopted Denmark for my class study study after the trip and I went through that binder that all the records pauling Eugene collected I was looking for evidence. The historical documents is to give some context to this injustice they experienced but when it came to writing up my findings I began to freeze because I wasn't riding a summary of Denmark's water history. I was putting pieces together to create it but who is added create that history just a twenty four year old engineering p._H._D.. Student of course I pay hours in months doing research on this but still ten years ago when they when all of this began allergists fourteen years old a freshman ninth grader at Cedar Grove High School in Southeast Atlanta when Pauline Eugene I started noticing Brown and stinky water from their taps who was to write up their history history as a kid didn't even grow up in Denmark. Did I have the right I questioned whether or not I was even doing the right thing. It was an Essex class last after all but what bothers me is that we're seeing your own me wouldn't have questioned at all. I was a feisty little thing who would have helped these people. No matter the cost I wouldn't have known how to help and know what I had the power to do anything about it but twenty four year old has been trained as an engineer for the past seven years where engineers must be objective and impartial we must present facts with hard evidence. We leave out opinions in minimize emotions because you know emotions make you biased and if you're biased you you jeopardize your credibility ability. Essentially I think that we were taught to minimize our humanity but the real question is was that too emotionally emotionally involved was was this ethical as you can see I struggled. I struggled to be objective to this possible at wanted to try to give the bad guys in the saga the benefit of the doubt less still honoring these citizens very harsh reality but it miss responsibility seem so great and I was so young so over my head but I am a part of the Virginia Tech Tag team that worked with Denmark residents to uncover the use of the pesticide Halla San that was being used to treat their wells it was used illegally illegally as is not approved for drinking water and they've been using this pesticide for the past ten years the exact same same As and when they first told me we were going on the trip and we were gone with President Sands and we were taking the Hokie bird. I was really excited okay but I was a little confused like why are we taking the mascot like I'm like I'm all here for you know the school spirit thing but do we really need that big bird costume but shaw the Hokie Bird is not just the university mascot okay. It is the universities -versities private jet. It's a plane all right so I was excited okay. It's a it's a plane. That's probably most frequently used to recruit football players but your girl was elated. My probably a little too excited because my mom was like calmed down. Don't act like you've never been anywhere before but you know well mom I never met President stands before and I daren't show ambition nowhere on no oh private jet so I'm GonNa have me a good old time. Okay don't worry though I'm a send you pictures are presentation was amazing and compelling and the best part was that Pauling Eugene got to go and present with us they got to it really share in the entire experience. They spent a couple of days in Blacksburg at the in beats he and we got to speak with the new ethics class and we had this awesome potluck for them. They were catered to by everyone around them. President stance personally went to go get Ms Brown a chair when she got tired of standing ending and Dr Edwards was running back and forth to get them anything they want it from the mini bar on the plane except for alcohol of course they wanted to make sure I'll let you know that part hard polly Eugene where truly the guest of honor as they should be and on top of that after we got back that my it took them to their favorite restaurants red lobster after we got back and I don't know what happened but for some reason season the waiter thought it was their anniversary and they got free ice cream and cake dinner it was like the perfect ending to the most amazing day and a and they were going home the next morning and so I asked Pauline Jean. What was your favorite part of the trip? Okay you know what they said. The shower the shower I tried to hide the shock on my face as they continue to talk about this water. It was in this moment of fun in fellowships in laughs that I realized that the best part of the trip was the shower it was this warm clean ability to wash the and the piece that they had after three days of not having to second guess what was coming out of the tap in that night. I cried myself to sleep because I I can't fix their water and then it dawned on me. They weren't asking me to be perfect socratic their history primed and polished they just wanted someone to listen and to walk with them on their journey to share with them what I do know and provide clarity where I can but I was so concerned about being so young and inexperienced and feeling underqualified even though I am as I take on something so much bigger than myself off but I just can't afford to do that anymore to question myself to freeze to shrink shrink back and wait for someone who is more fit to do this because pauling eugene they already had to wait ten years for fourteen year old girl to grow up that was Jeanie. Purchase Genie is a P._H._d.. Student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Virginia Tech her research focuses on examining the efficacy of point of views point of entry filter when exposed to extreme corrosion conditions and investigating the barriers hindering during the widespread adoption of these technologies at risk communities her interdisciplinary work is at the intersection of citizen science water-quality remediation and public health through her research genie collaborates with residents to pursue solutions to community based problems genie loves to teach mentor and Inspire students and work with communities like Denmark South Carolina. She aspires to be a professor story. Glider is grateful for the support of the Tiffany and Co Foundation in of Science Sandbox Assignments Women's foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science the story fighters led by me artistic director Aaron Barker as well as executive director Liz neely with with help from deputy director Nisa Greenberg Operations Manager Lindsay Cooper and the rest of our amazing team stories featured in today's podcast where from shows produced by Mariam's airing Holum Shane Hanlin Hanlin Christine Gentry and Emma Yarbrough. The podcast is edited by Senior podcasts editor Zoe Saunders withheld from John Quinn and Gwen Hogan the music is by ghost I special thanks to the beer baron tavern and the Haymarket Square theatre

Denmark heroin Miss Pauline Ray Brown Aaron Barker Blacksburg polly Eugene Xerox Virginia Tech drug overdose baron tavern Pauling Eugene WanNa Dr Edwards Charleston West Virginia West Virginia officer Lindsey Cree President Charleston
Charleston,WV, West Side, part 2: We May See a Harvest

