17 Burst results for "Charles Stone"

"charles stone" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

05:20 min | 3 weeks ago

"charles stone" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"So that was that was a shame, But you know everybody who saw standing there with the pirates really typical pirate of of those days. You know Al Oliver and Richie Hebner and Been startled that he just one tremendous hitter after another seven hits in a nine inning game seven for seven. Yeah, tonight. Any game? Yeah, about that. Any night came off for did it Next trainings and And the Bagley brought standing and Crawford together is really nice. Very Yes, Absolutely. Very nice. Very sweet. But yeah, so that was already standing. He was part of the nine players of the Pirates did this in the early seventies member. They put the all Latin and African American Starting nine out there, and he was one of them. It's the first time that had ever happened in Major league baseball least and this part of baseball. Yeah, I think they asked Danny Murtaugh about it. He goes. What do you mean, like he was trying to do it? These are the guys I want out there, you know. Yeah, that was Rennie Stennett. The other thing is Jayson Stark had a spot on Thursday about the new rules in the lower minor leagues that encourage stealing. And he says, everything is turning into a track meet You like it? Well, yeah, it's it's tough. I mean, I love stealing meal That base dealing is would be coming back in any form. But I mean, the fact is the way the game has always been played. There have been here is whether it's Ty Cobb or Max Carry or Lou Brock or Maury Wills. Where Ricky Henderson where the stolen base was a thing. Vince Coleman, You know you don't have to make it artificial. It'll happen. Without having to Jack Jack up the rules. If I'm a pitcher in the rule in the lower a ball now is that he's only got to pick off moves. You know and get and you know you guys were taken enormous leads. And like you say, it's it's turned into a track meet. I don't know. I mean, uh, that to me that zoo little rough to me. I mean, you can. You can still throw over there a third time, but the writer has to be out. You have to pick him off by this. It's a Bach so I mean, this is this is something going through a pitcher's head. I don't know that he needs to be dealing with. Especially if you're you know, good at the pick off. Move is, you know made it a nart of it. Um, but, you know, speaking of art that there's an artist stolen base, too. I mean, not everybody can do it. I need some of the fastest guys in the world, do you? They still got to figure out you know the situation, the pitcher, the catcher and everything else and to make it too easy. Like when Pablo Sandoval is going to steal 38 bases? I don't know. You know, I'm with you on this. I think the great base stealers still will steal. Bases. Yeah, and you don't you don't need, you know sand of all or Longoria having, you know, 40 stolen bases. You know, you don't need that. All right now, I think we agree. We agree on that, So that's a rule that they think they're going wild with, but I don't think I don't think that swimming in no, and that's all that's all the way down and low way. So that's not even in the Atlantic League, you know? No, we had Steve Trader on yesterday who wrote the fabulous book about the Horace Stoneham and Stone, his father in the 40 years of hard stone, a moaning the Giants. Um Bruce are stone and deserves a very special place. I think in Giants history, I just want to touch on it Briefly. We've got more with that interview next week, but hard stone and did a lot of amazing things. He seems to be known for Candlestick and drinking a lot. But he sure sees bigger touch yours. Yeah, that was his buddy in New York. But he did amazing things to revolutionize the social part of baseball. The organization And he loved the Giants. Yeah, yeah, his dad on the Giants, which is great. And then when Charles Stone him died, Horace was only 32. He takes over the team, but but he he absolutely. Did. You know, Um, I mean, Walter O'Malley was really the driving force, I guess between the two teams coming out here, but But Horace Stoneham had an eye on the West Coast way before that. During the war. The Pacific Coast League had this idea where let's come up with a third league and it's all West Coast and all the owner stopped at it. The I read except for Horace, he goes, You know, there's a lot of potential out there. We gotta think about this. So he was. He was quick to get out in the orchid at a time when he really had to do it. You know, the Polo grounds was falling apart. Their tennis was terrible and So he gets the team out here. But, um, you know, after after Jackie Robinson came in an integrated the game and chorus was the second National League team to bring in black. They brought in Hank Thompson and money urban and this was no small thing. At the time. It's not like everybody fell in line after Jackie at all. It was still a very bold moved to do, and it was just a precursor to Horace. I mean my God when the Giants came out here The team was just full of great blacks and Latin players. It was astounding, really, how many they had and just one great name after another. And so that's that's a That's a real big part of this legacy, too. So he's Hey, he should be finally remembered. I think in the big picture. Yeah, and he opened up the Caribbean scouting. He had this Alex Palm Pez in the New York Black Cubans, and he hired him for the Giants used the first African American Latin player..

Vince Coleman Rennie Stennett Danny Murtaugh Pablo Sandoval Lou Brock Charles Stone Maury Wills Ricky Henderson Richie Hebner Max Carry Horace Walter O'Malley Alex Palm Pez New York Steve Trader Ty Cobb Jackie Robinson Al Oliver Horace Stoneham Jack Jack
"charles stone" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

