35 Burst results for "Charles River"

Scientists cautious as England set to end COVID curbs

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Scientists cautious as England set to end COVID curbs

"Scientists are warning the British government not to weaken the country's ability to monitor and track the coronavirus off to prime minister Boris Johnson plans to end the requirement the people in England to self isolate Johnson's living with coded plan treats the virus like other transmissible illnesses such as flu the legal requirement to self isolate for at least five days off to a positive test is expected to be replaced by simple gardens and must testing for the virus will be scaled back however some scientists say it's a risky move that could bring a surge in infections and weaken the country's defenses Andrew Pollack director of the Oxford vaccine group says it's essential to maintain surveillance for the virus an early warning system if you like which tells us about new variants emerging Charles river that's my London

Prime Minister Boris Johnson British Government Andrew Pollack Johnson FLU England Oxford Vaccine Group Charles River London
"charles river" Discussed on SmartLess

SmartLess

02:20 min | 9 months ago

"charles river" Discussed on SmartLess

"Of the by. No no no. We don't have yet. We don't have we don't have earned have it was good. No yours was terrible. That was one of the worst and we're doesn't him. We're keeping it in. We should cut that one. Nope no. We're not going to cut it. Are you out of your fucking mind. Thank you keeping it. But we're going to sit here. We're gonna keep talking until somebody comes up with an idea and tries to gently braided into the conversation. So so again so octavia fantastic fantastic incredible She's there in boston Throwing out options for you guys. Sean started writing ideas down. Yes i would say. That rhymes with high okay. Oh my god doesn't know we don't need help. He's home which is let us think so. Imagine what she's doing today she's up there. She's she's up there. she's enjoying her life. She's making a musical go. She's up there in boston. It's a nice sunny day. She might just get along the charles river and we'll just go on one of those beautiful by big trail your art. I shown you just went by terrible. Here's this. I'll tell you what this has been the worst attempt end to this show real sloppy ending really sloppy. And you know what it's left.

octavia boston Sean charles river
Marcus Gerald  From Patient to Scientist

Sounds of Science

01:40 min | 10 months ago

Marcus Gerald From Patient to Scientist

"Marcus they must remain here so first off. Can you tell me about your current job. Like what kind of research do you do. Sure so. I'm a study director. At charles river labs in horsham pennsylvania. I work specifically in developmental and reproductive toxicology or dart as well as juvenile toxicology and essentially what we test drugs that are developed by different pharmaceutical companies and were determining their safety. So we wanna know one. Are they safe for pregnant. Women women who are currently pregnant and as well as the developing fetus. Are they safe for women who might be nursing. Are they say for men and women who are looking to conceive some or is it safe for children so a company may wanna repurpose job. They currently have in use it for juvenile. We would do the testing to make sure that that can happen to do this. We use several study designs. We have an embryo fetal development studies out. We have fertility studies pre and post-natal studies as well as juvenile toxicity studies. All right do you have like an example of some your work that you can tell us about. Oh sure yeah so we were gone a wide array of drugs from different covert vaccines that came through chelsea. Horses me personally. I worked on a kovic treatment. It was a a drug that was being repurpose from a different disease that they were trying to see if it had any efficacy coverted. We also are working with a wide list of different vaccines as well. As one interesting test article. I recently had was cocaine hydrochloride. And they're trying to determine if it could be used for nasal surgeries as a numbing agent. So it's you know we have cancer drugs we have drugs for note developmental disorders so there are a lot of different drugs that we get to work within. It's very interesting and very fulfilling and the whole

Charles River Labs Horsham Marcus Pennsylvania Chelsea Cancer
Prince Philip transferred back to private hospital

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Prince Philip transferred back to private hospital

"Britain's prince Philip has not been taken back to a private hospital Buckingham Palace says Philip has been moved to a private facility to continue his recovery off to a heart procedure for a pre existing condition at St Bartholomew's hospital on Wednesday officials say he's expected to stay at king and wood seven full number of days his illness comes as of the royal family braces for the Broadcom from Sunday open interview conducted by Oprah Winfrey with the Sussex is Harry and Meghan the sit down with America's queen of celebrity interviews is a chance for the couple to explain what led them to quit wildlife siting their anger over the British media Charles river this month London

St Bartholomew's Hospital Prince Philip Buckingham Palace Britain Philip Broadcom Oprah Winfrey Meghan Sussex Harry America Charles River London
Drug Approval Is The New Normal

Sounds of Science

04:11 min | 1 year ago

Drug Approval Is The New Normal

"The covid nineteen pandemic has been going on long enough for scientists and lawmakers to begin to reflect on the lessons we have learned robust response to the pandemic from the scientific community has been astonishing and the flexibility shown by regulatory organizations like the fda has also been impressive if we're entering a new era of more dynamic regulatory response to emergencies. How can we ensure the balance of science and law couple that with the growing fields of personalized medicine and rare disease. Emergency use authorization and it becomes even more complicated here to discuss. These issues. is charles river director. Mike template from our scientific advisory services division. Welcome mike thank you so i understand that. The fda processes like any bureaucratic organization contend tend to build up over time. Can you talk about what this means from a scientific perspective sure and he was one of those cases that there are multiple factors. Part of it is because these documents are is so important to the drug development world. They try to be in. You'll all encompassing in certain ways means they can get fairly large are also a case of. You're all a product of our experience. Of course we also try to learn from our experiences most get added in over time and that combination as well as other factors can make them rather large one to encompass a little bit of the what gifts and also to be able to address multiple situations and in those cases they just. They can get large soda. Speak or encompassing and get a little confusing about exactly what they're trying to address and how more important how you apply those to your specific situation using the general for specific questions so i know i mean each drug obviously would have its own inherent dangers or things that you really need to look out for but are there any in this little bit off topic but are there any types of drugs where there's some safety testing that you just don't need to do for whatever reason either. The drug has no way of interacting in that sort of safety way or a variant used a million times before so they know it safe in certain ways and are those accommodated in the regulations. They are accommodated in the regulations. And it is you know we encourage people to read them quite often or we will reference them. It was part of the scientific advisory services group and we have some initial calls with people who have a certain project. They're trying to move forward. We will reference those guidances. We also at least try and remember to say read them and then take a close look at what applies in. Maybe we're things don't apply but it still the responsibility of all of us in the drug development community to undergo and take a rigorous scientific process. What makes sense. Where are the concerns. We all have limited time and limited resources. In only situations and you'll i is sit down and develop the plan and then apply the guidance to the plan as opposed to taking the guidance and then trying to fit your drug or your program into every part of the guidance pull out the parts that are important. Make sure you give them the emphasis. They deserve places where it doesn't make sense scientifically you need to rationalize that if you can't come up with a good reason. It's probably not not realistic that you don't look there but if you can't come up with a good solid rationale it's just as valid to say. Yeah we did not go in depth in here because it's a low probability. We have enough information to confirm that. Let's put our resources where there's more important

FDA Charles River Scientific Advisory Services G Mike
How to Keep Computers Happy Using Chemistry

Sounds of Science

05:41 min | 1 year ago

How to Keep Computers Happy Using Chemistry

"I'm joined today by dr ugo. Sharma from cas which is a division of the american chemical society. Cas specializes in organizing and analyzing publish scientific data that informs researchers through their search platforms such as science finder and has also being used for customers learning analytics applications. I'm also joined by charles river. Scientists dr david clark. Who's a enthusiast together. We will be discussing the role of machine learning and chemistry how we can train computers to support researchers and how he can keep machines happy with high quality data. Welcome ugo and david exe my. Thanks mary me too. So i wanna start by getting our listeners on the same page. Can we discuss the difference between machine learning and true a i in which is really more valuable for chemists realistically sure. Yeah so we're gonna start by defining ai to a is it's really a broad concept refers to machines with intelligence and for the purposes. Here we can define intelligence is the ability to solve a problem so machine learning is actually a component of i. It's has subset and machine. Learning actually enables a system to learn by itself for chemists specifically a is the ultimate goal so using computers to speed up discovery and innovation and machine. Learning is really. What gets the work done here. And especially within applications like drug discovery so essentially you know leveraging computers to and existing data help reduce the available candidates face potential targets and some used to accelerate and reduce costs for drug discovery. This is really where rubber meets the road. And so you know africanus. There's other applications around things like molecular property. Prediction were trying to predict things like solubility melting points. You know all of these things. Leverage machine learning using known molecules in their properties the sort of predict properties for for new molecules that were unsure of other applications around molecule design. So medicinal chemist a lot of time designing new molecules variety of applications and then another sort of hot area right now. For a and chemistry's retro synthesis says basically when you have a given molecule using ai to predict viable pathways to actually synthesize that molecules becoming a pretty key area so for a drug discovery standpoint. David which part of this process is one of the most valuable for chemists like in terms of being able to analyze giant piles of data and come up with something useful. At which point is that the most useful for you a. A human chemist various levels of usefulness. I mean for many years. Chemists have been taking data and deriving predictive models from it in perhaps long before people were thinking of this as i. But i think one of the really breakthrough applications of i that i've seen in recent years has been the so-called de novo design of compounds where and i has been trained on a very large database of known drug molecules and then asked to invent some new truck molecules or truck candidate molecules that resemble What it's been trained in some way up. Put us still different enough to be innovative and useful. So they'll be props molecules that have same types of collectively and fiscal chemical properties up at an unless novel in terms of their chemical structure. So i think it's really those as we've been mentioning taking very large sets of data and bringing new discoveries are of them that you know you just couldn't do that with a a human person. Is that the. The task is too great it so easy for people to get stuck in their own knowledge space. If you like not be able to think outside that whereas the machine has no preconceptions if you like can come up with something that's truly novel. Yeah so the machine theoretically can know every chemical every drug that has been patented the formula for all of them and it can sift through that and find ones that haven't yet been tried but it can do more than that can at ugo it can also predict what kind of chemicals might actually hit a biological target. Yeah exactly so. I think that's sort of a especially with you. Know things that are going on in the world right now around. The pandemic is understanding mechanisms that can produce a specific kind of biological activity like like antivirals inhibiting well replication finding molecules that can sort of work along those pathways in all of this is based on leveraging existing data so using previous research Training up models we can learn relationships between things like structure and activity and then applying those models to new data. Or you know. Maybe drug already been approved to repurpose them as therapeutic agents. Yeah so bringing it back to your company Can you describe what see as does as kind of an elevator pitch sir. Sorta the short version here. So we're a division of the american chemical society being specialize in designing scientific information solutions that help organizations essentially be more efficient by leveraging the work and learnings of other scientists in our recent focus has gone beyond just our products like science finder which mary mentioned before Providing customized services to drive things like enhanced scientific data management increased scientific workflow efficiency are probably most relevant to the discussion here enabling high-value high high-precision initiatives required customized data sets coupled with scientific expertise