Out of the Blocks

44:09 min | 1 year ago

Charleston,WV, West Side, part 2: We May See a Harvest

"From W Y PR PR ex. In collaboration with the West Virginia folklife program. It's out of the blocks neighborhood. Everybody Story Wonders Voice. The Charleston West side used to be. I guess thirty forty years very good part of the city like most inner city neighborhood has changed other people were like look at all the negative saying look at all the positives that we look at the opportunities that we have to plant seeds in these kids lives. People were like. Oh that's where all the crimes are. That's where all the drugs are here and I looked into a really great block. My neighbors look out for each other. We talk to each other. We have community barbecues in the summer. So it's really cool to have that as well but I it was intimidating. His neighbor kids a lot of folks. They gotTA deal with a lot of things that they they should deal with kids but reality is what it is is not for producer. Aaron Hanging Window Patrick with West. Virginia's state folklorist. Emily Hilliard out of the blocks Charleston. West Virginia's was right after did support for out of the blocks comes from our daily bread. Employment Center hosting a taste aced for more a high energy night of auctions wind bowls raffles dancing and delicious dishes from some of Baltimore's best loved restaurants it Saturday march seventh at the American Visionary Arts Museum. The proceeds are going to benefit our daily bread. Employment Center offering much more than a meal to neighbors in need with services services like case Management Substance Abuse Disorder Treatment Legal Aid job placement services skills training and benefit eligibility assistance. You you can find out more at Catholic Charities Dash MD dot org slash a taste for more because hope is just the start see. We have a photo album here. You WanNA share the reason I want to show it to you because it's very important. Okay here they are the young kids that I took over here. We are in there. They've been grop now and now here the children now. They're grown. I if you know what these kids came to. Can you imagine a mother and father in prison and nobody so. I feel so blessed that I was able to help him their miracle. Name is Thomas Tower. Actually I've been going into prisons thirty years other people may go to preach over manner and the very first case had this lady. This family family that I ran into. She says my husband's in federal prisoners at us at this young lady ended up with four children begin to work with this one family family. One day my wife and I had them over to dinner kids prisoners about forum and casually she as the one of the children. You know where these green bean scam. They said crocus anybody left but us. I found that was very pitiful to know that we have kids. Didn't know how food was produced that date so the very next day when I began to look for land lack of start a garden so Charleston urban renewal. Let me have this property here ear. See these here. The call contain a beds right now. What Swan Hears Winner Green? What grew in here with tomatoes is corn and green beans squash and turnips with already harvest? This it was a progression from men and children of prisoners. Business to an urban farm also have an orchard terrorist peach and tortured in there as a boy about thirteen fourteen. I plowed outwith the horse. I grew up growing gardening so we would have adequate food aid. So that is really the beginning of my knowledge of grown Ron Food for my uniform way I came up. I'm so thankful we. I turned out that in my family. Now what I try to do. What latte done with my family? Can I do this with the neighb- with the homeless and street people. Can I do that with the this includes anybody wants to come in and join on with me they can and like say disarm it can be done and into watch stuff bruin and eat it. It amazes a lot of children to even adults. It was so funny. I had funny experiences. I had a bunch of kids and I had a much tomato plants and planting them. Emmy I was showing them sorta made like regionally. I drill a hole. Another person would come by and drop tomato another Tampa you know I had a little was born good but I look back around. There was a kid. PULL THEM ACID son. Please don't touch. And though the kids want to kill kill him. But I couldn't figure out why it was done at you know and I said there are some mental things but if you get kids interested they love to do this. If if you notice that a tomato rotten's from the inside out so when you deal with people you better deal with the inside so so you can develop the outset. So if that's the case with the Mehta then we'll send people rotten from the inside so let's deal with that in a progression of time. Maybe there developed better. Okay are showcases house. All the very very best this is is a rare piece porcelain dove Porcelain Dav and it has all the information on on almost everything we have has all the history behind it. My name is Tammy fallow salad and we are at trophy antiques and hair. We do estate sales for our customers. And we've acquired things from people who want to sell one item or a hose state state and it just grew and grew and grew and a lot of people. Come in I say. How do you get around here? Well if you WANNA look at my shop you're going to come and look at it crowded there's hundreds and hundreds of pieces here let me ask you. Have you had like that antiques. Roadshow moment where you realized you had like a super duper hot item. We've had several times especially in addicts. You you'll be doing on a state you'll dig in an attic and there's something you'd never ever seen before so yeah it's good you you get addicted and you can't wait to you. Ask them on the phone when they call you. What do I expect to see here in? Sometimes they can tell you one item that makes you say I'll be there in an hour or so. Is that okay like walking through a museum to be in here. It's kind of a museum and I don't do any junk in our shop as far a lot of people like junk and it's okay. My mother told me that's how you make good money when I started out by little things that don't cost a lot of money and are things are nice. They're not overpriced overpriced. Because we have this shop every day in the reason I can stay in businesses. I have my hair business on top of this so we're always doing something for someone. It's morning when my customers come in the door. They come first regardless. I'm here at eight o'clock every morning. Compliment you on your hair. You have beautiful very voluminous hair outta here. What's your secret? I have a little bit of natural curl in my hair frosted stood. And it's just good here. I don't spend a lot of time on it but I never come the work with my hair wet and I never come to work with my hair straight. I think you should see what the customer wants utilize so that's what I did people nowadays. We're real straight hair. My ladies are in their seventies and up to ninety now with an older lady look good with straight long long hair no they would not hair looks good pulled up pulled back a little bit and have a flair to it. So as long as I'm here that's what you're going to see from me conditioning. There because it makes trekking. Here design is an American false story or just glass. Okay could did you bring me a picture of it. We lived on a farm in Mason County and on Saturday mornings. We'd take our cream to ripley to sell and every Saturday. My mom had to stop along the highway and look at old big plant stands and they were made out of Oak and I think I still have everyone she ever bought and I I just began to think. Oh that does look pretty good. And then so the shop grew and grew and I had my mother with me until she was ninety five and she would always excite. You don't need that but that sure is a pretty piece and you know I'd end up with it. So my mom the way she raised this was to be honest in entail things and not tell someone big story about him. That wasn't true and so far I mean it's been successful for me as you can tell by the shop so I go right back to to how I was raised in the country. I can tell you must've had a really close relationship with her You loved her a lot. That's why like my older ladies. They just fit right in with. That's what I do. Nice gross in his Paula. Or anyone else know about this. She said if they call me once in a while they'd know about call him and tell him I feel. Oh Oh yes she is that oh I did hear back and I did a kind of fancy and she felt so much better. I'm searching you always have to think about the air. That's the real thing for us. It's like a bow over a string player. If you can't control that you can't play Hi My name is. Bob twits Ziani and we're in my living room in Charleston West Virginia on the West side and I moved here mostly just because I could live in the same city where I worked worked in which was nice. Well I play in the West Virginia symphony and I like to teach so I get to do a lot of that. What I I really wanted to play when I was a kid but I wasn't big enough to hold so somebody had the bright idea to give me a clarinet? Never managed to get rid of it so it's interesting. Woodwind instruments play almost entirely on the overtone series. We only have this many actual actual fundamental notes. Everything after is her money For any instrument. It's very easy to get bogged down in technical solutions and always worrying about him. I playing on my plane into my playing or whatever. And that's important. That really does matter but it doesn't matter very much if you're boring the real issue is how can can I take all of that and try to say something. So I'M GONNA. I decided to play a little piece. What's not a little piece? It's part of an opera opera by Puccini called Tosca in the last act the main male character is awaiting execution as happens in operas and he sings this amazing Aria. But what's even more amazing about it. The clarinet gets first elusive unless I think it's wonderful that we have this connection to people who lived three hundred the years ago and I mean I feel like I know. Beethoven or Brahms as well as they know people who are alive today and truthfully I only know a small part of those people. But I don't know much more of my friends that I see all the time. Everybody's a mystery but these people left behind something that I can explore war. That is not just words. It's I mean I have nothing gets words. My house full of books and reading will give me facts but the music does that immediately. I like to sign here redesigned for what does that what sets be humble. Stay hungry always hustle. You put that slogan up there. I seen it one day and I really liked it. I mean it makes a lot of sense to me. If you're not humble. You really can't make any money and especially with this crowd here. You have to make them feel like they're at home which this is their neighborhood neighborhood. You can't just come in here and say hey I'm better than you. You won't get any business like that. Hey she grouchy this morning. And My name is Sally Johnnym. Where Sally's market in Delhi eight twenty nine Central Avenue? It's like a convenience store we sell Cigarettes Blondes Candy. We have a menu resell philly cheese steaks burgers hot dogs Gyros. I'm originally from Palestine. I'm from a little city called Dude Kadam and now we live here Sally's market. It's named after are you belongs to you. This is your spot yes it is. I'm very grateful I had the opportunity to open up my own. Little business you know with my dad's help because a lot of people don't have that my dad actually used to own a restaurant too so ever since then. I've been helping him lurk around convenience stores and restaurants this year ultimate goal. What's what's in the future for? You know I want to finish school. Go into law school and become a lawyer hopefully like immigration lawyer or a criminal defense lawyer. Something like that but I need time to do that. That talk to me about what you studied so far. I mean you've been you've been studying yeah. I have a bachelor's degree in criminal justice than coffee in their blue. There's a lot of people that's why when I studied criminal justice. There's a lot of people that have like drug offenses and stuff like that. And they talk to me about it. I feel like I'm some of these people's therapist here. I swear I feel like a therapist. Just feel like a lot of people feel comfortable telling me their problems. 'cause I'm willing to listen. I'm willing to give them my vice and I'm very blunt I don't Wanna like sugar coated or anything. I'll just tell them straight away like that's wrong. You should not be doing that. And that's why I WANNA be lawyer because I would like. No that's wrong. I don't WanNa be with somebody for doing something wrong. I don't know how long have you been here behind the counter almost a year yeah year and a half. I work a lot. I don't have a social life anymore because I don't do anything but work and hopefully when I get somebody to help me out more here than I will go back to what I was. My goal is leaving also starts When I was a kid I had a list? You can still hear it from time to time and I stuttered. I was five six years old. When everybody else is GonNa play on the playgrounds a play by myself photos embarrassing? 'cause people couldn't understand me when I talked so that's when I started playing basketball. Fell in love just me and a basketball. My name is Lee Phillips ups. I live here at eight thirty one main street Charleston Charleston's west side while I got to junior high Thursday teacher. Her name was Lisa Hicks and she was a speech pathologist so she taught me to speak out on the back of my throat and I became more social then. That's when I started playing junior highs. WanNa Start Planning one teams that I got to high school. We won forty eight games in a row Castillo West Virginia and I played with a two people that went to Wvu West Virginia University with the in as he went on to college. He's infacy known for making the I ask the new West Virginia Coliseum name is Justin Phillips and I am the son of Levi Liba Phillips his group of guys at Wvu was the first all black integrated team in NCAA division. One and men's basketball. They said there wasn't a thing. Levi Phillips couldn't do on the basketball court and he was a guy that they said we looks like he's not playing hard and just gliding around around the court and in the game's over and he has a triple double win. You know so that's just the type of player at you. Know everyone tells me he was. And that's what I've seen on films with what happened with basketball career after college. Well after college on eighteen seventy four. I got drafted by the Baltimore. Bullets I WANNA get into playboy metabolite the twelfth. I gotTA check every two weeks so I like that. But they traded let me to the seventy sixers Philadelphia seventy six thank. They get two weeks and a steak sandwich for me but I never never want to stop. My Dad is one of the most humble Guys that I've ever met he won't tell you any any thing about you. Know all the incredible things that he's done you know. I hear all this stuff from his friends and his coaches his teammates. No they told me all these things. He's very very humble and he also show you know until he taught me humility. You know Let your actions speak for you. My son when he was in seventh grade. His coach cut him from the team and four years later he was probably the best player in the state. I think they knew I was. Levi Phillips Phillips sign. They expected a whole bunch. Not just wasn't you know. I wasn't physically ready at the time. And so you know. The coach was a guy that he's still a friend that his day. But what he pulled me aside And he said I know your dad was a star he said. But maybe this isn't for you. The long story short three years later he got run into. You are the best player in the state and I was like I wanted to say you know I told you so I wanna tell you that then but again I could hear my dad ringing him on mine and said we are actions not by the things we say. So what we're I'M GONNA do is we're going to work even harder so you know for the next. What three or four years every night come on going to the gym and debt to that cold coming back three years later saying you are the best player in the state known as simply because my dad took the time to mold me to that player? We have three different generations of bath ball players two years ago my grandson won the State Championship and was on the day. Fifty years to the day that my father went his championship. I mean it it. It was spectacular with something. See the day that he one I cried. It's our Motha that cry. I mean I'm not ashamed to admit I cried like a baby. It was a very special moment for me. I'm just so oh pro. It's all the blocks Jolson. Worcester you west side neighborhood. Everybody's store anybody aced everybody's story. There are very few things that we I can't figure out how fix I'm Steve Basham or Stephen. Stacey Service Center on Thirty Virginia Street blast entrust luck. Alexa were computer or agnostic work. That's kind of my specialty sort of evolved in the work at teaching guys what they need to know to do do that for me. And then I'm available if they need me Right now I'm just replacing a battery on a Hyundai elantra. This cody CRICHTON. One of the most promising young mechanics ever ever better L. D. Bene- tremendous asset force. Voltage is pretty low on it. I guess the cold weather is kind of knocked it out but hopefully we'll get it going here shortly. Proliferation these computer systems as tremendous some of these newer cars have eighteen twenty to twenty five different processors communicating on as many as three different types of networks. So it's not for the faint of heart or the untrained. It's and the biggest thing we ran into with Joan people out of the technical schools. Is they understand the electronics better than they do the basics. They've never turn a rag over over a carburetor to make it a little bit Richard AC- of that makes it run smoother. Since I've come here I'll learn way more than I even thought there was to do with cars and especially the older stuff stuff. 'cause we learned a little bit about the newer stuff in school but they didn't teach us real anything about the older cars. Just always loved mechanical things. Mom said on teenager that she never had to undergo all she had to do is go out and get by the ankles pulled out from under over. I was working on. So what was your first car of of all the crazy things. They had not traded a mini bike. That weight used for hill climbing for fifty nine Volkswagen that I had found in all places. Royal Oldsmobile. We were able to work it out because the salesman wanted the mini bike for his well. Apparently apparently he didn't grasp what I had told him. Because many bike been modified pretty extensively for hill climbing and Laura from stop up to about ten miles an hour. It was vicious. That's about how far you had to run before you got to the hill. Course he got on the thing and not understanding what he was into open throttle on. It didn't move so the throttle some more and then when it reached its RPM for the clutch to catch. It almost almost took him through the front window for those mobile down there. He got out the her was up in the air and he was holding by the throttle and of course it could close the throttle title as long as he was holding the Mike by this Ronald. But that didn't deter him for one so we ended up giving one hundred fifty dollars and a mini bike for my first the car. That was fifteen point at a lot of of that one. I've never seen one as bad. You got a situation in here. It sounds like you nasty wreck got in here. Eight wiring innate. All the door wiring nate part of the main harness here and ate part of the dash on us the the rats. Oh yeah because there's dash. He does some damage to this one. I'm Jeremy and I've been here Seven years that's that's the garbage under the DASH garbage bag full of candy wrappers and fast food wrappers Oh clinging to trash your car this this three reason. Well good luck with these players. You literally got a rat's nest big don actually I was Working at footlocker guy passed over for a couple of promotions. To got mad one day walked out walked across the street and wrote in Barbara School. That was in nineteen ninety. Nine this Kevin enright weird costumes barbershop. Four eight Virginia Street West on the west side. Actually there's a lot of bookwork first before you actually go out on the floor to cut here so I didn't I hear could I mean I was always really really nervous. You know crippling the handshake instructor they go ahead you. How did it turn out? Were they satisfied. Well it turned out pretty good because like you say when you first started instructor with you said they're not going to let you mess up too bad you know. Yes now almost twenty years later really glad you made that decision to walk out of footlocker and Go barring school. Oh yes I mean I. It's I I enjoy. What do you know what I mean? Works out pretty well for me just trim up on the hair. I uh shave the moustache taken everything else all. Tell me Your name Larry Taylor. You're a long time customer Kevin's while he's pretty good. I'm lucky founding you get you've got a good head of here for no man. Is this your neighborhood neighborhood. You live around the west side while me. Yeah I was. I was a mailman for forty one years I was carrying a Capitol Street ground to time stopped at McDonalds for lunch and girl that I knew went to school with said I got somebody I want you to me. I said it's not very far go. She took me up here at a meter and we met about two to three weeks later. We Mary wow that was a whirlwind. Romance wasn't it so you were you. Were on your postal route the first day when you met her she couldn't resist a man in uniform. Well I couldn't resist her. She she had been a major stonewall. Oh she was very pretty. How long have you guys been together now? Thirty one years at our they got fixed. No more kids you guys later in life you got met and got married later in life. Yeah I was forty three and our she. He was forty-three in house. Forty nine it must be nice to meet someone later in life and have that kind of second lease on life. I guess it makes you. I feel young again. I guess I have to make sure it makes you want to go to bed earlier. Maybe I won't ask you to elaborate on that so You're still together now. Tell me You it sounds like you. You obviously care about very much in you care for her these days. Yes yeah I don't I don't have long O'Hara because she's she's fading but She's still around right now she's Seventy four we've had a good life I'm Theresa Martin. I teach second grade here. Westside elementary and I'm also one of the girl scout leaders. What's four thirty and it's Tuesday? We have girl scouts Tuesday from four to five here today. We're making a clay pot snowman that I found on pinterest. So it's like a little white part. The orange knows on their paint and little cheeks. Pink pay my name is. BJ Name is a Dr. My name is my name is Miami seven and a half and I'm in second grade. You like girl scouts. What is what's your favorite thing about girl scouts We don't I don't know what to do. We just order feeds how dance. We do a lot of crafting girls like craft so we do. A lot of crafting The past last month we have spent practicing our flag ceremony so we could do the Veterans Day program here and bring the color. Seeing Miss Dunlap has been working on the technology and the photographing autographing badge with the kids. And we'd worked on Programming Oz box in their little robots and they take different colored markers and the the different colors make them do different things they had a lot of fun just exploring the same what they could make him do. My name is Cathy. DUNLAP and teach second grade here on the west side also a girl scout leader. I hope they're getting a strong belief in themselves in the idea that with some effort they can accomplish anything they want to. We have a lot of really bright eight good girls in our group and I hope that they're getting that self esteem built that they need. I is this is the promise on my honor. I will try to serve God and my country and to help people at all times into live by the girl scout law girls law and the girl Scout Law. I will do my best to be honest and fair friendly friendly and helpful considerate and caring courageous and strong and responsible for what I say and do and to respect myself and others respect authority use resources wisely make the world a better place and to be assisted to every girl Scout. So it's very it's long but it's every line is just impactful. Will I am Catharina Fritz. ller I am at the girl Scout Volunteer Resource Center on the West Side of Charleston. West Virginia and I am the Senior Program Manager for this Organization Organization. We serve sixty one counties almond were in four different states which is Kinda unique to our council. We serve girls Maryland. Virginia West Virginia in Ohio. And what makes us unique. As we're all in APPALACHIA which is traditionally a poorer income bracket? And so we give girls this experience experience That maybe they wouldn't get elsewhere and we try to make it affordable and low cost as a council to help these families give their girls and experience on I'm so they can dream bigger and aim higher than maybe they thought about in the past. Hey come here boy hi Fi Gotcha good boy layup. My Name's Walter Tucker One of the musical directors here at Mare see snow west side elementary and I'm Chelsea handler. which are dug? He travels to all the classrooms with our counselor so he gets the opportunity to interact with golf children here in the school. He's in the Mike Right now. One student of ours that was coming in in the morning AUTISTIC students He would cry every morning and and When he would come down the hallway and he would see ax? We stop crying so every morning. That student would come down just been like five minutes minutes with them and then he wouldn't stop crying and you'll be ready to go back out. There we go I call him little bear. It is very busy between medicines and accidents and boo boos the illnesses. It's it's lots of job security. I'm Janet Allio and I'm the school nurse and the healthcare coordinator and on an on average. I see between thirty and forty kids a day. They may appear in the morning with a bruise. or a bump or something. But there's always a history. There's a history behind the illness. There's a history behind the entry so one of my goals is to be able to meet that. Need Ed not just identify it. Some of our children leave here at night and they don't even know where they're going to go to bed that night. I had had a student that was not a frequent flyer in the clinic. I do get frequent flyers a dislike to come by some time just for sweet hug which I love and other times. Let's try to escape out of class but This boy with a fifth grade came in and he'd been so sleepy couldn't stay awake so he came down on and I did an assessment checked him out and always say. Did you get the bed on time last night. And he said no was played. I couldn't sleep. I said well why. Why couldn't you sleep? He said the cause of the gunshots outside my bedroom window. We have the school based Health Center. We have a dental clinic clinic. We have on-site mental health so that our children can have therapy here at school. We were finding that that some of the children who needed needed therapy. The parents didn't have transportation to get them to therapy or they have to miss the entire day so now child child can miss thirty forty minutes of the school day. Get their therapy. The same with going to the doctor. They can only miss a half an hour. Instead of a whole day before child can learn they have to be emotionally in a good place. Tristan programs in the classrooms garden in classrooms windowsill garden. Was We'd take out through our outside. Community Garden will school-based garden or the kids plant and grow vegetables. Maybe it's the Rail Miller we're on the west side of Charleston. I'm a member of Keep Your Inc.. which is a community outreach? Groups was literacy organization. While from a lot of these kids. I know their parents. They so is funny. When I'd be like Oh we usually on all day and they live like no you know what's his Niang over I'd say they met him That's fun and dealing with the kids and gardening because you know when they get home with the vegetables they have table talk ask talk about ib so excited and then appearing on the apprentice stool And I will now. We buy and vegetables when we come to thank you and if you like a laugh but it's beautiful because because now not just introducing fresh fruits and vegetables also give them a topic to talk about at the table instead of being on the phone you know. Tell me about your own Childhood Your proneness school experience here on the West Growing up in school. I can read it good. I played sports and stuff. So I got back But being L. to read was was was something always on my mind like when I go to school. I wouldn't want to get caught on threes so I had a disciplinary problem. You know I was bad kid because I didn't want to be. I don't WanNa be made fun of and I didn't want to be. I was embarrassed though really but I prayed about half the Lord if he if he ever showed me how to read our show other people and the little bless me you know and so that's what keeps you. Faith Corporation came from learning how to read still process for me. You know and so I I really thank you special because you can read pick up a book and anyway you can get away and then you can use your education to get away really WANNA get out tonight with so is been a blessing to be able to allow to come in school and be able to share my story. We kid and didn't talk to me about so many issues and they give what their parents you know. We've got a basic needs program where we help with identification -CATION Social Security Card Audit Filling out job applications housing papers and this year we just started workforce development program and for me being his be right now like my work is really started. My Name's Lauren. Farmer name is Michael Farmer Sam with the Bobber that scenario a nonprofit organization that provides after school and summer programming to children on the west side. I'm I'm the regional coordinator for the Kanawha County Educational Alliance Americorps Mentor Program We're married how'd you guys meet. That's none of your concerned We met from a small group actually matter when I was on a date with somebody else a couple years ago and I was trying to hook up with a friend of mine mine years and years ago and then couple years later. We kinda reconnected. I was actually working at the bank On the west side accent come in. I'll just like oh I kind of need to give her a call us. Yeah and then we ended up getting connected. It was really youth-related for me saying I know you're in the field and though you're doing this I don't want to be connected to this career anymore and really Getting some wisdom from her about. How do you get established? How do you get connected? How do we make this happen when me personally? I felt very disconnected from urban mum Biz working with Urban Youth. The hadn't done anything with it for years since I lived in South Carolina and really just getting the wisdom from Laura say you know. Don't worry about So much understanding of a worry about being there and being consistent consistent with them and you know everything will happen here. We are so and so years later with What ninety ten programs just in Charleston and you know having those specifically built on the west side is what really WanNa see? It's just so important for us to be invested in the place where we are loving people and that's why we've chosen to live here whenever he likes to tell a story so I was in the process of buying my house on the west side whenever we started dating news. A little salty about it He had grown up in. You know some not so nice neighborhoods and just didn't really want to place himself back in that situation Yeah but He really does believe you. Know Loving God and loving your neighbor is the most important thing. You can't make a change unless you're in in the middle of that change We we can't just say let's look at the issue from the outside and pop in for a little bit and then you say well those kids will be okay after school. They'll be okay when I'm not around and that was a really big Force as to why we said we're going to plan our church on the west side. One day we may see harvest one day we might not but we've been very privileged to see our kids grow up even come through after school. Programming is getting involved in ministry on my sheet is hired. One of my kids has one of my Americorps. Mentors is going to be working at one of mine and Lauren's programs I remember talking. I was such a bad kid. I was like yeah you were but you know being able to say we spent these years with you and now for her to be able to say you planted seeds in my life and now I I wanted the same for these kids who were coming up. I mean that shows right there. The power of investment. You guys have referred to many many kids as your kids. Do you have kids of your own. Well that's a complicated question but We I'm currently pregnant with our first first child guys working on names for the baby and do you have any names victim we we do. I like curtiss farmer. Put the girl Naomi Louise Farmer. You're what do you hope Langston. Naomi's childhood is going to be like on the west side. Well it's filled with joy. We make the joke by the time I tell our kids because they're I think they're more excited than we are. Sometimes I'm like. Am I gonNA be here to Babysit right when we make jokes at the time. We say we've got to get you guys right to. You can make make sure that the next generation. My kid has a better place that being. We're seeing it here. I've always been a firm believer that takes a generation before defect generation. After after it's it's you know it's reciprocal what you what you put in is what you're going to get out of it. You know the word talks about you. Know what you reap yourself. So we believe. We so seeds of positivity and good good things these kids life that we're GonNa see that harvests in our in our own lives and these will be the people will be influencing arcades hope that We're not running Out The gender so the baby WANNA call it We'll just grow up in a neighborhood where they feel safe and secure where they feel connected to their neighbors They really we do develop that love of God in love their neighbor you've been listening to Alva- blocks experimental producer Aaron Hanson Music producer. Ringo Patrie special. Thanks to West. Virginia State folklorist. Emily Hilliard and the West Virginia Life Life Program at the West Virginia Humanities Council. You can podcast series checkout photos online at. WIP ARE DOT org slash alad all of the blocks Aaron and window one. Thank all of us. Who took a leap of faith and shared off stories in our lives for? WIP R. N.. P. Rx this is Charleston West Virginia with certain off coming up on the next episode about of the blocks. We are back in Baltimore to get to know the locals at a city market. It's been running. Continuously for more than two centuries. Lexington market is a huge honeycomb of food vendors and eateries and it's at a major moment mental transition. Right now. The old building is coming down soon. A new one is gonna go up and things are going to look and feel very different around there. Some people alert thrilled. Some people are worried. No one knows exactly what to expect. What's lost and what's gained when change comes to historic city market? That's next time on out of blocks a special note of thanks by the way on the Charleston West Virginia episode. You just heard a shout out to the m the National National Endowment for the arts for supporting this and all of our travel episodes as we continue to bring the out of the blocks documentary model around other cities across the the country. And thanks to you for listening. If you liked the kinds of stories you hear on this program do us a favor and leave us a review on apple podcast inclined line or just tell a friend about the show. Thanks and we'll do it again soon. Out of the blocks is supported by pr ex and produced with grant funding funding from the corporation for public broadcasting the National Endowment for the arts the Maryland State Arts Council. The Hof Burger Foundation Patricia. And Marc Joseph Shelter Foundation Inc the Saana and Andy Brooks family fund the Peel Centre and the William G Baker Junior Memorial Fund creator of the Baker artist portfolios online at bigger artist dot. Org Support for this podcast comes comes from the corporation for public broadcasting.

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Episode 45, Appalachian Roadtrip: Mike Costello