12:24 min | 1 year ago

"charles stone" Discussed on KTOK

"Brad Meltzer is a good friend of mine I don't know if we even need to introduce him but he is the author of a new book called the Lincoln conspiracy the secret plot any time that Brad Meltzer is on it is always a tour de force of history welcome Brad how are you I'm good my friend how you doing very good very good I I brought a couple of things in on Lincoln that I thought you might appreciate I know you're going to hear I knew you're gonna do right now well I give it give him somewhere in the room in the studio today for anybody who's playing our game you know Glenn studio there is a link in artifact behind me that if you guess what it is you with a copy of my new book but the this I brought with me is a piece of Abraham Lincoln's coat it is actually the caller that he was wearing that night that he was shot and finally killed you can see the rest of the jacket at Ford's theater but it's missing its collar and this is the missing piece that somebody caught off of him that night which is awful senior analyst I've been accustomed to this year the cops during a military museum out Maryland but yet the jacket obviously of course so it's all the different pieces make up the whole incredible yeah and it's it's weird Brad how they treated him even as he was dying but will we get into that maybe some other time because you're going to tell a story that most people don't know in the Lincoln conspiracy and it's one of my favorite Lincoln stories tell me yeah we we all know the story of John Wilkes booth and in Lincoln's presidency but this is the story of the first secret plot to kill Abraham Lincoln at the very start because in order to be sworn him as America's sixteenth president as you know Lincoln had to take a train from his home in Springfield Illinois Washington DC and the only way to get there was to go through Baltimore early and that the time was displayed eight so the plan was simple a secret society planned to ambush link and when he came through Baltimore and end his presidency before it even began and this is the story and it's all true all really happened this is the true story of this secret conspiracy that very few people even know existed so tell me the story because with the Lincoln was like the fight what is a fifty third vote vote of the Republican Party at their convention it was a what do you call it of the convention we've been thinking it was coming for the Democrats the kind where that you either don't have a nominee so you have to go in to vote over and over and over again until you get a consensus they opted nominee you're not you're you're the the the final nominee a brokered convention is like fifty second vote was for Abraham Lincoln and then and people didn't I mean they didn't know who he was when you did know who he was he looked on the he was described at the time is uncouth and and drug tests he wouldn't grounded why did that no politician ever been uglier you they were ruthless I and and as you said they had they they go and they didn't know we what we found campaign poster and someone analyst says vote for Abraham Lincoln they spelled his name wrong on his own poster that so when he gets the more he doesn't he doesn't even know how split the country is he he doesn't know how he did he is already and how close the country is to just full on civil war Brandon may give it you know it is an incredible time in America and and as he's making this ride I mean this is she is truly unique three days after his elected three days and how much time to get them South Carolina passes the resolution same where students from the union so eight the hate mail starts pouring in and out there starting they they have no idea how the culture is splintering that's why I wrote this book is that it this time in American politics where you see the culture split into you see that whatever side you're on you hate the other side you think the other side a complete horrible people does that sound familiar to you one right it's like exactly where we are right now and it's why exactly what a great leader does not situation is you know it's it's blinking tries with all his power not to divide it with United even in the midst of this plot to murder him and and one of my favorite scene you know there's a train in the middle of the night the train at the speeding train filled with passengers and we're looking for them in particular there's two business ma'am there's a woman and she had an invalid brother but none of them are who they say they are so the the businessman is actually Allan Pinkerton famous detective headed the Pinkerton detective agency the woman is hate worn shoes America's first female private eyes either so called brothers no brother and he's certainly not invalid that they were handling can they put a minute this guy they give him a secret code name there whisking away to make sure the secret society doesn't get him and you know I just ruined chapter one of billing conspiracy but that's okay for you or any like it's been unbelievable the union yeah it is it what what's so incredible is and then maybe you would know this did they make him an invalid because I know is they snuck him out of the theater the you'll have to excuse me your fresh on the research this is years ago my research so correct me when I'm wrong but they brought him into a theater and then snuck him out to the back and they told him you gotta take the hat off and hunch down and they put like a shawl over him and he had a hundred I'm does your memory all okay well that's the thing if you're not you six four no one had even seen if you live in America at that time you didn't you didn't know anyone six four it's like trying to hide games today and and so yeah rap on him over it one of my favorite scenes in the in the whole book is one eight Callum let them they're coming to kill you we gotta get you outta here and basically then this hotel room in the middle of the night is exhausted making them look in Philadelphia you're gonna I want to tell us or just for you because you're going to love this part of it is they tell him you have an event in Philadelphia tomorrow we gotta make you skip the event when get you to the C. earlier and Lincoln says I'm not missing the event in Philadelphia no like what's in Philadelphia and the reason I think it won't miss the event in Philadelphia is because the next day in Philadelphia they are honoring the birthday of one of Lincoln's most favorite heroes a man named George Washington and No Way is George Washington I know is one of your heroes ofcourse one of mine they talk about a land like no ways Lincoln missing honoring George Washington and we found the actual speech the linking gives you goes to Philly the next day even I'll be interesting his life and he gives a speech in the speeches at independence hall he's talking about the beauty of the declaration giving everyone an equal chance and Lincoln said if we can't leave the country without that principle any pauses and he says I was about to say I would rather be assassinated on this spot then surrender and what I love is that in that moment Abraham Lincoln absolutely knows there's a plot to kill him when he says a fascinate me on the spot and it's right after that as you step we pick the right up is they would come right out of there we won't rona how it how they sneak them out but that's when they make him out of there and get to save his life I did not know that part of the story that is a great part of the story yeah I know that I was proud of that when I walked in and out walked along with like oh my gosh it's all coming together do you include anything on Charles stone Charles Palmer a stone yeah Charles stone is in the book and I'm trying to remember what we put on there he's an army officer and if the inspector I think back to general Washington DC and he has some testimony at the time because what happens is that they're trying to find this plot is you know and I love that I'm talking you would know the answer but they have a secret committee it's called the committee of five minutes you know to try and find out what this point is and the real name that they get to it the treatment committee they want to know who it is and one of the people that they bring you know Charles stone is there but they they they bring in there's a guy named Brianna Perrin Beatty and he is the leader of the secret society that's part in killing him and I inform my favorite line in the book that they will they finally have a proud parent exactly where they want under oath and he looks up at these congressmen and they say to him you know Hey stern is a barber of all things it is a barber in a Baltimore fancy hotel you go into the basement of this hotel we wish for the right password you wish for the right code words and they he will eventually tell you the secret pocket caliber handling and these are the men that they're trying to catch and they lie under oath to Congress I made like almost no different than today Congress has them right there but just doesn't ask the right questions doesn't have to be does anyone everyone kind of turning their head and they all walk out and it and Congress completely ineffectual to catching anybody it takes balance banker can and the Packers and detectives to save the day do you know the the rest of the story with Charles power a stone the reason why I ask is because he played a role in the you know the first assassination helping Lincoln during this first assassination but he he later plays a very important role in American history do you do you know that I know I know the first one no he's going to testify that it's real I don't know the end the end of the story what's that what happened at the end so so he goes to the fight in the civil war he is a guy who does not hate the south he's more like Lincoln he doesn't hate the south he just wants the civil war to end so he's fighting on the northern side but he's not he refused he refuses to engage in the you know I hate him I hate him I hate him and this this is a lot of the people in the north on north off and he set up by Congress to look like he was the cause of of this huge disaster in the battle but he wasn't even near it Congress takes him they try him in Congress they they don't really even they don't give him a chance to respond he's arrested but he's arrested without charge he's held in prison Lincoln finds out about it and it's like six months he's been in prison and Lincoln says stop it right now release him and release anybody without charge you know you're in trouble and they didn't they waited another three months finally yeah they finally released him he so discouraged he can't do his job is is name is is is another link in reference mud but he can't yeah he can't he can't find any work he is disgusted by the people that you know his country betrayed him he goes overseas he's in Egypt he does work over in Egypt for the French he finally comes home in the eighteen seventies I think late eighteen seventies and there's a knock on his door and it's the government and they said did you work with the French and they said yes and he said why would he need they say your country needs you we just got this box of stuff and all of the instructions are in French and we don't know how to put it together would you build the base for the statue of liberty and help us traveler bat it fantastic yeah and the great yeah I mean I know the guy who do train we love those those lost stories are yeah I know I know I mean we all know and you know I I listen.

