18 Burst results for "Charles Marie"

"charles marie" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

07:32 min | 2 months ago

"charles marie" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"A measure of human worth now. Does this the point. You're trying to make here. Is that none of these specific charitably coefficients of any individual psychological trait anything is a measure of the totality of human being a measure of the intrinsic. Worth of hamby. I yes definitely. And i and i would say further. We have to go beyond lip service to that idea. So when we're thinking about ways in which labor markets are structure in the ways in which educational systems restructure in ways in which we people have access to the ingredients of life. If we're saying that intelligence is not a measure of human worth than. I think we need to consider to. What extent is our society set up so that people regardless of how they end up in their measures of intelligence or jeans relevant to any specific skill have access to those ingredients of good life. We have to go beyond just saying that. We don't think that i q equals human worse. Actually reflecting that in how setup social structures. I was going to talk about that kind of in part to our conversation. But now you bring that up Maybe i'll just dive right into it. You know it's very interesting argument Because it seems to feels like it feels a little political if feel. Yeah that's right. I guess it's hard to it's just hard. There's no way around it of 'bout that philosophy of life you have about what what why were here on earth to help. Vulnerable seems to conflict with other political views Or even personal fos fees of what you know. We're here on earth do which some people might say. We're here on earth to develop our exit to all of our attention into developing our own personal. Excellence as much as possible and will have a trickle down effect on hoping the vulnerable. So how the world is once extricate. Where does the science you know. It's a real your i mean. I think you're picking on Interesting and valuable tension which is also related to like what is your role as scientists in science science communicator to be transparent about your own political values with which other people might agree So i think this project is very much coming from a space in which i have my personal political moral commitments in. I have a research career around studying. Genetic differences in relation to social bureau comes. And i know from experience that intuitively those two things which seem really coherent lee connected in my own mind. Strike other people as wildly unintuitive right. Like what do you mean you are a gala -tarian. Hey geneticist. i really think of this project. As as saying you visit these are my. These are my got us. This is how i think. A science is consistent with that set of values. I think articulating. That is clearly can is important for helping shape the larger conversation that we need to have about how to use genetics. But i don't think that anyone scientific finding commits you to anyone political ideology or moral ideology So guy walking line. I don't know how successful book of trying to say this is how i make sense of this. Given what i find arguable about giving my moral frameworks and you might not share them. But there's relatively few voices that articulating how these how these things together. So maybe you'll learn something from the interpretation of the science or from the way. I see the role of human affairs that might expand the kind of space conversation that we have right now. Look you bring a fresh perspective of this topic. There is no doubt about it. I in my own kerr like gift. I tried to be as impartial as possible in the sense that i tried to present all the evidence and say well. What does it all mean. What kind of lay it all out on the table for all to look at and say okay. What do we make of the truth now. And so i really respect and like what you're doing because i get a similar sense Even even if we don't necessarily agree one hundred percent with the politics of it i would say That you're a really important A balancing force for for the study of behavioral genetics in spanish particularly the people in the general public who take the behavioral genetics findings. And then start to use it for their own political purposes and along those lines it would be impossible not to mention charles marie belco. You're sick of talking about that. But i'm sure you're sick of it but we would be remiss not to mention that because i feel like if it's a seesaw The cease the seat and the see-saw part on the right is the link between behavioral genetics. Research being used to discuss The futility of certain programs and The the left see-saw being Just like your view which is is not the opposite. It's just a balance of of look. There is there is stuff we can do. Yeah i actually in a see-saw around social social intervention psychological interventions educational intervention. I actually. i'm not even on the see-saw like i'm trying to. You know introduced a new dimension to this conversation. You know. I really feel like most of the back and forth has been people one group of people saying because things are genetic genetic or heritable some measuring inequality is inevitable and our social programs are sort of destined to failure in another group pushing back against fat in saying Obviously we can. Intervene and genetics are distraction from now. They're either immoral distraction or resource distraction. Or they're just like undermining support for this let's like minimize where were point is i do think interventions can be successful but figuring out where to intervene that's gonna be. The most effective is really really hard to do. As a scientific problem politics a morality aside like just as social science problem designing successful interventions is designing successful interventions dot are preferentially benefiting people who were most vulnerable rather than the carnivore matthew facts. You don't really really hard problem. And so it's not genetics. As a distraction from social policy or genetics has a limit on the effectiveness of social policy but genetics is a tool for social policy. Which i think is perspective. That's really been missing in most of our conversations for decades at this point. Yeah.

hamby charles marie belco lee matthew
"charles marie" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

James Wilson Institute Podcast

04:40 min | 3 months ago

"charles marie" Discussed on James Wilson Institute Podcast

"I knew. We'd be doing substantive things. The surprise was the podcasts. That was not mentioned. Until i remember. I hopefully remained calm on the exterior but in my head of oh my god. I'm not. I'm not qualified for this. At all turned out of is fine. And i loved doing it and i learned a lot from reading josh hammer who i now follow on twitter judiciously. Making sure i'm keeping up with the writing he's doing and then also the doctor. Charles marie book so there was that and then the other one is the the move because that made by commute a bit more difficult. But i any time you you took it all in stride because sean had a shorter commute at a longer commute as well. That's the thing. I don't even care about the commute. I actually doesn't want surprises. I like taking public transportation and i. I don't mind him. i love. This is my first office job. And i love. It's been great being in the office and understanding kind of the office culture. We break conversations over lunch and in meetings and kind of just the conversational flow talking to dan. Just yesterday about Literature english and russian literature does a total aside. But that's that's something that you get an intangible in person internship in an office and i was great but you know getting getting here early in the morning staying late doing my own things just being in the office environment and the commute. All that comes with this was the summer of the podcast and the essay for makes sitting and listening to podcasts on the rides out listening to music doing readings um made good use of the time but it was. It was a pleasant surprise in that way too. So what was if you had to look back now. What was the most memorable. Part of your experience. Sean so i would have to cheating. Go to different finances. The has to be Interactions with the festival gifts. When he goes into the office and walks in talks to you. he doesn't ask you What do you think of the weather. Today he pulls out a passage of his new spoken. Ask you what do you think of this or ask you about some latest news story and asked an genuinely ass thoughts it which is crazy that preeminent scholar days asking some twenty year. Old of twenty-one doesn't have a bachelor's degree like what does he think about the latest passage of his book of such He's also just Something about that generation of people were they always have some stoli for anything..

josh hammer Charles marie sean twitter dan Sean
"charles marie" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