The Trip

1:00:02 hr | 6 months ago

Episode 45, Appalachian Roadtrip: Mike Costello

"A rare opportunity I get to. Actually experienced something that was written about. Yeah. Typically make it like with the you know as a as a dessert is a pie. And it was meant to mimic. Lemon Pie but In an age when limbs were either. Out of reach when your way back, you know here on the farm away from. Stores, or lemons were just kind of prohibitively expensive you got. Really creative with what little you hadn't kitchen. So this is just some eggs from the farm and. Vinegar. And the vinegar nutmeg. The numbers together not makes kind of the key ingredient because it gives that fragrant quality the lemons have the vinegar doesn't. So you put it in their. Your. Finger in there just like. Holy. Shit. It's pretty limited right and there's not lemon incite. A dayline already. Daniela is not in there yet that's coming on comes later. Yeah. The deadline line was. Just. This sort of Nice floor quality. Damn. I mean that sounds like some sort. Good. If life doesn't give you. Lemons. Make. Lemon Pie. Or something like that. That is the moral. Of today's last spring at lost. Creek farm in West Virginia the Harrison County farmstead that dates back in. Amy Dawson's family to the eighteen hundred eighty S. She and her partner Mike Costello are revitalizing that arm and they hope shaping in the process the notion of what Appalachian Agriculture and cuisine can be. Kind of a Shangri la there. They've stocks the place with that breed of chickens. That looks like it's wearing pants. It planted regional heirloom crops like fat horse beans and bloody butcher corn. And they've added a bunch of meat rabbit who all meet their end in a nifty little pair of mounted. Cheers attached to a tree. Front. Now. I had gotten a sense from afar of the life that amy and Mike were building for themselves. They hosted Anthony Bourdain at Lost Creek for the parts unknown episode in West Virginia Mike Hosts an excellent podcast, the pickle shelf radio hour, and I find his presence on social media compelling occasional farm porn cattle on the rolling hills but a lot of skew wearing the stories that. Tell about Appalachia or even sometimes stories at Appalachians tell about themselves. But forget social media to really get a sense of what Mike is about. Half the come up to lost creek and see how he puts those ideas on the plate. In my time with him, we went up to the hills above the farm found L. Mushrooms, wild ramps violence in Yaro and sweet citric Wood Sorrel, and Mike. All up with Venison and trout and this lemon Liz lemon curd they used to make in the days before supermarkets. It was ingenious invented delicious. All the things that Appalachia has always been and always should be. This is Nathan. Thornburgh and from roads and Kingdoms, you're listening to the trip drinking with exceptional people around the world. All right. What are we drinking here? So this is. Some cider some traditional solder from Hawk knob Saudi in Lewisburg. Really Good Friends of ours we've known these guys for a long time the CIDERS probably. Only four years old but these guys have been making Saudi for a long time and we went to. College with him. Hung out a lot at potlucks and just look at each other's houses doing a lot of homebrew and a lot of cooking together and we always talked a lot about. Our Dreams have either getting back into food or doing sire commercially. And Man Somehow Stars Align and we both ended up doing these things and urine food. He's inside we're food he's insider and you know they're really like one of the only other businesses that kind of fully embrace this kind of place based. Tradition. When it comes to food and beverage, you know they'd make this sort of. Old. World style of CIDER that was pretty prevalent in Appalachia for. Prohibition. In define old world CIDER. Well it's a it's much drier. So must have decided that's on the American market right now is it's pretty sweet. You know And I feel like this is actually kind of a challenge for these guys because there's like this perception. Of CIDER in American being. A little bit too sweet. True. If you get the really commercially available ones that are widely available commercially like whatever the angry orchard or. It's like not very drinkable to. To me or a lot of other people that like. The drier side. So this one I think is there. Okay. Yeah. So this is their their classic, and then we're also going to drink this one that's traditional dry hard sided. It's Bourbon barely edged. His Hawk Knob. Appalachian. Classic. Dry. Hard CIDER. My fellow. Thank you choose. Chit. That's good. Good Yeah I mean it's no angry orchard. Which is basically Angry. Sweet ice tea with. Some sort of alcoholic component like mott's apple juice with a little. Splash rubbing. Up. You heard that we're coming for you angry orchard you and your over sweet. Corporate. Bullshit. This is a this is super fucking good now. So, what is the CIDER tradition of of Appalachia I mean, you'd said, old world are we talking about the Spaniards who'd come up here? Well Spanish wave immigration was calm. It was either during or after prohibition but this is an early. European. Style CIDER, it's traditional in Appalachia because it was able to be made with ingredients that you could grow here you know. So we used to have a lot more variety a lot more abundance of trees in West Virginia partially because of cider industry in like the eighteen hundreds or early nineteen hundreds. and. You know when these guys open up a years ago they were the only cider in West Virginia there since been one of the salary that's open. But still it's like considering how traditional product that actually is there's. Virtually nothing just like these guys and then one other shop. But there are a bunch of wineries in West Virginia. Rate can't really tell you why because of this shitty place to grow grapes and you heard. Most. Of the wine that's actually producing West Virginia is not made with grapes girls. Virginia. It's like concentrate that's grown. You know like grapes are grown in. California. Ship over. A, so MOTT's apple juice even in the is. Yeah. That's crazy. Right because then I mean we've seen a lot of winds in some pretty unlikely places I. Don't know if it's everybody just getting ready for global warming figure. Well, we should stretch this winemaking tradition back at least fifteen years before the great dry or something. But so you look at that and you're fairly confounded as to why you're not actually making something that does sell as a category pretty well, and is something that's actually indigenous to write to this place. and. These guys are are so supportive of the growing community around CIDER and craft beverage and sort of traditional food and team up with him so much because we were so kind of been lined in our. In our mission. As, like a real sort of place based traditional food and beverage business, you know they're they're like. Trying to get the CIDER industry, go on your own and encouraging new series to open up and That's been really nice to see because I, think in in some other industries I've seen this in like. wineries for instance or even like in earlier days of the craft brewing scene here it was so territorial and there was a lot of animosity when like a new business would open up but I like this should is hard enough. Like everybody gun in each when when we see that. You know if we create a community, we created seen that people can seek out. We're much better off than just. Like A. Business. That is the only game in town and yeah. Well, let's let's talk about that scene because obviously that's a you know that's a big part of your evangelism about the region and it starts I think with what it used to be like. So I would love to hear from you what growing up in Appalachia was like for you in the sense of like how how did you perceive your culture? How how did you see other people perceiving it and let's let's start there Well yeah, it's a it's a really good question I think because it's like that back story sorted defines like every single thing that we do in. And I think for me, I have a little bit of unique perspective being from Appalachia but. My Dad actually moved here when he was about my age now from New Hampshire. and. I think that I have to acknowledge that sort of contrast and perception and perspective whenever I was growing up because. Like if it weren't for. This sort of appreciation for West Virginia that my dad had as an outsider I can't say for sure that I would have appreciated this place as much because I know a lot of people who you know they're from here the family is all from here. and. It's like without being able to contrast anything in the outside there's not as much sort of like. Reverence for like anything that comes from this place because it's just sort of like Oh yeah. This is. Just what happens here and insulated always happen and it's not really that special because so they don't have the news wise on the good stuff, but they're still eating all the shit that they're being fed kind of from. Yeah. The larger culture, what it means to be Appalachia right and you know it's my dad moved down here from New Hampshire and fell in love with the place, and that's why it stuck around and. You know I grew up being really Proud of being from West Virginia. There's a really strong sense of state pride here, but I also grew up seeing this sort of media portrayals and seeing all the stereotypes and all the tropes sort of played out in either the movies or in journalism. You know it was at that infrequent that twenty twenty or you know Diane Sawyer whoever would like show Up in Appalachian had this like dismal portrayal of mountain people in. You know it's like I think all a lot of the times, the intentions behind those stories where we're good. It's like we're going to tell a story and we're going to raise awareness around the issue but I think what ends up happening is you just sort of reinforce the stereotype and then You, know despite these. Like really good intentions. Some of these outside journalists have there's such like a damaging effect when it comes to like me and I think it all comes down to the power of storytelling and. You know the story being told by US or About us by somebody else and I think that like we're you know we're so used to having that story told by somebody else. And and it's not always. it certainly is not always like an accurate story in it's. Actually quite rarely is an accurate story but well I. Do feel like have some some. Some things to answer for down here. Fortunately, you have you're the one with a degree in journalism, so I can rope you. Right. I would. I would. I would assume that that that must have been some of the impulse that you had to was. To get into that. It's like feeling like all right I've got some kind of story to tell about this place. Let me let me try to get some of the tools that yeah for sure and I mean. It was interesting the way that I ended up in journalism school because when I was a teenager, I wanted to be a chef and I had actually enrolled in Culinary School in South Carolina in Charleston South, Carolina Johnson Wales and I was working at this restaurant my senior year in high school and Manages turned me off the restaurant industry in so many ways and part of it was just the sort of like the madness like they hours and the chef that. I worked under he was. He was a great advocate for for me and very supportive. But Man I dislike I watched milt down every night and you know and I just I saw that was sort of like toxic environments effect on him and You know I, think it really challenged what I what I wanted to get out of culinary career. You know it's sort of like driven by the creativity behind it and then sort of like ended up in a restaurant where the chef at the highest position at the end of the day is still just executing somebody else's menu day in day out and it's right. It wasn't that appealing to me. As, a ball of raw nerve, right? Right. Right. The sort of state pride thing kind of factored in because I was really proud of this place and at the time I wasn't really thinking about entering in the food world is like a shop specializing appalachian cuisine or something, but you still see it when when people are they have this mentality there there's like nothing good. Could come from West. Virginia. So we are not going to call ourselves at were knocking her embrace like are sort of place based spirit and we're not going to call ourselves West Virginia because we think that those terms Appalachian West Virginia have such a negative connotation more of an association with shame and poverty. We're just GonNa like stay away from and try to convince the rest of the world that were like just as good as the visit they come from. So all this stuff added up and I am yeah, I dropped out of culinary school before I even started and I enrolled like the very last minute in journalism school and men. It was the best thing I could've ever done because all the technical skill sets in the kitchen I could learn you know I still worked in the food industry for a while like when I was in college and and even after that some. So you know that stuff. Can Be learned in other ways but I picked up this like. You know set as storyteller and I picked up this sort of deeper appreciation for not only the place but the culture connected to the place when I went to journalism school because it the first time that I had really. Like giving myself the opportunity to get out and talk to people about you know live is place or why this culture is important to them and a lot of my reporting when I, was in college, it was about food and ramps I actually ramp season was sort of the first like really big multimedia project that I took on. This, it was great and it was just like getting people to talk oftentimes for the first time about you know like what these traditions mean, what the sort of behind something like community Ramp Supper means and you know the sort of environmental ethics of ramps or the Cultural Association of Ramps. It was also interesting. So complex and it just like it made me feel that there is a real sorted be told about food in West Virginia and it really made me want to like get back to food and I always knew I mean I I dropped out of culinary school but I knew that I would come back to food some in it. But figuring out that that you can talk about ramps and in doing. So kind of tied together a lot of these different strands in in your life and things that you haven't seen was the way that is something that journalism school you so. Hey, listeners. If you are anything like me, this life in lockdown has sent you scrambling for ways to connect for opportunities to actually help a world that has so many needs right now. For me that has meant sending support when and where I can I've done a lot of that actually through the pay pal APP, not long ago a call went out for example, from some friends in Oaxaca to buy WOK. Or would crates filled with fresh produce for unemployed hospital workers? It took something like thirty seconds, not more on my phone from new through the pay pal APP to buy a few of those full crates for good people. Three thousand miles away. It's a small thing but you know it's kind of a big thing too. With the pay pal APP sending or receiving money is faster and easier than ever. And there are new features like Qr code payments for restaurants, farmers, markets like the money pool to help split tabs and especially. POWs new charity connections. As you might know, all the proceeds from this show, the trip podcast go to the Northstar. Fund here in New York and that charity is on the pay PAL APP as well. So you too can easily and quickly support the vital work that they do. Pay Pal is making it easy to pay safely quickly and easily download the pay pal APP today terms and conditions apply. Talk about ramps we were out there foraging them I guess taking them wild off off your mountain here in you know you had expressed. Some concern that somebody could might come and just take these. You've got some pretty wide areas at it just covered and ramps, and because now Appalachian cuisine has reached some sort of moment where those ingredients are now valued somebody could just come and poach him off your property and in a way that wouldn't have really been a market for some years back. We're in this moment where people are talking about Appalachian food as as a trend, and there's a lot of excitement around that. Right. But there's also like there are these issues that that pop up that makes this sort of trend that everyone. So jazzed up about a little bit of a double edged sword in ramps. And overharvesting is one of those issues and we're seeing a lot of overharvesting of ramps just like in recent years I feel like especially because rams have gotten kind of you know trendier and trendier and in the mid Atlantic city's. So you know if you go to DC, they're like a bunch of restaurants that are advertising West Virginia Rams, you can buy West Virginia. Rams to the farmers market in DC and I think they're they're like I. Don't know eighteen or twenty bucks a pound over there and then you know I'll see sometimes people will post a picture on facebook that they're in New York City, and there's like the whole foods in your her the farmer's market or whatever has West Virginia ramps and they're even more expensive. And like there's such a demand on on these ramps and it's like created a little bit of a frenzy you know where people are just out. Digging them super quickly and just wiping out these rampages and ramps are not. It's not like a weed this just. Come back every year I mean, this is a this is a planet, really sensitive plant that you have to be careful in the way that you harvested and then you have to leave the roots and the grounds of the plant can come back. But a lot of times you know they're they're not paying these guys very well to go out and harvest these ramps that are going to be turned around and sold in DC for like twenty bucks a pound. So they just they just take these trials to the woods and they just wipe out these ramp patches that have just been there. Forever. And You know it's funny because you were explaining this to me as you were harvesting some the ramps up there, my metaphor alarms were just going deserving. You're like, well, it's trendy now and people are just taken it out by the root and it's not going to grow back and what you have to do is leave a little bit there I put it back in the soil. So it can grow and I'm like we always talk about food being a goodland explain things through. Rarely is the active like harvesting an actual leg, indigenous iconic ingredient, such an easy and clear metaphor for how you deal with like commodity sizing rite aid culture that now for for a brief moment after centuries of. Neglect and and abuses now having a moment. Leave the and route. Just like the whole thing up and go sell it right. Real quick. You know. Yeah I mean. So that's That's happening a lot. So we're we're kind of in a little bit of a crisis. It's tough. You know you got a lot of people who grew up here harvesting ramps, the old fashioned way digging the whole plan up and you know they wouldn't. See much difference here year because they're they're patches were rampages like so tremendously huge and expensive that they wouldn't have to worry about over harvest. And they weren't they weren't even feeding the capitol. Right so yeah, I, mean, that's that's one of the things in you know with the trend. It's real funny because we have to figure out how we balanced You know the the sort of opportunities that could come our way because the trend with. Like the negative consequences of just sort of irresponsibly dishing this stuff out and I mean, we don't exactly have the best track record in West. Virginia like an extractive industry state of. Like taking the proper precautions in you know how we harvest and sell off our natural resources. So let's talk about the coal industry. Now, actually we don't have to, but there's a metaphor in there somewhere too right like the coal is gone. And you know and I think that sense and we've seen it with with. Other cultures certainly other countries but the idea that your culture becomes inextricably linked with poverty is a special curse in America because poverties and just a condition or a wrong to be righted, but it's a personal moral failings. Of things that America has really invented that's a a total shit sandwich. History is this idea that you know poor people are somehow lesser than and had got themselves into that mess and Appalachia's kind of had to bear the brunt of that judgment. I guess and and it leaves you guys bad options like you're saying, you know on the one hand you talk about people who are trying to assimilate and that was happening in cuisine right? People are trying to cook French and like figuring that that would be the way the way in Appalachia to sue prove that they're not. You know poor hillbillies you know, right? Yeah and I I should say I mean 'cause I talk about this stuff so much and sometimes i. Think I leave people with the wrong person like I should say like. I'm okay with there being French restaurants in West Virginia I just think it's such a shame when we're telling the rest of the world like this is the West. Virginia cuisine that you should come experience. and. You know stay COUPO- of. With a lovely West Virginian Beaujolais right to this day there's a page on the West Virginia Division tourism website that it says like the five best dishes in West Virginia. and. Four out of the five or fucking seafood dishes. Right, right Oh, my i. Mean, I don't know that much about West Virginia. But good Christ. So that stuff is always, it's it's very disappointing because I've even before I got back into food I was like doing some some work around like public lands and tourism sort of place based assets and community building around those things and you know I saw it show up in that work a lot to was like you know we we look around and we see some other things other state we think works, and instead of realizing that we have this really unique sort of set of assets the people would want to seek out because of its uniqueness they feel like they should recreate the thing that they liked and some other place. And so the result is it's like a Shittier version of the thing that they liked and some other place. and. By the aren't going to seek it out because they want the real version they're going to go to like. Three place right. Right well, it's like, French, cooking anywhere had been for a lot of places. In there's a lot of French preparation, the seafood down in in Key West which. You know in a Caribbean context with the kind of ingredients that they had this just a limit to how much sense that makes you know like there's a lot of there's a lot of natural ingredients that you could use go along with the seafood that that just. Would not occur back at the tour d'argent, right? So right, it can't happen. But if that's your only point of pride and you're only half to pride the you're talking about a problem. Yeah. You know like we were talking earlier this morning about Spain in the Spanish influence and you know one of my biggest inspirations for coming back and doing this place base food venture was actually going to Spain and sort of seeing the level of pride and Reverend, the people had for. The Food in each community in the styles of food in the time that it takes to make these things and and everything over there is so full of pride and I came back in the we could. We could do that. Here. We could create a sense of pride in the food and could transition from this sense of shame that they have. But when I think about the way that food is often marketed here food is like not at all really rooted in place or tradition. That has any connection to West Virginia, but it's it's sort of marketed as what you should seek out when you come to West Virginia, it would be like going to Spain. And having like the Spanish tourism bureau be like the top five dishes in Spain. Tigreen curry from. This guy and. I know I know many people would rather commit Seppuku then. Put that on the Spanish tourism website Shout out to you not. You know you guys are defending the faith over there. All right. Well, listen this. This is so easy. Drinking It's gone and we need to get some more. It's easy drinking and. It's also ten percent alcohol. So what are things you have to be careful about this outsider is Just like your. Level of consumption in short amount of time because I've seen this happen actually the is they're opening sort of like kickoff night was at this bar in Lewisburg and you know it's sort of package in a bottle that looks like a beer bottle. It's really easy to drink everybody's just like down in these things and within like an hour and it was like it was like somebody here switch in the whole body. Man Okay. Well, known side effects podcasting well, blotto All right. Well, let's let's let's run the risk. Yeah. Cheers. So. Right, so they've got scallops in and French French recipes on on Western tourism site but. What what's the Mike Castillo? Of At least I guess what we'd call like indigenous. Appalachian. Food what is it? I mean indigenous Appalachian Food was a food prepared people who were here for four the European and this is something that the story of Appalachia is like it's just complicated. You know and I think that this is one of the layers that we talk about a lot because it sort of gets left out right of this sort of narrative of a place that's oftentimes considered like this place where like the White Scots Irish are are the natives but we talk about ourselves being like place based culture and I think that you know it's like impossible for us to sort of tell the. Fair just story without at least acknowledging that that that piece of it, you know it's like why were able to live on one hundred, eighty farm? Even though like we sort of inherited it and like didn't have money to do much with it, it still is like this tremendous privilege from horrific legacy. Of Land Yeah but length of. Like you know the Appalachian food that we work with, it's hard to define. It's defined by really complicated legacy and it's defined by all these like layers and layers of you know waves of immigration and. Layers of perceptions boasts both from the outside and from the inside and You know it's defined by how people made it through hard times and I think that you know when we talk about like defining Appalachian Food, we we really don't. Like to put a definition on it because I think it's just like so open to interpretation based on like you know who you are and what your experiences as as an Appalachian. But we definitely sort of have this this team that I think shows up more than anything else in the food that we prepare in the stories that we tell, and that's about you just like the sort of resourceful nature of the people getting through those times and more than anything else about like the stories in the narratives that are associated with. With those times and and how that shows up in food is that there are certain foods that we're prepared that were like born out of these times of necessity you know and that shows up in. Like all the cultures around the world. But in in most of these