Brad Meltzer Lincoln
"charles stone" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

11:08 min | 1 year ago

"charles stone" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Brad Meltzer is a good friend of mine I don't know if we even need to introduce him but he is the author of a new book called the Lincoln conspiracy the secret plot any time that Brad Meltzer is on it is always a tour de force of history welcome Brad how are you I'm good my friend how you doing very good very good I I brought a couple of things in on Lincoln that I thought you might appreciate I know you're going to hear I knew you're gonna do right now well I give it give him somewhere in the room in the studio today for anybody who's playing our game you know Glenn studio there is a link in artifact behind me that if you guess what it is you with a copy of my new book but the this I brought with me is a piece of Abraham Lincoln's coat it is actually the caller that he was wearing that night that he was shot and finally killed you can see the rest of the jacket at Ford's theater but it's missing its collar and this is the missing piece that somebody caught off of him that night which is awful senior analyst I've been accustomed to this year the cops during a military museum out Maryland but yet the jacket obviously import it or so it's all the different pieces make up the whole look incredible yeah and it's it's weird Brad how they treated him even as he was dying but will we get into that maybe some other time because you're going to tell a story that most people don't know in the Lincoln conspiracy and it's one of my favorite Lincoln stories tell me yeah we we all know the story of John Wilkes booth and in Lincoln's presidency but this is the story of the first secret plot to kill Abraham Lincoln at the very start because in order to be sworn him as America's sixteenth president has you know Lincoln had to take a train from his home in Springfield Illinois Washington DC and the only way to get there was to go through Baltimore early and that the time at this late date so the plan was simple a secret society planned to ambush link and when he came through Baltimore and end his presidency before it even began and this is the story and it's all true all really happened this is the true story of this secret conspiracy that very few people even know existed so tell me the story because with the Lincoln was like the fight what is the fifty third vote vote of the Republican Party at their convention it was a what do you call it of the convention we've been thinking it was coming for the Democrats the kind where that you either don't have a nominee so you have to go in to vote over and over and over again until you get a consensus stated nominee you're not you're you're the the the final nominee a brokered convention it's like fifty second vote was for Abraham Lincoln and then and people didn't I mean they didn't know who he was when you did know who he was he looked on the he was described at the time is uncouth and and drug tests he was grounded why did that no politician ever been uglier you they were ruthless and and as you said they had they they go and they didn't know what we what we found campaign poster and someone analyst says vote for Abraham Lincoln they spelled his name wrong on his own poster that so when he gets to all the more he doesn't he doesn't even know how split the country is he he doesn't know how he did he is already and how close the country is to just full on civil war Brandon may give it you know it is an incredible time in America and and as he's making this ride I mean this is he is truly unique three days after his elected three days and how much time to get them South Carolina passes a resolution saying we're speeding from the union so eat the hate mail starts pouring in and as they're starting they they have no idea how the culture is twenty minutes we wrote this book is that it this time in American politics where you see the culture split into you see that whatever side you're on you hate the other side you think the other side a complete horrible people does that sound familiar to you one right it's like exactly where we are right now and it's why exactly what a great leader does not situation is you know it's it's blinking tries with all his power not to divide it with United even in the midst of this plot to murder him and and one of my favorite scene you know there's a train in the middle of the night the train at the speeding train filled with passengers and we're looking for them in particular there's two business ma'am there's a woman and she had an invalid brother but none of them are who they say they are so the the businessman is actually Allan Pinkerton famous detective headed the Pinkerton detective agency the woman if worn shoes America's first female private eyes better so called brothers no brother and he's certainly not invalid that they were handling can they put a minute this guys they give him a secret code name there whisking them away to make sure the secret society doesn't get him and you know I just ruined chapter one of billing conspiracy but that's okay for you or any like it's been unbelievable the union yeah it is it what what's so incredible is and then maybe you would know this did they make him an invalid because I know is they snuck him out of the theater you'll have to excuse me your fresh on the research this is years ago my research so correct me when I'm wrong but they run into a theater and then snuck him out to the back and they told him you gotta take the hat off and hunched down and they put like a shawl over him and he had a hundred I'm does your memory over at all okay well that's the thing if you're not you six four no one had even seen if you live in America down on you didn't you didn't know anyone six four it's like trying to hide James today and and so yeah raps on him over it one of my favorite scenes in the in the whole book is one eight Callum let them they're coming to kill you we gotta get you outta here and basically then this hotel room in the middle of the night is exhausted and they think I'm looking in Philadelphia you're gonna I want to tell us or just for you because you're gonna love this part of it is they tell him you have an event in Philadelphia tomorrow we gotta make you skip the event when get you to the C. earlier and Lincoln says I'm not missing the event in Philadelphia no like what's in Philadelphia and the reason I think it won't miss the event in Philadelphia is because the next day in Philadelphia they are honoring the birthday of one of Lincoln's most favorite heroes a man named George Washington and No Way is George Washington I know is one of your heroes ofcourse one of mine they talk about a land by no ways Lincoln missing honoring George Washington and we found the actual speech the linking gives you goes to Philly the next day even though been risking his life and he gives a speech in the speeches at independence hall he's talking about the beauty of the declaration giving everyone equal chance and Lincoln said if we can't leave the country without that principle any pauses and he says I was about to say I would rather be assassinated on this spot then surrender and what I love is that in that moment Abraham Lincoln absolutely knows there's a plot to kill him when he says a fascinate me on the spot and it's right after that as you said purposely picked the right up is they would come right out of there we won't rona how it how they see come out but that's when this was taken out of there and and get to save his life I did not know that part of the story that is a great part of the story yeah I know that I was proud of that when I walked in and out walked along with like oh my gosh it's all coming together do you include anything on Charles stone Charles Palmer a stone yeah Charles stone is in the book and I'm trying to remember what we put on there he's an army officer and if the inspector I think back to general Washington DC and he has some testimony at the time because what happens is that they're trying to find this plot is you know and I love that I'm talking you know the answer but they have a a secret committee it's called the committee of five minutes you know to try and find out what this point is and the real name that they get to it the treason committee they want to know who it is and one of the people that they bring you know Charles stone is there but they they they bring in their the guidance to Brianna Perrin Beatty and he is the leader of the secret society that's part in killing him and I inform my favorite line in the book they say will they finally have the ground apparent exactly where they want under oath and he looks up at these congressmen and they say to him you know Hey stern is a barber of all things it is a barber in a Baltimore fancy hotel you go into the basement of this hotel we wish for the right password you wish for the right code words and they he will eventually tell you the speaker populate rambling and these are the men that they're trying to catch and they lie under oath to Congress I mean it's like almost no different than today Congress has them right there but just doesn't ask the right questions doesn't have to be does anyone everyone kind of turning their head and they all walk out and it and Congress completely ineffectual to catching anybody it takes balance banker Canada Pinkerton detectives to save the day do you know the the rest of the story with Charles Palmer a stone the reason why I ask is because he played a role in the you know the first assassination helping Lincoln during this first assassination but he he later plays a very important role in American history do you do you know that I know I know the first one you know he's going to testify that it's real I don't know the end end of the story what's that what happened okay so so he goes to the fight in the civil war he is a guy who does not hate the south he's more like Lincoln he doesn't hate the south he just wants the civil war to end so he's fighting on the northern side but he's not he refused he refuses to engage in the you know I hate him I hate him I hate him and this this is a lot of the people in the north on north off and he set up by Congress to look like he was the cause of of this huge disaster in the battle but he wasn't even near it Congress takes him they try him in Congress they they don't really even they don't give him a chance to respond he's arrested but he's arrested without charge he's held in prison Lincoln finds out about it and it's like six months he's been in prison and Lincoln says stop it right now release him.