Dr Ugo Dr David Clark David Exe American Chemical Society Charles River UGO Sharma CAS Africanus Mary De Novo David
From Farm To Pharma

Sounds of Science

04:54 min | 1 year ago

From Farm To Pharma

"Security is a growing global concern because obviously we all need to eat. In order to protect our crops from pests, companies are constantly developing newer and safer fungicides and pesticides. In order to increase yield, they are also developing better fertilizers however in order to not contribute to the problem of pollution and global warming these agrochemicals have to be tested. That's replaces places like Charles Rivers site come in. Here among acres of fields and greenhouses the latest agrochemicals are thoroughly vetted for toxicology. Do they seep into the groundwater? Do they linger in the plant causing issues for the human or animal that eventually eats it? Do they poison the plants pollen causing harm to already vulnerable pollinators these questions and more must be answered before the agrochemical is approved for use joining me today is Simon. Chapel, you functional manager of the Plant Metabolism Department here number. He is here to tell me about the exotic crops they house and how they keep them safe and sustainable. Welcome. Simon. Thank you Marilyn. Welcome to me actually 'cause I'm here joining you as opposed to the other way around. Thank you. So to begin with can you tell me about the site here and how long it's been in operation? Suddenly will this site be no printing since the nineteen seventies unplanned metabolism the operation for which I'm responsible has been operating since the nineteen eighties. Okay. How long have you worked at this particular site I've been working since the late ninety nine hundred s okay what? Kind of a off topic a bit. What are some of the biggest changes that you noticed in that time biggest changes here. we've punches. Sites within John's river, which is unable. To. Expand from Jeff's Edinburgh to Edinburgh. North Spain, which is enabled us to grow more crumbs. We've also had different types of studies of required. We also need to look at residues which lower lois regard to identify lower lower residue. So the types of analytical techniques we've had to develop an purchase on reflects become more. Refined yeah. I guess technology has also just gotten better. So can detect smaller and smaller amounts of these things. So. Do you have any legacy crops that have been here for a long time? Yes, we have enough annoyed. Coach twenty four apple trees. The we can use when necessary we also have an established field area. So grassland field area, which is agricultural providence for round three decades. On most of the crops, we grow grain from seat or can be purchased locally sourced from abroad tell me about some of the more exotic plants you keep here. So we support the global agrochemical industry. We often need to grow crops which far into the UK or even foreign to Europe for example, infamous common crops that we grow is rice support Far Eastern uses. But we have a long list of unusual crops such as bananas, citrus grapevines, mango sugarcane. The plans can be crowning temperature control glasshouses to simulate growing conditions here in the UK with. Not glasshouse rooms, which we can use when a study be. Does I understand from someone else who I was talking to earlier that the glass in glass houses can quite very you've got the typical glass but then you've got like What he say courts glass very expensive but allows you through and also some sort of special type of plastic that also allows the Youth v through but is has a short lifespan. Yes it's true. Sounds pretty cool. So I understand we have sister sites like you said in northern Spain. Do we use them to get a sense of how these chemicals behave in variety of climates? Yes. We have another science yet during the Nova Spain. and. That's operated by field crowns department were possible. We will run a study unto doors rather than glasshouse because out dose study. is exposed to natural sunlight. So the in life as the study with a crop Mike Citrus, cotton, olives would be in. Spain whilst that for crop like weeks. Oh, shook abate. As it make sense. He wanted mimic real world conditions as much as possible. Absolutely. What is your background this work? Why Line? Why this line of work? Why Agriculture? Having completed, doctoral and post doctoral. Studies in plant metabolism at Southampton University in that gave me foyers training in the underlying principles. Fun Recovers them under very specific analytical approaches associated with this type of work.

Spain Simon Marilyn Jeff UK Charles Rivers North Spain Edinburgh Nova Spain. Southampton University Mike Citrus Europe John
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Events. Tens of thousands of airline workers facing job cuts today. Congress doesn't act on a relief package and the industry is bleeding money at historic levels. After a second emergency shutdown, the Weymouth Gas Compressor station is projected to be fully operational. Today. They're expecting protests by the four River Bridge into Quincy on nine workers testing positive for Copan 19 at the Attleboro Fire Department. Today, marking the third anniversary of the Las Vegas massacre that killed dozens and wounded hundreds on the Las Vegas Strip. Now an agreement has been reached, giving the victims and their families financial compensation. More on that from CBS's Steve Futterman, it happened three years ago. Today shooting this is shooting the worst mass shooting in American history. Now a judge has approved an $800 million settlement. With the more than 850 people who were wounded and the relatives of the 58 people killed. The massacre occurred as an outdoor music festival was taking place. MGM Resorts acknowledged no liability, It will pay $49 million well, that's insurance companies will pay $751 million. Steve Futterman CBS News at 5 46 on the West Coast, the death toll from a wildfire raging in Northern California's Cascade foothills. Climbing to four as firefighters continue to battle flame strong winds, and it's wreaking havoc in wine country fires of no power. I just need a break. It would be nice to have, like two days of good weather and maybe kids, some sleep, firefighters and volunteers. They are up against it in every way. CBS's Jonathan Vick Liatti fighting fire with fire. In Napa crews are lighting backfires toe help Southeast planes from causing more devastation. Meanwhile, the fourth person has died in a wildfire farther north. Both fires have burned more than 100,000 acres. Wineries like this one are now barely recognizable and scores of homes now destroyed. There were fires on both sides of my property. Not only did Sean mayor lose his home in the town of ST Helena, his brother and father lost their homes to and at 5 47 in advisor is in place over water concerns and the Charles River as the Charles River Watershed Association now has red flags flying between the mass at bridge. And the new Charles River Dam officials warning of a bacteria also known as blue green algae. Both people and pets should be avoiding contact with that algae and growing concern among the medical community is coping. 19 cases right now are surging in different parts of Wisconsin hospitals in several areas of Wisconsin are being overwhelmed by Corona virus cases. Some health experts are calling it a dire situation. Milwaukee County medical director Dr Ben Weston 640 hospitalizations far higher than the previous peak of 440 back in ankle Hospital in Warsaw says Covert 19 patients increased 30% At one day Some hospitals have started putting Corona virus patients on the waiting list, with times raging from several hours to a full day. Jim Priscilla CBS News at 5 40. 80 Spotlight now shining on a potentially deadly side effect of Corona virus and elderly patients, cardiac arrest or an abrupt loss of heart functions is common in critically ill patients with the Corona virus,.

Steve Futterman CBS Wisconsin Jim Priscilla CBS Weymouth Gas Compressor Las Vegas Charles River Dam four River Bridge Charles River Las Vegas Strip Charles River Watershed Associ Congress Attleboro Fire Department MGM Resorts Milwaukee County Jonathan Vick Copan Warsaw Dr Ben Weston Napa
"charles river" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"charles river" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"Years. Yeah and Maestro. IFA fiedler you're at Arthur fiedler in Boston POPs back in the seventies he was an leader of the person POPs Orchestra and he was a famous fiber. He ran to fire system. So there was a group that became a militant group and they join together. They met each other while out parking lots at night waiting for fires coming because they'd run two fires and take pictures and watch firefighting operations, etcetera and. This particular group said you know with all the layoffs and everything the only way we're going to get people back on the job is set by its. Yeah A group of Eight is form this giant conspiracy people in Nineteen, eighty, late eighty, one, early, eighty two. Sided Stock Setting feist. Right they never. Go. Ahead. Is An unusual mommy now thinking France because we don't have a volunteer system and night in France and some other countries. They make money from going out and FICO. So of course, some of them become five dollars in the negate of colon sent to prison for it but this is huge. What happened here isn't it? It is. It is really good. Did actually where firefighters one was a Boston firefighter full-time Boston bipedal yeah. really as police officers wine was a fulltime Boston police officers in two more of what they call house and police officers were a house in the city housing cops. And so we have cops and firefighters who joined together in this conspiracy. dumpsters. Now you know if you think about your city of London or something maybe behind your buildings, you have a bunch of dumpsters or people can throw the. Trach. So, we haven't area along the Charles River. Separates Downtown Boston. From Cambridge. And they they would light twentieth thirty dumpsters in a row. They just go right down the back alley in a vehicle and just throw a device into a dumpster and they were laid off one after the hour. But what they were trying to do dave was to get. The media attention and public.