places, there's not this like negative association with that food. and. Poverty in shame. So Right Soga will lead pizza without a spiraling into guilty about. What has broughton lower of cheese right? Flat Bread. Yeah. And a lot of this comes from that sort of history of. Like media portrayals in the way that that Appalachia has always sort of been seen. From the outside in turn, you know how we've sort of seen ourselves and how he's sort of like grappled with this this perception issue on how when it comes to food that was originally designed. To solve the problem like lack of refrigeration right? You know just like the millions of other foods that we eat that are fermented or preserved in a way that you could be stored because there was no refrigeration we tend to shy away from these things here because we're so sensitive about like the the perceptions around you know like how we navigated those hard times you know we see so much of like people coming up to us After, we've done the dinner event and they come up and they like sometimes they have these like tears in their eyes over over some of these foods that they will tell us. You know when I became an adult I decided I was never gonna eat this thing again and just just because like you know my grandma used to make it for me and like I. Liked it when I was a kid but to me, it represented this like Hard time that. I felt like we move past an never wanted to revisit it. You know in the ashamed of. In, then you show why know the food events that you do are a high high ticket there There, well presented they're presented with with pride and and the per execution you show up and put this on a plate as in a in a place of pride I guess is that where the emotional kinda switches well, I, think it's I. Mean it's a combination of things that's part of it. The being served this food in a different context and you said they were foods that were that had done that most of all. Yeah. and these are the ones that are like the most consistent is it's like Chow Chow and tomato ASPIC and you have some Chow Chow. Yeah right behind you. Pull this out. So his Chao Chow from October seventeen, two, thousand, seventeen. Looks to me like kind of a relish. Type thing what exactly to what is pickled relish wise this the thing that brings people to tears, I mean, how is like just one of those many foods that like people would make at a when they didn't have much money and you know they gathered like kind of the leftover vegetables at the end of the harvest season and you know throw together in this way that that make something we'll open this later tonight and We can have some of it with dinner in and you'll see like it's a really Delicious thing and it's it's delicious. It's beautiful and it's like the flavors are bright and complex and there's a lot of like I a flavored this Chow Chow with sorghum. So it's like sweet notes and a little bit of smokey flavor in a little bit of bitterness but like the. The way that all these flavors were come together is really really really beautiful. Ans- his a product that we should be really fucking. Proud. Right but the so the switch. When people? Don't have this child and it's presented in this way at some of our dinner events that it really happens when we. Like we tell the story about like how Chow chows made in and they've got a story in their minds about what Chow Chow represents right into them. That's the story about poverty in its absorb out Shane, and it's a story about like a time that they wanted to get away from. So we tell the story in a way that is not about how shameful it was that you poor. But it's a story about how? Innovative and resourceful, the people were to get through those hard times with very few resources right and to be able to make something like this. Beautiful on this delicious with. Virtually. Nothing and this is just a leftover from harvest, right? Right. Right. So Chow chows is like lots of different things I. mean there's there's there's a lot of debate over what child really is because there's like different versions of it and I think the sort of common thread is that it's made with sort of like the leftover ingredients so say you're growing Crops of turnips and cabbage and green tomatoes and green peppers and. In, October when it's harvest season, you like pull this out and you'll harvest those things and you'll you see up on the same shelf where you've got cha-cha we have these jars of green tomatoes. We have jars of pepper. So you know you you process your batches of these things and let's say we have like a few green tomatoes leftover and a few green peppers, few turnips but not really enough to make like a whole batch you throw those things together. And Flavor and piglet and. Candid up and put it on the shelf and then. A couple years later or later that year. Right again, and so you're you're you're showing the kind of the genuity behind it in a way that's getting people to rethink about some of this crap. They've been there psychic baggage carrying around head right? These dishes we've we've grown up all of our lives being told like how ashamed we should be of that time in our history, and so these foods represent that shameful period to those of us who grew up being told by our teachers that we should leave and go to go to. Charlotte. North Carolina 'cause that's the opportunity really is or Go To D.. C.. Go to go to Pittsburgh, go get just get the hell out of the state you go somewhere where there is opportunity in we're so used to sort of carrying around that that baggage with us and sort of having all those associations and all these stories in our minds about this chow child being about how poor we are in and if we can get people to think differently about. This and to get people to that show is not about how poor we are. It's about how creative we've always been. Right like that changes the game. And it gets people to look at food differently and it gets people to to be willing to embrace their place based heritage and it gets the West Virginia tourism. Bureau maybe to start marketing shit a little bit differently. Well. Of course, as as you would know to, if people are going to go down to Atlanta or four Brooklyn for that matter, they're going to see people who are trying to live as much like Appalachian people as they possibly handling there's a whole culture of craft and beard. Yeah. Yeah. Like just making shit by hand that I mean basically like Appalachia's men doing it all along. and. It's this It's very funny how circular those things could be the value kind of coming back here although that's something West Virginia seen. The back to the Land Movement and Decades ago right there. There have been times when they've been kind of very primed to answer this Zeitgeist. With their natural gifts, right. And here we are foraging. Right. We just have Aqaba foraging set. You know I don't want. It wasn't sex but Jesus Christ it's close man when you go just like walk up the hill and have. Just. Handfuls of like these more mushrooms is incredible wood sorrel. The whole thing was I mean it's ridiculous bounty out there right and that's right out in front of your door. Yeah it's it's right up you know I mean this like hearing you talk about it is also. You. Know a lot about what drives us to do this because we have a lot of clientele from out of state and they come and they seek us out and they want this sort of experience and. And they want to be challenged to you know and they they have a certain perception of West Virginia and they know that there's somebody out there sort of trying to tell this different story and. Like, people want to have their minds blown now and they come here and like the this food and it's just like what you said it's like you know something is insignificant little leaf of woods. Early you pick out of the woods and Ulan. Put It on a plate and Wow I never knew that West Virginia and such depth complexity before. There it is. So tell me about. Since this is also kind of brought us together I'd I. I'd be interested in in kind of your feelings about having worked with Tony with with main on on the show because you you were there and his West Virginia episode and I remember. Talking to him I. Think he was emailing me while he was on the road here and he was like so am so geeked in the way that that perhaps only a New Yorker could be. Because it wasn't just like. That he was fired up, but there was also A. Mixed with a heavy cut of surprise. You know I I say that I can say that because I've been in that situation before with West Virginia, where I've been like I've written back home to Julian just you know. Man This is amazing like this is a really beautiful part of the country or you know. So Anyway tell me tell me about working on that show and how that came up and what went down here I. Mean it's been a roller coaster and a half honestly just because it's like there was a hell of a lot of pressure. You know that we sort of put on ourselves because we we know that the opportunities to tell a story about West Virginia are. Like few and far between, and you had your doubts about being being a part of the product. We're skeptical end general I think of national media you know there's like national media doesn't have the best track record of like dropping into West Virginia and telling. A story that we feel is. Fair and accurate and. I mean. There were a lot of people that didn't feel parts. Unknown episode is that what they wanted to see either but I I actually thought that the end result of are always was pretty good and but yeah so. Your question when we got the first call, it was a good thing that it was from someone that we know very well a good friend of ours Elaine Sheldon who is a great documentarian filmmaker in West Virginia. They hired her to sort of do some some scouting of Some scenes and you know between Elaine and Mo- Fallon. They were like you know a lot of connections like back to Lost Creek. So a right most Allen who is the director was born in West Virginia And took dishes very personal like he wanted to make that this episode right rose to the occasion for that. But that's a great lesson by the way for anybody WHO's trying to get out there and make documentaries and television higher fucking great field produce. Right? He was like a legit person pay pay enough money paid that money and you're going to be safe and some local knowledge that makes all the difference because we've had some bad experiences with. National. Media and we've actually said no, we're just sort of like passed up some inquiries from other national media just because we of know their style and their. Eat A lot of. You know. So we got that call from. Elaine. You know we we knew we could trust, and then talking to mow and hearing him being from West Virginia and hearing him talk about how important this the show was. You know we knew that we We were in pretty good hands, but it's tough. You know because like you you sit down Tony came out here. We had. We had basically like a big party and we had a bunch of the everybody from the. Young folks who kind of help us out on our staff to these old farmers in their ninety s who have passed on their varieties of heirloom beings to us or these like old timers who grow impress sorghum with us in the fall. You know they were all here and it was it was so special to have that one night like with everybody sort of in our food community that we we really care about into to sort of let the let the world see that for a few minutes but you know we talked about so much. We talked for like two and a half hours about all these you know like. Things and then it's it's tough to to know what you talked about insertive. Convinced. Like six minutes segments Welsh it. It's It's an hour long show six act. Like. You're never going to bridge. You know from act three our you're always down to be but you guys played the anchor leg. Great you. You're the the finishing. So we you know we we had a lot of pressure on ourselves. Leading up to the shoot, and then it was just sort of like nine months of total suspense or. Just waiting to see what what the show is going to be like, and then the reactions it was like this was the most sort of annoying part of it was Like the reactions in West Virginia I, think overall it was it was very positive, but there was a lot of negativity particularly from like the affluent left. Who? They're exactly the people that we talk about when we talk about these like narratives and these associations with West Virginia and with poverty like these, these people were making the point that were not poor Colmar's. So the poor coal miners have had their time in the spotlight like. Now time to talk about farmers, markets, Joe the wineries and the. Reckoning because we want people to know that we have the same things that they have in their other states and. You know it was it was ridiculous because I thought it was. It was really good. It was coal miners got some time on TV and it was good that they got a chance to toe story that that they thought was fair about themselves and the way that. We could validate that was like seeing what people in Mcdowell County West Virginia think of the episode like Tony is a hero in McDowell County West Virginia. Now, because this is like in McDowell county I should say for Air. Folks listening in like Macao. County is Say One of the counties it's in the coalfields. It's a place to Yvonne doubtedly read about dozens of times because it was sort of the focus of the national media during the two thousand, sixteen election. So it'll boy, it was like and Sorta like McDowell county it's like hard co- country trump country like this where media shows up to like figure out APPALACHIA. So the people in Macau counting are used to being on TV and they're being being there being used right straight something that by the way belies affected, there were more trump voters in New York. Right. So you can take that she an but but still it's out there and that's that's the mentality. They got a good response from the where you got a good response from them on the and I mean I think. It's just that they're used to have immediate come down. With the story already figured out in their minds. And they just want to look for somebody confirming all right Yup and they these people feel like Tony came in. And sort of say what is the story? Yeah it's been fun You're your fun follow on twitter for that reason too because. As you before it's complicated and you do a fair amount of clapping back at people suggest kind of remind them that it's complicated and We'd worked with you on the explore parts unknown stuff, some of the writing and and recipes and talking about kind of filling out the information of the episode and just watching people like kind of. Yeah. Come in and just dropped their drop their two cents about what they thought should and should not have been in the episode and and having you talk about West, Virginia, food culture and how it actually is is pretty fascinating to me. Now it I mean one of the issues too is that Appalachia is diverse place and you would mention that indigenous. Cuisine was actually comes from indigenous communities who were here before, but it's also not Scots Irish entirely on the European side or even on the you know kind of post after Columbus moment right here, there's a lot of diversity they'd record it doesn't actually make into the picture. So what does that look like I mean tell us tell us about some of those kind of those bigger cultures that have come through and and what they've done for the food here don't even know where to start with that because I guess I should start with A. Saying that the myth of the Scots Irish Appalachian is kind of bullshit because. Like that's actually very few of us like by the numbers you know there forget. Where there's actually came from but one of my good friends, Ronni Lundy whose a she's. A great writer she wrote this great beer to winning book called vittles. Okay. Francis Lamb edited. It's A. Right but she she cites this study or survey I guess that came out where it's like how people identify for their heritage and Balanced like Scots Irish was an option in Appalachia but. So few people. Identifies as Scots Irish and not only do they just like not identified that's just not let's not all the heritage because the heritage here is so it is so diverse and it is so complex and there are these. Waves of immigration that come from you know from Eastern Europe or from the Middle East. Or from is like Spain or Italy I mean if you go a few miles down the road. Know into Clarksburg. There are significant African American communities. There are a huge Italian. Communities in Clarksburg. Clarksburg was settled by a fair number of Italian Myers who've families stuck around just like it's great for the food coloring Clarksburg because They're all these old school spaghetti houses in these traditional Italian bakeries or these little shops where he's old women make this traditional Italian sausage to, and you know culture is still sort of alive. You know this organ culture is still alive and it shows up in in Clarksburg in the Italian community and you're working on a project now about Spanish in other types of sausage. You made the soup today from. You know locally made more see and Logan Isa Sausage, which is. A. Leftover from the Spaniards that came right to work here you said during prohibition. So it's like kind of the memory of those people alive can also help disrupt some of that that monotone. For sure and you know there's One of my favorite things to do to put some Lebanese. Food on the menu and. Blow minds. Yeah and This is the thing that I particularly like to do when we go out of state because I have this cookbook and I had this collection of recipes from the Lebanese community in Charleston. From back in the nineteen fifties in Charleston used to be still is but used to be like this huge Lebanese community. There was something like a dozen Lebanese grocery stores in Charleston West Virginia and like the nineteen fifties. Not, not a time where Lebanese people were seen widely in American pop. Right so yeah Lebanese and Syrians, but there are still there still is eleven festival in wheeling West Virginia, and I love to make this like Kobe I usually make it with venison actually. Venison A and You know I love to do shit like that and and you have people tell me. Well, you know pitch yourself as an Appalachian Chef and. This is like Lebanese food it's Appalachian Food and I love it because it gives me this opportunity to say you know just set some shins say like, well, what makes the Scots? Irish Shit More Appalachian than right you know the food of these people who also moved here because of work opportunities. The same thing and it it just gets people to think in different terms about like you know who does doesn't sort of belong on the pages of our history books in right who who gets to to be part of the story in there's a lot more than no fly lists. Yeah. Yeah. Right in West Virginia. I mean this work has just like opened up so many opportunities to to establish these great relationships with people like you know in the Spanish community in the Lebanese community or in the Italian community because there's been this sort of longing. For some of them to get some of these stories out in, there's just sort of been A. You know there hasn't really been much interested. It actually took a guy from Spain to come to West Virginia and You know do a documentary on. A story immigrants in West. Virginia for me to know when I was in college I saw the documentary about. Spanish settlements in West. Virginia nearly fearing these old timers. We're still around time like talking about making this tradition Spanish sausage and. Crazy thing Spanish to this guy and was like, wow, this is this is place I have to find and I have to find these people and have to. Learn about these stories and it's a it's a special thing to be able to connect with your neighbors like that and. Get to. Work with them and get them to be so much a part of our our work in our daily lives really and just like this is our. It's a pretty good gig. Hanging out, make Spanish sausage and. Learned how about it? Yeah, and teaching stuff. Well so speaking of good gigs like you know I've were here. On the farm. You and your wife Amy have that had come down from her great grandfather I think this house great-great-grandfather. Yeah. Great. Great Grandfather So long longtime hold hundred and eighty acres and you guys are doing. I think what is the sort of dreamy job of creating? Your own kind of you know leasing in here like you're trying to create a place where you can grow both the food in the livestock to produce the kind of food that you want to do and and have it be something of a model of I dunno sounds like A. Shitty headline in The Sunday style section but you know this kind of like. A latch and life that you could have. That is kind of rewarding and creative, but also very in touch with where you are. So tell me some shit that you're doing here like what are you doing now and what do you? What's your vision for this place in the future? Well. So right now, he's sort of our like homebase is here at the farm. From the farming side and we serve to use our kitchen as a little bit of like a lab you know but but we are not able to operate out of the farm commercially because we have to look working a commercial kitchen. So we have given that we rent in Clarksburg and that sort of our our home base on the on the culinary side but we're sort of like this travelling road show where we you know. Pack Alvar shut up and travel around to a venue that will host us for a night and the we go somewhere else and it's almost like A. I would say it's sort of like a culinary equivalent of a traveling band in because it's set up. Like the venue hosts us the venue promoted they sell the tickets and. People come and it's not like going out to eat restaurant. You know what it is like people come for a show almost it's like right as they want to hear you talk about talk about. Like. They want the sort of full experience of it. So you know eventually we want. To build a facility on the farm and I think the like the wheels are really starting to turn on that this year I'm not sure exactly what the time line is going to be. But up until now, we've basically just been sort of like fixing the farm up and trying to get it back to life because this was this was a working farm. We back in the day when Amy's great-great-grandfather ran it. Going on here and then her grandparents were the most recent ones to to live here they. died in. The. House. All this stuff was still here in the house just sort of got abandoned the farm gotta for a couple of decades decades. So all the buildings collapsed like there was so much to. Bring it back and I mean the house was just sort of falling apart because he'd been abandoned for so long. So so we've really just been hard at work just trying to bring this place back and. Now, we're sort of at the point where we can start to think a little bit more seriously about building a kitchen facility on the farm. which but there is cattle you've got rabbits have a few remaining. Out you got chickens and then you have you have these kind of hills these forests again using and you you serve from from all of that in terms of like the kind of meals that you put together too. So that's I guess it's a natural step to find a way to get people to come to where it's actually happening. Right? Right right because I mean the the product for us is. Sure. It's the food but like it's US and it's the story of us like fixing this farm up and being here in this place, and it's like you know the story of us sort of like. Discovering rediscovering lot Through our community or through even the history of the farm and the sort of some of the recipes that we found here. Or? Or our own just kind of like Appalachian Resourcefulness story where we just sort of bit the bullet moved here without you know having much money in and like moving into a place that was just in total disarray and right I think. This is it. This is a Chow Chow like you're you're making like somethin' pretty special out of like, what was what was given to? On some level, right so I don't know I I just you know a few weeks ago I was up in five again in northern Sweden which has has been very successful at creating that kind of place based experience modeled around a story of a Zine and and the the you know the people who run it and I just like I i. See all that potential here somehow. Already kind of making it happen. But like creating that as a as a destination, right right and I'm psyched to have the opportunity to bring people to the farm too because. So much of the stories that we tell her about the crops that we grow here you know in in the some of the foraging that we do but the crops in particular because we've got like, let's say these heirloom beans they're like somebody's early means that they've been saving for sixty or seventy years this. Guy For instance has gotten Clarksburg. Italian got Been Poor Taro. He's he just turned ninety eight. So. tale, he gave us these Rabin's these tomatoes peppers the his parents from Italy brought with them right. So like he's been holding onto these things that aren't just vegetables, right? This is like. This. This is like the store, his people in his family and the double helix right right in and and that's the case with like so many other crops that we grow like we've been blessed to get these seeds from people who have really stewarded these things over the years not because they really liked green beans but because like this is a story about like them and their family and their heritage and their community. And You know I want people to come here and to experience this and the growing season. You know when we we've got like twenty five varieties of tomatoes, beans or whatever growing out there the received the bloody butcher corn on the vine or or see the sorghum and be part of the the process. That's the stuff that I think it's like it's fun to go somewhere else and tell the story about the stuff that were growing in the farm but it's GonNa be really cool able to bring people here and create keep creating community based on what we're doing here. That sounds like the stuff I'm I can't wait to see what you guys get up to with it. So you have to come back. I'M GONNA, be back, here. You're going to be a little sick of it. I'm like, Tony I'm like West Virginia. Who Knew? It was an amazing place. Our able. Thank you. Mike. It's been such a pleasure Being, a guest years and having you as a guest on the show let's Go kick some ass stood. The trip from roads and Kingdoms is hosted by me Nathan Thornburgh Emily Marinov was our producer on this episode Taffy Malkin. Yahtzee. Are Consulting producer Alexa van sickle was our editor. Music by Dan the Automated Episode Illustration Bhai Daisy de show artwork by Adele Rodriguez executive producers are me and Matt Goulding also of roads and kingdoms. Next episode on this feed will be on Monday October fifth, and it's from our never before released Berlin series, which is continuing. We are drinking and biking and talking with longtime foreign correspondent Simon Schuster who has much to say about Ukraine and Russia and America and how we're all more alike than we might want to be. We will meet you there.