Brad Meltzer Lincoln
"charles stone" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"charles stone" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Lesko WTMJ palette of you I got contact sunny high today of forty eight clouding up tonight the low thirty eight it's thirty two degrees in Milwaukee seven oh two from the W. T. M. J. breaking news center more guidelines being put into place countrywide as cases of corona virus continue to rise the latest from ABC news god lives in the White House announced on Monday are aimed at slowing the spread of the corona virus there are now more than forty six hundred confirmed cases in the U. S. with several weeks of focused action we can turn the corner and turn it frankly a lot of progress has been made president trump in purging Americans to avoid gathering in groups of more than ten and to eliminate discretionary travel many state and local governments are putting restrictions in place on restaurants many of them are choosing to shift to take out delivery only summer closing but regardless of the plans it's challenging for workers like Charles stone he works at a restaurant on Bourbon street in New Orleans I understand what the what else is going on it's not easy it's not easy treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin expected to meet with Senate Republicans today discussed the economic relief bill that passed the house there will not be primary voting in Ohio today but three other states will go forward with voting Brian Clark ABC news governor YVR is putting a limit on social gatherings around Wisconsin the governor signing an executive order banning groups of fifty or more during a conference call either said he understands the impact this will have all right hello we have to be our highest priority it does however allow restaurants bars and other businesses remain open so long as they follow guidelines on social distancing grocery stores hospitals and child care centers are exempt from that order restaurants and bars can remain open in Wisconsin but they must take social distancing steps to prevent the spread of the virus Sherman Phoenix ownership team member went.

"charles stone" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"charles stone" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Liquid to last at least a week since Massachusetts now has a four month ban on vaping products but it's an exercise in frustration Salada miles on my car yes I guess Charles stone I would say marble had and no words store manager Ali Sheik taking off some of the Massachusetts communities customers are coming from enough to boost his sales at least thirty percent the temporary ban in Massachusetts is being challenged in state and federal courts restrictions on the scooter use in Salem riding a scooter is now banned in the area of downtown Salem during weekends through October that's because this is the height of the which cities Halloween tourism season and the crowds just keep getting larger and larger police chief Mary Butler doesn't want to see any mishaps or accidents involving scooters and pedestrians she says people can still riding scooters in the city and just get off and walk them through the nose scooting zone we know that people use them for commuting purposes we know that Salem state gets you some in between campuses and as a means to get into the downtown so that are getting very close to the downtown before it gets too congested at which point they can stop there right and then walked the rest of the way through the entire month of October the speed limit for east scooters husband dropped to five miles an hour Kim Tunnicliffe WBZ Boston's newsradio an arrest in the shooting and Roslindale in July that killed Daniel vole Boston Anderson logo of Norwood is due in court today facing a murder charge dot Huff WBZ Boston's news radio Hey what was going on is Romeo T..

"charles stone" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Morning show hosted our affiliate in Charleston, South Carolina. Newsradio ninety four three WSC joins us again this week Kelly. Give us an update as to what things are like this morning at Charleston. I gotta tell you, Gordon. Good morning. I might have set the record straight. I am with Mike Gavin. No reasons with their smoked salmon, and I beg to differ with Katie hill messy is best when it comes to food. How much we love our food in the low cut and messy at that. Well, so speaking of messy, we are, of course, this is the phase where are -mergency operations officials say all right. It's hunker down. Phase your time to get out as over certainly. They don't want people on the roadways as winds pick up here in the low country and beyond around the Charleston area. It looks this morning like our threat is is changing much like this entire storm has been absolutely nerve. Vacuum for forecasters and for us it looks like our neighbors to the north of about an hour who were under a hurricane warning. Now in Georgetown county Macy the worst of this tropical storm force winds, which is why they're under a hurricane. Warning. We are under a hurricane watch at this point. And what it really looks like is the water threat, and when our emergency operations officials bring out the coroner to start talking about ways, you can die in floodwater. It gets really serious here in besides a general term like drown. What are the threats that they indicator there? Well, what really gets me is our our corner has been a part of the local people, you know, grew up here like guy date, even though I worked out of market and came back. She has been here Ray Wooten, she's a very motherly bordering on grandmotherly woman. And so just imagine a very sweet southern woman explaining how you know. When you get caught in floodwaters, don't try to stand keep floating. You know, when when we see fatalities and flooding it's because of blunt force trauma to your body. I mean, she's just cry being all of these things, and I'm thinking my goodness in all my years of covering these storms in Gordon the business going at twenty two years, and I've covered storms, you know, for many of those in well for all of those. But she I I've never seen that. I've never seen a coroner come out. And explain the ways to not be stupid in in flood waters, and that's coming from somebody in Charleston, right, which is used to this stuff. In a really, of course, she she goes back to what people can remember nineteen eighty nine inch Hugo and how devastating that was even though we we've had many events in the last three years. I mean, Joaquin just came in drenched in sat on us. And we kept that was three years ago. And you know, we all dubbed it ourselves in year flood event because it was so epic and it sat on us, and we had really to events happen. Because not only did it drenched to the low country with, you know, twenty thirty you know, we didn't hear the forty inches until Harvey happened in Texas, but then came all of the roll down from the Midland's and upstate where that storm went and sat after it left our area. So it was a two prong thing. And we're all of our officials are warning us. You know of that as well. We're speaking live this morning with Kelly golden morning show, hosted our affiliate in Charleston, South Carolina. Newsradio ninety four three WNYC talking, of course about hurricane Florence. Is. It scary at this point or Charles stone. Used to this. I think it depends on when you moved here. So we have a lot of new folks moving to the low country as our popularity ramps up and being number one on every list in the world and friendly and so on so I think for people who are weathered and seasoned. I mean, I, you know, I'm a tween writing out Hugo and my house in nineteen eighty nine. I've chased storms in Florida. The worst that we've ever seen in two thousand four hundred thousand five there's not panic. Of course, I I've seen a lot of people, you know, they're preparing. But a lot of people I think true to the low country have stayed and that's really concerned, of course. Emergency officials because you know, what we'll see next. We'll see people getting cabin fever. They're losing power for extended amount of time. They're gonna start rooming out in win their floodwaters, then you could get trapped in your car. And you know, it just goes on from there like a domino effect of those folks been told that that they will not be. Priority. Absolutely. Was the number one reason why they pulled the, you know, sweet motherly grandma motherly coroner out yesterday to say as she literally probably Gordon for five minutes talked about how awful it is to for them to have to pull themselves off the street at forty miles an hour because that's what I do to stay safe themselves explaining the calls. They get to nine one one thing. I can't breathe. She said, you don't know how horrific that is for us to have to endure like begging people to please not do. Don't put us or yourself in the situation. Goodness, anybody saying at this point like with this latest storm enough is enough amount of the low country. I can't deal with this. Or are they willing because of the because of the beauty to to take the risks? I always say there is a price to pay to live in paradise, right? Everybody. There's always something. So I think after Matthew two years ago and Irma last year if if you've moved here, recently, you're probably starting to get used to it. Hey, thanks for a few minutes as always Kelli. Kelli, golden morning show hosts set NewsRadio ninety four three WSC in Charleston, South Carolina..

