17 Burst results for "Charles Monroe"

"charles monroe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I was dangerous. I was given a bunch of medication. Guess what happened when I give medication the voices? Stop. Wait a minute. The all powerful God of the universe can be stopped by this pill. Put all these people are telling me that God is flowing through me healing them. And this guy say, no, you're schizophrenic and this pill will help you in the voices. Go away. Even though I take my medication all this stuff. I still have relapses, and I have problems, and I hear voices sometimes I have mental issues. And that's what I struggle with. You know? And used to when I hear them Nightline down or somewhere out would be like. I don't know what you're saying God. But this talk to me. It's nice to have God grab your blanket. And the master of the universe is talking. You'll even know what he's saying. And it's beautiful. Now, I hear and I'm like, my lithium levels often need to go to the doctor for this or needed to that. And it's it's not a fun fun. When God was talking to you. So I miss it. I missed the voices. God. Thanks to our dear friend, Charles Monroe. Cain for sharing his story on snap. Confined Charles on the public radio producer was content. Public radio's fantastic program to the best of our knowledge. And he's got a brand new book is called lithium Jesus. It features as faith healing exploits and much much much much much more all.

Charles Monroe Cain producer
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Suddenly destroyed with humanization it's really hard to walk back from that but you know it is a lot, like drugs it is a lot like alcohol. Where you have to make sure you that you're critically thinking all the, time and don't fall back into that pattern of blaming the other, for no other reason other than to make yourself feel better I have one last question for you and I wanna flip the switch here. A little bit you for many years so, minorities and gays, and in Jewish people as the. Other the person that you hated I think for a lot of my listeners people listening right now they see the kid with a swastika on his neck as the one to hate tell what what should we do with that guy Is it makes me mad scares me Yeah well we should be scared because when people, are lost in this ideology. Myself included, we were capable of anything I mean there were times when I was very adamant about committing acts of violence and even. Mass acts of violence during that period and what I can say, is every single person in that movement whether they are part of a group or a lone wolf for just indoctrinated online has gotten to that. Point because they felt marginalized or broken and what I, say is for people who are marginalized we cannot continue to marginalize them further. Because it just pushes them further away, now I'm not suggesting everybody hugging, Nazi like I did with Richard Spencer but. We need to bring them in closer I was thinking about your book and I recently, interviewed Arno Michaelis and some other people and it seems like there was a. Cumulative effect of small acts of kindness there wasn't some one moment in any of these stories where like and then a Nazi anymore Affects of compassion and maybe, I just need to like. Online or, interactions with people just show small acts of compassion who maybe I contributed five years later to this person changing let's a. Great point I saw somebody do that recently and Sarah Silverman had, the troll attack her collar a really vulgar word she replied and said how can I help you after looking at your Facebook page of noticed. That you're depressed I've noticed that you're struggling with lower, back pain that you've never been able to rectify and you don't seem like. You have a lot of friends what, can I do for you friend, and after just a couple of Twitter conversations. With this guy he came around and the world really started to support this person who, had been nasty just a nasty nasty troll and suddenly this person had found. This compassion and empathy and started to embrace it and changed his views and actually now Sarah's In an ongoing communication with this person and their friends and. She's trying to help him with? An education and with a doctor and it's completely changed his view, so I think that these small acts of kindness these pay it forward compassion moments are, really the key, to eliminating. Hey thank you very much for the work that you do that's my pleasure Charles thank you so much, no problem thinking by As Charles Monroe gain. Talking with. Christian Piccolomini Christian co-founded life after hate, a nonprofit group that helps former extremists change and. You can watch the video of that conversation he had with, Richard Spencer on our website that's TT book dot org Coming up. From racism and hate to the u. Toby envision of afro, future ISM I think that after future is in is really wonderful way of planting Shirley shifting consciousness But at, the same time I wanted to see how Africa futures and can show up in our daily life and be used on. A daily basis And during that investigation I began creating meditations from the sounds of senses Sorry.