Boston Arthur fiedler France Charles River Cambridge dave London
A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

Sounds of Science

04:43 min | 1 year ago

A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

"From mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Charles River Saffron Walden Mariangela Founder Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Building the Building Blocks of Life

Sounds of Science

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Building the Building Blocks of Life

"I'm Mary Parker and welcome to this episode of Eureka Sounds of science from mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Mary Parker Charles River Saffron Walden Founder Mariangela Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Head of the Charles Regatta going virtual

WBZ Midday News

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Head of the Charles Regatta going virtual

"Cove, It cancellation another major event going virtual this year. The head of the Charles Regatta won't be held on the Charles River this October. Instead, it will be held as a global remote event. Two rowers will be able to compete by erasing the length of the course. On their own body of water. The head of the Charles is the world's largest today rowing event. It regularly draws some 11,000 participants. The only other time it wasn't held on the Charles River was 1996 when it was cancelled for rain. In a windstorm

Charles River Charles Regatta
From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

Sounds of Science

06:23 min | 2 years ago

From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

"Today. I'm joined by foster. Jordan, the CSV of Charles Rivers Endotoxin, Europe foster has spent most of his career, working with and around South Carolina's horseshoe crabs, strange creatures, whose blood keeps US safe. He joined to discuss how his career parallels. The changing attitudes towards horseshoe crabs as well as the future of endotoxin, testing and recombinant technology. Welcome foster. Thank you join the conversation. So, let's begin with you. Can you tell me about your early experiences fishing for her? She grabs sure it was funny, you said. My. Most of my career actually I kid people because it's only job. I've ever had Your career then. I don't even I don't even have a resume so. The way I got involved with this was my. My father was an investor in a small company called in safe back in the mid eighties when I was an undergraduate student at Wofford College. And I heard him talking about it. I was studying organic chemistry, and he had partnered with the person who had originally used the test for pharmaceutical application. His name was Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper. He used it at John, Hopkins. University, he was a a radio nuclear pharmacist who is making nuclear medicines and the test at the time for bacteria. Linda toxins was called a rabbit powergen test. You took a New Zealand. Zealand White Rabbit and you deluded your product that you were testing for contamination and sailing, and he's ten meals into the ear of the rabbit. You Monitor the ravitch temperature for three hours, if the favor spike more than three degrees that was considered a failed test, and that rejected the product, but you know these new nuclear medicines. Had you know half lives of their nucleotides pads of of only twenty minutes so the? The test was was ineffective for this. These rabbit tests just sounds so inefficient. How did we get from there to using what we use today? Yeah, so be. It was really I. Forget the time it was wasn't really about replacing. The rabbit test is about five minutes Dr Cooper needed for these nuclear medicines, and and and when he did it, and he made these first crew preps, and they were, and he published that. That in nineteen, seventy two. He was actually he was actually on a grant from NIH so it wasn't something that was patentable. it was public knowledge at the time public information because it was a h grant that funded the research when he published that in nineteen seventy two I. Don't think he really thought anything of it and as the FDA solve the the value of this test replacing the the rather. Test. They also realize it would be the first time that a an animal model, but whatever be replaced with a regulated in vitro tests, so they decided to reunite the test itself, and what's interesting is even today where the only quality control tests that's actually regulated by FDA and we have the same license. Our licenses eleven ninety seven. We have the same licenses of. Of biologics manufacturer vaccine manufactured right, and we're inspected by the twice a year. All our products has to be submitted and approved by FDA. So we're extremely regulated in the space, which is also important when you think about new technologies, and how will a new technology be developed when we're so highly regulated and controlled and the amount of testing? That was necessary to just. Show equivalency to the rabbit, but long story short as the evolution into safe. When I ended up in graduate school, I ended up going to a into safe working for Dr Cooper. We were very small. I was just four of us in the lab. And you know obviously one of the main things we needed. Was Horseshoe crabs. Charleston was known for having horseshoe crabs, but two things about Charleston one is the population or or South, Carolina population is very strong in addition to the the the largest physical more shoe crab. There is the. Female one time that from tail, the whole link. The female was basically a meter. Long thing so very long right? YEP, so so they're big, so you don't have to handle nearly as many to get the quantity of blood we needed, but back in those days the crabs were were a nuisance. They were considered pass. they tore the fishermen's nets ups, especially the fishermen, and when they were bottom, dragging which was warhorse, pass laced for ill and cough. That was a byproduct that they just didn't want to deal with many times. They would just throw them up on the bank. Let and die compost them. Grind them as fertilizer the only other commercial applications for them at the time was to be used as bait, but again thinking about just the pure amount of work, and it just wasn't worth the fisherman's time to do it so again, not very well like creature that. So going back. You said you've. been working in the industry, your entire life and that is very unique, so can you? Tell me about working for for your dad and doing the early fishing long story short so when I when I left Graduate School I was given opportunity the company wasn't doing really well at the time, although the tested then mandated by the FDA to replace the rabbit, it was still a difficult competitive situation so again for us. It was tough. That's why they wanted me to come. I was one of the first ones to get you know three or four o'clock in the morning and go gathered the horseshoe crabs. From April fifteen to end of June. We bleed only when they coming up at high tides, and mainly they come up at high types after dark. Full Moon and a hot crabs. You're going to be there, okay. The southlands in thousands in early days we couldn't handle all the crabs that were coming up, so it'd be kind of surreal I can imagine a beach full of crabs. It is and we you know. We had very selective fishermen that we work with because again. They a lot of them just didn't see the value of them. It took us a long time to get the get the attention of the commercial industry. Get them to realize the value of the crab. Eventually we did I would actually drive to the docks during shrimping season If they caught him as byproducts I would just leave our car business card and say hey, call us if you catch any byproduct I'll come, pick them

Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper FDA Graduate School Europe South Carolina United States Wofford College Charleston New Zealand Jordan Linda NIH Carolina John Hopkins
From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

Sounds of Science

04:52 min | 2 years ago

From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

"Today. I'm joined by foster. Jordan, the CSV of Charles Rivers Endotoxin, Europe foster has spent most of his career, working with and around South Carolina's horseshoe crabs, strange creatures, whose blood keeps US safe. He joined to discuss how his career parallels. The changing attitudes towards horseshoe crabs as well as the future of endotoxin, testing and recombinant technology. Welcome foster. Thank you join the conversation. So, let's begin with you. Can you tell me about your early experiences fishing for her? She grabs sure it was funny, you said. My. Most of my career actually I kid people because it's only job. I've ever had Your career then. I don't even I don't even have a resume so. The way I got involved with this was my. My father was an investor in a small company called in safe back in the mid eighties when I was an undergraduate student at Wofford College. And I heard him talking about it. I was studying organic chemistry, and he had partnered with the person who had originally used the test for pharmaceutical application. His name was Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper. He used it at John, Hopkins. University, he was a a radio nuclear pharmacist who is making nuclear medicines and the test at the time for bacteria. Linda toxins was called a rabbit powergen test. You took a New Zealand. Zealand White Rabbit and you deluded your product that you were testing for contamination and sailing, and he's ten meals into the ear of the rabbit. You Monitor the ravitch temperature for three hours, if the favor spike more than three degrees that was considered a failed test, and that rejected the product, but you know these new nuclear medicines. Had you know half lives of their nucleotides pads of of only twenty minutes so the? The test was was ineffective for this. These rabbit tests just sounds so inefficient. How did we get from there to using what we use today? Yeah, so be. It was really I. Forget the time it was wasn't really about replacing. The rabbit test is about five minutes Dr Cooper needed for these nuclear medicines, and and and when he did it, and he made these first crew preps, and they were, and he published that. That in nineteen, seventy two. He was actually he was actually on a grant from NIH so it wasn't something that was patentable. it was public knowledge at the time public information because it was a h grant that funded the research when he published that in nineteen seventy two I. Don't think he really thought anything of it and as the FDA solve the the value of this test replacing the the rather. Test. They also realize it would be the first time that a an animal model, but whatever be replaced with a regulated in vitro tests, so they decided to reunite the test itself, and what's interesting is even today where the only quality control tests that's actually regulated by FDA and we have the same license. Our licenses eleven ninety seven. We have the same licenses of. Of biologics manufacturer vaccine manufactured right, and we're inspected by the twice a year. All our products has to be submitted and approved by FDA. So we're extremely regulated in the space, which is also important when you think about new technologies, and how will a new technology be developed when we're so highly regulated and controlled and the amount of testing? That was necessary to just. Show equivalency to the rabbit, but long story short as the evolution into safe. When I ended up in graduate school, I ended up going to a into safe working for Dr Cooper. We were very small. I was just four of us in the lab. And you know obviously one of the main things we needed. Was Horseshoe crabs. Charleston was known for having horseshoe crabs, but two things about Charleston one is the population or or South, Carolina population is very strong in addition to the the the largest physical more shoe crab. There is the. Female one time that from tail, the whole link. The female was basically a meter. Long thing so very long right? YEP, so so they're big, so you don't have to handle nearly as many to get the quantity of blood we needed, but back in those days the crabs were were a nuisance. They were considered pass. they tore the fishermen's nets ups, especially the fishermen, and when they were bottom, dragging which was warhorse, pass laced for ill and cough. That was a byproduct that they just didn't want to deal with many times. They would just throw them up on the bank. Let and die compost them. Grind them as fertilizer the only other commercial applications for them at the time was to be used as bait, but again thinking about just the pure amount of work, and it just wasn't worth the fisherman's time to do it so again, not very well like creature

Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper Jordan FDA United States South Carolina Europe Wofford College New Zealand Charleston Linda Hopkins Carolina NIH John
Tuning the CAR T