03:59 min | 4 months ago

"charles marie" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"Baron cohen was doing that and then he switched over to bruno. Like there's a lot of people who still didn't know what you know borat was certain places you could go. That have no idea who eli. Roth is because there is such a huge kind of like you said global conspiracy behind the scene just also with a camera like you can go. Paul hilton was charles marie. Line of his footage waiting interview that he did did make the movie. Paul hilton in serbia was in getting a lot of the stuff. Where you have the bulldozers dumping the sharks and then the footage that he got is just. It's unbelievable so what we would do is have different people in different parts of the world around the globe. Going doing the work and doing the interviews. We'd have like a shark os or something. It's narcos we have people around the goal is to track people around the world that are doing it and what's the progress in. Who are the politicians that are on our side who are the politicians blocking at which companies are pro. You know helping save sharks in which companies are like screw it. They're good ingredients. So it's it's kind of keeping those people on notice. You can't use the element of surprise anymore. Nor would i but. I think that you know having show that put constant pressure on the train and constantly raises. Awareness is something. I really love to looking at now last two questions. What is the scene that leaves lasting impression in your mind when you're talking about fin or maybe your favorite scene or something along those lines. Probably my favorite scene was when i was in boston and I was at the sharp kill tournament and the guy was bragging about how we use circle hooks in there so safe pop right out of the shark's stomach. And then they pulled a mako and the lisa from no uh stuff the maker because this is entirely infected and she she's like there's a foreign object inside the shock stomach. This thing's going to slowly dying kind of open. What is it. it's a circle hook. And i look at gynecology. So what kind of circle signing does i. It's a circle. Hook is at the one that you said. That one pops out right is that same when it goes Just it's like he ran his mouth and then it was like god. It was amazing it was like to have it sets when you feel like the universe is looking out for you. And here's this guy talking about how sharks don't get hurt because we use the circle hook they pull up this beautiful pour mako shark sites it open and its stomach is running because of circle hook i was like god sent me that sharp to film it but yeah jerry mean i was like. There's someone in the universe that's like he got. And i said you know at this one maker chartres. This one. Mako shark will not go to. Your death will not be in vain. I remember thinking this shark was sent to me from some divine spirit. Saying here you go. This is the moment you couldn't planet. Were perfectly this guy literally says it. The shark shows up. It's killed invites completely infected inevitable from the circle huggins on camera just with absolutely no at finishing wherever i was like that that to me was like one of those divine moments that makes the whole movie worth it and then yeah and then being on that boat that mormon that freezer limit i started having a heart attack and we had to. We had to get the hell out of there that one walk of climbing out of the freezer from the freezer to the thing with all the fishermen screaming and we it's almost like we like cutting the cameras filmed them like. We had to like actually hold the cameras way like it was. It was really was terence by you. Know we got it. Got it though. Yeah and last question for you. Do you think there's a chance that this can can be abolished like you mentioned. Save the whales and the whales congress saluting absolutely. I think that the shark industry wants you to feel helpless. The shark it's really not. I mean it completely can be reversed but only can be reversed if we really all stop the trade in we stop the trade by stop buying it dumped by the sharp pills. Don't buy the shark meat. Look at your products and see if it has squalene that a shark river. Oil demand tweet. The company's posed them face demand that they used plant based squally and then go to fin the movie dot com. I put a button right at the top. Same right It's.

Paul hilton Baron cohen charles marie borat bruno eli Roth serbia sharks boston huggins jerry heart attack terence congress
The Hippie Trail Killer Charles Sobhraj

Serial Killers

03:17 min | 1 year ago

The Hippie Trail Killer Charles Sobhraj

"Nineteen seventy four, thirty year, old Charles Sobhraj had an international rap sheet that would make any con artists blush. He committed grand theft auto and France smuggled black vehicles into Bombay oath thousands to Macau's casinos and robbed a jewelry store and telly. Perhaps. Worst of all Charles tricked his half brother Andre into switching places with him abandoning him to eighteen years of hard labor. Charles was a manipulator of the highest order and he was only shot just getting started after his escape from a Turkish prison. Charles made his way back to Southeast Asia from there, he concocted a scheme to con people out of their money and identities. Charles, stationed himself along the HIPPIE trail, a tourist laden road between Thailand and Turkey because he was half Indian and half Vietnamese he easily blended in and could pose a helpful local. He often claimed to be a gem dealer or photographer and offered his services to help guide Western tourists. Once he gained their trust, he robbed them blind or convinced them to smuggle precious gems for him. For over a year Charles Rome to Southeast Asia perfecting his scams and in May of nineteen seventy five, he was in northern India carrying out his usual scheme on some French tourists when he met a young Canadian woman who would change everything. Twenty, nine year old marie-andree. Leclair was French Canadian and had never traveled outside of her country. But when she arrived in India, she was delighted to meet a man who introduced himself as a long goatee. Along was really Charles who used his fluency in French to Charles Marie and convince her he was a famous photographer. Charles Pursued Marie suddenly at first coming across us a mysterious rogue adventurer then to Marie, it seemed like he wasn't entirely interested. So of course, she fell head over heels in love with him. When her vacation eventually came to a close Charles asked her to stay and travel with him through Thailand but Marie used she had a life back home in Canada once in Quebec. However, Marie couldn't stop thinking about the mysterious along she wondered if she should have prolonged her travels and as she felt the weight of regret, a slew of love letters from her dashing prints made up her mind. Convinced. He was the one Marie flew back to meet Charles in. August of Nineteen, seventy five. She was completely devoted to him and completely unaware of his criminal past or his criminal present for that matter. That Fall Charles Marie were in Thailand spending time in the coastal town of Taya. But when they met a young Australian couple Charles knew it was the perfect opportunity to test Marie devotion to him. He Convinced Marie to help him drug their coconut milk when the tourists were knocked out Charles and Marie stole all of their belongings and ran by the time. The Australians Awoke Charles. Marie were Long Gone

Charles Charles Marie Charles Sobhraj Charles Rome Thailand Southeast Asia India Leclair Bombay French Canadian Theft Macau France Andre Turkey Canada Taya Quebec
"charles marie" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"charles marie" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Us at Adleman financial engines come see the services we can provide the two of you not only now but in the future when you're not there to help triple a plane wreck that's triple eight plan Rick or visit us online at Rick Adelman dot com that's right Stillman dot com I've never really opened up about how much I actually hate the dentist my spouse just doesn't get why I need this kind of dental care so embarrassed about being afraid of the dentist my the only one with this kind of fear where can I go to get everything done at once so I don't have to go to lots of different hi it's doctor rob doctor Devin I see patients like this every day who have just these thoughts hi it's Larry o'connor and I hear all of these concerns from our listeners I used to have similar worries until I too went to Bethesda sedation dentistry there's no place and no team like what you'll find at Bethesda sedation dentistry they've helped thousands and thousands with their dental fears and I know they can help you to give rocky a call it three oh one five threo twenty four thirty four or visit them online at the Festus sedation dentistry dot com three oh one five three oh twenty four thirty four or Bethesda sedation dentistry dot com Bethesda sedation dentistry sleep dream smile do you know when you should start taking social security should you pay off or keep your mortgage have you discussed qualified charitable distributions how much can you afford to spend in retirement hi I'm Simon Hamilton co hosted W. M. males wise investor show heard every Sunday morning from nine to ten AM we not only manage investments for our clients we help you make good decisions about your realistic an enjoyable retirement call eight six six seven five eight nine four seven three or log on to the wise investor group dot com resolved become a better informed why is investor news traffic weather and great gas weekday mornings on the mall W. and Charles Marie he.