Sarah Silverman Richard Spencer Charles Monroe Arno Michaelis Twitter Facebook Africa Toby Shirley five years
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Science fiction writer David Brin So throughout this hour we've been talking about anger and the Rolette can. Play. In achieving social change yes anger can, separate us into partisan camps but he can also inspire us to work together, to, achieve, amazing things writer Michael Eric Dyson knows this, firsthand. In his latest book tears we cannot stop reads as a call. To action too many Americans, he told Charles Monroe. Cain why he wrote it you. Wrote, this for white America obviously it's in the? Title, of the book why well because, I think, when white people, you know hear about. Race they think, black people and I say. Let's talk about. White people see our uncomfortable it. Is then that's our, comfortable it is for us but. You never think about that you never have to peel back the layers and think about what. It means to be white and so I wanted to to, address why brothers and sisters, because if they. Don't, change ain't nothing, happening man Black people can, get converted in think. About this in different ways it. Makes, no difference unless white brothers due to insist? Is, to to she said if less, they change, or I should, say I'm sorry unless. We change I'm, I'm white what do you. Expect I want. The conversation to start I wanna. Conversion factor to happen, I want people's mind to open. I want them to think seriously about again angry get upset get mad get resentful but move. And think about what this might mean for you to write, a book like this when, I look through. This I saw a. Lot of grief was? This really painful for you to. Write extremely painful for me to. Write it was painful because I. Had to dig beneath the objectivity of my, scholarly. Craft and, vocation and, come up, with a personal voice something deep inside of me see partly my.

Michael Eric Dyson writer David Brin Cain Charles Monroe America
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Freakonomics radio is supported by twenty three in me a personalized genetic service dedicated to helping people learn what their twenty three pairs of chromosomes say about their health traits and ancestry learn more at twenty three and me dot com this is k q e d public radio opiate addiction is epidemic in northeast ohio in the places where people i lost jobs and then hope laid off after morning company called for instance done this week charles monroe kane heads home to ohio join us onto the best of our knowledge from pr ex the episode is entitled center of the world ohio and to the best of our knowledge of the first hour comes your way in twenty minutes at two o'clock and then a three it's the second hour of to the best of our knowledge called what do we have against other people coffee experience of being stuck in a crowd you can't breathe you can't see ahead you're just stuck in place with people all around you know under jump also said hell is other people but is that really true writers and philosophers tackle that proposition next time onto the best of our knowledge from pr fax mild temperatures currently in the high fifties and low sixties and then later on today it'll be sunny and hot again inland sixties and seventies around the bay some high eighties too low nineties inland and then there will be some cooling on monday still sunny but a bit cooler this is k q e public radio.

ohio charles monroe kane twenty minutes
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Drugs and alcohol and violence and so grief is complicated enough when it's private but when the person you miss was a public figure with a big reputation it can be a lot harder to navigate now want thompson has written a book of his own it's called stories i tell myself and it's about his complicated relationship with his father he told charles monroe cain that despite their shared last name he and his dad could not have been more different he had a lot of shortcomings as a father but he really really wanted to have a connection with me and i wanted to have a connection with him and that was really the key that we just kept trying he you know didn't give up even through the many many examples when we were not talking the same language it seems you have a real hard thing to deal with i mean unfortunately a lot of people i know grew up with an alcoholic or drug addicted parents but those people didn't their father wasn't a legend for doing those things that must make it harder for you because people like yeah he parties he was awesome but you're like that's the stuff that paid him not the best i mean that's what motivated me to write the book in the first place right all of the coverage of hunter after he died really focused on you know that that wral duke wild man persona and that really bothered me because it was so one dimensional but also it completely missed the point of of hunters you know real contributions are you like your father and all that i mean our world into drugs or drinking guns i mean is that the anger and are you like that question a lot recently and you know the simple answer is my father and i are really different people i think that's part of what made it so difficult for us to find a way to connect part of it was was you know me observing the chaos that that he just created in you know follow them around like this cloud and i really didn't want to you know to have that so i think a part of my personality was kind of formed in in opposition to his you know i prefer being control i don't like not the drugs you know very minimal drinking and just to so many other ways i mean he was a very typically masculine macho guy.