Charleston South Carolina Gordon Newsradio Kelly Hugo WSC Kelli Mike Gavin Katie hill Georgetown county Macy hurricane Florence Charles stone Ray Wooten Joaquin Texas Matthew grandmotherly Harvey
"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"In in a way like like the black church van where that's the oh yes the van arguing over his biggie biggie smalls better than is e brothers versa we actually shot that scene it was only day of shooting twenty four hours and it was the last thing we did was seven in the morning and going to the stage i'm thinking like it was going to be a total mess because they're going to be totally grumpy and kyrie's been in in this makeup three and a half hour problem so they came in and killed and you know this two versions of that seeing version of wu tang version where he's playing us uncle playing assam by the sharmila which has a great sample from cream and and he and rail rifts on that it's very funny but they were amazing and that's a perfect example of that and i just nerd out another example that was in forty over showing romney mount hard that is one of the most like the most hilarious of goal time we he he was on the podcast who kevin romney romney good we my god like when they when they butthead i mean it's fun black on just the culture the black rate lag shit is my really heavy and they did it so well on so good it gives me goosebumps it's such a that's exactly that like we're it has that judd appeti rave like improvisational just build or even beyond judd is just like in feeder jill you know like like in a rehearsal you're just you're just building on it and capturing that so yeah there was a little bit of that in in making the movie so james any final thoughts or yeah i just have one question okay what's that and you end charles you talked about how you know black panther and black lightning and those those movies or those those those moving entitled show but those those comic books they were very black right they came out they had to be very black movie black panther right is pan african and like meteor man he's like in the hood right and he's like you know he's trying to save the neighbor handcock signal that's what did you what did you say hey hancock is a that i bring up a lot on the show and they don't talk about his blackness in that james i'll let me tell you what's happening right now the phone is breaking up and it's breaking up because you're talking about handcock okay maybe you're right maybe we don't ask the question literally don't even ask literally our reception is is shutting you down i don't know if you know this james talked about hancock every single episode he wants what's the question yes even give out if we can get it i can answer the question is the question is if you were directing black superhero movie a superhero movie with a black superhero right which direction would you go would you would you lean into the african the black or would you try to dance between both worlds or not mentioned at all why i could say have you all answer it based on everything that i've just expressed y'all about my work in sort of how i see things it's curious to see what what your reaction is i personally think you should direct hancock to they need to make thank you thank you for james at third and and really lead into the fact that he's just this order to who has you prepares but you know he has this alcohol problem he has to get over his alcoholism he has an anger management problem it's just like real banal stuff and then he can take a train and throw it like halfway across the world i think that it would be for me i know we'll be the character will it's like devon in drumline it's like forgot the characters name how they're in mr three thousand or dax in in drew is that he or she the character will pursue his or her dreams and the struggles that come for like it's like the great heroes tail and and that's what it will be and his or her blackness will be part of one's wardrobe figuratively speaking and it will it will sing at times were people notice it and other times it'll be invisible like it'll be just like how it is because again drumline is is in.

twenty four hours
"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"Film didn't do well i mean critics actually liked it but didn't do well it was the opposite of that because i even told him in my pitch i said if you want to do the bernie mac show with the baseball bat i totally get it right i because he's a brand by said that's not what i wanna make i don't i don't want to do major league i wanna do bull durham on something a little more nuanced in that manner and both are both legitimates not like putting down one or the other and that's what ended up happening for all intents and purposes and it's not what the viewers were expecting right 'cause i remember they said the students say we're going to market it as the bernie mac show just to get into the seats right this is right at the beginning of just before tweeting became a thing so it's like soon as people saw their like y'all oh shit was kinda wack like he wouldn't like balls out i mean and that's it's always a tricky thing when the marketing they try to do something that they think will get more people in but if you're tricking people like if they think one film is coming another film have i get pissed like mad mad people not to see like right up and they do that and i'm want to jump this just before yeah so young like uncle drew that the dax character really was fascinating to me because he is the end tissues to the stereotype to a black male character he is not masculine like in the typical you know what i'm saying he looked like he's gonna up somebody's ass he gets picked on by everybody you know short do you know he he and he comes across he's not this impersonal realm but he's like little tubby dude you know what i'm saying what and he's funny and all that but he's also hurt he's also vulnerable the guy who wants a family he's writing for a family so i love it for that that it's so weird because again this weird combination of nba players in old people drag like meaning that yet playing basketball team and then all these comedians so it's got various components that would send up red flags of osa black movie because you got you know jamie's move and mike epps in it and tiffany haddish but it doesn't it doesn't it doesn't do that again it is something that is universal that was the agenda from the beginning about it even though is nigga basketball you could say that you i'm saying got got tiffany haddish like got all these things that you would you could easily say oh it's a black barbecue movie but it's not and saying they will little route he's a g he's a great stand up like stand up is no joke character playing but he's like this little guy who gets picked on by everybody the oh photo right so that's that's kind of a win win and so i mean i imagine it was fun onset because you basically you know i mean well like we we know rela little bit and so funny and then obviously tiffany and they both have like this chemistry and other and they have the ability to write because they worked together on the carmichael show and they have the ability to kind of riffa lot you'll nick crowe who who came comes from the same like ucd background that we do and you know he has the ability to riff and and do all that and i imagine the some of the basketball players had like the freedom to do that on set so how how was how was that because we it's i don't know i don't know if this is really true but i feel this way like you have that kind of like the judd appetite sense of movies where people are doing the improv and having fun and you have all these different takes and stuff but in terms when it comes to comedies led by black comedians like if feels like even though you have like the chris tucker were shooting out a bunch of lines the those scenes in which both actors get to have that kind of movement and freedom i've i personally feel like i don't see that as much so it was it was a fun for me now is like one of the fun things about uncle drew that i'm like oh man like they're just having they're having fun on set with some of these set pieces like you have these the script kind of sets that up.