"charles marie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

17:54 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Can see Charles Marie Hughes on stage at the Walter Kerr theatre in a flowing dress the flower in her hair as part of the band for the Tony Award winning musical Haiti's town and on Saturdays this month she has her own gig a residency at bar best the Brooklyn barn performance space in park slope every Saturday in January marica will be exploring unique fusion of folk jazz blues and soul traditions which she came to after years of purely classical training at places like Juilliard I think you've heard of it it is a surprise you start with classical music her grandfather was the renowned twentieth century cellist Emmanuel fireman marica has performed recorded with d'angelo Whitney Houston Mary J. Blige David Byrne Lou Reed ani DiFranco and a whole bunch of other artists she's released two solo albums on her own and one with her band bottom heavy and today marica Hughes is in our studio into the company by pianist Matt ray who by the way is also the composer for Taylor Max upcoming play the fray at the fleet welcome to all of it thank you so you're gonna start us off with the song what we going to hear first America we're going to play a tune I wrote called flow where he is and that's America Hughes on shallow and that rate on a piano when did you first pick up a cello wow you know I started the violin actually when I was three and I played for nine years and I was of quite an accomplished young little violinist and then I there was a shell of the in the the the Carnegie Hall there were all these shops in the studios at Carnegie Hall and most of heavy had been a student of my grandfather and he had a shop there and he was a telecine at all these tell if chill is hanging on the wall and when I was twelve I was there with my mom for some reason and I just basically just try one and he took one of the wall and I played the the Lucy string and I felt it vibrating inside us like mommy I wanna play the cello she was like no and anyway I convinced her to let me start playing the cello and for the first year I had to play both she was like play keep playing violent start the cello and at the end of the year we'll make it you can make a decision and I knew the whole time that I was gonna put a chill but I just appease her for that year and I quite so by twelve I was legit playing the cello now we only performing classical music at that point totally I mean I grew my parents had a jazz club on the Upper West Side I was growing up in nineteen eighty two eighty six or seven was called Burgundy and I grew up with that music that is sort of like my spirit music I think is how I have come to understand it in my life but as a player at that time especially I was strictly class I no idea that I would ever do anything else musically so you're studying classical music but you're surrounded by jazz in your home and your parents profession how was being surrounded by jazz what was the impact on your learning classical music or the way you approach classical music you know it's interesting at that time when I was still studying they were very desperate I didn't have I didn't make a connection and I never even considered at that time of the nineteen eighties there weren't as many cellists as examples that were doing this kind of genre breaking stuff so I just it never even crossed my mind spins in nobody suggested to suggested it to me at the time so it wasn't until I moved to California in my early twenties to the bay area that I somehow just fell into the meeting different musicians were string players especially Carla kills there was somebody I met there and was she was already experimenting and extraordinary improviser and a classical traditional player so it was there that I started to make this transition what was that moment like when you figure it out that you could connect the world and that the world didn't have to be in their own silos it was exciting and horrifying because being a classical player there are so many rules and strict ways of doing things and we know what we're gonna play before we play it always that's exactly what's on the page and you're trying to honor the comp composer and having to sit down and play something having no idea where it's coming from felt like magic and a mystery to me at the time and it took a long I still feel like it's something I'm learning to do with the for like a second language although I'm now speaking my first language maybe with a little bit of an axe so it's it's changed my life and I'm so grateful that that time happened at the patients the people around me had to take me under their wing and teach me in I learned on the job for the most part I feel like my guess is cellist marica Hughes so I'll let alone is about you also you also saying I do yes when did you start to think of yourself as a singer as well well president because I I still I think of myself as a cellist two things I'm not a I'm hired as a cellist and then like when I work with the dean of men sell like I sang with her because she needed a chalice and it happened that I also think that that was great I'm rarely hired is just a singer but it was really in the bay area I connected with somebody named Julie Eisenberg who the dear beloved friend and beautiful beautiful composer and singer and another friend and told her that she heard me humming in her car and she needed a singer so she called me was like can you come thing with me and that's when I really start to sing it for real real and professionally and in front of people and gigs and stuff so when did you decide sounds like California was really a place we had a lot of epiphanies that you really grew and you really got to experiment but then you came back home what made you want to come back to the east coast there were a lot of things you know the early days in the nineties in San Francisco for me I was in my early mid twenties and it was a really fertile creative place and as the years went by people were sort of spreading out that I have been working with a lot of people came to New York and at that time about how long ago was that maybe thirteen or so years ago I felt like I needed to be pushed a little bit more than I felt like I was there at the time and I wanted to be re inspired and it was literally just I remember I was walking to a gig at Joe's pub and I was on second Avenue downtown and just from one step to the next I was like oh I'm going to move back home and then I did it with there if I wanted to be pushed and inspired and hit back I also wanted to come home you have this residency in bar bands you're about halfway through what is it that you like about performing in that space is a really cool space I love barbets it's tiny Olivier who is the owner of by best he's created something so special and I think I have an affinity also because it's a local performance based kind of like what I grew up in very small and intimate and it's a place where you he lets us whoever he plays a we can do whatever we want to experiment and if you get thirty people in my bed you can feel like a sold out Madison Square Garden and acts like packed and it's hot and sticky and it's a place where I can also play acoustically a lot which I really enjoy often amplified in bigger spaces and it's really nice feel to play the cello as it was built to be play there's I enjoy all the other things they do but to return to an acoustic sound there is always really special to me and I can listen differently and I can play differently because of the way the sound is coming out of the cello and it's just it's a neighborhood spot you know and it's I play at six o'clock so especially in January people sort of fatigue from all the excitement of the holidays it's like a nice way to sort of chill out on a Saturday night and people come I know people I don't know common then you carry on into the night what is it that you wanted to explore you said a live a let you do what whatever it is you want what was on your mind what was in you that you wanted to just kind I try out this January this January because of Haiti's town I had less time this year to write I didn't spend as much time writing as I have in the past and I wrote to him and asked if I could come back before I had figured out what he wanted to do and then I realized that I wanted to do covers and there's so many people friends of mine particularly who are professionals out here doing their thing whose songs I love and I decided there plenty of beautiful songs already here and I'll learn some of those songs that I've been listening to a friends of mine like Jonas policewoman or Christina cordon or morally and I love being able to sing my friend's phone for file so that's what we're doing a lot of this month and that will be Saturday nights it for the rest of January up our best at six PM you mentioned Haiti's town you can associate with Haiti's down for awhile for a long time tell us about your initial initial encounter with it and then what it's like now to be on Broadway well initially toxic of who's who is one of the arrangers of all of the band and a producer he we were together for years in the bay area in the nineties and early two thousands and then when I moved home to New York he called me and asked me to come and play on the recording session I was like okay you know we went to book a recording and that was the original Haiti's town concept album and we did and you know it was beautiful music and it was really fun people I knew and then it was years later three years ago that he called again and was like do you member that concept album well now it's gonna be a theatrical production and I'm putting together the band and I love you to be in it so that was the band that got started with Haiti's town at New York theater workshop and then just a year ago we got the call that it was actually going to Broadway and so it's the same band from New York their workshop that's on Broadway and we're none of us had ever done Broadway before we're all like band leaders and sort of more downtown type folks and so it's been really fun for all of us to be in that building and to get to know this culture of work which is very new to all of us I'm going to the same place every day in doing the same thing every day there are lot of world improvisers so it's been in learning experience and something I really I've come to love I like the vocational aspect of it like you get there and say hi to the Brandon is at the door to see Kevin the week man like I like that part of it you see your team yeah now that date last night you know and it's great it is time you know people that come to hear it and see it are really excited to be there were very lucky to have full houses and people who are happy to be there when Andrea shields walks out that we all stumble out he gets a roaring applies every night and it's thrilling to be of the play to people who are excited to be there and you were part of the show the man is right there on the stage just not it's it's integral to the experience and it's yeah I like being on stage I have to say it's really fun I did get in I can see some of the audience and I had always fun to watch people watching the show and it's wonderful to watch all the actors on stage because there's so many little details that they change looks people give each other the audience can see and it's it's a thrill I have to say I'm I'm surprised how much I'm enjoying it and grateful yeah my guest is America Hughes the cellist we play another song first America absolutely we're gonna play a song I'm along the lines of these covers I've been looking at this is a song by Christina cordon who's a beautiful violinist and composer and singer and she's also a sub on violin at Haiti's town and I heard this song of hers maybe fifteen years ago and fell in love with it and was very happy to get to know it this is someone like you by Christina cordon one two three one that is three thirty and you to said to and the from the we we yeah well and some so someone and we.

Charles Marie Hughes Walter Kerr theatre Tony Award Haiti Brooklyn
"charles marie" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