thompson hunter charles monroe cain
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For myself and my kids that my daughter forgot that look at the house but also had the 16th sense of guilt distraught look close to ride of its motions who will save who was not tell us the footsie by the end of the day find out the dad was one of the six victims um and as you would make it pardeep colleague his father was shot on august 5th 2012 that was the day a forty year old white man wade michael page attacks the sick temple in oak creek wisconsin he killed six people including parties father my in the aftermath party tried to process what had happened and as it happens he's actually a trauma therapist himself so he knows something about facing pain and he wound of reaching out and this extraordinary way to a former white supremacist a guy named arnaud michaelis who's one of the original founders of the hate group that the temple shooter belongs to arnotts had left that world but it's time he was spending a lot of time as an antinazi trying to deep program young skinheads and so two months after the massacre these two men met at a local thai restaurant and they talk for hours charles monroe came ask them to tell their story party you reached out to earner on a few months after the massacre why no one word answers understanding i think a lot of times we do things and we think that we understand and we take stuff as gospel as far as like somebody telling us something and we echo chamber ourselves we build silos from these echo chambers and we we do this subconsciously that it was very important for me to reach out to somebody who can give me the authenticity that this tragedy deserved i wanted to reach out to understand and i also had a feeling that arlow had the same feelings that i did and so i believe in that spirit and i reached out donnellan and i met at the restaurant and i definitely got a better understanding of why the shooter did what he he did but more importantly than that i again a friend that.

arnaud michaelis arnotts charles monroe arlow wade michael oak creek wisconsin forty year two months
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It mean weather happens on a human scale weektoweek month to month but climate climate hoosen's centuries and millennia it's a whole different time scale charles monroe came recently walk through a new exhibition of work by come bui ulji me he's a new yorkbased artist whose work is all about getting us to think differently about time if we can talk about time deep time is a whole nother beats everything of geologic time that's a whole nother bees you know when you have your first case tomba's and move at the time niche o'clock tells you should move when you are in solitary tom does not move at the same time that you're o'clock tells you was shared time is not actually something that is innate in our existence but is something that is fluid is created is malleable is interrupting two so i'm looking at a walk in feet tall as a bunch of different digital clocks of photos it from your family your past two found photos and behind it is stars in small blinking different times it almost made me it relaxes me pledged almost like i see this amish doesn't matter leka in ah you know if the if the sun is an orange the earth says many blocks away in the site the size of a pinhead and that's that's the case then wish trooper that don't we as pliuta dan hobeika saw galaxy how big is our universe and i think you know wearing and ran a gallon cheetah has say a bit less it consistently a begging stars in man claire each of those base ours have full planet and and you know the nab billions of galaxies sit so as you start to to see move out a decentralise is your your toil.

charles monroe tomba tom dan hobeika claire
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Also quite nice to yours unlike howdy also must might once house on the hunger and we found out that both he and his wife and that it is the movie that is something of an inspiration him we think up from this thing all white we got to stick together though we've got to have faith in each other and so in that movie and it's a wonderful like you see that the bailey savings and loan is this cornerstone in the community honest top to bottom out on what you walk along with plenty already and a half hour later you don't have to sign an accord on though you pay when you tell us okay so i think that that really does speak to to sort of the higher calling of banking in this country and it's funny because when the storm came out a number of reviewers made the point that know here's a film about a bag where the banks the good guy because i think we have grown accustomed to thinking of banks as these sort of pernicious the paties huge institutions that only care about the body steve james is a documentary filmmaker he made hoop dreams and the interrupters and he was talking was charles monroe cain about his new film abacus small enough to jail by the way abacus spent ten million dollars over five years to defend themselves and in the end the bank was acquitted of all charges if you wanna see the whole film you can find a link to it on our website at t t book dot poor so when you look at.