baseball
"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"I pass it came back i don't know six months later he was going to historically black college which for me wasn't the thought i didn't have the thought like okay it's all black thing now i can do it no it was like okay in that world i can explore other realms of precaution because stepping in the sorts the fraternity sorority world is really another form of rhythm because i'm a drummer us nothing always in love with the idea of doing drumline regardless of the setting but once he was going to all go into a historically black college i knew the stigma of being a black being magical negro would cancel out right so there was that i took into took into consideration and then again the opportunity to explore rhythm and other realms other than just the marching band thing okay so mystery thousand came along because my agent was like the one thing he had to keep in mind that you want to have another film locked in before your other film comes out because god forbid the film tanks then your ass goes into directors jail and then it's a struggle to try to get in the movie so that's that was also the agenda so and mr three thousand km again part of my agenda in the commercial world in the business was delight key working right but also find something that totally works mystery thousand here's this man who called himself by number so i got really excited that idea and this was during the period of te'o terrell owens okay yes the soloist aspect of of sports and the highlight reels on espn they were totally promoting this self image as opposed to the team thing in advertently i don't think that was their idea but anyway so that i thought okay here's this black man who calls himself by a number by three thousand there's something there and and bernie mac was already attached to it and he's quite larger than life and that was a perfect thing but those are the reasons why i was reacting to things are presented to me and also my gend of keeping alive in the business as well as all the cultural racial things i need to hype been raised to avoid to try to dilute to try to like flatten out things to all that so it's a combination of things whereas now at this place i'm still working and jus another story about that of the choices i made to do that film but i'm starting to develop my own stories that that are coming from me into put out and in fact the the one thing that i've done in that manner is true too short film that eventually became the what's up campaign for budweiser so true is from me that's my truth that's not something that i reacted to i wrote a story about these guys basically holding hands through the phone saying and resonated with so talk about banality yeah about like that's i did not know that that was based on my mother yelling at me for talking on the phone and watching television at the same time she always say you do one or the other but you don't do both so and i was to do both it is right i thought about like what what is it really because thing that's funny about that it's like you're not really talking to them on the phone how was your day oh let me tell you about my day no it's like you still there to here cool you'll you still there man i'm here by that's that's that's that's that that brilliant ordinariness or whatever that i know i like to celebrate and i try to do that film real quick what's his name he used to review for the times brother he's gotta show the treatment i was on it on on npr on kcrw elvis mitchell okay elvis mitchell i was on the treatment for mr three thousand and he said to me the first thing he said we started goes how did you make a movie about know how did they studio let you make a movie about a middle age black man and i had not even thought about that way but i was like you know you're up i don't know what i'm saying but that's bernie mac was like i feel like he was huge at his show was already out was allie allie comedy was people were loving burning they were loving this was a major time for bernie mac major but the thing was is that in the.

three thousand km six months
"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"Of of of negro artists were not must be for all were up in arms because she was getting like the macarthur genius grant she got that she was getting all this praise from the quote unquote white power structure the art world and impairs people off the older black folks and great person interviews thelma golden who's curator runs the studio museum in harlem she is she can tell you all about that but again it's that's sort of like the todd sahlins of storytelling within the black community or or therapy that you know we don't wanna talk about you know what i'm saying so it's seen more of that i think is important and charles burnett you know bless his heart man he he was doing that and you know he didn't get the props you know to sleep with anger when when you asked me to think of a film that was one of the things i thought about as well like this talk about banal but yet totally light culturally fertile and even in terms of blacks turn black spirituality like the danny glover character had sort of spirit trickster guy kinda fan you could almost dip into the europe thing but it's like so to me had like flavors of blackness for sure but it was like house in the suburbs right you know what the kid is playing trumpet badly like remember that like in the opening stand thing little kid is playing like trumpet and is really sounds horrible because he's just he's practicing just that gesture law and i was like oh great yeah it's not that shit that you know we got to open up right now yeah so okay we have to i mean i wanna talk about paid in full too but we can't talk about every single i know okay so yeah i know this is this is squeezed by so because i do wanna to drew here i will say this we because you you know with drumline paid in full in even mr three thousand you haven't stuck in one john you've kind of been collected in that in that sense and i guess i was interested to know is that was that like something that you set out to like i just wanna make sure that i'm not beholden to one type of thing or you know how much how much control do you feel like you've had over the types of movies you you get to direct and and do you like being able to direct these these different kinds and it's a really tricky question right complicated question but you said use the word control at one point i i chose to yes i chose the movies that that i end up doing but it's also me being sensitive to the commercial realm of what i'm doing meaning that i'm working with somebody else's money so i had agents and when i did paid in full i was really taken by the story when when when it was expressed to me from damon dash but and i also my thought was if i can do that film in a way that one addresses sort of the banality a little bit in terms of how i shot it cinematography wise but then also the surrey he'll order hyper real element choose that world meeting seeing through the eyes of ace when he's stairs outside of the cleaners and he sees money raining down and stuff i actually wanted a lot more of that of seeing his inner mind what he was thinking i wanted that to be more surreal which connects to my love of fantasy and science fiction and stuff so so i thought okay if i can do that in this movie i'll do it because otherwise because this is right right on the tail of minister society that kind of new jack city yanks film film phenomena which i grew up in a very diverse we'll probably eclectic household with art on the walls different kinds of music so i was i was very much exposed to a variety so i knew my reaction to pay them full was first cautionary of i'm not trying to do another one of those films so that was the agenda there drumline when it was first presented to me is a script it was about a black going to sort of predominantly white school and he's got rhythm fungus up the school times white like get on beat.

"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"It didn't become a prominent wasn't a diva or anything i'd have to worry about work through that stuff yeah and yes great opposite zoe to those early zone that's right donna donna yes yes super earlier i mean she and she became just this megastar yeah who she's gonna for for whatever reason continues to be made it into an alien of a different color but like that's still cool to there's that's that's that's an interesting object get into that ossified philosophize movie honestly yeah james do you have any other questions about drumline that you wanted to ask yeah i mean a couple things are coming up for me now actually one of them is like it's interesting that when talking about nick cannon you talk about his sort of his boyish nece or like his sort of his sort of childlike quality that he brought to it and something that we talk about on the on the podcast a lot is that like there are not a lot of black coming of age movies like like like we see we see so many whites coming of age stories but like and then and i don't even i can't recall if we talked about drumline as if it were a coming of age movie win we reviewed it but that's what's coming back to me now is like that's exactly what it is like he you know he starts one way in his journey is sort of like is very much like one of growing up into can you just talk a bit about like like your thoughts on that on like if that is something that you have noticed and like how you think we can sort of change the the scope of hollywood like we can have more movies like this well it is happening for sure as much as we joke about the word diversity and there's always going to be they're never going to get the right word but it's there's there is success within the the market or the the stage of of of television storytelling in feature films storytelling i mean i think more in television because there are so many platforms and everyone's been now empowered if not emboldened with the confidence that they can put out the content they want to put out that people wanna listen enters opportunity for like obviously atlanta insecure what is the the the lena wave movie made into a series she says christ clayton no you're talking about is it on hbo insecure is on hbo it's not it's not power but oh i know ooh have alzheimer's moment happens to us all the time get mad at us for not knowing things oh the shy no no no no it was a movie and lean away white people thank you knew was a sentence she's doing so much yeah she's at steps brian's on that that we did so i got the chance to work with she's she's she's awesome but yes there is there more platforms for it to happen and i think what you're saying there's there's more of an open ear and to receiving it and especially something like it lanta in even again like what's the rappers name he did he got a pulitzer pulitzer prize andrew maher yeah kendrick lamar i mean why look at his music videos and and he'll take you know he's taking the hip hop the john raw and again making it his own and really coming with a real sort of vin vigor and how he's he's presenting it like his shows with the instrumentation in the compositions and stuff it's it's just again i say emboldened and empowered folks are just doing it and childish gambino i mean don donald glover like what he's what he's putting out and is receiving praise for it is pretty exceptional so it's definitely happening i think to maybe kind.