Sounds of Science

04:54 min | 2 years ago

Tuning the CAR T

"I've always liked the word camera. It's one of those difficult to pronounce words that has many exciting definitions. Is it an ancient Greek monster cobbled together from several fearsome creatures? Is it an illusory pipe dream a wispy Mirage on the horizon or something from the island of Dr? Moreau each instance features heavily in some of my favorite fantasy books as a kid. Today is part of the subject of our podcast kyw Merrick Antigen Receptor T. cells better known as carty cells. You're in the real world. These Americ- antigens are much better than fantasy. They life changing therapies here to speak about these wondrous cells is Sunday. Halt! Group leader Biology for Charles Rivers Light. Incite welcome Sanni. Hi Mary thank you for having me. Thank you for being here. So I some background. Could you explain what these engineered cells are before? We get into how they're used? How long have they been around? Absolutely so t cells are cells near immune system that played important role in eliminating foreign. Foreign invaders they do so through target specific binding using receptors on their surface who owns a t.? Cell binds at it triggers the cascade which can lead to killing of the infected cells, commerical Antigen, receptor, or car you mentioned can be designed in a lap to bind only one specific target. If you add these engineers car onto a T. Cell, you generate new T. cell, which has the ability to bind and kill specific cells which express that target that you designed your car for okay defers, clinical trials into RT sells for a really reported, trying to buy two thousand and five and currently being. Over five hundred trials ongoing said this is a massive increase and really shows potential that these Arabs have. Currently there to fully APPREC- cartoon south at on the market, which I was approved in two thousand, seventeen so Howard, these sells used in cancer treatments so cancer, except it's very different expression profiles than normal cells. If you can find a target on a cancer cell, which is not present on healthy cells, you can design a car against his target by then treating these cancer patients with the cartel cells designed against cancer specific target, the Kartini cells will kill the cancer cells, but touch any healthy cells. This would be a major improvement over current chemotherapies or also healthy cells are killed. It also makes cancer treatment a lot more personalized for each patient. Unfortunately, it's not quite as simple as making it saint, and these therapies all that they have major potential have some serious challenges so basically what you're saying is you can design. Like a normal human immune cell, but give it a a sort of a key that will fit only into the specific cancers lock exactly that's very wave describing it, so this has been going on for a while as you said, but you mentioned that there's sort of a a new up start, which is t cell receptor therapy? Can you tell me about that? And why? It might be a better alternative? He absolutely so I'm not entirely sure of could call it a better alternative, but they're definitely turn it, and they've got some pros and cons same, said the car t-cells, so t cell receptor therapies are t, crt cells are. Are, in many ways similar to cells where you do engineer receptor onto a T. cell in this case, you just engineer a tea CR onto it instead of a car, the advantages, but also some challenges of t cells is that they bind through h receptor on the one hand. This means that you can actually select from much larger set of targets, which increases the chances that you can find that one target that's only expressed on cancer cells, but not on healthy cells, and on the other hand it also limits ED patient population because people have very different lots of different types at an it makes a safety testing in animals. Very close to impossible. You mentioned earlier. That safety can be a real concern. We can talk about I about some of the reasons. Safety needs to be so so thorough I understand that these can have some really serious side effects. So can you talk about those little bit? He yes, absolutely so as she mentioned your metaphor if she give these cells, the receptor, which could be key. Key and then it only fits in the lack of a cancer cell. You need to make sure that the key doesn't work on any other locks, and so if the target expressed on the cancer cell that you've designed to St CRT, sell or your car, T. Cell Four. You need to make sure that that target is not expressed on any other healthy tissue if Any of your organs express that same target, the Tesol will bind kill also your healthy cells near healthy organs, and that's something yet. You very clearly want to avoid.

Engineer Mary Moreau Carty Charles Rivers Light RT Group Leader Howard
Tuning the CAR T

Sounds of Science

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Tuning the CAR T

"I've always liked the word camera. It's one of those difficult to pronounce words that has many exciting definitions. Is it an ancient Greek monster cobbled together from several fearsome creatures? Is it an illusory pipe dream a wispy Mirage on the horizon or something from the island of Dr? Moreau each instance features heavily in some of my favorite fantasy books as a kid. Today is part of the subject of our podcast kyw Merrick Antigen Receptor T. cells better known as carty cells. You're in the real world. These Americ- antigens are much better than fantasy. They life changing therapies here to speak about these wondrous cells is Sunday. Halt! Group leader Biology for Charles Rivers Light. Incite welcome Sanni. Hi Mary thank you for having me. Thank you for being here. So I some background. Could you explain what these engineered cells are before? We get into how they're used? How long have they been around? Absolutely so t cells are cells near immune system that played important role in eliminating foreign. Foreign invaders they do so through target specific binding using receptors on their surface who owns a t.? Cell binds at it triggers the cascade which can lead to killing of the infected cells, commerical Antigen, receptor, or car you mentioned can be designed in a lap to bind only one specific target. If you add these engineers car onto a T. Cell, you generate new T. cell, which has the ability to bind and kill specific cells which express that target that you designed your car for okay defers, clinical trials into RT sells for a really reported, trying to buy two thousand and five and currently being. Over five hundred trials ongoing said this is a massive increase and really shows potential that these Arabs have. Currently there to fully APPREC- cartoon south at on the market, which I was approved in two thousand, seventeen so Howard, these sells used in cancer treatments so cancer, except it's very different expression profiles than normal cells. If you can find a target on a cancer cell, which is not present on healthy cells, you can design a car against his target by then treating these cancer patients with the cartel cells designed against cancer specific target, the Kartini cells will kill the cancer cells, but touch any healthy cells. This would be a major improvement over current chemotherapies or also healthy cells are killed. It also makes cancer treatment a lot more personalized for each patient. Unfortunately, it's not quite as simple as making it saint, and these therapies all that they have major potential have some serious challenges so basically what you're saying is you can design. Like a normal human immune cell, but give it a a sort of a key that will fit only into the specific cancers lock exactly that's very wave describing it, so this has been going on for a while as you said, but you mentioned that there's sort of a a new up start, which is t cell receptor therapy? Can you tell me about that? And why? It might be a better alternative? He absolutely so I'm not entirely sure of could call it a better alternative, but they're definitely turn it, and they've got some pros and cons same, said the car t-cells, so t cell receptor therapies are t, crt cells are. Are, in many ways similar to cells where you do engineer receptor onto a T. cell in this case, you just engineer a tea CR onto it instead of a car, the advantages, but also some challenges of t cells is that they bind through h receptor on the one hand. This means that you can actually select from much larger set of targets, which increases the chances that you can find that one target that's only expressed on cancer cells, but not on healthy cells, and on the other hand it also limits ED patient population because people have very different lots of different types at an it makes a safety testing in animals. Very close to impossible.

Engineer Mary Carty Moreau Charles Rivers Light RT Group Leader Howard
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"WBZ radio station thirty seven degrees right now mostly cloudy very windy today in Boston at eleven o'clock good morning to you thank you for joining us I'm TV gal here's what's happening Massachusetts recording another one hundred and fifty corona virus deaths on Friday bringing the death toll to more than forty seven hundred also more than seventy five thousand here in the bay state have tested positive for carbon nineteen cents the start of the pandemic sixteen hundred of those cases added in yesterday's daily count thousands of people are being tested every day fourteen thousand on Friday alone some good news though the hospitalization rate continues to drop four percent of all current cases are hospitalized right now in the current number of cases in the icy yield has also fallen however still about eight hundred people are fighting for their lives right now in the ICO one of Boston's most traditional and biggest events is canceled this year because of health safety concerns it's Boston's lie fourth of July concert with the Boston pops along the banks of the Charles river here's more from WBZ's Karen regal hop goes the fourth in the worst way possible and the feast of Saint Anthony pride was already gone dot day all of them big and small destroyed by the link the layer that is covert nineteen which is taking with it all of the economic supports around it Boston mayor Marty Walsh the economic impact of canceling the pox when you think about you know we can't the merit Dolly postponement on September you know that that date does does events have real economic impacts the city of Boston so.

Boston ICO Charles river WBZ Marty Walsh Massachusetts Dolly
Collaborating to Cure Dementia

Sounds of Science

08:35 min | 2 years ago

Collaborating to Cure Dementia

"Many of us will have to deal with dementia at some point in our lives whether as a patient or caregiver this terrible range of conditions affects five to eight percent of the sixty and older population at any given time. According to the World Health Organization the Dementia Consortium of Private Charity Partnership that Charles River joined last year is one of the organizations leading promising research on dementia treatments in order to discuss this condition and the research to treat it. I am joined by Sarah Almond Associate Director of integrated biology. Welcome Sarah Hi. Can you explain the purpose and organization of the DEMENTIA CONSORTIUM DEMENTIA Is SETUP BOY A? K. or outside research she k. Is a charity that focuses on. Alzheimer's disease it brings together. Active research is Pharma partners. Sarah's including Chelsea River in order to bring forward novel treatments dementia including outlines disease outside reset she. Kabc this research is invited to come forward with ideas for novel targets in Europe. Degeneration Your Inflammation Way. Them work with them to put together. What packages the funded by the partners? Anti Kate to prosecute he's talk and hopefully lead to novel treatments for Dementia. What do you think of the way? They've set up their organization. I think this is a great way to stop the organization because it brings together such a broad range of experience From academic researchers may have spent years really understanding the biology of targets to pharmaceutical companies. That know how to bring targets three two treatments actually effective in the clinic and also is a CRI where we have a broad range of so biology and chemistry capability so we cannot provide the word packages also have extremely experienced. Research is catchy. Help develop the molecules to treat these young coupled with the charitable input of the Vale Uk. He Project managed but also do so much to bring forward research in this area. Yeah absolutely cut covering all the bases. So what is Charles Rivers role in this group? You mentioned a little bit and you go into a little more detail. Charleston is WANNA to Communist with capabilities and drug discovery expertise. We provide strategic input into plans to de risk these targets and how to generate tool molecule suitable testing the hypothesis. We went with Alzheimer's Research K. And the principal investigator to proposals together. That income dreams that executed by then the appeal and US working closely together. They may do the basics. Hogging island allergy and we bring medicinal chemistry or HD CAPABILITIES. That actually will enable us to find a joke against that tailgate. We meet with the foul partners to finalize plans. And then once funded. We actually execute the work. Okay awesome I understand that a couple of research projects from the consortium have already been green lit Can you explain those proposals? She'll you're correct to Russia in progress of the two targets. One is fine as the Scott appears to link to Tau Accumulation ear inflammation. We aren't sure whether we need to be selective over a closely related kind as the. Pi is looking at whether ACHSAF. You've reduced this target. That doesn't indeed impact Taufel are. They should be China in Vivo. Mostly of onto molecule and vacation and which is a specific type of dementia or Alzheimer's. Or is that just a general Assignments towel face but particularly Alzheimer's disease at the eventual Gulf one is to the impact of the tour the killer produce on time phosphorylation. In an in Vivo model than the second project is two gene mutation I l s from tempo dementia the courses of pathogenic Rene to be produced. And we're aiming to block the expo this RNA. By targeting his with the protein takes out the Chris into the cell. When this new mix and Rene is exploited toxic repeat protein produced which then up today so responses and Kohl's neurodegenerative disease so the talk if allegations. This is actually already fairly strong. So we'll focus on producing told molecule capable of testing the hypothesis drug ability in Viva. And this is quite interesting that uses Zebra Fish Assay which is as a Pi Out Annika's scrap. The compounds can reduce the interaction between the protein. And the mutant. Aren a over So vice projects Charles River going to rub in Asia screen and then performed medicinal chemistry. Touchy try and get the molecules to kind of test with the viable targets. So how exactly is the consortium supporting this work on on these two proposals? So the consortium consists of Pharma Partners K. And they weren't. She formed kind of equal partners within that and they provide funding the project so they've also provided their expertise in kind of defining the key risks that we need to address in our plans and also technically hurt entice for example as I was research to see progress against small Stein's out payroll Consult here as a whole. I understand our work on dementia has increased substantially over the last year or. So is this because of a higher demand for treatment or is it more promising research avenues. Or is it both. I think by This been advances in understanding of neurons. Lemay tion in particular so this is triggered research projects. But also there's a shift away from the amyloid focused approaches for outside disease due to a lack of clinical success but equally dementia is still highly prevalent in and loss of US. Know people that'd be personally affected by this August. Just it's very hard Eric Tree but not one which people are going to give them. What is the importance of collaboration for researching these neurological diseases? They understand that. Probably the REAL STRENGTH OF THE CONSORTIUM. I think just touches found that there are Kiama nays area The SIS for those lost focus hasn't been successful in the clinic so it's clear that novel therapeutic approaches and needed and this takes time so rarely. We need different people to work together. Different functions work together so farmer actually reduce what they do in house and choose to those complex in return. Viva studies take years to fully establish in Zeros and so when academic academia follow charities and see arose all have complementary skill sets the they they research can be three to benefit the patient in the minimum time possible. Is it also a matter of the fact that CNN diseases are so complicated? And there's so many different factors going into the Mike. No one can be an expert in enough of the different areas of research to really do absolves ex exactly not. Yeah you know. And and so just by the nature of scientific institution you may get more time to focus on specific disease mechanisms. That PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY. Just doesn't have the kind of time to dedicate starved to really building that level understanding but they may have a much broader range of complex models. That can actually help advance. This yet come has been unfortunately so we can you tell me about the psychiatry consortium which I guess is kind of an offshoot of the dementia consortium. Yeah it's it's basically has the same structures dimensions. Timonen is formed in consultation with a K. Who a kind of had a stake in his on. Psychiatry example schizophrenia or autism and this is obscene medicines discovery cats who are not for profit and are there the cats ponant which was set innovate UK to support innovation and use by UK business? So the psychiatry console is one of the indicates which is accelerating drug discovery and psychiatric