steve james charles monroe cain ten million dollars five years
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"No hello no jio cameron mathison the battle that was nica coasted them and this is her now ooh quite a change you're listening to singer nica costa and her ban doing a sound jacket npr's la studio nica got an early start in music when she was five years old she sang with don hope by nine she had a number one song and south america by ten she was a pop sensation in europe she went on to become britney spears opening act but that pop music is behind her now and she's doing something pretty different or in some ways very familiar necas father was frank sinatra's arranger sinatra was her godfather and she's gone back to her musical roots in her new album it's called nica and streams underneath and in between charles monroe came talked with there nick how would you describe this thing what is this thing this album this nikon strings underneath and in between thing like how would you describe it well it's a string quartet with a rhythm section for me it's kind of a full circle to where i started in dust historically you know kind of growing up with my dad and kind of doing homework in the orchestra paid and just being around those kind of performers you know like sammy davis and frank sinatra and kind of as a kid taking it for granted by a kind of sank in to my psyche so it's a very kind of comfortable place for me to be and i've always known i would kind of do this music at some point but it's not your gramoz class e record it's kind of it's got like a hump on it it every her have groove on it which is very me it's like standards but through my filter so well let's your one which looked here come rain or come shahr which to me is you kit for your version thank you thank you not colmes.

nica costa don hope pop music frank sinatra nikon sammy davis cameron nica america europe charles monroe five years
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Need to take others down to make themselves feel better but emily you and i know that this can be it could be dangerous isn't just a hurt fuelling i mean no no i get death threats all the time i've been getting death threats since i was thirteen years old and i just part of me just doesn't carry that you know the first time i got a threat that was like i'm going to put our your family and right they're dead bodies while i make you watch i was thirteen that freaked me out and what to do and i let it get to me was hard yeah i mean i could see what gets you because it's messed up it's so nice stuff the other thing is is that you know w empowerment as a muscle i was told that once in a sounds like you've been flexing and flexing or flexing their most of your quite the empowered woman but always seems like it's at a price is this whole thing worth it 100 percent every day you know i have made some of my best friends through this work all over the world as connected with women i've heard their stories and i've gotten to know these women from history in such a deep substantial way i've gotten to dig into their papers and their writings and the details of their stories their struggles and their triumphs and every day that inspires me more and more you know reading about the first women to go to medical school makes me really grateful for the place that i'm in right now it makes me want to study that much harder and it's a joy for me to share these stories with the world you know every time someone reid said and that makes my heart girl named and that was emily temple would she's a medical student at midwestern university near chicago which is talking to charles monroe came between classes from her car the most people can name at least one famous woman scientists someone like marie curie how about the other einstein albert's first wife mileva in next week's podcast extra we'll talk with marie benedict about her bestselling novel about malaysia einstein and in the meantime here's a preview in october 20th 1890s sex zurich switzerland squaring my shoulders and willing myself to be just a little taller than my regrettably tiny frame.

reid midwestern university chicago marie curie marie benedict emily emily temple charles monroe malaysia thirteen years 100 percent
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Science fiction writer david brand throughout this hour we've been talking about anger and the role it can play in achieving social change their yes hangar can separate us into partisan camps but he can also inspire is to work together to achieve amazing things writer michael eric dyson knows this first hand in his latest book tears we cannot stop reads as a call to action to many americans may told charles monroe came why he routed you wrote this for white america obviously it's in the title of the book um why well because i think when why people you know here about raise they think black people than i say let's talk about white people see our uncomfortable it is the mets our comfortable it is for us but you never think about that you never have to pull back the layers and think about what it means to be white and so i wanted to to address white roses 'cause if they don't change aim of them have mamathe black people can get converted and think about this in different ways it makes no difference on was brothers due to insist is due to she said if less they changer agus i should say i'm sorry unless we change i am i'm white what do you expect i want the conversation the start i wanna conversion factor the half and i want people's minds open i want them of think seriously about again angry get upset give mad get resent four but move and think about what this might mean in a for you to write a book like this when i looked through this i saw a lot of grief was this really painful for you to write extremely painful for me to rate it was painful because i had to dig beneath the objectivity of my scholarly craftsman vocation an come up with a personal voice something deep inside of me sleep partly my success has to do with keeping those feelings at bay getting a clinical distance between myself from.