06:01 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on 790 KABC

"And get twenty five percent off a fantastic deal for all of the Shapiro lovers in your life daily where not com slash guest go check it out right now Charles Marie so that's a very let's talk for a second about the the media at getting it wrong when it comes to how they depict trump supporters one of the things that I found so puzzling and you see it with Krugman here is the suggestion that if you are from red state if you are from supporter then you are by nature more religious than a Democrat and that if you are a trump supporter and your religious then it can't be your religion that is leading to your poverty right that there really is you it is that in other words it is red state social policy that leads to poverty and not the lack of economic movements that leads to people's siding with trump out of the sort certain level of despair yeah you have a very different situation reality from the the caricature the caricature is all smart people are getting more and more secular and it's only the dumb working class people who are still religious not true you have in the first place all much less secularization in the middle class and upper middle class then you have either in the elites or that you have in the working class and the working class you have now had a drop in religiosity and again I'm using specifically numbers for flights because I don't want people to confuse this with racial issues among white working class you're now down to about twelve percent who go to church regularly down from about a third of the population forty fifty years ago to the point that the the role that religion formerly played in cooling communities together has pretty much evaporated in working class communities is still strong and in the middle class in both red states and blue states alike the idea that this is a red state phenomenon and grounded religiosity is idiotic in Brooklyn also makes the point in this not very good column that that the blue state mortality rates trend toward Europe that Europe has not experienced the same level of suicidality an opioid epidemic anything like that the reality of course the Europe has been a lot more secular for a lot longer than the United States that as you say this top down anti religious secularist culture has laid down and it doesn't the the rain doesn't fall and everybody equally if you if you tend to be lower income you don't have a lot of social institutions to back you up anyway if you're not if you're in a social club that is based on where you went to college if you don't have sort of an air stats social fabric provided by your kids private school well then it is likely that the decline of religion in those areas will disproportionately affect you and make you more visible lead to more depression leads more suicide we more opioid epidemic in the in specifically those areas that need religion the most yeah but but imho another thing I think that then you need people need to understand is we don't divide by states if you look at the white working class in California blue state in New York blue state you will find in those in those parts of California and those parts of the of New York exactly the same phenomenon do you find in rural Kansas similarly if you go to the red states and you go to urban areas in which you have smaller numbers of working class people you will find the kinds of numbers in red states the Krugman is applauding in blue states you've got to segregate and states are not the way to go noticing the Charles Marie WH Brady scholar at the American enterprise institute a final question for you Charles if you're going to solve all of this where do you start you start with the economics or you start with the social policy I've always been of the view that social policy is easier to deal with in some ways and hard to deal with obviously top down social policy is difficult things while the bleedin but at least you're talking that individual choices you're talking about the ability of somebody to change the church they go to or to get married rather than having a kid out of wedlock that's all on you it's something you can do today as opposed to a broad economic changes banning self driving cars changing our trade policy and that sort of thing it seems like our political class are utterly on interested in the cultural conversation they're much more interested in the economic conversation because it provides a political quick fix that I don't think it's going to work where where should we start well we start with the elites in this country who talk about flyover country who talk about rednecks and look with contempt upon ordinary Americans getting out of their bubbles actually interacting with people in the country and starting to understand that the folks out there that they despise are competent good people that they ought to be embracing his fellow Americans that is shorthand for much longer answer Ben we have a cultural divide which has produced the trump presidency because of the extremely accurate perception of a great many people in this country that the people who run the country holding them in contempt that has to stop and that can only stop with the lead some cells let's Charles Marie means nothing run off campus is he's writing intelligent Avenue Giles I really appreciate your time his his newest book is coming out in a little bit it's called human diversity I look for to have you back on then the book we're talking about here is coming apart which is largely ignored by the chattering class which is why they write stupid columns like Paul Krugman thanks much for your time really appreciate it my pleasure we'll be right back with some more of the best interviews of twenty nineteen this is the Ben Shapiro show Hey ABC dependable traffic right now severe traffic jam in west Covina sent freeway eastbound via Verde injury crash as we've been reporting three lights are blocked traffic is bumper to bumper from Grand Avenue west bound side also slow going silmar getting rid of an accident you can freeway westbound a former place three cars right shoulder and in Burbank one thirty four freeway westbound past past Avenue accident right lane blocked their.

Charles Marie Shapiro
"charles marie" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"An end to this violence well then whether or not it's fair he's going to have to answer those questions it's also worth noting that last week we asked whether president trump's racial resentment rhetoric was a political issue for Republicans now I have to ask whether it's harsh words are actually inspiring violence but he has used his megaphone his platform as a means to enable and encourage a lot of that side of public discourse and he bears the responsibility there's an eerie similarity between what we're seeing with white hate radicalization and Islamic violent extremist radicalization to jihad and they see and the president they aim mentor or a similar figure to that type of Muslim cleric that calls people to violence and jihad how can we bludgeon trump on the back of a tragedy I was sick these people become Daniels newsradio nine twenty one oh four seven FM here's what's happening reports of a person with a gun at the U. S. A. today headquarters in northern Virginia appear to be mistaken the reports prompted some evacuations in a massive police response including a swat team no plea in court today from the man police say sexually assaulted a Michigan team forty three year old Charles Marie and see faces four counts of third degree.

trump president Virginia Charles Marie Daniels Michigan forty three year
"charles marie" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Into this violence and whether or not it's fair he's going to have to answer those questions it's also worth noting that last week we asked whether president trump's racial resentment rhetoric was a political issue for Republicans now I have to ask whether it's harsh words are actually inspiring violence he has used his megaphone his platform as a means to enable and encourage a lot of that side of public discourse and he bears the responsibility there's an eerie similarity between what we're seeing with white hate radicalization and Islamic violent extremist radicalization to jihad and the city and the president a a mentor or a similar figure to that type of Muslim cleric that calls people from violence and she hot how can we bludgeon trump on the back of a tragedy I was sick these people become Daniels newsradio nine twenty one oh four seven FM here's what's happening reports of a person with a gun at the U. S. A. today headquarters in northern Virginia appear to be mistaken the reports prompted some evacuations in a massive police response including a swat team no plea in court today from the man police say sexually assaulted a Michigan team forty three year old Charles Marie and see faces four counts of third degree.

trump president Virginia Charles Marie Daniels Michigan forty three year
"charles marie" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Requires men to plunge into a world that is unmapped, unknown. Only anecdotal and ruled by Spain. Larry Ferraro is the book is the author of this book measure of the earth, and Larry has listed, Gordon, as the French leader of the expedition, but two men are very critical to the success Larry, who is locked Lacan law, calm demeanor, and who is Luke air on this ship that sales from France to, to South America with go. Dan was Charles Marie Laconda mean who was who was better known as an adventurer than as a scientist. He made his name famous in part by winning a lottery. In fact, rigging it so that he won. And of greater perhaps greater. Import is that he made not only himself with rich, but a well known member of society, Voltaire very rich. He was a he was well known in the social circles. And when you compare that with his companion peer bogere, it's quite a contrast and amazing that they became friends Bulgaria was a child genius. Literally, a professor at the age of sixteen and had been teaching people for twenty years, and one little corner of France when he was also selected for this mission. So on the French side, you had three scientists each of whom had completely different temperaments. And as I mentioned, led by a person who whose idea of leadership was essentially barking orders, onto other ships heading out across the Atlantic. There were two Spanish officers. They were named hor K Kwan and. Tonio date yellow and although they were junior officers they literally just come out of their academy training. They were aged nineteen and twenty two. They would become the glue that would hold this expedition together. The expedition sales it reaches the what, what is now the Panama, they have to cross it, it takes a year from sailing. This is this is travel in the early eighteenth, century. When the maps were largely blank takes them year to reach the royalty of new Granada with their equipment. They have a lots of incidents and scenes on the way including adventures, being accused of being smugglers. They reached what is now Ecuador on the coast, and they have to travel inland. Overland Ecuador is well, it's called the vice royalty of new Granada, but the town, they're going to his Kito, which at this point was a chiefly jazz Jesuits with the governance and the landowners. And then the Indians the native Americans who had been dramatically drastically pandemic reduced in the previous centuries because of diseases from Europe, Larry at one point estimates, ninety percent of the population have been. Reduced in this area over the previous two centuries. So the Indians were reduced. But that is that is those are the people they called upon to travel, they arrive in Kito, and what is significant about their basic Kito. What does it look like at that time, there was a small city for the Spanish empire? It was it, it stood about still today stands about one hundred and fifty miles inland from the coast. It's on the chain of, of mountains in the Andes, which is at composed in almost entirely volcanoes in that in that point. And that part being on the equator the, the land is quite rich. It's green all year round in fact, in Spanish, it's called ky-ko Nevada today, which means evergreen keep Kito. But to get there as you had mentioned was quite an arduous trip. They were over twenty people in the entire expedition. If you count all the assistance, and servants and slaves so taking that many people. On ocean up rivers across the Andes with probably ten tons of cargo eat all of which had to be carried by hand over mule trails that were seven inches wide was quite arduous and the, the, the scientific equipment, which was very delicate manage to get their intact. When they arrived, they had expected. Everybody in, in Kito, who had received orders from the Spanish king to greet them to house them to give the money. The problem was that they had not really prepared very well. And so they thought they had sufficient funds, when they got to keep though, they almost broke, and they had no way of getting additional money to carry out the expedition right grants. Weren't available at this time. And so there's a good deal of ingenuity, as they meet the society of Kito, which is suspicious you understand the inquisition is still on everywhere. These could be spies. You know, you could be at war with France. Spain any moment anytime. And in fact, you will be again, so we're looking at a world of mystery in which in which legend and superstition dominate. And also, the juicy the church is very, very suspicious all the time of so-called scientific men, all of the and Kito has no law enforcement murders a routine their slaves. In fact, at one point, a slave is murdered. No one has ever arrested or even pursued there's governance questions in Kito, but they're there and it takes them a year to organize a for the beginning of the expedition. And when we come back, the triangles of, of Peru, the triangles of what is now Ecuador, and how they actually constructed the measurement of, of a of latitude, Larry Ferraro is the author measure of the earthy enlightenment expedition that.