zoe donna donna
"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"And the us on fire suddenly the canons raise the marci ban stands up and blasts or fires of foam across and then then then they respond in kind but that's literally were i was going raise thing and the same thing with the in battle the marching rather the percussion they change shape so i was saying like hasley like it's like transformers so they'll they'll the idea that you can change your actual architecture in order to best the other team that's that's what i'm bringing the woman who's flipping the symbols around it's like total martial arts shoe you know martial arts so again what i bring which i think ultimately gives you what it was what it is and how it transcended people went to see it because they enjoyed seeing a selfish kid learn to become a team player right right and and i pat myself on the back just because it's a total coup against all black cab a black college like it's a quote unquote a black movie yet it wasn't right it wasn't definitely transcended that in in so many ways i mean we we have to talk about nick cannon works draws bills but i mean i mean a phenomenal performance in that film and that was his debut film i believe is that right is that who's i like i made his debut feature because obviously been doing tv and he a huge nick star we we know that we were kind of in that range of growing up with him as as a as a knick star and but i mean i i mean we talked about this on the podcast already but it was such a great performance but we were kind of interested in in hearing you talk about like working with nick at that time because it was his first big film which i imagined was a big deal to him and in a way he kind of had something to prove his character has had something to prove well actually i'm really glad you brought that up because based on what we were just discussing it fits perfectly in that that that that thought pattern which is that nick had the he had a combination of things he had this boyish enthusiasm funny guy but he had this boy shenice thing and then coupled with that is he had a little bit of an edge which would be construed as you know all he's he had to the sort of ghetto thing whatever not how i would say it but i'm saying people look at like he had to urban the urban presentation or the urban facade and or is remember when we were looking at him and he was up for the role think some of the executives said you know and he's got a little bit of an edge to which is nice you know and i agree i mean is corny as it sounds but typecasting but he had that but he had a boyish aspect and to me that's similar to what we're discussing which is that despite this movie taking place in a quote unquote all black environment with all black cast it has a universal spine to so the boyish ness of of nick when i met him and isn't doozy azam was something that connected to me because i something else i look for and characters and especially male characters is the little kid in the boyish nece and again it's universal women as well but most the moves i've done tend to have a male protagonist except for say step sisters and lila knee viola davis but yes so that made him i think even more acceptable to the mainstream because that's what that's that's that came burst not his blackness right and it was really apparent and he was so wrong the role i remember he came to the hotel and for like a final meeting and he he just like whatever i gotta do you know dove i really want to do this he's just so excited and and he just brought it energy and he got the role and yeah and it just it ended up working and you know again use the beginning actor so there were certain things to certain muscles yet to really exercise and figure out but again he was so open for it right and so.

us
"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"That that was made in that time right no exactly the guys you know got the brothers named the writer but ryan kugler rewriting partner they did an exceptional job of of stepping out of that right you know because that was always the same thing with luke cage it was something that i was never really interested in and i know cheo he did a kick ass job i also love that because i felt like that was a love letter to new york to harlem in the ninety s yeah which is a real beautiful thing but again like the hero for hire just like to know win is like do say yo i gotta get paid right that's what i'm saying like the superhero we got us finally got a superhero and he's like put the brakes on y'all i'm not gonna show any to fucking pay me right curse i didn't know oh yeah we yeah this is lees please do these as they as they say that i tunes explicit explicit isn't that the the word where he police we're an explicit we're an explicit explicit diversify versed urban so actually this is a i think this is a great segue to talk a little bit about drumline because i personally feel and it was your second film that you directed but it has for me it's film that we we all love and it's a film that has kind of the elements that we're talking about a person who is just an average who's an average kid he has a passion his passionate drums i mean it's it's it's what do you what was that movie we compared it a lot to stump the art no whiplash because whiplash came after and i mean whiplash i mean what we saw whiplash it's it's a good film told you did a great job and jake they were all great but it was just so interesting to see a film like that get this perceived where so many years before we had drumline that was dealing with a very similar subject of course it was you know in a school that had mostly black predominately black college and so we has that culture those cultural elements but the the story and the heart of the character feel very much in line with this is an ordinary person that anybody can relate to definitely the agenda i think you know it's interesting that that was that wasn't the written agenda i think for me that that's what in many ways my my spirit right that was that was agenda or goal without even saying okay i got this all planned out but it meaning for it to be a universal move right and i will sort of tote that that bag of of of that of saying that the success for me that movie was that it transcended its blackness i think so too that's a tricky one because blackness is a wonderful word but at the same time it does what it does which is the segregate or to say that i am other than besides just being a citizen but yes so it transcended that it's a popcorn movie right because it's a popcorn movie and it right rupture takes it out of the prestige right away but i also i think no one was ready for that right and that's not like a sophistication like nobody was ready ready for a film that had essentially an all black cast takes takes place at a historically black college and and it involves marching band like just on the universal tables right movie about marching bands like belly march but no one knew the aesthetic diversion that historically black colleges created.

writer partner ryan kugler
"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