david brand writer america mets michael eric dyson charles monroe
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Great set of thank you jacqueline what what does the title of your book and other brooklyn refer to so another brooklyn refers to a number of things first and foremost it's the brooklyn of another time the bushwick that is on the page here has changed drastically and it also refers to the girls looking for a way out exits from their current existence so so what was that time in brooklyn at in in the bushwick neighborhood a cell in the 1970s there was white flight going on white folks who are moving out to long island in queens up to west chester and black and latino people are moving in through the great migration and down through immigration then it settled into a black and latino neighborhood that was considered by people on the outside urban ghetto slum whatever the words of that period where and it was one of the things i wanted to explore and the book was gazing from the inside because so much of the narrative around the place at that time was an outsider gays and it wasn't our truth what was the neighborhood like when you lift there as a kid push week was amazing it was it was alive there were people coming back from vietnam so that was that kind of change stale as of course in know heroin because people path that back from vietnam sadly there are lots of kids in the neighborhood there was this freedom that we have because everyone rarely looked at out for each other so much fewer cars soap kids played in the streets and it was safe.

brooklyn bushwick bushwick neighborhood west chester vietnam heroin jacqueline
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was on the show he was there was going to him for the next audio you going to here scheduled yesterday to talk to us and he's back on heroin again so you asked me if i feel guilty i effective such household has switched the mood epa bit here for a minute because there is another aspect another place that is there is a mansion in town oh yeah it was built in the 1980s by none other than mike tyson it's a thirteen thousand square foot mansion fiftyeight swear acres mike tyson in town he did he lived there the my whole high school he lived there was fantastic and this was a crazy place this mansions godley goal jacuzzi through actual tigers that would crawl around in these pens real zebra carpeting it was it was so godley and over the top an armed security detail it was fantastic so what the mentioned like now just laker down it's abandoned covered even graffiti smashed windows but what happened was about a year ago this guy comes through town is evangelical guy and he buys it he's and billionaire and he buys at any donated donates it to the local ywca church called living word sanctuary they don't has one hundred forty members donate it's it to them and says god told me you should turn this to a mega church so my aisin's old mansion with its gold faucets and everything is now a mega church you're turning it into a right now so i met up with the pastor his name is nick diamant you and he gave me this amazing tour of their conversion of mike tyson's mansion so we had a grip all those off totally clean all these buildings got these garages painted the barns that's where the tiger benz wore right all the traffic does all my heavens look at the cages wow now obviously he.

heroin mike tyson windows godley
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Jess why did you want to go back and do this does this radio peace when my older brother joe was killed recently in a motorcycle accident and really got me thinking about my roots and i realized that i don't take care of my route generally give tree gets obvious water from the roots and that's what makes it grow i'm not growing from my rooms for me i realise i am from where i'm from and i'm tied to that and there's really nothing i can do about it other than to understand it did it change things for you to go back and do these interviews talked to people meet people you have an caught up with for years i think i romanticised them i have in the past of romanticised their poverty in the seventeen year old stealing pregnant and and the drug addiction in the alcoholism and the foreclosures once romanticised it it's not romantic at all i think when i went back i got a lot of empathy and i'll tell you one thing i saw and i saw this again and again especially in the men i saw me ooh i'll give you they have a mile crew k was kenny mike mark in me okay kenya might live right next door to me we are really close but a car together high school wished to hang on for our they were highest how hang out and we would just cruising crews crews listen ecdc so we just had become really really good friends and i realize when i was home interested in my relatives privacy them in their thirty years so wooded what are they like now mike was like sutu taurean why is really really smart perfect in he was talking but as grants his ramzi yadransky asleep while he was granted in kenny you know kenny works out all the time he's got a six pack but he lives in his montana else does he have a chance he does he works parttime at a um a mix flowerpots plastic flower pot factory the time i was.