Kito Larry Ferraro France Ecuador Spain Andes Atlantic Granada South America Lacan scientist Dan Charles Marie Laconda Bulgaria Peru K Kwan Panama professor Europe
"charles marie" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"John batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show were setting sail for the equator of the year. Seventeen thirty five it requires men to plunge into a world that is unmapped, unknown. Only anecdotal and ruled by Spain. Larry Ferrara is the book is the author of this book measure of the earth. And Larry has listed Gardanne as the French leader of the expedition, but two men are very critical to the success. Larry, who is locked calmed, a Lacan domain, and who is on the ship that sailed from France to, to South America with go. Dan was Charles Marie villa Kanda mean who was who was better known as an adventurer than as a scientist? He made his name famous in part by winning a lottery. In fact, rigging it so that he won. And of greater perhaps greater import is that he made not only himself with rich, but a well known member of society, Voltaire very rich. He was a he was well known in social circles. And when you compare that with his companion peer bogere, it's quite a contrast in amazing that they became friends Bulgaria was child genius literally, a professor at the age of sixteen and had been teaching people for twenty years, and one little corner of France when he was also selected for this mission. So on the French side, you had three scientists each of whom had completely different temperaments. And as I mentioned, led by a person who whose idea of leadership was essentially barking orders, onto other ships heading out across the Atlantic what, there were two Spanish officers. They were named. Whore cake one and Tonio date, we owe and although they were junior officers they literally just come out of their academy training. They were aged nineteen and twenty two they would become the glue that would hold this expedition together the expedition sales it reaches the what, what is now the Panama, they have to cross it, it takes them a year from sailing this, you know, this is travel in the early eighteenth century, when the maps were largely blank takes them year to reach the us. Royalty of ne- new Granada with their equipment. They have a lots of incidents and scenes on the way including adventures, being accused of being smugglers. They reached what is now Ecuador on the coast, and they have to travel inland. Overland Ecuador is well, it's called the vice royalty of new Granada, but the town, they're going to his Kito, which at this point was a chiefly jazz Jesuits with the governance. And the landowners. And then the Indians the native Americans who had been dramatically drastically pandemic Lee reduced in the previous centuries because of diseases from Europe, Larry at one point estimates, ninety percent of the population have been reduced in this area over the previous two centuries. So the Indians were reduced. But that is that is those are the people they called upon to travel, they arrive in Kito, and what is significant about their basic Kito. What does it look like at that time, there was a small city for the Spanish empire? It was it, it's thought about and still today, stands about a hundred and fifty miles inland from the coast. It's on the chain of, of mountains in the Andes, which is at composed in almost entirely volcanoes in that in that point. And that part being on the equator the, the land is quite rich. It's green all year round in fact, in Spanish, it's called. Keep those today, which means evergreen Kito but to get there as you had mentioned was quite an arduous trip. There were over twenty people in the entire expedition. If you count all the assistance, and servants and slaves, so taking that many people down on ocean up rivers across the Andes with probably ten tons of cargo eat all of which had to be carried by hand over mule trails that were seven inches wide was quite arduous, and the scientific equipment, which was very delicate manage to get their intact. When they arrived, they had expected. Everybody in, in Kito, who had received orders from the Spanish king to greet them to house them to give the money. The problem was that they had not really prepared very well. And so they thought they had sufficient funds, when they got to keep their almost broke, and they had no way of getting additional money to carry. Out the expedition, right grants? Weren't available at this time. And so there's a good deal of ingenuity, as they meet the society of Kito, which is suspicious you understand the inquisition is still on everywhere. These could be spies. You know, you could be at war with France or Spain, any moment, anytime. And in fact, you will be again, so we're looking at a world of mystery in which in which legend and superstition dominate. And also, the juicy the church is very, very suspicious all the time. So called scientific men, all of the and Kito has no law enforcement murders a routine their slaves. In fact, at one point, a slave is murdered. No one has ever arrested or even pursued there's governance questions in Kito, but they're there and it takes a year to organize a for the beginning of the expedition. And when we come back, the triangles of Peru, the triangles of what is now Ecuador, and how they actually constructed the measure. -ment of, of a of latitude, Larry Ferraro is the author measure of the earthy enlightenment expedite that reshaped. Our world is the book. I'm.

Kito Larry France Ecuador John batchelor Andes Larry Ferrara Spain Larry Ferraro Gardanne Charles Marie villa Kanda Atlantic ne- new Granada Peru Tonio South America us Dan Bulgaria Panama
"charles marie" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

NutriMedical Report

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

"On by attorneys and judges judges have no frigging right to strike down a law put together by the legislature. Even if it's not perfect like these heartbeat bills dramatically reduced abortion benign eliminate what we need to is eliminated. It's evil. In fact, it's destroying women who figure that they can behave in the lascivious sexual manners. And just simply have an abortion if they get a sexual encounter the causes of pregnancy. And eventually makes them very unlikely they actually bond with her husband or their children afterwards. Many of them become sterile and may have to have a health problem. We'll have abnormal attachment. The placentas Admiral bleeding problem like a low attached to the placenta call placenta Previa caused by previous abortion people. Don't know these facts there has no medical indication for Boertien. Not no psychiatric, no medical and even in the case of incest by actual previous pastor, they had back in Scotia was a product of incest. So if you're going to say that baby. Didn't offender or deserve to die. What we have to understand. We don't defend humanity from the moment of conception won't be a human race because it would be a trans human race in the future. It'll be genetically engineered and become fused with the SuperNet with their technology. They wanna make us merge. Great kurzweil with the internet people. Don't know this do they were trying to ignore it and say that well Bernie Sanders is going to give us free healthcare free. There's nothing free in this world. There's always a price in the price to even rats watt is much higher than what Bernie Sanders Claus with his angry is is going to say is that. We we get this way back from Charles Marie again. They dino's. Feels who was a hardcore communist federal Frederick fields department store. It's interesting. The Sears errors are also heavily involved in the new world order, and then Rockefeller John's Mariam was talking about, you know, changing people using their glands every settled in perceivable move in order to create an obesity burden or whatever they want. They they talk about all of this way before the technology was here way back in the thirties. And that's what they advocated. That they have to understand this. And I'm going to explain this to people are Intel agencies are occult agencies. You're know that right. Society, which was a German chance, you know in agency. We're basically agents of wizards, and they are actually channeling transfer mentally technology, including anti gravity contacts with the society of the bell, and even the rocket technology. And they're actually channeling information about the future and technology because they knew it was coming for example, enough edited hundreds of thousands of experiments was fence plants. I color changes, and he was trying to kind of muster. Even before the discovery of watching the creek, and the DNA genetic engineering he wanted to do that. Now, we have those technologies down. We have Christopher cast nine technology the trend recruit Beata work with DARPA forty-one years ago was VA hospital.