Dementia Dementia Consortium Dementia Consortium Of Private Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Charles River United States Rene Sarah Hi Sarah Almond Associate Director Of Integrat World Health Organization Europe Chelsea River Charleston Neurodegenerative Disease Vale Uk Russia Charles Rivers
Coronavirus Threatens Press Freedom Around the World, Report Says

Derek Hunter

07:03 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus Threatens Press Freedom Around the World, Report Says

"The mother at night yesterday was arrested for having her kids at the park this video that's circulating on social media I don't know how much longer people are gonna tolerate this shall we say I went for a walk yesterday after the show around the neighbors too nice and I think clear my head to to start writing a column which I still have to write but I came across new there's a school near us and there's new Equidad you know swings and slides and stuff and then there's nucleases bagel everything I thought the kids would love to to climb all over this and I wouldn't let him but they were with me but that was a big sign their yoga in our parks are open but don't touch any of the equipment and everything well what if the parents as you know the hell with it kids are gonna go down swinging on the swings confidential open arrest them how well do you think that's going to go and of course then there's pulling this is why polling so worthless the new morning consult poll asking if nonessential workers should be allowed to move freely outside seventy five percent said no sixteen percent said yes and nine percent didn't know how the phone worked to be able to answer it apparently they don't have an opinion but seventy five percent no you can't you should be able to go out and move freely outside yeah well we do have rights in this country and the constitution isn't just you know well we it's inconvenient right now so we're going to ignore it as many governors have tried to do when it comes to the second amendment they're now trying to do it from the comes to parts of the first amendment now all of the people all the blue checkmark brigade on social media who are outraged that anybody would go and protest by driving around their state capital in their car and honking horns I guarantee you the they're they're fine with the free speech aspect of the first amendment the right to assembly assemble part of the first amendment and the right to petition your government for redress of grievances they're fine and and the the freedom of religion they're fine with those parts of the first amendment being scrapped how do you think that they that's it was a public safety matter people just need to stay home while they're hammering big fat checks how do you think those very same people would react if the freedom of the press part of the first amendment were curtailed were ignored the people in the media get permission from the governor they're considered essential and so they're allowed to go wherever no matter how stringent the lockdown order is members of the media are allowed to go out and do whatever it is they want to do if that courtesy warranty extended to them if it was a face ID with will get so bad that in New York you can't leave your house even if you're going to do your MSNBC or CNN show you can't leave the house so there you go and you can't go down to city hall you can't go asking questions whatever just helping jurors to be around other people stay home how long until those very same people would be crying a river about how awful it is and how draconian and monsters and to radical it is that they're being shot out there the first amendment to vet well they care about as all leftists do they really only care about that which impacts them and the parts of the constitution they like they they ignore the rest of it you know they they wrap themselves in the first amendment while wiping themselves with the second amendment is I like to say do it constantly they treated as a doormat and kill it's convenient and then they revere it and then they dismiss it again this with the same vigor and that sort of thing is happening online so could be cut one the C. E. O. of you too Susan workshops schemes or something I don't know there's a whole bunch of season Kay and Jason at night wouldn't begin to know how to pronounce it she's announcing as you know said basically and she told him and potato Brian Stelter on CNN and he of course was not he didn't say anything or anybody who goes against the world health organization's recommendations will have their content removed from YouTube the World Health Organization now dictates how you as an American citizen can what you can say what you can't say on your YouTube channel if you have one that's in the same that's Kerama goals the World Health Organization to everybody except for leftists has a lot of issues a lot of explaining to do and Brian Stelter got to the bottom of zero of it because well he's a moron listen to this clip from his show cut one go ahead that is raising authoritative information but then we also talk about removing information that is problematic of course anything that is medically unsubstantiated to people saying like take vitamin C. you know take to manipulate those are all will cheer you on those are the examples of things that would be a violation of our policy anything that would go against World Health Organization recommendations would be a violation of our policy and so remove is another really important part of our policy which is going to remove a look if Dr Ted rose over at the World Health Organization says no then you just need to shut up you need to accept what this puppet of Beijing has to say Mr all is well come on out don't worry about it China has done a wonderful job that guy that guy gets to dictate your free speech rights lastly today I want to leave you with a bit of a it's kind of a funny story reporter up in New York ABC station up in New York print out a report of a tragic story it's it's it's it starts off said trust me it gets better then cut six here this guy announces the passing of a very young coronavirus victim patient and it's sad it's it's somber listen to him cut six go ahead I do want to mention one person who was singled out today by governor Murphy this young man that you're looking at right there twenty six year old Jack Allard we profiled him last month Michelle Charles river the powerful story former Ridgewood high school across store in two time all American was in a medically induced coma after coming down with the virus after spending time on a ventilator

drugs that could help treat coronavirus

Houston's Morning News

03:09 min | 2 years ago

drugs that could help treat coronavirus

"News I would like to put in a formal request because I have a sneaking suspicion we'll be talking more and more about medications as relates to corona virus and medications all have these very long difficult to pronounce names we like rename some of this stuff it is something that's really really easy for example yesterday the president announced that the FDA had approved hi droll Sitecore Klein I think that's how you pronounce it it's a drug used to treat malaria rheumatic diseases and other conditions the clerk when it's Quinn I know what's going on then hi drugs the Clore Quincy high across the clerk when K. well that's not too terribly bad but you know what maybe what we need to do is limit how many letters you can use in a drug to wonder if it's sort of like a a derivative of quinine you know you used to always drink quinine and for malaria and this is an anti malarial drug believes they think there may be some it is a cure for covered nineteen no but as a treatment for covered nineteen they think there might be some merit well there's a difference between vaccine and rarity so these are therapies that they were talking today exactly while they are working on a vaccine they're going to try to develop more therapies here to try to yeah save as many people as possible from this yesterday as well we had distributed bio president Dr Jacob Glanville on how much they're doing to try to complete engineering on the drug to try to neutralize the again not curable to neutralize the coronavirus what my company is doing is adapting antibodies to recognize and neutralize the novel coronavirus so this would act like it's sort of skipping one of vaccine does so instead of giving you a vaccine and waiting for it to produce an immune response we just give you those antibodies right away as I wasn't about to the minutes that patient has the ability to neutralize the virus so how far how close are you to achieving this goal how many months years away are you from being able to give people what's essentially a treatment right sure so we're moving super fast on this we had a little bit of a scare when the ordinance shut down all non essential business here in San Francisco but my team members all volunteer to come in and keep working on this and we had an exception so we're about three to four weeks away from completing all of our engineering at that point the completed drug is gonna go to the U. S. and read so it's the U. S. military and they're gonna be testing it for its ability to neutralize the virus at the same time that drug is going to go to Charles river laboratories which is international contract research group which is going to test the safety of that drug both of those pieces of information come together so that we can produce batches go through some red tape and then do a first human studies that will do on two hundred to six hundred people and the summer probably in July okay so you put the time line all together on that and it's probably not going to be helpful for this particular bout with covered nineteen but it might be if it turns out of all the testing turns out that if we have a repeat of that then chances are fairly good from what they're saying that would be me I'll just are saying about if we have a return of it then we may have a a treatment the very effective and

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Rose moving find along the Charles river Davis droning WBZ traffic on the three of the four day WBZ accu weather forecast here's accu weather meteorologist Matt Ben's chili for today we'll see blustery conditions throughout today with plenty of sunshine a high temp job to thirty seven for tonight a load near twenty degrees in Boston but closer to ten degrees and some of the colder suburbs heading into Sunday will see sunshine followed by afternoon clouds outside after up to thirty eight perhaps a couple flurries and for Sunday night becoming milder for Monday will see the chance for rain showers plenty of clouds with a high of forty eight every Tuesday afternoon rain showers cloudy with a high of forty five I'm accu weather meteorologist Matt bands WBZ Boston's news radio sunny and bright right now twenty seven degrees down in Braintree twenty four in Arlington twenty one in Lawrence in Peabody and twenty seven in Boston this is Dan for next day if you look at the largest selection of architectural moldings doors and spare parts look no further the next day holding doors and stairs top notch products top notch service delivering daily across Boston visit us at and the molding dot com there were a lot of New England Washington's birthday sales of it last month it's seven twenty five welcome to another edition of conscious corner Jordan rich here along with Matt Robinson of match meals dot com wonderful column that he writes and lots of restaurant news lots of information about food and then Boston by foot is something new yeah well the one thing that I really love about growing up in Boston is that there's always new stuff to learn and one of my favorite ways to learn has been going on towards with Boston by foot they have they had one for Ben Franklin's birthday right one about famous women famous politicians stories that you would hear otherwise so this spring they're up there partnering with Sam Adams another Boston favorite to do a series called tastings entails it's got a kick off and for may twenty fourth they're going to be starting at the same as brewery in JP and the towards can.