05:27 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"The when the word urban replaced negro diverse i as the new it's like going from natural to organically right coin word in food marketing so right make sure as gluten free and diverse diverse so how no if you've i don't know if you've ever been referred to as a diverse director i know we've been no it's that yet yeah like people will say they'll be like oh yeah this yeah we have a we have a diverse cast and it's like all black chasm you got i understand what you mean but that's a blanket i just want her trying to save black it looks different than what i'm used to staring at in the mirror so yeah it's diverse there is there is a pilot report that said like it was about a white family moving into and they wrote this diverse neighborhood and was like just me black yeah that's that's the kind of like i want to say tragedy of it all like if you just take that literally leg okay so literally it's like a melting pot in the neighborhood and it's like nah yeah right okay yeah i guess we're diverse or grant in the of color right in the grand scheme of things but yeah i mean i mean just as director how's that how is that shaped kind of your experience in this kind of this trend that's happening feels we talk about this on the show a lot of feels positive but then there are some trap falls i feel like we were wondering how how is that affecting you today you know i guess the thing i have been a professional storyteller i guess why music videos in the nineties but then i started doing narratives in two thousand paving falls my first and i kind of moved on from there but i find that the there's a in terms of diversity in terms of of color that whole the movement to the movement to see us the of color tribe in ways that are varied in wide that's the big thing back in the sixties it was the famous photograph of black men holding the posters i am a man now to me if i was to remix that poster it would say i am banal because to me the the struggle is or the journey now includes like how can we be perceived as being ordinary up and boring and i say that all the time i'm saying that the banal within our existence and for me i i'm a kid who grew up star wars original very first one seventy six really kind of flip my lid on many ways i was really into the ray hurry house in sim bad movies with the stop motion animation and josh argonauts and all of that but stall was really kinda jumped off for me and just really kind of new wanted to tell stories in this i guess you could say epic kind of way or now the term they use for that event movies so you know though that wasn't perceived as an event movie at the time people actually thought it was going to be just like this be scifi film they didn't realize how big it was going to be well i think that's a marketing i think i think that the person you're talking about are the are jaded executives lying okay and they didn't because george lucas was like okay i'll do this for nothing i just want the merchandise right rights no one had ever done that before and lions so that's exactly those folks who were like fine loser they're the ones who like us is you know kinda scifi thing whatever but i guess the event has been around for a minute cease will be the mill was pumping him out or director i mean think about the busby berkeley i mean shut right but but maybe you're right because it's i think that buster keaton and charlie chaplin i i don't think they looked at their movies as event movement and now to kind of if i go on a little tangent yeah is when you see like architecture from way back like european architecture or or like the ornamental decorum you see on say churches let like insane sculpting and stuff you don't see that now like if you want that it costs a boatload of money and it's almost unheard of but back in the day that's just it was just that way right right michelangelo like the sculpting the he did i look at it now and.

mill
"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"Welcome to black men can't jump in hollywood would sit it to go through a mash up amass up amass up it started as drums line and then it turned into i started as drums from drumline did you do better i forgot we did review jim line we should probably introduce our guests i remind mystery so this is jonathan bray lock draw j third teams is james can you say your can you just we have a guest so can you what eight your name that's how i said it i said james the third i doing when he when he introduces name he likes to go low all right dry is in here he's he's being fancy he's in la i mean he's in atlanta what's he doing in atlanta james i don't know i mean you got drought always be showing up in different cities all over the place i swear that man's a spy of some sort the cia i think he's he's produce it some stuff with is it with wild out see giresse i think i think like walling out live or something is there or like this season is in atlanta or something right because they have a lot of comedians down there that are that are on the show this year which is kind of a show or maybe or maybe every year it's like that and so now he's just they're they're just there for this while now is is it's a standup thing they have multiple comedians it's like it's like i think of it like it's like the black version of whose line is it anyway like improv games they do like fun improv games but nick cannon hosts and it's like right so jay on mtv still it's still there that's still doing it yeah he's he kills me he's like a mover and shaker like as a producer he's always doing stuff because we always like doing more stuff like drumline and bubba but i'm like yell he's keeping it moving on doing different projects everyone while out for a start at that a good idea you know and you know it's still going yeah it's a it's a i mean draws been working on that show for a while so that's why it's kind of sad that he's not here because of course you directed drumline and people might also no other films paid in full the recently stepsisters i believe yeah and then of course the film that is coming out or actually has just come out this weekend uncle drew comes out next weekend or this weekend that term always confused me this next but yes this weekend coming up this day this friday yes yeah that's right ecorse here in the studio we have charles stone the third the third yeah that's right james james another third is here should i this is just great this is just great this the population of thirds has grown on the show having a kindred spirit here kinfolk yeah i do feel up out for sure are you the second or the first i'm the i see those kind of power move right there can i can i be real might first name is jonathan which is one of the most common hymns especially in the western hemisphere with this country jonathan is a super common name but my last name berry lock is so uncommon that i'm actually straight up science fiction only jonathan bray lock on this earth that i.

hollywood
"charles stone" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on WTMA

"To the these increases and the the times are going to be changed when they get this park ride system for hospitality workers now we todd yesterday about seven thousand seven hundred people that work downtown and that they depend on parking downtown so now what they wanna do is they wanna come along now these are these are people that i thought we were supposed to be protecting these people i thought these were the people that we were supposed to be looking out for the average american or the average charles stone ian and the people that work downtown i thought we were supposed to be looking out for those folks i thought liveability was going to be the rule of the day under the tech limburg administration but it seems that now and i would like to amman and find out exactly gov vote did for this because i would really like to call them out on it where's the liveability there where is them we had a lot of folks call on in yesterday and we we talked about the fact that this is really about the tourist they are they want you to go to the park ride and go downtown if you work downtown but they don't care about the tourist because they've already got their money they know that they're here and they know that they are here to spend money so it's not going to tourist are gone a revolt against it is not going to affect them when you go to a town in new go to visit or something like that and you walk in and you go to dollars an hour and they enforce till ten o'clock okay i don't know any better so i'll go ahead and pay it well the tourists don't really realize how that's impacting the people that work in that community back in denver i'm gonna say i was there last week their mayor a few years ago decided that way he was going to make it easier for people or more affordable for people to go downtown in denver and i'm wondering i really needed to.

liveability denver todd amman
"charles stone" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"charles stone" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Yeah i mean i think the biggest thing in the biggest take away all the rigorous training that these actors went through to kind of vim body and emulate um southern h b c show style marching band because i talked to nick hanan you'd one double in in the film and he was saying that the 'cause there's will drummers in the film and and they saw these actors come on set and they're like what is this what is this what are what is going on i mean guy they're trying to make a movie about hb may than you're having actors instead of real drummers well there's a little bit of controversy in terms of the training but all the actors went through it and and ended up doing well in terms of on the screen when when the film was role as a quick aside few personally and somebody that was in banned in indiana i mean you know i say that there's this sort of stigma about that except in the black community really viewed a bed your dope but i guess i'm asking you how do you think this movie holds up because like if of eh one now and i watch it because it's got cool like the solo scenes and all that but for you is this movie is this to the flick you check out when it's on every once in a while yeah i to be honest i i watch it every time the comes on vh one or tbs nothing has held up really well and and a lot of the actors in the producers and director charles stone cut to realize that uh dallas austin who is the atlanta music super producer he inspired the film and he kinda said that before drumline a lot of people thought that people in bayan were were nerds their own cool but this movie kinda made it seem like thin showed there was the world and showed the people that to be in a drumline to be in a marketing ban your have what you have a lot of rhythm in your your cool to be in the band and that's why i think the film is really held up over the last fifteen years errand dots dotson of the undefeated joins us year we're talking about his oral history of the movie drumline who is most shocking thing you learned about this film overall besides the fact they had.

producer nick hanan indiana director charles stone dallas atlanta fifteen years