Bernie Sanders Claus Bernie Sanders VA hospital SuperNet Boertien Scotia Sears Intel kurzweil Charles Marie dino Beata Christopher Rockefeller John Mariam forty-one years
"charles marie" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Welcome back, America. It's Hugh Hewitt. Thank you so much for losing the Hugh Hewitt Show yesterday. I had on Eric dry band. Who is the assistant attorney general for the division of civil rights in the department of Justice tell you about the president's executive order guaranteeing free speech on campus this morning, I'm joined by Pete Peterson is dean of the Pepperdine school of public policy. Pete four C A is Twitter handle PET the number four. Good morning Peterson. How are you your morning you? This is the perfect follow onto my conversation, which the audio which is posted over to hughhewitt dot com. What is the American project and initiative Pepperdine school of public policy? What do you make of this issue of free speech on campus? The American project is a rather unique initiative Anakin -demia, it's were exploring the president huger of the American conservative movement and its importance informing public policy, we actually treat conservatism seriously as a philosophy in a movement and one of the guiding pillars of that of the American project is defending higher education as a civic institution as one that forms future citizens and public leaders into the work that you're doing in really exposing and shining a light on what's happening on our college campuses. And really how conservative views are being squelched not just on the part of speakers. But even what's happening inside the classroom is really so important. Now, the numbers are whether it's Charles Murray. Whether it's Ben Shapiro, whether it's anybody, and I'm I'm not a fan of some of the people who've been. Boycotted on campus. But I'm Ben Shapiro. Victor Davis Hanson a Harvey Mansfield. I mean, one of the great scholars of our time was disinvited from a Canadian college. What the heck is going on p? Well, again, it's this this connection that the left is made between speech and violence is really something that they've cast upon some brilliant people. We've had Charles Marie speak here. We've had Victor Davis Hanson speak here, we're actually hosting an event for him in a couple of weeks in Los Angeles. And we've had Harvey Mansfield speak here. And that that recent Wall Street Journal piece that he penned about being disinvited by that school in Canada is really just. A window into the squelching of conservative thought on college campuses. Now has it ever happened at the Pepperdine graduate school of public policy? No, no, no. We've never had that problem welcoming speakers here conservative speakers to be specific. That's not to say that I haven't had to go through the process of sitting down with public safety and just making sure for example, when we had McDonalds speak here and Charles Marie speak here last year that we didn't have to make preparations for it. But suffice it to say we are an institution that supports viewpoint diversity. And in particular, we support the thoughtful conservative voices that are out there, and exposing students and audiences to these people now in terms of what you would recommend a guideline the heckler's veto cannot be indulged. But I understand university. Don't want to spend a lot of money on security. Trouble is if you're going to invite any speakers, you got to invite them all you, and I both know viewpoint discrimination is not fair on campus. So if you're going to invite some speakers, you're gonna have to invite them on your to protect them all I think, that's right. Hugh, and especially if you're gonna go through the process of inviting this disinvite thing that's begun. That's been happening for the last few years on campus campus, really needs to you need to put a stop to it. I mean, people are making speakers like Mansfield and others are making commitments to come to places and as with Dennis Prager forthcoming movie. No safe spaces in the fall. What conservative speakers has to go through on campuses is really just incredible. And something that really the lesson should be standing up for if they value free speech and free inquiry, you use to describe this show culture. I think the answer is pretty obvious arrest. People who are not people in the community and expel those who disrupt speech expel him the next day Pete. And then it will be over. No. I think you're right in that piece. I wrote in real policy that you reference around the shell culture is actually looking. Not at the speakers who are coming. But even some of the growing Survey Research about what conservative students are going through inside the classroom as well as conservative faculty members. My my issue certainly is with the disembarkation that are happening and the difficulties that conservative thoughtful conservative speakers have in coming to speak in an event on campus. But my deeper concern is what's happening to conservative students inside the classroom in the Survey Research is showing that they're really having to squelch their opinions on essays papers and even classroom conversations. It will continue until administrators stand up and say Pete Peterson and said the shell culture cannot win that goes veto cannot be indulge in the president's executive order must be respected pe- Peterson. Always a pleasure. Follow him at Pete four. The number four CA on Twitter and follow me to the next show because Mike Gallagher. Many local broadcasts will be covering attorney general William bars press conference at six thirty in the west nine thirty and the east.

Pete Peterson Harvey Mansfield Hugh Hewitt Pepperdine school of public president Victor Davis Hanson Twitter Charles Marie Ben Shapiro Charles Murray America executive assistant attorney general Eric Wall Street Journal department of Justice Anakin -demia McDonalds Los Angeles
"charles marie" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on AP News

"Roger Charles Marie had been sick suffering from brain tumors and lung cancer after suffering stroke last year formed in nineteen seventy eight the beat rebranded the English beat in North America infused politically charged pop with reggae on hits like save it for later in this one in the bathroom, the track stand on Margaret was a political anthem directed it. Then prime minister, Margaret Thatcher, Jarl Relator formed general public which had a hit with tenderness and he recorded with sting sting said Wednesday Charlie had been at the center of a quote febrile explosive clash of cultures uniquely plays to document the excitement of those times. Reggie Roger was fifty six. A different version of the blockbuster film. Bohemian rhapsody has been released in China and movie goers. There aren't happy about it. The bio-pic chronicles the life of Queen frontman Freddie Mercury but was heavily censored erasing mentions of his sexuality. Those who saw both versions say scenes in which mercury reveals that he is not straight and that he has aids were cut or abruptly muted and a kiss shared by mercury and his longtime partner, Jim Hutton is also missing while LGBTQ content is generally less taboo than other topics which Chinese authorities deem sensitive same sex relationships are still virtually absent from mainstream media with Chinese video site, mango TV livestream, the Academy Awards in January star Robbie Malik speech was subtitled to read special group when in fact, you said gay man, one LGBTQ advocate and China's said it was a pity the scenes were removed calling it disrespectful. Two letters written by inventor and electricity pioneer. Nikola? Tesla have been made public for the first time a culture society in Serbia says the nineteenth and early twentieth. Century inventor and electricity pioneer pendulum letters in nineteen thirty four and nineteen thirty five to the Yugoslav console in the United States. The society says they got the letters from collector and verified their authenticity with multiple sources, the letters had been known to exist. But couldn't be traced.

Freddie Mercury Reggie Roger Margaret Thatcher Roger Charles Marie China Jarl Relator Charlie prime minister North America Tesla Jim Hutton United States Robbie Malik Academy Awards Nikola Serbia partner
"charles marie" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on AP News

"Charles Marie had been sick suffering from brain tumors and lung cancer after suffering stroke last year formed in nineteen seventy eight the beat rebranded the English beat in North America infused politically charged pop with reggae on hits like save it for later in this one mirror in the bathroom the track. Stand on Margaret was a political anthem directed it. Then prime minister, Margaret Thatcher. Charlie Relator formed general public which had a hit with tenderness and he recorded with sting stings that Wednesday Charlie had been at the center of a quote febrile and explosive clash of cultures uniquely plays to document the excitement of those times ranking Roger was fifty six. Southwest Airlines says it'll lose one hundred fifty million dollars because of the US government. Grounding of all Boeing max, eight jets as the airline with the largest fleet of the planes. It says it had to cancel about twenty eight hundred flights after the grounding which followed an Ethiopian Airlines crash in which one hundred fifty seven people died southwest said in a filing on Wednesday that it had to cancel an additional sixty six hundred flights from mid February through the end of March because of weather and unscheduled maintenance. Volkswagen says it's partnering with Amazon to develop cloud computing capacity in hopes of improving efficiency and coordination across the automakers. Global factory network Volkswagen says combining data from its one hundred twenty two factories will allow it to standardize production planning and management of inventory. They should raise officiency and lower costs. Volkswagen says it's industrial cloud to be developed with Amazon web services would be an open platform that other companies such as suppliers could join. Eighteen radio news. I'm Tim McGuire. Two people are dead two others wounded after Seattle man went on a bizarre rampage this afternoon deputy police chief Mark green explains how it started gentleman who lives in the area for some reason it came outside with it with a hand with a gun. Attempted to carjack vehicle shot. The woman driving the vehicle vehicle veered off the road. At that point in time. I metro bus with southbound on Sandpoint way, the suspect and opened fire on the metro bus.