Charles river Davis Matt Ben Boston Braintree Arlington Lawrence Peabody Dan Jordan Matt Robinson Ben Franklin Sam Adams Rose Matt New England Washington
This Medicine Is for the Birds

Sounds of Science

07:33 min | 2 years ago

This Medicine Is for the Birds

"All know by now that the overuse of antibiotics has led to the evolution of superbugs. That can't be treated with typical medicine through a series of global double in local programs working under the name one health many governments are looking to fight this trend in many ways. Including reducing or totally eliminating antibiotic use in animals. Unfortunately animals still get sick joining me today. Is Natasha Ortega Director of laboratory operations at Charles Rivers. Avian Site in Connecticut. She is adept at finding new ways to protect her birds from common infections and diseases. Without using antibiotics antibiotics she was the second ever guest on sounds of science and I'm glad to have her back. Welcome Natasha Hi thank you thank you for inviting me. Thanks for coming. So I'd I'd like to start by getting your impression of the one health initiative especially how it relates to your area of expertise chickens so I think the one health initiative is a great initiative. Should've it's a global one where it looks at not only people's health but also the animal health and the health of the environment and how they're all interconnected like for example take antibiotic resistant bacteria. This topic is heavily looked at under the one health and that being on it's really looking at the usage of antibiotics and specifically typically looking at the use of it in livestock and how it turned out during investigation that there is a significant amount. That's being used. And it's being used not only to treat. The animals will also in some places debuts as a growth promoter which has been banned has been banned over in the EU but other countries may be using it for that purpose and so they do administer antibiotics as well to kind of prevent diseases and so how relates to chickens is Chickens are bred to be fast growing at least here here in the US. Due to consumer demand for more natural chicken they have been switching away from using antibiotics and going towards more antibiotic free or or no antibiotics ever and their labels and so they raise these birds without any antibiotics and the whole purpose is to control on antibiotics. Used so if Animal is sick. You do apply the antibiotics and they don't fall under antibiotic free anymore. They would fall under a different category. But it's really looking at the animal health and so with the increased amount of disease that's occurring. There's an alternative that needs to be a natural tournament that needs to be Created in order for the to help out the poultry industry for that right and just to be clear. The Charles River chickens aren't used for meat. They're used for research for the vaccine growing in the eggs. Things like that. Yes so you mentioned before that there were different in pre labels. Can you explain the difference between those labels Yes so there's multiple different ways of saying it Some labels else was saved raised without antibiotics and some will say no antibiotics ever which I'm sure many of you have seen in the grocery store and you pick up a package of chicken and so it's it's it's different ways of marketing it but really it's the animal's not raised with antibiotics at all. So they're pretty much the same And versus a labeled I'll say no medically important antibiotics so that would mean antibiotics are used to treat. People would not be used and treating these animals. So that's the difference between house so last time you were on the podcast you were talking about a new product that ah you guys were developing can you give us an update on that product. Yes so just a brief background to summarize the previous podcast as we were coming out with an all natural product that can be applied in place of antibiotics. Antibodies that the birds will produce. So you expose these birds to Ah Pathogen for example and they will produce the antibodies in their serum. And as they do they transfer the antibodies to the egg yolks. And the whole purpose of that is to protect the chicks when they hatch Up to the first two weeks of its life to protect against any environmental on pathogens that cause disease for them Kinda taken that the same concept and harvesting the antibodies. Then you create this product that would be administered in the broiler industry for example Drinking water so the birds ingest the antibodies and it will bind to the bacteria of interest and prevent disease or colonization of bacteria. And when you originally on the podcast this was just an idea or something that you were testing. But now it's actually started to go into production right yes so we are actually went through few few. RND Studies and we have some great promising results. We are focusing on one disease. In particular and aquatic interruptus and so with the results that we've seen and we are pursuing suing. USDA licensor for this product. So it would be a first one for us to go through that market very cool so onto some of your own personal accomplishments. I understand that you've recently earned European pathology. Congratulations thank you. Can you tell us about the research that you did for your dissertation Yes my PhD. The work was in chicken. Parvo virus so chicken Parvo virus is not to unknown it was discovered in the nineteen eighties on kind of went little. Doormat it for a while until it starts creeping up because it causes viral into rightous. It's a similar virus to the. I know that dogs often get Parvo. And I think there's a vaccine for that right similar virus yes similar yes similar to that There's there's a difference though as well and I apologize Viral Enteric Disease Embroiled said it causes but the difference. Is this virus does not cause high mortality like for example. The Canine Parvo virus does but what it does is that has has been implicated along with other pathogens to cause fronting stunting syndrome which abbreviate as RSS and so with the name indicates is the broilers were become stunted compared to attachments. So will you look at an image of severe case of RSS. You'll see one bird will look like a chick for example while the other chicken will look like a really media like market market weight type bird. So what happens is over time as you Place more birds in the house. You'll start seeing increase in stunted growth for these birds and EH PARVO virus. It's not as easy as some other vaccines where you can grow it in cell culture to produce the vaccine or you could grow it in eggs actually requires the live bird on it. Grows it replicates in the intestines of alive bird. So that's when I thought of what is there a way that we can produce a vaccine or create create one. I should say I'm using a different method. So I used a p. ship stores expression system to express the structural proteins. There was previous publications that showed chicken Parvo virus using expression system like back low virus for example looking at the structural protein of VP. To my research focus focus on DVD. P. One gene itself which codes for all structural proteins. And so I took this and put it into a P.. Sheep historic system which is a yeast expression system was able to produce a structural protein successfully and in my PhD work. I did a immunogenetics study as well as a challenge. Study and what I was able to show was that when using the VP. One gene to express all the structural proteins. We were able to show protection and the birds so it gives us one step closer to coming out with the vaccine. That's

Parvo VP Natasha Ortega EU Connecticut Charles River Charles Rivers Director Of Laboratory United States Usda
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Or the pain of losing that law and depends on the dentist idea unfortunately in life more often we remember the negative things because they have a greater impact on us and at Denny's in tennis it's a little different now okay okay yo everything cover my career about the about okay okay see the not about him and they might not have been happier with my victories not that I have been upset with my defeats I think well not much in the way of getting out in your car right now north of town upper end of one twenty eight both directions clear between hike in Danvers for one no issues roots ninety three ninety five and three nothing in your way up to the New Hampshire state line and back it's quiet out west of town downtown the lower decks clear connectors moving fine tune from ninety three star drive in soldiers field road both moving well along the Charles river the the top it's clear all the airport tunnels are on time so the town route not for ninety five north bound you Jim over a mile and a half three works on that's before route twenty in Marlboro lower end of ninety three and north bound that is now clear that we'll have that with the earlier crash before or after route thirty seven in Braintree that's moving fine now the expressway yeah about ten fifteen minutes getting in and out of the city route three is okay up and on the south shore twenty four in ninety five moving find top to bottom David to draw any WBZ's twenty four hour traffic network I'm April and this is Travis bustle and we recently got a CLI life insurance this is a nice feeling and now with our new online application S. B. allies giving you another reason to feel great about getting life insurance you can apply in minutes from any computer or mobile device we really feel that we've got everything and more from the company apply right now it has to be allied dot com or call eight eight eight six three zero five.

Denny tennis Danvers Charles river Jim Braintree David New Hampshire S. B.
Tumors and their Entourage: Exploring the Tumor Microenvironment