West Virginia Virginia Appalachia Appalachian Appalachia Spain Charleston West Virginia CIDERS Amy Dawson Lost Creek Lewisburg Clarksburg West Virginia Rams West Virginia Division Anthony Bourdain Chow Chow Mike Costello Cultural Association of Ramps Daniela Tony
Long Distance Calls Vol. 1

Long Distance

26:00 min | 1 year ago

Long Distance Calls Vol. 1

"You're listening to long distance. I'm Paula Mario Hi for Baldwin Park High Pollen Patrick Hi My name is hi. I'm hey my name is this is my name is And I'm from Virginia Beach. Virginia groups here in the Empire and I moved out of the Philippine in two thousand thirteen to buy. And I'm now living in North Tex- I suppose boarding when I'm from Anchorage Alaska Article Place Lights on cars. But I was born in Hong Kong and then moved to Malta when size and then New England when I was eight. I live in Portland Oregon and I'm from Beckley West Virginia. Actually I live in Charleston West Virginia now anyway by the way I definitely Filipino. Okay so ooh awhile back we asked You yes you to give us a call and tell us about your long distance story or what. It's like to be Filipino. Wherever you you are in the world many of you called thank you very much? And now we'd like to share some of those calls with you on this episode. This was a really fun episode to put together. Honesty was inspired by a lot of your messages and requests from last season. Many of you have asked us to come to your part of the world and tell stories about Filipinos. He knows there will because we can't be everywhere at once yet. We figured this would be a great way to get your stories on the show and to finally hear from you our listeners. Who have made this show possible and this episode would not be possible? Well all episodes really but this this particular one truly would not be possible without my fellow producer voice actor partner whatever Patrick Aquino who made it all happen. Hey Hey Patrick. So Patrick usually I take the lead on show production and you come in first story editing and things like that but for this episode you took charge urge of collecting all the voicemail messages received you sorted through them then you edited a bunch them into a really great piece at three hundred music and all that jazz but you really took the reins of putting this all together. was that like news cool. It was fun kind. Just light hearing people's stories and a lot of the stories were kind of always from the perspective active of being the other. You know so. I found that kind of interesting. There were so many great calls. We really appreciated that. People took the time to call leave a message. Three minutes or less some may be took a couple of calls to get their messages in but that was cool. There were calls with different kinds of stories. A lot of them had to do with what it was like to grow up in their part of the world what it was like to be in a community that was very Filipino or not Filipino. At all that said we could not not fit all of the calls into one episode and we also had to edit allow. These calls down for time. Patrick actually really got to listen to all these messages messages pretty closely. Where were these calls coming from? Could you name some places. Yeah there were a bunch from the. US One from Australia and one from a woman who lived in Dubai. Canada places like VOB each Stocked in Queens. The Bay Chicago even in Boston. Well I'm really excited to share this episode. It's going to be a change of pace from our usual story episodes but I think it'll be fun. Thanks Patrick for making it all happen. No problem now without further ado all that is on this episode. Long distance calls volume. All you want a quick warning. There's some curse words in this episode. Not Too much just in the first and last call. Okay here we go. Hi My name is frank modern and I grew up here in the inland empire which is like the halfway mark between Los Angeles and San Diego. At one time I was on. I was actually reading at a bar and I think the bar back. He was Philippino from the Philippines and he made that clear is after shift. They asked if I spoke to college. I don't Speak Tagalog and explain this to him and he just sort of said that I wasn't like qualified to be Filipinos. Weird statement statement is getting heated about it and I was like look man. I guess. That's your definition Filipino. On Justice Filipino. How to get out of here and as I said that term said by he basically told me to fuck off and I said Whoa? That's not necessary and a and just felt really compelled to to let me know how he was. And so he found the outside and He shouldn't combat hey. My name is Kayla combat armor of strata hours born in Hong Kong and then to Malta. When I was five and then the England when I was eight? And that's where I spent most of my time. I'm on the Philippian. My Dad is English and growing up. I've always been proud of my Filipino heritage. But Ed time struggled to find the balance between else's and I have it you know what the answer when he blast way from know. Really where you from. I worked in production out of. He's like Oh. I'd love to take it to the Philippines one day and until then attempts to recreate the dishes. My mom used to make rhapsody. Thanks for listening anything for the PODCAST. I love it right hi hi. My name is Lorenzo Caring Union and I'm from Beckley West. Virginia actually I live in now anyway I definitely Filipino. And growing up here of all places really todd as is conservative. Place not really racially diverse than I don't know man I didn't really have a good idea of who I was for the longest time and and my exposure to Filipino. Culture was really just limited to my church. which was I don't know? Maybe she doesn't people most excuse me growing up meant I duNno figuring out on my own though every time I'm around family. That's actually from the Philippines from Filipino community. Some kind of weird Al My name is portion Tolentino and I. I live in Portland Oregon and I've been living here for the past twenty years. I was born in the Philippines but my family moved to the states. Now two years old and I've lived in Maryland Kentucky North Carolina before they finally settled in Oregon. I grew up with a lot of different people from different backgrounds. And Yeah I like I was lucky to grow up in a release support a family and to have found my passion early and that art art helped me navigate as a person right now. I work in Portland and I work doing what I love. And that is making process pieces for a company and I really love what I do and actually work with a lot of other Filipino artists which is so inspiring. I see them doing their thing. And it inspires me to keep moving. My name is Nicholson Barnes. I'm originally from northern California Korea. I grew up only knowing my mom and my Lula being the only people I knew who were Filipino. I didn't really like being clip. You know I didn't know what it meant. Then and it was hard. I grew up in mostly white place and only understood being Filipino largely as a marker of difference and in two thousand fifteen eighteen. I was on a two week trip with my mother to our ancestral province. which is the province of speak on the island of benign the size and I have never ever really spent a lot of time in the country on the last day? The mayor asked me to be a regional beauty pageant. I didn't even. It was possible and so my mom and I went back to to Manila. And then we're GONNA fly out to the US but we had different flights and my mom said you're not GonNa do that pageant right. And I said No. And then she got on her fight and then I walked away from my life and I moved to the Philippines with Duffel bag with two weeks of course serve and I won the patches and after I won the beauty pageant the governor appointed me head of Tourism and I was like twenty two so then I lived there for the next year Over a year maybe and it changed my life and it changed my work. So yeah. That's my long distance story You're listening to long distance calls volume one. These are thoughts stories anecdotes and experiences about being Filipino. Anywhere anywhere in the world delivered through voicemail messages from you our long distance listeners. Now I WANNA take a short break from these calls to share a podcast that I I think some of you might dig as you might know from previous episodes. I lived in the Bay in Highschool Ninety Five. What's up so I have a podcast to suggest for all you bay area listeners? or or simply folks who like to listen and learn more about the news. The Bay is a podcast from K.. Q. E. D. about local bay area news. But it's also something much deeper than that. It digs into some of the biggest news of the region the stories that exist in the margins current events and issues that affect one of the largest most active Filipino communities. He's in America who Silicon Valley. What makes bart a politicized? SPACE DO Asians go to jail to the bay is storytelling but storytelling storytelling the news. And it's hosted by Devin Katayama and Erica crews Guevarra who is by the way Dope Filipina journalist APP. You don't already follow her her work. You really should subscribe to the bay to get stories delivered to your feet on Mondays Wednesdays and Fridays. Listen to the bay on your favorite podcast APP like the thing. You're you're likely using right now to listen to long distance aleve more information and links to episodes from the Bay podcast in the show description so just tap or swipe on the podcast art in your APP or check it out on her website. Long Distance Radio DOT COM now back to more calls Hi My name is genevieve. Nina mine from Anchorage Alaska I'm the only one family board here. In America. The rest of my family emigrated from the Philippines and the late eighties and early. Nineteen so in Alaska Doc There's a thing called scuttle which are Filipino workers who what between California late summer And Fish African Fan and LASCA and the better time though. That's what my dad did growing up here in English. There are a lot of Filipino. People for that I I saw and so it was normal for me by was never really involved and like Hannity. I didn't think language I never really felt Filipino. Now and I never really wanted to be proud of being with you know they. They only conception of Filipino. But pride and all that but now you know and then working in nonprofit healthcare policy they really trying to reclaim a lot of identity that I really. It probably didn't growing up because I only learned over the past couple of years that passed Immigrants Group and Alaska and and we are like nowhere. We're not really 'cause isn't the power we're not really you representatives in the whole like officials and all of that and so I'm really trying to reclaim my looking taste because our access politics have been awarded Hi My name is mark. I was born and raised in California has largely surrounded by the Latinos and I went to Undergrad at. Uc Davis where. I majored the American studies years later after I graduated I decided to move to North Carolina to apply for the school where I'm one of the few handful awesome knows. It's been quite a culture shock. For example in order to get into the school you have to gain not hands on Howard's in the field and I decided to go out of my comfort zone. Anco work with a large animal veterinarian. And he'd go out any very rural places and as soon as I step out of the truck many of the clients they look at me and they automatically assumptions. They see me and ask how how. What was it like to live in Hawaii? Or what's Rosca like and offer valid where I tell them I'm from California. Yeah and also kid as I'm feeding their animal that explain what the Hell is. Hi My name is amy. Saint George and I'm from Virginia Beach Virginia. And you're speaking with Little Miss Philippines. Virginia two thousand to two thousand one I grew up in a pretty tight. Knit Mitt Philipino community here in Virginia beach waiting to Filipino parties. Every weekend awesome food playing Nintendo upstairs while all of our mom. But these played Bingo downstairs and I grew up doing Filipino folk dance for the yearly fiestas here Viva San Clemente and doing the pageants around here as well. My sisters and I all competed in the pageant here. Although I'm the only one that really wants After I graduated I got recruited into a religious order her through my church and so I basically became apostol which is essentially what Maria than sound of music kind of nine and training a lot of the other other people who were recruited into this were also Filipino. Kids like me and we basically ended up leaving and having to seek treatment and therapy therapy for essentially a really traumatic experience so after leaving there and basically seeking treatment for brainwashing into a cult. kind of been a long long road of doing and self discovery for me because as a non binary queer Filipino American. I I tend to have to live my life in a really fragmented way. I feel like I have my queer and Trans Friends and then I have my hi so if you know friends and then I have my family and it feels like nobody really get to know all of me. Hi I'm Angela Gumby. I'm from from Maryland just outside of DC and it's fun and easy to be so appealing hair because they're a lot of resources and opportunities to yourself represented. I'm also by Rochelle. My mother Philippine on my father is white and my son is always been sort of a complicated issue for me. My mom came here in the sixties. And what is nothing to do with being Filipino. So I was always told check white on my farm but I don't look wait or present white. I wasn't treated like I'm like but I was treated differently in the Filipino community because of Colorado them so it's really complicated for me for a really long time and it wasn't until I got to college that I'm not sure if you know outside of my family and I think those relationships experiences really supporting and you're finding my identity that I'm I'm proud today. I have a daughter. Now who is a quarter Filipina half do a quarter broadly European and she you presented white so I struggle with how she and I will connect culturally and how will experience the world very differently. Some people don't think I'm her mom. I get a lot of weird books. But that's common coming for a lot of families that I know and I think it's the Latinos we're accustomed to the sort of diversity because of our history and our migration all over the world but I think to on this is real another outlet. It's great to be able to share these experiences. No matter how complex they are Hey My name is David Manassas. I'm a Filipino. American group in the Chicago area and I live in Laszlo slow from Spain. I guess my family because most of my friends the Filipino. Mom and white that if they're mixed opposite listen. My Dad is the Filipino. One and my mom is a blonde haired blue eyed lady from the south. There's interesting growing up because my mom very American classic American woman and my dad was very much an immigrant and we live with my grandma and for a long time just pretty typical in Filipino. Family but I still never learned tagalog or compound in and I've had a great Filipino. Yeah that's a new a new Philippine on America. My name is Lauren. And I'm from San Francisco Bay area. I'm third generation American. My grandfather on my dad's side from from Biko and I'm also mixed race. I am along with Filipino on German Portuguese and Irish growing up in San Francisco Bay area. I was to run by very diverse community so growing up in the suburbs there was also bad previously way community and brought up in the White House. Hold as well my Filipino heritage. Didn't really have too much of a role in my upbringing. Kind of make up for lost time by learning more about my heritage both in Tikal and even more so as an adult and college and beyond and I have a feeling. It's going to be something that will be big pro life going forward on not just being Filipino. Phil Can Meralco understanding why you'd be mysteries. philippine-american this is Justin heavier I went to UC Santa Barbara at the end of highschool. I was basketball player. And when I it went to Europe I witnessed a lot of people playing soccer. Or they're riding bicycles or they're competing and trampolines. But I thought hey. Why don't I do that so as soon as I got back to? The United States I bought a bicycle And I started training to compete in a triathlon Ford couple years later I'm now competing in cycling races and traff on racists from the United States all the way so as far as Italy but along the way. I'm also trying to find like my identity of who I am as mad as a Filipino. Man I remember having a conversation telling me you know if you don't know many Filipinos out there especially one who are in sports if someone that you can look up to see just to who search nick that long story short. I couldn't find anyone basically. I've been through to a lot and I've witnessed a lot as the dark Filipino kid. Cycling in pretty much predominantly white race. Like competition you know Filipinos. There'll be any minorities especially out in Europe I faced in here a lot of discriminatory words towards myself but but let that deter me racing. That actually empowered me a little bit more but not a lot of stories Hilas says originally originally from ten to one that's In southeastern was on typical region was born in whenever back in line line. Shortly after he moved my family I moved to Iraq. And I lived in Philippians intro around. Oh six seven that we last the Philippines came to New York Who Live out in Queens New York borough of mass living with a cover time racing but a lot better than ever gets caught? Shank Chino a monkey and I piss them off and they get mad and questions but you know then that much money back then and like I do after. Living moved to Wisconsin out in a Chipper Fox Constantini little town one of the five Asian Dollar School. Living Darren that very white environment you know not just in the snow but why and people said to become apparent that I'm different. Obviously another after that and my family and I moved onto stocking now and That's where it was able to rediscover what it was like to the Filipino. What it means to be for you know met other after you know very long vice relations with my culture I even reaching my speaking? I live on some more. I'm able to find pride and who I am and what it means to be. Filipino is not really about. Do you know this and that about the culture held us doesn't mean you have another language but what it is is that entity intensive tough where people do San Vitamin D. You send with them. Do you support them and do you love them. That's what it means to be you. Yeah they leave The in this episode was edited. Did by Patrick. A piano. Sound design mix is by me all amato long distance is produced by Patrick a piano and me by the way I know. It's the holidays and you might have a little more free three time or even travel time coming up so be sure to catch up on all episodes of long distance on your favorite podcast APP or on our show site long distance. RADIO DOT COM. Aw Please tell your friends and family check it out too. And while you're at it leave us a rating and review on Apple podcasts on the show site we've got photos and links to materials on every episode so page plus you can watch new episodes too long distance. TV The documentary video series for this podcast directed by Patrick Aquino. He worked really hard on those videos. And they're beautiful. Do say so myself. So please do check it out this season of long distance produced with support from PX and the Google podcasts casts Creator Program Music in this episode is by Blue Dots sessions beam song is by c light and the prisons special. Thanks to Jagmeet Singh Mac over at pure rex for giving us feedback on this episode. And seriously thank you so much to everybody who called and we wanna make more episodes like this in the future. So if you'd like to share your long distance story call two one three two nine three six zero two four and leave us a message about what. It's like to be Filipino. Wherever you may not be able to fit every story for your call on the episode but we love hearing from you and who knows he might put it on the next one? Remember with your story. Please leave your full name if possible where you're from. How how we can email you or call you back just in case you want to follow? That's it for this episode of Long Distance Weeks. Thanks for listening.