Volkswagen Margaret Thatcher Charlie Relator Amazon Southwest Airlines Ethiopian Airlines Charles Marie North America prime minister Tim McGuire febrile Boeing US Seattle Roger Mark green
"charles marie" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"He is able to out quick German. A couple of times at draw foul so part of night. That's the fourth foul on Andre Drummond. Let's see if they're gonna leave them out there. Free-throw number one for jokers up and any you'll have one more said fifty double doubles this season. That's six best in the NBA with Westbrook. Other NBA rakings for joker. Second a Westbrook and triple doubles, eight assists, twelve rebounds, thirty third and scorn misses the second free throw in the rebound comes down to German. So they're gonna let entree play with those four fouls. Here. Blake Griffin has it over to Brown hands behind him to Reggie Jackson. Jackson goes to the right hand. He's inside the art over to Andre Drummond with nine on the clock. Be hands it off to Blake Griffin lake stopped by Nicola, Yokich left side, three pointer. Ellington short rebound down to Wilburton. What a job that nuggets at the dunk. Contesting three point opportunities tonight yoga Chaz it behind the three point line faked. A handoff Murray now gives it to him again. And he gets fouled by Reggie Jackson, reaching out and just grab it. Well, you gotta if you're a guard. I have to come off a joker handle, it is really tough. He's such a good. Passer and yet Murray a great shooter. It's just a tough played a defend inbound goes to the Colo yoga cheese inside the it behind him to Gary hairs left side over the ball. Millsap Millsap top of the head fake got rid of and again falls. Now that's going to be a foul on Drummond number five. Now, what do you do? The leave them out. Your comes thong maker. Drumming as a few words for Eric Lewis as he goes to the bench. And you might be done for the third quarter here. Inbound goes to will Barton Barton bounce pass on the pick and roll the Yokich. Takes a jumper misses. A rebound tipped and then grabbed by Blake Griffin. Griffin brings it up the floor himself. He stopped at the three point line rights. Reggie Jackson for three jumpers off. The Mark again. Rebound tipped by Yokich grabbed by Brown. Kick out to Jacksonville, try it. Again, this time Nicole Yokich secures the rebound, Reggie Jackson. The springs native to for ten old. I six from the three point is keep shooting. Does it out to Barton? Barton's at the free throw line behind him to Millsap Millsaps bid. Move kicks it off the Yokich seventeen footer jumpers. Do short three tap by Millsaps rabbi maker. And there's a foul whistled are Millsap trying to get it back. We'll stop was trying to go for a jump ball there. Initially had it sorta tied up at Tom Baker pulled it down. And then he over the baggage call by the official. Back. The other way comes to Troy maker will try a three that was good rebound come down to Paul Millsap after three twenty-five from downtown. I guess they figure they get paid at twenty six to get back in. They gotta make threes. So there's keep shooting them Murray. How's it inside the arc over Nicole Yeltsin's now Millsaps open for three that one's going? Rebound comes down to Reggie Jackson. Jackson has it in the frontcourt. Dribbles behind us. Back down to the wing on the right hand side goes out of a Blake Griffin right back to Jackson another three that was. Down to Millsap. Oh, you keeps shooting Jerry Harris wrap around the yoga to the corner. For three short misses are not just their chip and pay Qasr. Reggie Jackson Oprah seven from downtown. And he keeps jacking him up there. He has it again throws it in the corner over two Ellington Ellington garnered out there by Wilbert with ten on the cloth. Lobs it on the elbow. Blake Griffin Griffin squares up on Millsap five on the client looks like he wants to deal. Head fake on a jumper now ticket contested to that was no good rebound down in a Colo Yokich whips the outlet past the front court to Paul Millsap Millsap has one on one with Elliot and tripled off of his foot. Turned it over now decide top play there. Blake has it behind the three point line over to Thon maker. He drives on Yokich layup is up and somehow that thing went down. Gets up twenty four, but they missed them louder shot they could easily be up thirty costs and here to the right side of the midcourt circles. Charles Marie Luke Canard going to come back at it. The next whistle over Nicole yoga it off the Barton back over to Jamal Jamal pitch at the elbow on Thon maker. He starts backing down gets the patriots over his left shoulder hook shot. No, good rebound down to Blake Griffin should have made that one way quickly up the board stops inside the Arcus Jamal Murray's. Now, he drives on him his shoulder dot foul, Mr. runner, and he'll have free throws analogous may need a time out here. I just mentally. They're not into this half yet. Tougher Kamal Murray cannot be picking up a plate Griffin. He scored every time they've been on a switch. Luke Kennard comes into the game. It'll be Detroit basketball. I said free throws will actually be pistons basketball on the side here Griffin. Looks it gets the inbound a Thon maker maker. Thank the fast doesn't know what to do with. It finds Griffin on the high left side lakes out there with Reggie Jackson. Reggie gives them a pick lake goes baseline leans in. Layup is up in nice move. Have a timeout coming next. Whistle nuggets are old for eight in the third quarter. But they still lead here by twenty two points. Murray has a top of the key over to Yokich back over to Jamal kicked it over to Barton for three. Number finally, get a bucket every time nuggets at needed a big shot. Went Detroit's made little wrong. They've got him this time we'll part with a three. Blake Griffin has it on the high right side over to Reggie Jackson hands off behind him. The Canard we've action back over to Blake. He takes three pointers that one's good for Blake. Blake Griffin's got twenty in the ballgame nuggets. Lead is twenty two points. Joe-marie again throws it away. Right. Tecom maker and a foul on Jamal trying to get it back. Is Bentley not into this. Michael Boulogne, not happy. Well, see it belong to get them focused here during the time out six fifteen left to go in the third quarter in the nuggets lead it by twenty two points on the altitude radio network..

Blake Griffin Griffin Reggie Jackson Paul Millsap Millsap Barton Barton Blake Griffin lake Jamal Murray Andre Drummond Nicole Yokich Blake Jamal Jamal Yokich Ellington Ellington Charles Marie Luke Canard Kamal Murray NBA Thon maker Detroit Westbrook Brown Murray
"charles marie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lester young with that's all and Lester is joined by Harry sweets, Edison, Oscar Peterson and herb Ellis. That is a Bob Haymes Allen Brandt composition and a song which is sung so beautifully romantically by folks like for example, NAT king Cole. That's all. I think it was used in to when Harry met Sally. It's another one of those movies. It's come up on an anniversary. So it pops up here. And there when you look for something it's on the side. That's become a twenty first century thing opens, a sidebar my YouTube. Oh, it popped up in my my browser is on my Email. Interesting. The way the modern world invades us with other ideas. Joe Stafford I don't want to walk without you Bing Crosby. I've got a crush on you back to the matter of Lester young his nickname from Billie holiday was pres-, his nickname or the defining aspect of his personality. And look was pointed out by Charles Marie. Angus as pork pie. Hat goodbye. Pork pie hat. He wore the famous hipster lid is the name of a jazz composition that a couple of artists have contributed to respond Roland Kirk did words, but famously Joni Mitchell in her collaborative record with Charles Mingas. Let's goodbye pork pie hat now. Tell a story with her words, here's the result of that meeting of minds the songbook on WNYC..