Sounds of Science

07:17 min | 2 years ago

Tumors and their Entourage: Exploring the Tumor Microenvironment

"Cancer Research is a complex in ever evolving field one of the most promising research areas involves the habitat that cancer is able to create for itself which is known as the tumor micro environment to discuss this topic. I've brought in Vienna Jenkinson Director of Science at Charles Rivers portishead site. She has over a decade of experience in the fields of oncology and immunology and she has agreed to talk with me about what exactly the tumor micro environment is and and how we can exploit it to treat cancer. Welcome rhiannon thank. You see me to stay today. Thank you for coming. So let's just start with the basics six. What is the tumor micro environment? So when we think that chairman Momaday on we often maybe think of all of tumor cells so quite a genius in the way that it's formed and these cells really foam from our normal cells which being incorrectly programmed maybe gone bad resulting in them growing up normally taytay an affecting the normal function of our organ all tissue but really the reality is a lot more complex as often is in these scenarios. I'm really uh not more different cell types get recruited by the missiles into the moncur environments to the tumor cells themselves along with these other south types. And the extra study in a mate checks at the cell. sit-in form the Cheema Might Kerr environments so then that raises the question of what are the cell types in the tme. and and why are they. They're severely if we think of the Cheema styles what they're trying to do is survive on and gray said to do this. They need gray. Factors this nutrients and sell staff is signals from types. So as they grow they send out signals and this results in other cell types coming to the Cheema not an infiltrating into the sort of Chima cells to form a tomb amass in addition in the Magrao's it might results into she strasse S. or dangerous signals and this results in the immune system which is constantly surveying the bulge coming along to see what's going on and that rain really is which tax help on these dangerous signals resulting in killing of the Cheema cells so the body is like attacking the tumor but is the tumor able to use news. Those attacks to its own advantage sometimes. Yes that's right side. Whilst I hope would be that the immune cells come in an act against the Shema resulting in killing the reality. Is that the tumor fights back against this. And what it does is generates immunosuppressive environment. Soup one in Wichita riches. Switches the T.. Cells off on the other immune cells and really on subverts them to support the Does this immunosuppressive effect extend then beyond the tumor micro environment to the rest of the body or is it pretty localized. It tends to be localized to the actual Chima micro environment itself. Because we've got to remember that the cells the at the a very very specific on full the tumor itself so it generates sort of a small niche weather cells. Become we'd programmed an influenced by the environment itself. So what does having all of these different types of cells present help us. When we're thinking about ways to inhibit tumor growth? So when we're thinking about inhibiting CI mccray we can think of to on strategies very broadly so the first strategy and the one that's traditionally Russian people total. When they were thinking of drugs? That could talk at the Cheema. would-be Chuma intrinsic mechanisms. So those would be therapies. which would die? We talk the Cheema sales but now we can think about hole of a subset of therapies and these are the ones that will be talked to the other cell types which within the Cheema Might Cram Graham varmints best supporting achievement rife so if we can impact on that function then then now supporting the Cheema and we can even turn theirselves against the Cheema and then that way we can fight back. So it's like you're killing the protection around the tumor and therefore leading the body. Do its natural natural thing and defending against the tumor. Yes that's right so effectively. We're reactivating on the immune response as it is and we will send may be switching the phenotype five of some of the other cell types. which in the Huma so we can think as well as the immune system we can think of the vascular cells? The within the Cheema Might Kerr Garment. Nice saleslady that and they form the Bulls of the blood vessels. They supply the medicament new chance. Perhaps that could be a target cutting off the food supply yet and changing the metabolism. So you could think about strategies by talking yourselves we can say. Think about lymphatic. endothelial cells those form part and emphatic drainage they're taking away debris and metabolites from the tumor itself essentially keeping the environment mclane so again if we could impact on that then we might impact on the amount of danger signals that the chew Miss Generating Sort of the other cell types would be cancerous icy I took five glass. So CAIN FIBERGLASS and normally they're voting but these ones have been subjected to produce despite fat to lay down extra study in a matrix such smooth muscle up ten Collagen If we could talk at these cell types than we talk potentially attention to the framework in which sits and again. It's sort of just about mobilizing those cells and reprogramming them effectively to stop then and helping matchy mccray okay. So we've got the cells. That are helping the tumor get fed. We've got the cells helping. Keep the tumor environment clean. So what would the role of immune cells be in trying to create a therapy based on targeting the tumor micro environment. Tma Chima micro environments often contains on several different types of immune cells. But as we just mentioned the tumor really acts to switch these cells off it wants to survive that wants to grow and then the opposite of the immune system. It's coming in there. It's looking for danger. Signals nuys the team as abnormal. So it wants to go back to its job of killing the Cheema Sales The the two must sort of in a way that it's able to educate on the immune cells ineffective be switched them all in a goal that you have the selective pressure of having the immune system and then the tumor adapts to type with sales in the micro environments support. We often end dot webs Chima which has been infiltrated by mean cells. He's at the team. has actually influenced these cells to become regulatory uh-huh suppressive or switched off and clearly the role of a lot. It's therapies with Ben's Bay either to switch southbound colon ole to drive an the influx of new fresh immune cells into the Environments Obesity just get cells sort of right into the Tumor Micro Environment Rothman perhaps just sitting around the edge itself. There's a few different strategies. We can thank cope when thinking of the immune system in the context of Chima

Cheema Cheema Might Kerr Garment Vienna Jenkinson Director Of S Chima Cancer Research Rhiannon Charles Rivers Chairman Mccray Wichita Momaday Gray Bulls Mclane BEN Magrao Rothman
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Quiet out on the roads right now starting south of town the expressways looking good getting in and out of the city but a ten fifteen minute ride their route three no issues up and down the south shore who's twenty five in nineteen twenty four and ninety five are good to go to and from Rhode Island lower end of the one twenty eight and ninety three the both clear between the pike and Braintree going downtown that opens find the lower decks moving okay star we drive in soldiers field road move well along the Charles river well the poor tunnels a clear to and from Logan route ninety nine Broadway that sold both ways getting by the casino in effort David Souter owning WBZ's cry a twenty four hour traffic network the kids he he he he he also accepting boats motorcycles R. V.'s and real estate donations you can restore your body's health balance and function naturally with safe effective C. B. D. I ordered see beauty for my daughter and my.

Rhode Island Braintree Charles river David Souter R. V.
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Tunnels Charles river roads all find expressways doing well both directions between Boston and Braintree nine miles of smiles David Struff Pelino WBZ traffic on the threes and Ellis check the accu weather forecast tonight we'll see a low of thirty three degrees in the city twenty six in some suburbs it'll remain clear tomorrow we'll see a mix of sun and clouds during the afternoon will reach a high of forty seven degrees very mild Thursday night partly to mostly cloudy down to thirty nine in the city then on Friday it'll be cloudy will see some rain or drizzle with a high of forty eight Saturday breezy with a period or two of rain those highs so very mild for January near fifty degrees rain likely during the patriots game as well temps in the forties then Sunday night we'll see rain that may mix with or change over to some snow with blustery with clouds and a mix of some sunshine as well hi highs in the upper thirties right now we have the thirty eight degrees in reading forty in Hyde Park further north Merrimack New Hampshire it's thirty seven degrees in here in Boston we have forty degrees with partly cloudy skies it's five oh five the first baby of twenty twenty in Boston is baby Dominic he arrived just as the new year began this morning right at midnight weighing in at six pounds six ounces mom and baby are said to be resting comfortably today Wooster's first baby a twenty twenty was born just eleven minutes into the new year a seven pound fifteen ounce baby boy born at UMass memorial Medical Center his name was not made public all right for most of us the start of the new year tends to bring with it the whole full possibility of self improvement physical financial and emotional self improvement ABC's Jim Ryan has says that some specialists in all of those areas have some sound advice for us whether it's weight loss for money management the experts advise taking small achievable steps instead of trying to climb the mountain on day one for fitness start with a short walk adding a few minutes to each day putting ten dollars we can savings increasing by a few dollars each month and the key to emotional health might be as simple as getting an extra hour of rest recent surveys have found that Americans are chronically sleep deprived Jim Ryan ABC news mayor Marty Walsh here's a special new year's message with Boston Boston two thousand nineteen was a big year for.

Boston Ellis Hyde Park Merrimack New Hampshire Dominic Wooster UMass memorial Medical Center ABC Jim Ryan Marty Walsh Tunnels Charles river Braintree David Struff Pelino
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"It is ten twenty three good morning and TV gal thank you for joining us here's a super retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes David any big backups right now not big but it is getting a bit busier on the expressway north bound now almost like clockwork getting crowded from seven hill past Columbia road close to eleven or twelve minute ride from Braintree to Boston and that time is increasing as we go along but once in Boston everything's fine no troubles or around town right along the Charles river on store drive is cleared the airport totals in Tobin bridge are doing well to or from the city and the lower deck is a nice and easy ride into Boston ever connectors looking good the pike is an easy ride out of the city on cruise control past one twenty eight into ninety all the way up to route eighty four eighty four is no delays getting on or off the bike into nineties an easy ride through western Shrewsbury David Struff fully know WBZ traffic on the threes are most common if you're over sixty five smoke cigarettes or have a family history of this disease the aortic center at Beth Israel deaconess reminds you to talk to your primary care physician about the I. D. M. C. is part of Beth Israel for traffic and weather together WBZ Boston news we it's the truth about money I'm Rick doubled and we're telling you about the risks of under funded ETFs that are actually showing themselves down the average lifespan.

New England Braintree Boston Charles river Tobin bridge David Struff Beth Israel deaconess D. M. C. Beth Israel Rick Shrewsbury
"charles river" Discussed on AP News

AP News

10:50 min | 2 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on AP News

"Leaders from Germany Poland Hungary Slovakia and the Czech Republic have attended a certainly up but now Strasse well 1 of the Los pulse of the Berlin Wall remains the 1989 protests and a stream of people fleeing East Germany pile pressure on the country's communist government to open its borders to the west and ultimately end the nation's post war division German chancellor Angela Merkel speaking at a memorial service in a small chapel near where the woman wants to know what keeps people out and restricts freedom is so high also wide the kombi broken down she reminded that the fight for freedom worldwide isn't over yet I'm Charles river that's my

Germany Poland Hungary Slovaki Czech Republic Berlin Wall communist government Angela Merkel Charles river Germany chancellor
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Boys dating back to the nineteen sixties well it is a beautiful day a great day to be outside and WBZ sherry small is down by the Charles river people enjoying the grave knowing when summer weather and sherry what is happening there well that I got I got to tell you I really got the sweet assignment today along the Charles river here in Cambridge after seeing a few heat wave thunderstorms and does some high humidity today we are now seeing a picture perfect day weather wise along the Charles there are people walking their jogging roller blading I've seen fishing boating and I even caught up with the cold Boston she attended an outdoor yoga class it's not your med it's not high I am so glad to be outside walking around for the rest the weekends and what's it like to do yoga outside it is much better than inside if you have the opportunity especially on a day like today with the breeze and his hearing all the sounds of nature and hearing the water it's perfect it is perfect Hey Dan Cambridge here at seventy seven degrees the sun is shining there's a beautiful breeze as well so it's a perfect day to get out and enjoy the outdoors and that if you need us some inspiration of course blue bikes are free as part of our yeah I find out campaign writers can get a free twenty four hour adventure pass through the blue bikes app that you could go for a bike ride along the tertiary small WBZ Boston's newsradio I thank you sherry great day to be outside coming up help for vets in Quincy four times the super retailers are doing that all wheel drive a driving report new to rob afternoon Doug wait until Friday on the south shore on route three southbound is jammed out of Braintree down into hang and we did have a crash it reported to buy route eighteen in Weymouth in the backup and more slowdowns down by route forty.