Philippines Patrick Aquino Virginia US The Bay Virginia Beach America Portland Hong Kong Oregon California Philippian Charleston West Virginia Malta North Carolina Anchorage Alaska Article Place San Francisco Bay Alaska Beckley West Virginia Paula Mario
 Bonus: Carole Baskin Talks About Her Past

Joe Exotic: Tiger King

17:02 min | 1 year ago

Bonus: Carole Baskin Talks About Her Past

"From wondering this is a special extended bonus interview from Joe Exotic. The third episode of Joe Exotic will be out in a few days in the meantime because of the intense interest in Joe Carroll Baskin many of the other people involved in this story we will from time to time. Be Sharing exclusive extended interviews from rob. Moore's reporting rob spent years on this story and spoke with dozens of people in this episode Rob Interviews Carol Baskin where she shares more details about her childhood leaving home fifteen her first marriage and the first time she met her second husband. Dan Lewis. Here's the interview. So when and where were you born can serve? Tell the story of your birth members kind of a good story. I was born the Lackland Air Force Base. My father was in the military. He was in the Air Force for four years so even though I was born there we move back to Tampa when I was about three cat. I was wondering what was the good story so recently. I was going through some photo albums my mother gave me and I pulled out some pictures and was putting them in a different book and one of the pictures was a picture of me the first day they brought me home from the hospital. My Mother's holding me and my father is holding a little orange and white kitten and on the back of the photograph. It said the cat's name was tiger. And all these years I had no idea that might first pet was a cat named tiger. Didn't even know that there's a cat. They're the cat in the cradle When your baby so can you just briefly just kind of describe your your family for me? My father was a workaholic and my mother was a workaholic. My father had a lot of different jobs as I was growing up. He had a lawn care. Business is the private pilot for the governor of West. Virginia that was Governor Arch Moore. He had a furniture store and my mother worked. Mostly the secretary and mostly in legal settings or in bank settings in nineteen ninety six. My father retired and my mother was still working and he was driving her crazy because he didn't know how to make popcorn need at nowhere. Anything was in the house. Didn't know how to take care of himself. And she said you gotta find something for your father do so we brought him out to the sanctuary and he built a couple of ponds for the cats and then day after day he was finishing these projects so quickly that he finally said you know. What do you want me to do next? I said knock yourself out whatever you WanNa do and back then. All of our cages were concrete floor. Chain link steel boxes and so he started building the huge natural habitats EC for the cats. Now and that's what he dedicated his life to was making their lives as comfortable as possible. Jimmy Siblings Child. I have one brother. He's six years younger than I am. He retired from the sheriff's department a few years ago and that was right at the time when my father was falling ill and so he was helping my father with some of the cage work around the sanctuary and then helped us out for about a year after that. And your daughter's years was really like a family affair. This little place built by but when we rescued the fifty six cats from the farm in Minnesota that was in nineteen ninety-three and Jamie was twelve at the time or thirteen guest right around that time and so she's been taking care of exotic cats and she was twelve years old. What kind of like just in general terms? What kind of kid were you? What were you what were you into? What was your you know? How did you fit into the ecosystem of the school? What were your passions? Just what how? Can you describe yourself as a child? I was always a tomboy. I all my friends were boys By spend a Lotta time climbing trees and I made the mistake. One day of climbing up into this tree that was right outside of our house and it was in Charleston West Virginia and you could look out over the mountains and the airport was in the distance. Which is where my father was flying in and out all the time so. I would watch that. I was just bored out of my mind and I remember saying God i Never WanNa be this board again and it was like the Voice of God answered that question and it has just never had a boring moments since then. I don't think as a kid you ever get bullied. Did you ever get your face? You know. I don't know kids who are being particularly Intimidating or harsh or anything like that. I did deal with bullies a lot because my brother was extremely shy. Just couldn't look at this child and not having break out into tears and of course bullies just love that and so they were constantly picking on him and I was always having to fight his battles for him. There was a a particular situation where we had to walk to school and it was a long way. We had walked five miles. The there was this one particularly rough gang of boys that were all my agent older in fact one of them. I remember his name still to this day. Name was Eddie craft and they said he had failed the sixth grade six times so he was probably eighteen nineteen years old and still in grade school but he had this group of boys that had surrounded may at one point and I was carrying lunch to school in a amway briefcase which is kind of like a hard plastic case. I sold Amway doors a kid so I had that briefcase and I just started swinging around in a circle with that briefcase in figured if I took out just even one of them the rest of them would scatter and sure enough. I clipped Eddie and the rest of them ran like roaches in. Did you learn a lesson than about about how to deal with with bullies is terrifying is? That was for me to teach me that. If you stand up to them they will back down and I think if I had not just like with my brother. Because he couldn't stand up to these people he was constantly tormented. You moved out right. So when did you did? We move like twenty times during my childhood We moved we moved from Texas to Tampa from Tampa to Panama City. My father was a flight instructor in Panama City and then we came back to Tampa then. We went to West Virginia. That was when he got the job for the governor and then when the new governor came in Governor Rockefeller took over he sold all of the State. Planes bought helicopters but none of the pilots could fly helicopters. So my father my father. My mother brother ended up moving back to Tampa. I stayed there and worked for governor. Our Governor Rockefeller for Awhile and then I came out one day and my car was buried in the snow and I dug it out of the snow. I had to use a hairdryer to warm the engine up enough that it would actually fire and I called in and I said I'm not coming into work today. A move into Florida packed the car up and moved to Florida coming in today. Or any day after this Goodbye and so you sort of you got pretty early when you left home. I left him at the age of fifteen. So so. Where'd you go? Would you do when you're fifteen? You Tomac literally even at night. Where did you go? Well it was It was a perfect storm of events. I had been dating a boy that was in Tampa when we lived in Tampa. When I left home we were in West Virginia. He had gone into the military and he was up in Washington. Dc around that area and he calls me up out of the blue and says that he's going back to Florida. Do I WANNA come along? So I packed up to paper grocery bags of clothes and we drove back to Florida. That then ended up being. I don't know probably a year year. And a half of hitchhiking back and forth down the East Coast and turns out he had gone Awol from the army which was a really bad thing And he was an extremely abusive person. He was six foot. Four two hundred thirty pounds of just nothing but temper emperor so it was a horrifying part of my life. We ended up back in West Virginia. And that's when I got the job for. I worked a number of different jobs in restaurants and bars and even though I was underage I I looked a lot older than I was and so I was able to work a breakfast shift for I think it was Howard Johnson's at the time and then a lunch shift. I forget where that place was. And then there was Evening Shifts that I could work at restaurants and bars and I remember. One of them was called Athens by night and they had this belly dancer named Little Sheba and I had ended up getting a job for the governor's office so that was fabulous and I was able to give all of these restaurant jobs that I had and the press got a hold of the fact that there was a fifteen year. Old Working in the governor's office and just had field day with that and my parents actually had to sign a work permit for me to be able to do that. But by that time I had left home and they understood was coming back. Sydney rate the press got a hold of that and said that I was little she but I I can't dance. Lick was not the belly dancer from Athens by night. But I have a long history of the press twisting by story so when I dug my car out of the snowbank and drove it back to Florida. I don't remember the exact Sequence of events but I was driving up old Mazda station wagon and my father had gotten a Orange Datsun pickup truck. It went found the job. Zehr which was kind of like K. Mart or target. By this time I hit my cat. Who had been living with my parents so the cat was living with me in the truck. I had a camper that I put on the back so I was living in the back of the truck and at night what I would do is. There was a pastor window between the cab of the truck and the back in the next day. When I'd go to work I'd have to find someplace cool that I could park where she have a breeze and here in Florida this just too hot and so my boss there was Mike Murdock and he had an apartment and so I asked him. This cat could stay with him during the day which he allowed and then I ended up marrying Mike and he was the author of my daughter. Jamie so I married him when I was seventeen. Seventeen in this is a here in Tampa. Yes did that feel young marrying someone seventeen. That was a pretty standard for the time. It was not normal. I don't think at that time for people to married that young but I had been out on my own for two years so it seem normal to me mentally. You were already nineteen twenty one like you were way ahead of people your age and allies in the marriage to Mike cost. I married him when I was seventeen. So that would have been nineteen seventy eight and then. Jamie was born in nineteen eighty The birth little bit. I never had any intention of having children because I am not mother material by any stretch of the magic nation. I was never a kid that played with dolls. I never imagined what my wedding was going to be like. I don't have any of those them in kind of leanings but accidentally got pregnant and ended up having Jamie who has turned out to be. Just you know soulmate. She's amazing and people often credit her with being the adult ner relationships as a result of having no mothering skills you pretty much had to raise herself and I think Mike and is separated. Probably about eighty four. So it was. A long protracted divorce by eighty six eighty seven. And then you mean you may done right and that. Don In nineteen eighty. Okay so you and Mike were together. But you're kind of on the rocks and you need done and done was also in a married but he also kind of on the rocks right. And how'd you meet there? Was there was a story there. Yeah ask always been. I think fairly easy to get along with in marital relationships or in Relationships in general but this one day Mike and I had just the worst day ever end he to just like Jim before him was extremely abusive physically abusive and so he came at me and I was in the kitchen making dinner peeling potatoes and I could see that this was going to result in a beating in so I through a potato Adam out the door and then I was like ducking behind houses in such until I got far enough from the House that I felt like he wasn't going to be able to just ride around the neighborhood and find me and as I'm going down the street. There's this one car that just keeps coming around in front of me and looping around the neighborhood in the coming around again and again and I remember there. Were some old black men sitting on the corner selling watermelons so. I asked if I could sit with them for a while and I sat with them until the guy quit cruising the neighborhood. I felt like it was safe to keep walking in the way. I deal with stresses to walk walk. Walk walk so I can really understand when cats pacing cages. What they're dealing with just trying to walk off. All of that stress saw him walking again and here comes another car circling around and doing the same stuff and so the one that comes around this time guy pulls over rolls down the window asked finest ride it ride. He doesn't sit again when he comes around again. He's got a gun laying out on the front seat and he said you can hold a gun on me. I just need somebody to talk to and I was like well. This is interesting. This is boring got so I got in health gun on him and listened to him. Tell his story and that was on. That was done. Wow that's a better story than I remember. Wow and so this conversation. Well not really we. Last time we talked. We talked briefly about you. He you know you're walking on the road and he picked you up in you know. He's you know he's really kind to you in the other guys previously hadn't been but I think part and so then you. What happened you guys? You started sort of clandestinely dating after that we did. That was a special bonus interview with some of the characters behind the scenes of Joe exotic new episodes of Joe Exotic. Come out weekly or you can binge all six episodes of Joe Exotic right now and free on one three plus get a seven day free trial subscription by going to wonder dot com slash plus. That's wondering DOT COM SLASH P L U S. Hi wondering listeners. If you've ever wanted to listen to the best episodes of your favorite one re podcast. All in one place will now. You can introducing the best of laundry. The Best of laundry is a new podcast that features stand alone full length episodes of some of the most captivating compelling exciting stories from all of wondrous originals including Dr Death Business Horse. Life is short with Justin. Long American history tellers shrink next door and many more to hear your favorite shows all in one place search for the best of wondering on Apple podcasts. Spotify or your favorite listening.

Tampa Mike Murdock Florida Joe Exotic Jamie Governor Arch Moore West Virginia Lackland Air Force Base Governor Rockefeller Joe Carroll Baskin rob Dan Lewis Air Force Amway Carol Baskin Eddie craft Charleston West Virginia Spotify Washington
2167 - Labor Day 2019

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

44:21 min | 1 year ago

2167 - Labor Day 2019

"It is monday september. Oh my gosh september second two thousand nineteen. My name is sam cedar. This is the five time award winning majority report. We are broadcasting live to tape steps from the industri- ravaged ghana's canal in the heartland of america downtown u._s._a. Yes folks happy labor day. What'd you think aw we were going to work on labor day. Yeah we're not. We're not a scabs around here. I'm management. I'm not even come into work here you go but of course to celebrate labor day. I have made everybody come in the office and post this record this in fact they are mac has created this entire introduction by piecing together different words i've had said over the course of the past year editing them so that they sound normal and presenting the show no in fact it is our are a special labor day episode. We repeat this every year. Now it has become a tradition we have compilation of labor speeches and a little bit of music nick labor <hes> labor songs solidarity with the coal miners in kentucky if they're still going at it we're recording this a week in advance before we go on our vacation and solidarity with all the <hes> workers out there who hopefully will start to use their power by withholding their labor more and so with that said enjoy this compilation elation. We'll be back tomorrow. Thanks again to all our members who support us by going to join the majority report dot com. You make this show possible day in day a out enjoy clip from f._d._r. Franklin delano roosevelt's four freedoms speech which was actually the nineteen forty one state of the union address so this is <hes> a ten eleven almost twelve months before <hes> we <hes> we entered a world war two and <hes> this is the speech where he laid out <hes> to i guess freedoms <hes> that go beyond the the constitution and <hes> basically said that <hes> you know we human beings have a right to economic security and and this is a fairly new theme at that point and liquid goddess in a good place until of course <hes> the right wing and the money in this country decided they had enough of that but here's a clip from that speech now a- a- as men do not live by i read alone <unk> bye bye on them alone those who are defensive and those behind them will you build the fence must have gone courage come from unthinkable belief in the manner manner of life which they are defending the money that we are calling for cannot be based on a disregard of all the things worth fighting the nation's take great satisfaction and much for things which have been done to make it people conscious of their individuals states in the preservation of democratic light in america. Those things have complement. The fiber of people have renewed that faith franklin both the institutions. We make ready ready for a test. Certainly this is no time for any of us to stop thinking about the social and economic mkx problems which are the root cause of the social revolution which is today a supreme factor in world. Father is nothing mysterious about the foundation of a healthy and strong democracy the basic you think things affected by all people of airport lyrical and economic systems are symbol they they are equality of opportunity for you and for other jaw but those who worth security but those who need it the ending of special privilege for the few the preservation of civil liberties for all the enjoyment in joy moment of the proof of scientic problems white and constantly rising standard of living the simple basic things that must never be lost sight automatic turmoil unbelievable complexities of modern world. Hello the inner and the bitings strength of our economic and political system is dependent upon the gre- the wick zane for fill the expectation many subject directed will also clearly economy call for immediate improvement as an example. We should bring more status under the coverage of old age pensions and unemployment. They went in short. We should widen the opportunities adequate medical path. We should plan a better the system by which persons does gooding on meetings gainful employment may have paid. I saw all for personal track of and i am assured of the willingness of almost all american respon- on dulack call a part of the sacrifice means the payment of more money in taxes back in my budget method. I recommend that a great part of this great defend and program be paid for from texas gun. We are paying for today. No person should try. I'll be allowed to get rich off of the program in the principle of tax payments