Jess joe kenny mike mark kenya montana ramzi yadransky seventeen year thirty years
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Do you remember the day your dad lost his job i do i do i mean i remember listening to my mom and dad and my mom crying thinking she was going to lose the house i say and a half saves you lose the house poppa i love i'm he went out he painted houses are my neighbors you know a lot of them were to general motors they hired my dad to paint the inside of their houses the outside of their house is they put his name down and general motors so people that were there would higher hindu pain yeah what was that like what was it like for you then grisly you've he just didn't know any different you know i mean it just i didn't know we were dirt poor you know i didn't know they my dad was taking food stamps or anything i no clue because i we stood at the store with them and then it got to the point now you've had a stayhome home no you can't come to the store going into the store by myself you know you didn't nobody was his embarrassment you know that that's what happened you know you went for making thirty dollars an hour to now you're peyton houses for fifty is funny i wonder if they know like if those men know that we respect them for the hard work were at that time and you never heard him from playing never heard any he just you know he did it and then you know by mom for the first time actually went had to go get a job now she had never worked essay my mom she gotta i'm she worked at kmart yet my marked at murphy murray dad i remember that actually at like it's like maybe she was it here charles what were these factories closed and and what do you remember about when you data must as cia well the big one was copper wealth steel and the and republic still there the two big factors but then they made a stool for cars was the gm factory in the van hustle factory but then of course the tire factory in akron here by and whole things connected right and once the steel fell apart everything fell apart it's happened like there was one we were reading were seventeen thousand men lost a job in one day boom.

the house general motors food stamps kmart cia akron stayhome charles gm thirty dollars one day
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from npr news in washington on giles snyder fire officials in california now say at least forty people have been killed by those fast moving wildfires in the northern part of the state as high winds push flames closer to homes and force more people to evacuate in pierce david schaper is insufficient accounting where the winds are spreading flames the areas that had not been threatened by the fires before the wayne started picking up in the early morning hours saturday at as it is very hard and there's a pretty good for aren't going out in the field right now cal fire operations chief steve crawford says several fires in cinema county flared up and change direction he says it's a big setback after significant progress was made in containing the fires now removing anchorage because of the wind event and and the wind pushing nieto who pushing the fire a time that i'm losing agrees with burning agreed i'm i'm not as move there was yet california authorities say there are now more than ten thousand firefighters battling these wildfires including many with come from other states in canada david schaper npr news in santa rosa calif california governor jerry brown is calling the wildfires one of the greatest tragedy says state has ever faced brown of the state's two us senators visited the fire zone yesterday authorities have not determined how the fires were sparked but power lines down by strong winds are seen as a possibility the death toll in this weekend's truck bomb blast in the somalian capital mogadishu is rising as rescuers continued to search for survivors of the rubble officials now say more than 50 people were killed and scores injured somalia's government blaming the alqaedalinked alshabab extremist group were setting up the truck bomb outside a hotel another bomb went off a couple of hours later in a different part of the city austrians voting today the elections have poll suggests could shift the country to the right and hand power to a thirty one year old man who would be europe's youngest leader emburey seraya sarhadi nelson as in vienna she reports of vote is being held a year ahead of scott joel after the current centrist coalition government called it quits opinion polls here show the austrian people's party of foreign ministers.

mogadishu sarhadi nelson canada giles snyder npr scott joel vienna europe somalia washington jerry brown santa rosa nieto steve crawford wayne david schaper california thirty one year
"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"charles monroe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Quite a change you're listening to singer nica costa and her band doing a sound jacket npr's ally studio nica got an early start in his ex when she was five years old she sang with don howe by nine she had a number one song in south america by ten she was a pop sensation in europe she went on to become britney spears opening act but that pop music is behind her now and she's doing something pretty different or in some ways very familiar leka's father was frank sinatra's arranger sinatra was her godfather and she's gone back to her musical roots in her new album it's called nica and strings underneath and in between charles monroe came to talk to them nick our describe this thing what is this thing this album this weekend strings underneath and in between thing like how would you describe it well it is string quartet with rhythm section for me it's kind of a full circle to where i started in just historically you know kind of growing up with my dad and kind of doing homework in the orchestra paired and just being around those kind of performers you know like sammy davis and rates now dan kind of as a kid taking it for granted by a kind of sank in to my psyche so at the very kind of comfortable place for me to be and i've always known i we kind of do this music at some point but it's not your gramoz class e record it's kinda is got like a hump on it it every have groove on it which is very me it's like standards but through my filter so well let's hear one let's let's hear come rain or come shine which to me is you kick it a freer version thank you thank you.

nica costa south america pop music leka frank sinatra sammy davis don howe europe charles monroe five years