Charles river Cambridge Boston Dan Cambridge Quincy Braintree Weymouth roller blading Doug seventy seven degrees twenty four hour
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Drugs were mailed from post offices in Vermont and northern New Hampshire Mike Macklin WBC Boston's newsradio Boston for a living therefore please call the State Street thank long medical please WBZ thank you for getting our listeners to their destination thanks a lot thank you he tried the city WBZ's with you on the line tell your driver to put on WBZ ten thirty I like to stay caught up Boston's newsradio can you check your ride it is five fifty three traffic and weather together starting with a super retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes how you doing David overall we're doing pretty well team that we have a couple of work crews for ninety five south bound it has just a minor delay getting by the work crew between Boston road and route one nineteen and intrusive hurry to ninety westbound has an on going construction project by main street otherwise everything else west of town is in good shape no troubles on the mass turnpike that's moving well between route to ninety and downtown Boston around downtown there are no troubles for the lower deck of ninety three and as they can bridge lever connector is clear Tobin bridge in the airport tunnels are fine and no problems along the Charles river expressways looking good between the o'neill tunnel in the Braintree split route three is a good ride up and down the south shore no backups at the Cape Cod bridges David Struff Pelino WBZ traffic on the three seven thank you and now the four day WBZ accu weather forecast here's accu weather meteorologist Carl the Penske we are expecting some sun today it'll become breezy and a bit less humid this afternoon.

Vermont New Hampshire Boston WBZ New England Tobin bridge o'neill tunnel Penske Mike Macklin Charles river Cape Cod David Struff Pelino Carl four day
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"England business news it's off to the races for the very first I. P. O. of the year for Massachusetts tech company dina trace of Waltham hit Wall Street with a bigger than expected have billion dollar public offering and nearly immediately shares jumped nearly fifty percent not everyone is on board with the fed's decision this week to lower interest rates Boston fed president Eric Rosengren says the nation's low unemployment three point two percent and continued growth are just a couple of reasons why cheaper money is not a wise move right now it's no secret the greater Boston as a housing issue WBZ Jeff brown says despite all the construction it's really not getting better we're sort of stuck in the reality of if they come we will build it conundrum the economy a so good we keep adding jobs faster than we can build homes construction companies though are still getting permits definitely picked up sort of course the procession PK but I'm sort of leveled off Chris Salvi ideas an economist with real estate website apartment list which finds Boston supply and demand for housing is way out of whack has been for years and likely will be for years to come the construction and really kind of picking up it and continuing an increased pace for quite awhile for this sort of balance out now we are building here but Boston doesn't have room to grow simply put on like city say in the Sun Belt also growing really quickly but they have a lot more space to kind of spread out the only place it's tougher to find a home in Boston the San Francisco Bay Area Jeff brown WBZ Boston's news radio is a beautiful day for a romantic summer walked along the Charles taken a long fellow the sail boats on the water and all the dead fish yes the dead fish floating air early in that dirty water the Charles river watershed association has been getting plenty of calls about the deposit it says the deputy director of that organization Juliet dire ward she says it's.

Sun Belt Juliet Charles river watershed associ San Francisco Bay Chris Salvi Jeff brown England deputy director Charles P. O. Eric Rosengren president Boston fed dina trace Massachusetts billion dollar
"charles river" Discussed on All Ears English Podcast | Real English Vocabulary | Conversation | American Culture

All Ears English Podcast | Real English Vocabulary | Conversation | American Culture

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on All Ears English Podcast | Real English Vocabulary | Conversation | American Culture

"Hey Lindsey. How's it going Amy Michelle. It's going great. It's going great. I'm so glad it's summer feeling good to me to two and by this time that'll be long over but I am actually going to Boston for July fourth. o- July fourth are you really is that true like for you know that's awesome okay. We are recording this about a month in advance so that's why fourth of July has not happened yet for us. That's so cool Michelle. What are you going to do. I don't know where we're GONNA. Stay a back bay yeah and hang out so maybe I'll see there but you know I mean the what should I do in Boston. What are you well. You know if you call me when you're here then. I'll show you around. We can meet for coffee and I'll show you my favorite places at Boston. How about that. That would be awesome. That'd be awesome yeah. I'm really really excited yeah. Boston is really fun on July Fourth Yeah. It's pretty fun. They have a really nice firework. Show <music> over the river the Charles River and it's a pretty American city I would say so yeah yeah <hes> also if you can go to a baseball game or something that would be the quintessential went to central Boston Fourth of July experience. I'm not sure if the red sox are playing or not but something like that would be very typical yeah. I'm excited head. I'm really excited. I went a couple of years ago and then of course for <hes> when I went for the urban adventure right <hes> but then I went just for fun and now I'm going again for so well. That's awesome Michelle. I hope you enjoy my city of Boston. I won't be here because I'm looking. I'm looking west these days Michelle. I'm looking west guys right. I know I know that's exciting. Yeah more details coming on that soon but <hes> but this is great. It's on Michelle. What are we talking about today. Well guys. I don't know if you noticed that but today but Lindsay used a conditional answering my hey question. What did you say Lindsay well if I said if you call me when you're here then I'll show you around right right. Yeah yeah go ahead. Yeah show you around yeah. That's good so guys. We have a listener question about conditionals today. Now we're not going to cover all of them today because that would take a long time but we're going to focus on one of them in just a second so but before we get into that guys we wanNA thank the people who reviewed us in our APP right Lindsay Yeah and earlier we mentioned the Fazl Verbs. Show you around and guys now. We have a new tool inside the APP Michelle Michelle. I'm so excited about this saving study vocab tool. Are you excited about it. Oh yeah definitely I think huge for a listener. It's GONNA be a game changer because now now what we're GONNA do guys. We're going to select five to ten vocabulary words per episode that are going to be tap -able inside the real time transcripts so if you want to know the the definition you WanNa see a sample senate. You'll be able to see it right inside the APP annual. Have the option net. Will you have the option to save those words inside your favorites grits list so you can make your own personalized. Word Bank guys you can come back and study so.

Lindsay Yeah Amy Michelle Boston Michelle Michelle Lindsey Charles River sox Word Bank baseball
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Boston at eleven o'clock on this Thursday morning July fourth before thanks for joining us I'm Jim McKay and here's what's happening well just hours from now the fireworks will be filling the skies above Boston this morning people gathering along the Charles river waiting in line so they can get that good spot for the big spectacular show tonight WBZ's James Ross at the hatch shell where crews are putting the finishing touches for tonight's big fireworks display and concerts we're expecting half a million people today among those eager for the concert and the fireworks show is the singer family from Ohio they drove in it yesterday morning got in line at ten thirty almost twenty four hours now they've been doing this for eighteen years TV like how do we go see that too so you'll be way in the back and it's better just to watch on TV so somebody asked me and a friend how they do that and that's how it started we may come with ever since she was a year old when we first started coming we like the whole life much yeah there's no other place to be on the fourth they like the fireworks but they're really here for the concert that begins at eight o'clock the fireworks show at ten thirty at the hatch shell I'm James zero Haas WBZ Boston news radio the summertime tradition returns to Boston for the fourth of July as the Boston pops get ready for their fireworks spectacular at the hatch shell on the Charles river as well not I met della guards of who's been coming to the show for the last five years all the way from Houston Texas and she explains why she keeps coming back and I started coming to this wind up the marathon bombing I decided that it was support Boston she even explains her family history dating back to the seventeen hundreds so I have a connection to the American revolution and you can't get any better than this the Mayflower.

Boston Jim McKay Charles river WBZ James Ross Ohio Texas Houston twenty four hours eighteen years five years
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"America gets an early birthday party along the shores of the Charles river thousands of saying it danced along with the Boston pops and it tells for many catching a dress rehearsal is a yearly tradition to see everything and everything else is actually the celebration of America the night before the fourth is also a long easier for people to just drop by and walked right up in the area yeah those cans go up a new realism the concert tonight begins at eight PM the fireworks begin at ten thirty and remember to plan for some lane closures detours and traffic delays in and around the area now to Washington DC where despite all the controversy the fourth of July even ordered by president trump is a go military vehicles are in place for this evening's salute to America on the agenda flyovers music fireworks and a speech by the president there is plenty of push back from the Democrats who want his job claim he is politicizing the armed forces on a day that usually is a nonpartisan celebration ABC's day Packer has the latest like by tanks president trouble speak to V. I. P. supporters in front of the Lincoln Memorial democratic twenty twenty presidential hopefuls campaigning in Iowa you're the president's using taxpayer money for a campaign rally senator couple iris sandcastles.

America Boston Washington DC president trump president ABC Packer Iowa Charles river Lincoln Memorial senator
"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"charles river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The end of the day, when women appear in high places only as one at a time performers Justice Ginsburg taking the oath of office in August of that year. Michigan's attorney general says no one is off limits in her fresh invest. Gatien of the ongoing Flint water crisis. CBS's lauren. Bartholdi says it comes on the heels of news that shocked that city attorney general Dana Nessel and Wayne County prosecutor Kim worthy announced Thursday. They're dropping all of the charges against eight people in connection with the case, arguing the special prosecutor appointed by the former AG dropped the ball, but she wouldn't say, whether former governor Rick Snyder, maybe charged. They will go after anyone and everyone who has criminal liability, but they will also you know, make certain to exonerate. Those poor not criminally liable. Nestle says her team is combing through millions and millions of documents that have never been reviewed. Lauren Barth old four CBS news, Detroit, and Boston. We love that dirty water, but we can swim in it. The Charles river conservancy saying, today, high pollution levels, have forced the postponement of tomorrow's plan swim. It's now scheduled for a week from tomorrow. Recent heavy rain caused pollutants to wash into the river and they said it's always better to air on the side of caution. Rising water in the Great Lakes is causing huge erosion problems. Here's ABC's Ryan burrow in Euclid, Ohio record high water levels in a row have left homeowners like Randy Keith looking for expensive ways to fight the wave..

CBS prosecutor Dana Nessel attorney Justice Ginsburg Lauren Barth Charles river conservancy Great Lakes Rick Snyder Michigan Bartholdi Kim worthy Ryan burrow Nestle Flint Wayne County AG Randy Keith ABC Euclid