in accordance with ability to play the big comfortably before is guide legislation. If they congress maintain these principles the vote us warding patriotism on ted bucket books. We're did you there. I finley's days. We it makes us your we look the way your old founded upon fall. A central sulman freedom is freedom of being and the everest where in the world the second is freedom of every person to worship god in his own way in the world the third freedom from one which translated in the world means economic understanding which will secure to every obey for a healthy peacetime life foreign patents everywhere in the world freedom from fear which translated the world means is your wide reduction of ottoman to such a point and then trace sarah fashion that noah mason will be the and operation who commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor anywhere in the world. Ah that is no vision millennium. It is a definite basis for kind world at panel in our own time and generation. That's kind the world is the very antithesis of the photo falls new off up which seeks to create the crash of a bomb go that new the water we oppose the great awesome septum the morrow autumn a defining is able author face teams of world domination and farm revolution without v since the beginning. We're getting of our american history. We have been engaged in came in april petrol peaceful revolution revolution which goes on settling just thing itself the changing jason with the concentration camp. All the quick lime in the world auto wake wasting is the cooperation of free countries looking to then a friendly civilize is this makes me has placed. It's destiny mataz ted pop other millions of free men and women and face in freedom under the guidance of freedom means with the primacy of human rights. Every support goes to those pro to gain those rights and keep them. <hes> frank is all units offer that high concept that can be no end save victor k now. This is a speech from john. L. lewis he was the <hes> probably one of the most famous <hes> labor union leaders in this country ever. He was the <hes> head of the united mine workers for gosh. I don't know twenty eighth twenty some odd years maybe more <hes> and <hes> some of his speeches i think come from the thirties but i couldn't find on <hes> i found this one from <hes> i think it was <hes> late nineteen fifty fifty two <hes> he is in <hes> charleston west virginia and he's endorsing ally stevenson in his run for the president and <hes> but it's it's still a great union speech and you really get a sense of <hes> just how <hes> powerful speaker this guy was so here it is almost armed goldminer marching together raise thank the wright express themselves that freeman pose blair mom hum by six hundred bribed so juries pain by the logan county fula the royalty of ten cents a ton on all coal mine in this in that county and they didn't do a food ooh from wickford draw the money to buy rifle ammunition and equipment for six hundred mind god's in the pay their cetera korea their key say operators who rebel level load royalities nuclides allowed to high heaven. I'm on workers union adjusted leading of a royal day of ten cents a ton to have or the mineworkers bridge was destroyed who lives where you in the cool mom they said i i tim royalties men the right king and we said in all the right of coal miners and we demonstrated that yes i say to the miners in northern west virginia who may be listening tonight. I remember one point five thousand men in those northern hozeal murder victim primarily homes by the associated with the consolidation coal company and who long winters and through style asian them disease. They fought the fight for the right to belong to their union and and mining coal from all twenty cents at the awkward with paying at that time twenty eight time reminding a ton of cold underground reading the man within the sound of my voice or in the stayed in west virginia we could pick up a kind of coal and moving three inches for twenty. They live in the barracks. They froze in the winter. They did without medicine and medical attention and teachers for their children. They bury their dead on camp that they might v and order mountaineers might be free and all of the west virginia india and west virginia might have a right to govern themselves and who select armagh man for public office the same is true in the new ever in the winding this amos amos now all of the honors and the duck river the same is true in the panhandle of west virginia famous on both banks the manga he'll love it and today mom and one hundred thousand nine or stay in several districts working when they work on another room with collective bargaining and under wages and working conditions that american american citizens have a right to enjoy and which no other would leeann keep it that way and i come to west virginia tonight to say a word of advice and code minor word of advice vice dakota minor and not alone but citizen of west virginia who believed in proper treatment and hubby's fellow citizens and who liked wise long-term prove his professional been by participation in the increase properly prosperity which come to a community artists state when the people who work are properly compensated what has become a earnings the west virginia mine workers since since they weren't organized at v._m. Nevada republican depression nine teen twenty nine what has become of that that money like everyone else was only able to retain more himself in any stay calm but it's mall boston. I'll be darned because the providence of life he's bennett. Manager shoes for the children for in grief education brennan crew specialties in the hall very broader out love and he meant it in his home community and the businessman that came out and the professional manner that mandate. I'm a creature that amount of and every institution in the state of west virginia had benefited by participation in the in waves standard foundered raw state by the united mine workers of it. It isn't very long. It isn't very long aw fuck this on eighteen years the wages in logan county where a dollar dollar and a half dollars seventy five cents a day for a supposed ten hour day but went to reality while they clean up day and and more often brought fifty-nine almost better ah man they and the professional men of logon coffee today because the mind workers have money my name to become their customer to buy the good by their and motoric receive professional services medical amana carney practitioners in the profession. All of the citizens of west virginia have shared an improvement and what is true in logan county has been crew in every other mining sector of the state and what is in the mining sections of virginia's likewise drew in the chemical limb stray in the lumbering and it does in the railroad and three and the limestone and and it's true of all of west virginia you may hypocrite and a fool to be gone sir. I have just come here from agreed. In nice convention of the united mine workers take monica with delegates from several local union richmond section and the queen's cincinati afford about eight days and conventional witnessed one of those not taking marvelous sex of visions of suzy. Adam has been mile off to see twenty eight hundred and five elected delegates the carolina this country from the cascade mountains of washington to the lawyer field of alabama from the jurisdiction of pennsylvania to the far flung minds of new mexico knows twenty eight hundred didn't file man after due consideration adopted a resolution by rising standing you unanimous vote words upon the mineworkers of this country and all other members of organized labor that hey hey refuse to take a professional soldier for president of the united states but the tape take a great human humanitarian and public spirited the citizens in the person of ashli e stevens recommend surely owes men must have representatives presentative sentiment of the mannered hall sure ed that demonstrates that men who who work in the mines thinking man end early admixed one believe that they all during the problems of life in america and the burden and the responsibilities divinities of reading and educating family through their proper place in the community of citizenship eight hundred word than five delegates which aren't able to nobody but the man in her home domenici who elected them by unanimous vote instructed the officers of all his asian that do everything possible third membership and all other citizens that is in the cost aside and push away the luring siren boys those candidates who represent that con- pregnant well and power of the american american industry and financial world and who law to elect their man in the white house so that he make the rules for you and those similarly situated. I'm here for that purpose and i come here. Also how's that in this great state. I would like to have obvio- the minor who this great. We'll take my own advice because they believed in december in the responsibility of what i say i would like to have the mine workers of this great state another state date not only vote for honorable add lie east davis in the united states my vote for bil modern the governor of west virginia and hy-vee okay so the next step is a four minute song by guy name uncle george jones he was a united mine worker her <hes> and <hes> he was a mine worker back in late eighteen hundreds he went blind in the <hes> around <hes> <hes> i guess <hes> the second decade of the twentieth century around like the nineteen fifteen or something he went blind he was working the alabama minds lines and he was singing essentially about the <hes> <hes> revival of the united mine workers and <hes> as well a singing the praises of unions he mentioned john l lewis and this and obviously <hes> <hes> franklin delano roosevelt so check it out enjoy it interesting song and we still got more nineteen gun rolled back took the bread the dan donald them union. We might be come neta through gather at gone onto lead the plan by the dharma another another year. We'll have the union back. Then who rang who ray union we must ban with the old guard they don't john protect believing man didn't make the women oh dude on the han speaking to book out beaming in no riding ban and the predator dan dan gonna look at nine decree eco john rainey around one made three oh down in alabama all benign believing man bread and you go to nine montgomery union union backing dan rae who got in union we must go they pro believing men didn't make though women happy out dude uncut the han the begun to book out gaming in drowning winging than one out bread then rove bad many off raiders man otamendi right to all the night don magnon dot jaw aw event at bad law we all doubt jar whether they had no arboretum on june by the union baugh ooh ray who rang but in union winning stan your dog pro believing men didn't make the women out and crap ban ki to be the good book out teaming in ryan and in nineteen hundred to come time to adding do abdin round complete agree trying to find some way to you would do well to bong scaffolding van summertime. Oh most often fall who rang but union we must dan at the old dog today's pro the leading men bar didn't make dow ramen then happy out dude on gap and good booked up deeming in regarding pan people. We got out the union back. Did that thing old do shave than overall. Would it be today. They want go vote. 'em pack and so bad the tone. I'll why that our people there could be one who ran put the union. We must stand the old eob they pick the man didn't make though women happy out you ooh ungloved nicole booked up giving indoor brian patten now we're now union man walked out gut to sued on them back great machine down to find the brand new blog hand by talking to john's you glitter and got the song one woman good regard ball against the union dong boomerang pretty union. We must dan an old dog. They don't believe thing then baugh didn't make the women happy out you'd uncut ban outstanding and no gardening ben before we ain't gotta overdoing back <hes> wide already mad when they went out to pittsburgh all they had but thank god our union back happier or thaddeus kind to be who ring ring but union winning dan at the old dog they've done believing man bar didn't make the women happy and crap behan dig undergo opt out teaming and ryan and okay and now we have <hes> a i. It's a seven minute clip of a speech that mario savio gave <hes> in december of nineteen sixty four at sproul hall in <hes> university of california berkeley <hes> and this is this is a pretty famous speech now. It's getting a lot more attention. These days actually part of this <hes> this notion of <hes> putting your body upon the gears in the machine that was quoted in battle star galactica <hes> during a labor scene and <hes> <hes> tim to christopher's. I <hes> a going to prison. You know <hes> speech that he gave after his conviction sort of evoked this <hes> this moment for mario savio bobbio and <hes> it's interesting people are talking about it these days and it's in the consciousness so i thought you'd be you'd be interested. What's also particularly interesting thing is he addresses. <hes> <hes> what's going on on the campus with some of the union workers and you know this <hes> if you recall that piece he's by kevin drum <hes> which talked about the the cleave between union and many of these student leaders this sky was <hes> savia was from the berkeley free speech movement and <hes> this this cleave ended up really hurting the democratic movement the progressive <hes> the democratic party and the progressive liberal movement <hes> because people are split into sort of two camps social liberalism liberalism and economic liberalism and <hes>. We've talked about that on the show. It's interesting so he just in passing mentions <hes> what's going on with the a union workers there but <hes> and we've also talked on the show about hopefully how that cleave is closing but <hes> so here is <hes> this clip from mario savio. You have a great labor day folks. You know i just wanna say one great thing about something. The previous speaker said they want to spend too much time on that because i don't think it's important enough but one thing is worth considering. He's the he's a nominal head ahead on organization supposedly a representative of the undergraduates whereas in fact under the current directors at the arrives delegated power from the administration. It's totally unrepresentative of the graduate students in t._a.'ed but he made the following statement. I quote wrote. I would ask all those who are not definitely committed to the f._m. Cause to stay away from the demonstration all right now. Listen to this for all upper division asian students who are interested in alleviating the shortage problem. I would encourage you to offer your services department chairman and advisers that has a sprite brag frank the great one other things about a union problem aw upstairs you may have noticed already on the second floor sproul hall locals forty and one twenty seven of the painters union are painting anything the inside of a second flaws sproul hall now apparently that action had been planned sometime in the past. I've tried to contact those unions ends unfortunately and jazz my out there as bureaucratized the administration. It's difficult to get through to anyone in authority. They're very sad. We're still we're still making on attempt. Those people there have no desire to interfere with what we're doing. I would ask that they'd be considered and that they not be heckled in any way and i think that you know while this unfortunately no sense of some sense of solidarity at this point between unions and students that are at least need be no you know excessively. It'd be hard feelings between the two groups now there are at least two ways in which citizens and civilised obedience whatever at least two major ways in which you can occur one one a law exists is promulgated in which is totally unacceptable people and they violated again and again and again tillett's rescinded pill right but there's another way there's another way right sometime. The former the laws such render impossible. It's effective violation as a method to have a repeal. Sometimes the grievances of people extend to more than just the logs. Thank you a whole load of arbitrary power whole motor auditory exercise of auditory power and that's what we have here. We have an autocracy which one which runs this university. It's this managed. We were told the following if president current actually tried to get something more liberal out of the regions and telephone conversation why didn't he make some public statement to that effect and the answer we received from a well-meaning liberal was the following he said. Would you ever imagine the manager of a firm learn making a statement publicly opposition to us board of directors. That's the answer. I ask you to consider if this is a firm and if if the board of regents are the board of directors and if president car in fact is the manager and i'll tell you something the faculty or a bunch of employees and where the raw material but we're a bunch of raw materials that don't mean to be any process of us. Don't leave me made it to any product. Don't mean don't mean to end up being brought by some clients on the university. Be the government be they industry be they organized labor. Be they anyone yeah. I'm that that brings me to. The second mode of civil disobedience visit time came on the operation of the machine becomes so audience makes us so sick at heart but your ten take part you can't even possibly take part and you've got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels upon the levers find all the apparatus and you've got to make it stop and you've got to win the to the people who run it for the people who own it but unless you're free machine wealthy did pro-war at all that doesn't mean we'll be interpreted to mean unfortunately by the bigger to run the examiner for example. It doesn't mean i guess the break anything one thousand people sitting down some place not letting anybody by another anything anything happened can stop any machine including this machine and it will stop going to do the following and the greater the number number of people safer. They'll be and the more effective it will be. We're going once again to march up to the second floor of sproul brown hall going to conduct our lives for a while and the second floor of sproul hall show movies for example. We tried got to get them all. Unfortunately that's tied up in court because of a lot of squeamish moral mothers for moral america and other people on the outside the same people who get all their ideas out of the san francisco examiner sad but mr landau salon has gotten to some other films likewise. Well do something we'll do. There's something which hasn't occurred at this university and a good long time way going to have real classes up their freedom. Schools conducted up there. We're not passing on first and fourteenth amendment wagging. We're going to spend our time learning about the things this university is afraid but we know we're going to learn about freedom up. There and we're gonna learn by doing. We had some good long rallies. We've had some good long rallies and i think i'm ciro bally's than anyone else here. It's not going to be long. I'd like to introduce one last person when one last person before we enter sproul hall young and the person is joined by ed's ah yeah napoli aw sir and sir uh-huh mm-hmm sir <music> eh mm-hmm <music> <music>.

west virginia america sproul hall president Franklin delano roosevelt united states kentucky alabama ghana workers union john sam cedar charleston west virginia montgomery union union mac representative mario savio texas logan county sproul brown hall
102: "I Always Knew I Could Do It, I Just Didn't Think I Was Allowed" Rosemary Ketchum on Breaking Barriers

RISE Together Podcast

45:48 min | 9 months ago

102: "I Always Knew I Could Do It, I Just Didn't Think I Was Allowed" Rosemary Ketchum on Breaking Barriers

"Welcome to another episode of rise together today. We welcome Rosemary Ketchum. Rosemary has been a community organizer in wheeling. West, Virginia for a decade. Now. She's the state's first openly transgender Fischel. As the associate director of the city's local drop in center for the National Alliance for mental illness. She worked with community members, experiencing poverty, homelessness and mental health issues. A lot of the problems with access to mental health care in the area were systemic and over her decades of advocacy work. She saw that they weren't being addressed properly. So she ran for office. National Media expressed shock when Ketcham was elected in a small town in a conservative state her victory. It's historic. In addition to being the first in her state, catch him is also one of only twenty seven out trans elected officials in the country, while there are an estimated one point, four million trans people in the United States. Ladies and gentlemen let's rise together with Rosemary catch him. What would the world look like? If we all pushed ourselves to have candid conversations with people who didn't look like us, think like us were live like us. I'm Dave Hollis and I'm on a mission to learn more about this World Bhai meeting more of the people who live here. You may not always agree with everything you hear, but I guarantee. You'll come away more informed on topics. You might never have thought to seek out before. This isn't just a podcast. It's a community and when we raise each other up, we all rise. Together. All Right Ladies and Gentlemen Rosemary. Catch him is here. I'm so excited to have bureaus rosemary. Thank you so much for being on the show today. Thank you so much for having me. So just by way of introducing yourself a bit to the guests of this rise together podcast. Will you give us just a little background? Just look history in how you got your start in mental health advocacy, and maybe how that advocacy led to what you do today. Wonderful, so I've been a community organizer in the State of West Virginia for quite a few years now and I started community organizing for a few reasons, but most importantly to really engage Mike Community on a few really key issues. Those key issues include racial justice and LGBTQ equality, but also mental health and mental health is through line in my life and my family's life out for a very long time, so. I went to school for Psychology e because I love. You know everything about the human brain and I have a lot of questions about the decisions we make in the behaviors we have and I was lucky enough to get a job. while I was in college as Director of a mental health facility. Wow, so you had some of your passionate about I'm gonNA. Assume that you in some way saw need in your community, and at some point you decide to pivot from your work inside of his advocacy to running for office, which does not Doesn't feel crazy. Because of course, if you have passion and you see need, and you think yourself to be the most qualified human being that could help bring change your policy to the thing that has issue in your. In your town or your or your state fantastic it turns out that in making the decision to move from advocacy that you happened to have become the state's first openly transgender elected official, but I'm going to assume and I. Don't want to assume I shouldn't assume anything that you ran because of your belief in you being the most qualified candidate who happened to have been transgender, but I'm curious what the inspiration was in wanting to jump into politics, and how how your identity in some way or not played a role in that choice to get in the mix. Great Question I never wanted to run for office and. I. Organized our as a grassroots organizer kind of loved the idea of being you know kind of scrappy underdog, and sticking it to the man and i. In while doing that, we worked on some really really important issues got some things done. you know more often. We failed than than Than One hour issues That's politics and. I always acknowledged in new that. While we had policy positions in we had enough. We wrote bills and renew what needed to be done to solve the issues. That we care about eventually and inevitably the biggest obstacles where the elected officials it, we needed to convince. To support our cause and they were often. Less Compassionate less sympathetic and less motivated than anybody else. Unfortunately and you know, and even then I I didn't decide that I should be the person to run for office. I asked all my friends. If they would for office, and some of them did most of them didn't and it you know. I came to the realization that if we wanted to act actualized the issues, we cared most about We had to take the next step and support the members of our advocacy groups. You know organizations to run themselves so I always loved supporting other candidates, but this time it turned out to be my turn. It so I love it. I read the quote that you had in Time magazine I. Mean Hello, Time magazine covering local politics as they should. Your. What was I? Never considered running for office not because I didn't think I could do the job, but I just didn't think I was allowed. And so man for anyone who, in any way has ever afforded what they think you can do or what is okay or not okay. There's something amazing in this recognition that any of us can be called to step into an opportunity like this and you. You heeded the call inside of a state that had never previously recognized someone who is like you to do this job and you were you were voted in. You're elected so I mean it's an amazing thing. I think. Unfortunately West Virginia isn't always cast in the most flattering light. There are a lot of misconceptions about our state, a lot of things that people believe. And, and who may never been to our state before, and you know with with this election I did I definitely didn't anticipate you know national headlines I thought if if I made the front page of our local paper I'd probably frame it and so to see the the you know. The country respondents such a positive way. I hope impacts also the narrative that have about Virginia. Yeah I. Mean it's it's It's an interesting thing anytime. Anyone does I anyone anytime has an only right like you are. In a town called wheeling I'm GonNa Guess Most listeners of the together podcasts couldn't find on the map. Man The media. They love story about the first or only in your case, the national news attention or the focus of this you know smaller town kind of thing becoming something that might be picked up by bigger publications has to have been. I'm GONNA guess unexpected, but was. was there something in it that you are prepared for? Or was it just absolutely? Holy Cow World is going on. You know it's thrilling for sure I mean I gained thousands of twitter followers overnight and Yucky said time. Magazine gives you a call on CNN and MSNBC and. Yes, it is somewhat overwhelming. I did not prepare for it. However, you know I think you know. My race in his somewhat historic nature of the race was compounded by all of the other things happening in the world. I mean I was elected. During pride, months by accident, I mean our original election day was in May and so it needs to be pushed back because of Covid the, you know. Supreme Court of the United States of course. Ruled inside of. Drenched. Gender workplace protections in their Scottish decision. All of that I think kind of close were the ingredients for a national story that that was kind of riveting. It made sense and hopefully also provided some hope in a world that seems kind of hopeless. Yeah, so let's let's talk for just two seconds about the federal civil rights law that the Supreme Court of the United States held up protecting gay lesbian transgender workers it. I I don't know if it was a surprise. It felt like man. What an awesome affirmation of a thing that ops to exist and yet! It happening during pride felt super serendipitous, and the fact that it was happening as other stories like your own or making news felt like it was just a know good thing on good thing by. Talk a little bit about what a decision like that means inside of the community and how the? Confirmation of protection in some ways affords the ability for you to continue to do the work of advocacy work inside of the community. Yeah, so I mean forever. It has been the case that lgbt people. Have Been. On the front end of discriminatory workplace practices. If your boss learned that you, you know, had a spouse of the same sex or Simply, dating someone who they didn't approve, that was also the same sex. You could be fired or not hired at all, and that was. You know legal on the basis. Of their right to do so and you know that happens happened and I'm sure we'll continue to happen often. For me, it was a surprise. The United States supreme. Court ruled in favor of transgender workplace protections. Not because I didn't think it would ever happen, but I mean this is the most conservative quarter lifetime and. For, one of the more conservative justices on this court justice, Neil Gorsuch, a trump appointee to make the majority opinion was a refreshing and in absolutely historic, so it also I think you know. Given me hope that may be. The the judiciary component of our government is less polarized than others. Because Y- again. You know if it were a political court. They would have not you know voted in favor of transgender or lgbt workplace protection, so that was really incredible, and also the Daca a decision as well just I think one or two days later was i. mean also incredibly powerful, so this is been incredibly convoluted pride months in some really great ways in some ways not so much. God tell you about sleep number just for a second. I mean this sleep number mattress in my master bedroom is the thing that dreams were invented for it has so many cool features that let me change the firmness to meet my exact needs that lets me raise the old backup. If I want to sit up and read that allows me as if I ever would turn some heat on in the bed, because man, it has all the gadgets all the bells, all the whistles and affords incredible night sleep. Sleep is such an important thing. I mean more important maybe than ever because of the way that it can be a natural immunity booster the way that it helps with energy and recovery and Y'all we're going through some things right now, and some of those things can be made better by a great night of Peaceful Sleep, compared to the average sleeper sleep number bed. Owners enjoy almost an hour's more sleep per night. What would you do for one extra hour of good sleep? I'll tell you you would wake up feeling so much better and so much more ready to take on your day. In Times of stress in times of uncertainty, self care is more important than ever and quality. 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A lot of people I'm GonNa Guess Listening to the show I'm myself included I started our conversation before we were recording representing that I, do not have is much kind of dislike, knowledge of the experience of a person who is transgender and I. Man. I love an idea of having a conversation like this, so that I can also sit closer and become a little bit smarter. I mean my pleasure to trans visibility, as it were has more than anything. Come through shows like transparent orange is the new black and. I know you know laverne Cox being on the cover of time back in two thousand. Fourteen is a thing that I can. I can still remember like wow. I really leaned into an had. You know a doing life with someone kind of experience to actually understand what it what it is that you are having to overcome when it comes to societal anything for anyone who may be like me, can you? Just you know help? Dimensional is a little bit of what you know like. The community at large has worked through. I'm not looking I mean if you have them. Stats are great, but like I. I don't have a perfect handle on kind of what it is to kind of against the current of the world that we live inside. Ya? I mean it's incredibly you know cultural all the implications that we deal with our societal and cultural, especially as Trans, folks because you know essentially, we are betraying the societal expectation of our biological sex. We are saying we don't feel this way. This isn't the way it works at least not for us, and that's really hard, because I mean think about these centuries of built up societal expectation, it has been affirmed for centuries until this last one you know although we know Trans, folks announce ubt. Folks have existed forever. I mean you know some of the first? A kind of identifiers of experience exist in native American culture. We have yet to have a real kind of inflection point, in cultural consciousness or awareness, I think that's happening now in a really powerful way, and so when I was a kid. There, I'm twenty six years old I was born in ninety three. I you know did not have representation available to me in the way that we have now, and it makes me feel even saying it, but the only real introduction to the community that I had growing up was will and grace, which was meant to entertain and not educate so. I think for my parents as well. That was their only real. Familiarity with lgbt culture, and while I love the show. It wasn't built to kind of you. Know be a masterclass in lgbtq. Lived experience and I don't even I can't even think if there was A. Trans Portrayal in that TV show. So, nevertheless I grew up in I really sought these representations that weren't kind of traumatic and tragic. You know. When thinking back to the representations that I am new most more closely as a kid of trance people they were. Sex workers and you know a subject to incredible violence, and were on the outskirts of their communities and use drugs, and and while that can be true and it's. A horrible plight on lgbt community that was not the normalized. You know saying that I think I needed as a young trans person. Is more frightening than anything, so I hope that now we have more normalized or typified examples of the Trans Experience I'm not a celebrity. I'm not a model. I'm not a whatever I am a normal person doing normal things in a normal little town. I hate the word normal. I work in mental health. We never use it, but in the context of culture I think it's really important to see a very You know a a very healthy portrayal of the Trans Experience, and you know I I hope that we can influence our culture enough to make sure that's you know that's the that's the priority. Yeah. Now that's good I. I heard you in an interview at one point talk about the distinction between ignorance and bigotry. Think is such an important thing. Because one I think there's just a lot of ignorance in just kind of like what the experience of someone who's transgender actually is what it means. Can you just for anyone who's a little less familiar with transgender? In general talk about that difference between the two and how there may be a role that anyone who's listening can work against either. Yeah so growing up Trans you encounter some of the most awkward experiences, maybe ever you know especially being trends in rural America and. I could I remember. You know having experiences with people who would ask me about my genitalia on the first within the first five minutes or they? Would you know point out my Adam's apple or just? Some weird weird things and I've gained a lot of confidence over the years. I've no longer a insecure teenager, but I-. Sooner or later began to. Identify differentiate the people who were doing this on purpose in. We're unkind and and hateful in a way. But. Differentiate that between people who just did not know, and did not have the language, and we're working with an empty toolbox. They had no frame of reference here and I learned many times over that I was the first person you know this individual for transfers individuals. and. I tried to come to those situations with grace, diplomacy and patience because. The last thing I want to do is punish curiosity because the second somebody kind of goes out on a limb to ask a question. They're uncomfortable with. If we slap their hand, they may never ask that question again or they never. Feel a willingness to learn or understand I understand that I am for some people only transient presentation they see their town and I while not transfer center. lgbt person owes somebody, their story or the facts about their personal injury or medical history. I feel kind of responsibility to try to be as open as possible for the folks who are genuinely curious and ignorant, but one a bill that toolbox. When a when it had the language, you know at their disposal the next time they meet somebody or have to have a conversation at a dinner table. They're prepared to be an ally. Now that's good. I like that on this rice together podcast with a lot of parents that are listening a lot of parents who apparently have children if you have children. Maybe? Are questioning their gender identity or have maybe recently come out as trans and you. If your accomplishments, you're now obviously a very visible out trans person that they could potentially look up to what is something that you would want these parents to know about how best to show up for their kids if they find themselves in a situation where they're being introduced with something that they also may be unfamiliar with and don't totally know how to handle. I would say embrace self-expression, one of the one of the most fascinating things to me just from. Psych mental health perspective. Gender identity gender roles are fascinating in and of themselves. And there's a great discussion about nature nurture in what's innate and what isn't and I actually am fascinated by folks who aren't LGBT. The kind of gender expression that SIS gender heterosexual people experience because as transpeople and lgbt people we are, you know I think privileged to be liberated in our ability to. Have Free Self expression I mean we live in a world that does not is not always kind, but you know I get to do this in a way that I think I'm given permission because of my trans identity, a person who? Does subscribe to you know more rigid gender roles Gender Heterosexual they don't have the same liberties to express themselves in in their gender, identity or sexuality without having to you know You. Know get permission or have to kind of qualify it in some way, and so for parents I think you know it's easy to be scared into. Not Know what's going on in to you. Know and I hope that. What you're doing is enough, and all I can say is that. So long as you lead with love and compassion, and and let your child that you're an ally, languages super important. I say this often that you know you never know who who you're in the room. West you never know what people are going through, and so you make a joke or you make a you know whatever if somebody doesn't understand your ally, they may be very uncomfortable around you and so I think the language we use is super, super important, and especially for children. They pick up on it, so so incredibly, so I mean I, remember being a kid and if somebody made a gay joke whether it was you know. Just lighthearted or not I remember that and I thought Oh. They might you know that's something I need to kind of not just for my own survival I. Guess and we live in a different world than we did ten fifteen years ago. but I think those things still show matter. One thing that any listener can do I got a tattoo on my arm. It just says the word ally. Clear to anyone was interested in having a conversation with me where I stand and wanted to be supportive of frankly anybody anywhere. Yeah, let's go I read You were quoted in rewire saying when folks say I can't believe a trans person can win in a place like West, Virginia I think this is the very place I believe a trans person could win elected office and you've now proven that with your win. I'm curious. On the campaign trail. Run anything that had you questioning the confidence of that statement where they're strain. In the midst of of this or was it? I'm just going to be the most confidence candidate, and who I am will be led by the way that I can help bring advocacy and solutions to the city and not anything to do with my identity. Yes, it's so funny! Campaigning is my favorite part. I mean running for office, knocking doors and face to face voter contact. You know we were lucky enough to do that. Really early before covert hit and nobody could do anything We ran our race for about a whole year. Before Election Day while other candidates, Ram, for four or five months in did that consciously because I understood that while I have worked in the city of willing for decade community, organizing and building relationships. There are plenty of people for whom I did not. Know in did count on their vote that I needed to engage with them. Speak to so I I did a lot of the groundwork early on, and I had some really wonderful humbling experience as a few awkward ones, none were traumatic or tragic, I did have one. Experience where we were. Driving part of our district that was. It's more rural and that I have not I have not had a whole lot of experience at a district that is in two counties, so it's a little awkward I remember driving up there and kind of getting lost in the industry. We were trying to find and seeing a bar and parking in the parking, lot of the bar and walking inside at me and my my volunteer, we walk in and exterior, typically one of those saloon scenes where the music cut send, everything gets quiet and people start whispering and we kind of walk in. And Walk Up to the bartender in ask where specific streetwise and you know everybody's kind of furrowed brow, and looking at us and very suspicious and She she says what are you doing up here and I say well. I'm running for office of a box and I thank her and we leave We do our campus saying we're gone for hours. I left my car parked in the parking lot, and we come back to the car, and it's like dusk and we get in the car and somebody from the bar. Out and is hailing saying hey, hey, hey. And immediately. I think Oh my God I'm GonNa get in trouble for parking here on Yada very bad, and he runs out, and he runs up to her car. Just before we drive away and says he said You're the worst politician I've ever met. And I say ome sorry, and of course I'm filled with insecurity in like. Oh, my gosh, this isn't working. This was the first day it ever gone out to canvas and he said you're the worst politician I've ever met because you didn't introduce yourself and I was like. Oh, I'm so sorry. I was just lost in whenever. He said when you laughed the whole bar. Had A conversation about whether you are a man or a woman. And I was like a my volunteer kind of like who and I was like Oh, okay, and he said Bob Sad. I think that was A. Girl but Sally said that must have been a man and I'm like trying to my laughter because it's this is a lot to handle and he says. Well regardless of what it is, we all loved your energy and everybody wants Your Business Card so if you could give us a few I'll pass out, and he bids Ado and went back to the bar, and it was a moment that I think set the tone for the rest of our campaign and makes me think of the you know the difference between ignorance bigotry. You know. He didn't have the language that he was using. He wasn't sure how to approach the conversation, but he kind of got down to the ground level, and said you know you seem like you could do a good job. We WanNA learn more. And and for me that you know that gave me some humility, and I think hopefully helped us win along run. Local politics an. Liberal politics for. I mean it's. It's so interesting because. You know turning on the news right now feels like. Be careful that you don't get pulled in for hours and overwhelmed by all of the things that are happening. There's a chance that you can be discouraged. Sometimes in watching what's happening on the news with how big national politics feels how hard it might feel as an individual to effect any single thing in such a big machine I'm I'm not even sure to be totally honest. How A CITY COUNCIL WORKS! Yeah, will that when I am actually done? You. Could you just give a little bit of insight for the human? Who might be listening? Who thinks man I feel overwhelmed by my ability to personally change everything that's happening in the country. How the possibility of change or affecting things locally through local politics or city councils is a thing that may, in fact afford them a chance to feel like they are contributing in a meaningful way. Yes, so you are right on point. You're speaking my language I. Talk About this all the time. We focus on national federal politics, and the progress is glacial in. It's frustrating. It feels super hateful in just everybody's fighting and We do this in. It feels the distance to sign I do this, too. I mean I love federal politics. I focused on it. I can't help. And we should be paying attention vitally important. You just had these Skoda's cases. You know they do impact our lives. But when people feel apathetic or indifferent about national politics, I try to remind folks that. When you think your vote doesn't matter you know talk to your Mayor Talk Your City Council members I won my vote my race by fifteen votes. There were fifteen strangers or maybe people I knew who decided to walk into a polling location or mail in their ballot, and make history indirectly directly, and those were fifteen people who cared enough about their community to do that. It wasn't rigged. There wasn't electoral. College is fifteen real people who live on real streets in my war. Who decided to vote and that we wouldn't be talking right now. If fifteen people voted the other way, and so I that makes me you know really engaged in local politics because I know how. I know how sensitive it is, and how much change can be possible, and while each city government is very different. We have different charters in rules about. Engagement. There's so much untapped power in local government, and wherever you know your listeners live there. There is incredible power in your local government, because your mayors can make a decision on Monday enacted on Wednesday, and you can see the results by Friday. That doesn't happen anywhere else in US politics, but in a city town or neighborhood, and especially, when we have conversations about racial justice or lgbtq equality, you know we have I think a particular obligation in local government to tackle these issues. We have opportunity to do that. You know in. The city of wheeling in two thousand sixteen. We passed a nondiscrimination ordinance. We didn't wait on our state or the Supreme Court. We said you cannot fire a person in the city of willing based on who they love. How Jess and you know that was kind of symbolic, but also very tangible thing. We do as a city to make good on the promise. Promise that we are the friendly city, and so every other municipality in the country has that kind of power in that kind of authority, so yes, registered vote. Make sure you know your mayor is in your council person because they can make him really really change your life. Let's go rosemary. Come on, get this local politic machine running i. am here for it. we are in the midst of the upside down Corona virus here year for how long who knows I'm curious how the impact of quarantining or social distancing affected the end of your campaigning because you're elected, yes, inside the window of the upside down I believe yes. Very much so you know, we did not anticipate covid changing our lives. Nobody did and you know running for office is hard as it is in and have to combat an entire pandemic while you do, it is no small feat. However, we know that campaigns are won and lost based on the amount of face to face voter contact you. We have I mean they're numbers and stats all over the place to affirm that. Have you talked to voters? You have a better chance of getting elected, and you know I knew that before covert and that's why we went out in the in the dead of winter to knock doors and and meet people. And you know we, but with that said we only were able to canvass percent of our district before Kobe hit. And you know I was really confident that I was GonNa win this race before cove Ed and the day. They said you can't leave your home I thought. This might be the end of it because the other candidates in our race. Are. Older than me some twice my age. And, who had grown up in this community I was not born in wheeling West. Virginia I didn't go to high school here. I don't have a family name and so in local politics, those things matter lot. They're not necessarily indicative of a winner a loss, but they do matter, and so for me. It was really really important to kind of work against those already kind of institutionalized factors. We had to re strategize and really work on our social media presence which I think at end of the day you know was. Was impactful, but again we skated by you know, and so I can't I hope that if Kobe had not happened, we would have had a better turnout, but but we did it nevertheless. A win is a win. No one else is counting the fifteen who? You won by a landslide as far as up. This podcast are concerned. I I learned a fun fact today that West. Virginia actually became a state by seceding from Virginia during the confederacy during the civil civil war in order to join the Union. That is a pretty amazing legacy that is now a beyond what you've taught me today. all of the facts that I know about West Virginia has vowed serving elected member of government in Virginia. What else should people on the rise together podcast? Know about your great state. Oh. Yes, the we are the original rebel state, not the rebel flag state as I like to clarify you know. Wheeling also used to be before I We were the first state capital in the entire state of West Virginia. Not Long, after Charleston West Virginia, took that over. We are an incredible state for many reasons, and one of those reasons is our landscape. We are the only state in the entire nation is made up of one hundred percent Appalachian Mountains and you know a lot of people. Don't think Colorado when they think of mountains in Colorado is beautiful. Beautiful, but you know one of the things. One of the biggest obstacles we have to work on in the state of West Virginia or the beliefs. People have about West, Virginia and so you know we really do need to work on our tourism so much pro cannabis I think we could really do some amazing things in regards to cannabis development and how? In the state of West Virginia. We are progressive in a strange way. I think we have a lot of pockets of progress in Morgantown West Virginia Wheeling Charleston Lewisburg up some of the northern panhandle but we are a scrappy state underdog but we're GONNA I hope we're. We're going to really impress people in the next in the next few few years. good work all right West Virginia. I'm coming. I'm coming for some Appalachian. Mountain treatment at some point. Are we find ourselves in pride month. We're going to throw this on I. Believe in pride month. I hope that we're going to have that happen. celebrating pride inside of quarantine global pandemic feels a criminal in some way. I don't know how pasta celebrate the way that you might normally what is pride inside of pandemic looking like How should or how can people get behind and celebrates all the things pride related in the little time? We have left in this month. Yeah I mean pandemic pride sounds counter intuitive because pride is all about. Being out literally and figuratively, and expressing yourself unapologetically, and while we cannot do that in crowds in, assembly. We're already doing that. You know through mediums like this. We are engaging this folks that a positive progressive way and and learning and I think what what is happening right now. Regard I mean a bigger than LGBT politics I mean. We're having A. National Conversation about history about what's happening right now. What our country will look like for the future and the decisions that we make today the people we elect today or going to be in charge of shaping the future of this country in a way that I don't think other elected officials have had the opportunity in the past, so we are absolutely and inflection point in our country, and you know I worry that if we don't capture this momentum in really set in stone, the values of what it means to be an American that we will not see the progress we want to see so make sure you registered to vote. You know be proud. Of your ability to participate in this democracy. Because you know, it's all we have at this point. All right so speaking of elected officials shaping the future of the history of our world of this country of your state. What is for you next beyond wheeling I? Mean you just one so maybe you're not thinking about? Next but you see this as the stepping stone to something that may be takes you beyond wheeling, or have you even considered yet? What happens after this? Yeah, I I am sworn in next Wednesday so I have a lot of work to do to earn my space as a city council member and as the as an elected official. I am excited to support people who run for office whether they are. You know people I know people. I don't know whether it's me or somebody else I I don't know if I will run for higher office, you know. I feel like I love this work already. I feel like doing it. Unofficially for quite some time now, but I will take any opportunity to represent. The values that I hold dear, and I can see those actualized in a way that is impactful and influential. I will do anything that I can to make that happen. That's awesome. we have as a company previously supported the work of the Trevor Project that has done a lot of great work instead of the Lgbtq community, and I'm curious if there are other advocacy groups that you have personally either been connected to or have passion for the might share with the audience if they find themselves interested in being able to I've been to understanding advocacy or supporting people who are being advocates themselves. Who who who? Who Do you think they should go to great question? A few resources that I really do love include the transgender law center. They have a lot of incredible resources. Around Litigation and also resources around advocacy love them. I'm a little biased here, but I love the work of the ACLU across the country I'm a former state board member. Here in the West Virginia and the ACLU is doing some of the most incredible work around the advocacy and litigation in regards to the community, so if you're not a member of the UCLA, you make sure you make it happen, and in in so many states we have some incredible organizations doing really good work here in West, Virginia, we have in work. Desertion called fairness West Virginia. I'm that. I'm so incredibly proud. To be associated with a supporter of an so we're attempting to pass something called the Equality Act with. Would set in place a workplace protections. Although now we have a decision that does that for us. Could also housing protections for lgbtq people while we do have this incredible Skoda's decision to protect folks in the workplace. There are no protections for lgbtq folks in regards to housing, you can still be did or Discriminated against in regards to. Housing in the United States, so in West Virginia, were trying to pass a law to make that discrimination illegal. We're not there yet, but we're getting close so I I would I would also search in your own states I'm for organizations that are doing similar work and see how you can what you do, support it. Ladies and Gentlemen Rosemary Catch Him. His gips absolutely brought fire to this the rise together podcast having conversation about being a first, and only the decision to step into a space where permission had never previously been ranted. The willingness to because of being connected to the spirit of at sea, been side of her take in a just a big step in the public politik space and do work now as an elected official to change the world that she works in and maybe influence others. Make that same change so. Grateful for you being here today, What an awesome conversation, and hopefully for anyone who is listening who may be has never had an interaction with someone who is transgender now. Bake can check this box it has. A wonderful conversation, and maybe leads them to being even a little more curious about. Any other way that they might be able to step into a posture of advocacy. You're being an ally on behalf of the community at large. So thank you, thank you. Thank you so much for being here today. Thank you for having me. Rise together as hosted by me Dave Hollis. This show is produced by Chelsea her foolish and edited by Andrew Weller with production support by sterling coats. Cameron Berkman is our executive producer. Rise together is a product of the Hollis company. Ladies and gentlemen. Did you know that I'm a coach? I am in fact and it's a new month. It's July which means that there are new courses in coaching that I afford to other human beings available in real time at the House Co Dot Com. This month we are diving into failure. Failure in the July life coaching class, we're talking about the wildly important lessons in failure, and how those failures will help you become the person you are becoming, it is inevitable if you are growing that, you are going to fail, and how you can take the experiences of those failures and apply the learnings to become who you're on the road to becoming is what we're diving into on the career. Side this July career coaching. Coaching is all about putting yourself out there and how to make failure your unfair advantage in building your career anyone that you look up to anyone who was built something great whether it's in their life or in their career they have a relationship with failure that sees it as the opportunity to grow and everything we dive into will give you the tips and tricks on how you can frame it that way as well. There's a couple of hours a curriculum. There's a live Cuna that happens after there's a facebook group inside of a private setting that allows our community to interact with and encourage each other, and we would love I would love to see you there. Come on down to the House Co Dot Com jump into the coaching community. Let's dive into failure and find a way to reframe it as the vehicle for the success that you're hoping for.

West Virginia Virginia United States West official Rosemary Ketchum Supreme Court Dave Hollis Time magazine National Alliance wheeling Director National Media associate director Charleston West Virginia Neil Gorsuch Mike Community twitter laverne Cox