Lester young Harry sweets Bob Haymes Allen Brandt Angus Bing Crosby herb Ellis Joni Mitchell Roland Kirk Joe Stafford Oscar Peterson Charles Marie YouTube WNYC Charles Mingas pres Edison Sally
"charles marie" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

14:08 min | 3 years ago

"charles marie" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"More stimulating talk. And welcome back to coast to coast, Dr Claude Swanson, we're talking about the afterlife is latest work science of the soul. The God factor as well with physics Claude. There's there's order this structure, it it. It seems to just have rules and regulations. Do you find that to be the case in the paranormal as well? I do. And that's what I'm looking for really a because there are new forces like consciousness, so I'd like to find those rules that you can expand to include those things and one of the things about this whole God question that I came upon by surprise really is trying to understand the whole picture is if you look at the smallest scale particles, they're interacting very very rapidly. Emitting and absorbing energy all the time. And this is the synchronize universe model that assumes that they would be interacting over very large distances. So what that leads you to is that every particle in the universe is interacting with all the other particle, very high speed over huge distances throughout space and time. So they're all connected. And if you look at all those interactions, there's a web that forms from all those interactions because there's torsion president as well as electromagnetism. These this web interacts with itself, which means that this entire web will act like a neural network. Mike. Of computer? So this web becomes conscious. It becomes intelligent and that was one of the surprising conclusions. I came to in my work. So if you think about what a Yogi does when he wants to merge with God. Which is how they talk about. It a yoga yoga means merging joining and so you already emerging your consciousness with this web. And when you do you in contact with every other events and every other intelligence in the universe. And that's what the white light is when when you die or having their death experiences or even in deep meditation when you encounter white light. You're meeting that web of torsion. So I think there's all fits together in a really comprehensive picture of what God would be phys point of view can science Claude even explain what life is all about. I don't think it can can't it. Not yet. Some of these things are so huge so complex. We have to have a high enough perspective to look at it. I tried to understand that it certainly when you talk to. People who are regressed into afterlife or between lives when they come. What typically happens is they they discover that this other form of existence the out of body formed the heaven if you wanna call it that is a much more blissful place is really our natural home. That's where the the order recall the soul lives, and that's where it comes from. So we come here this physical plane for short periods of time to have experiences and to learn certain lessons, but it's all about learning and understanding our connection to one another and learning to love and use our power of intelligence, those are the lessons that they say are are part of what it's all about. But I can't I dunno. Scientists ready yet to understand all that. You have also looked at what psycho kinesiology limitation teleportation is that all part of the same. It is. That's that's part of what is torsion energy can explain how it's it's one of the ways that our president would not understand. But if you torsion you can include those things. Yes. Now, let's talk if we can't about some of these other experiences tied into death, primarily does the new book science of the soul concentrate, primarily on what happens to the soul after the physical body has died. The first thing that concentrates on is the evidence for the afterlife the evidence that something continues after death. And they're about a dozen different ways. We have a verifying that our life continues after death. And we have a lot of information about what that is like what life is like in those planes. One thing we learned is that there are various different planes different. It's it's like George meek described like. Like a department store, and you go into the ground floor and you ladies apparel. You got the second floor and there's a higher higher planes which correspond to higher levels of consciousness, and they also seem to follow the rule that like vibrations are attracted to one another. So typically, you'll end up in a floor and a vibration that's compatible with your own level of spatial development. When you die. It's just a it's an amazing complexity, but I think if science truly can follow through we've got something here in a in. It's probably as much as life is complicated. The afterlife is complicated. I think they tied together Claude in in. They're both very real, aren't they? They are one of the other parts of that story is when people go out of body and began doing research, they often find ET's they often find aliens and often the what we call aliens are very much like us. But they're maybe often more spiritually advanced than we are. They're more at home in these higher planes than we are. And they often help us in our own evolution. So that you'll find the spiritual helpers in these planes, and you'll also find ET's they're all this stuff is connected since you've been doing this. What have you concluded about all of this? Well, I've concluded that we live forever. The soul is Energy Forum. That is immortal and our purpose is to grow into advance. Go through these experiences as we do. And I think that as we do we also learned to connect with other intelligence is more and more the higher planes appear to be places where the souls are more in a communal group type of identity so that we learned to beatable more comfortable sharing not having just one single identity by itself. But you know, it's it's a it's a beautiful system. And then so we don't we don't die. We're just this is temporary. And we're just here to learn. What would you say Claude is the most compelling evidence? That would convince most people that what we're talking about tonight is the real deal. Well, one one one example, I that is pretty powerful. If you can arrange it there are these people like I mentioned before called director voice mediums, they generate something called ectoplasms that we can now photograph I have some photographs focusing my book of these mediums. One of the things I say on. So they do with this ectoplasms is they go into a light trance and this stuff can just start spewing off the body rolling off and piling up on the floor. If this is a case where spirits have decided they wanted. Appear spirit can crawl into this little pile on the floor. And as it does you can watch it rise up off the floor and take the shape of a person. Sounds hard to believe it is strange. But you're right. Yeah. But and this stuff was well known and well researched a hundred years ago. I have documents by Charles Marie shea Nobel prize winning Dr Who investigated active plaza in great detail of the twenties and thirties. So this is a well researched subject. But when I have a an account of a lady who went to a seance like this. She was scared to death because she's going to beat a dead person. Didn't know how to deal with that. But most people wouldn't know how to deal with that. Totally understand. But when this lady materialized out of this pilot ectoplasms on the floor. She took the shape of the sister of the deceased sister of the medium, many Harrison. And then this lady whose name was on edge and who frequently appeared at the four feet tall, not very tall. But then she could walk around in a say and shake people's hands since she would look you in the eye because they cover the what it turns out is that we all have bodies as well as souls and these bodies are like information forms, or holy grams that we take with us, you know, the afterlife. So when you go there, you often see people in the in the form of that body that helps you to recognize them. But they also that body also acts as a mold that you cover with ectoplasms. And when you do they they look quite real. So she shook her hand and talk to her and the lady was just completely charmed because these people are. Are still alive. That's the hard thing to get used to you may not be able to see them, but they are alive and conscious and that's true for all of us. How does the reincarnation fitted to this and the recollection of past lives? Well, the soul goes through these lifetimes to learn and you'll have when you in your between life state. You often have coaches and died in the plane of the athletes that you happen to be in. And they will have you do some research. There are libraries they have computers, and they will you'll look back and look at what you've been who you have to work out things with karma still to figure out and then go into a stage of planning the next life. So you choose your lifetimes to solve certain problems and to learn certain lessons. And of course, we have lots of evidence that reincarnation occurs. In Stevenson's one of the most famous of the researchers sure lot at times over two thousand cases of children who remembered their past lives, and he would go to them and interview them and get sufficient information he could track down the village where they had lived before find the family where they lived before. And they recognized each other. So so, you know, we have lots of data to this stuff worse. But it's just part of the learning process Claude do you think all of this is geared toward what we call living in the afterlife of heaven and hell, and that that is the reason why our physical body is here to perfect the soul to make it better. And better show. One day it reaches that higher plane that higher level, and that's really the the whole reason for existence the physical life are is now the you know, what we could do what we go through. You know, working building things eating is merely the step to get to the perfection of the soul. Is that possible? I I believe that that that if when when let me reach a certain level of development, we don't need to come to the earth anymore. The earth is what they call an astral planet where feelings and emotions are the dominant issue. It's sort of like doing psychotherapy, you know, people go to a psychiatrist, and they have a certain issue. Maybe it's anger or something like that. And and you want to work on it. And and it's kind of like that with life here and the life of the school that we're here to work on certain emotional issues, and as we work them out, then we get to graduate beyond the astral plane. The next plane is called the mental plane, and you get to go there when you worked at your emotional issues. So it's it's similar in your second book. You talk about the life force energy. What is that? The easiest way to describe it from a scientific point of view is twisting of space time. We've seen how people describe general relativity Einstein's theory of gravity as a bending of space time. Mass Purves isn't the space. Einstein didn't worry in that first eerie about the possibility to space could twist, but that it can. And the fact that all particles have spins means that space is twisting all time and Torigian is the energy of that twisting, so it's a very important in basic energy that is closely connected to gravity. So that when astronomers pock about dark matter and dark energy, I believe they're really talking about torsion, which is left handed or right handed, but that's an equivalent description. I believe that's an amazing thing. I mean, it's it's just the the whole thing. Truly is a science all by itself. Isn't it? It is. And and I think it's kind of getting to the point where our our science has to face this because as you know, one hundred years ago, scientists discovered that poshness affects visit experiments, the double slit experiment is the most famous if you look at it it affects how the particles go through the double slit and how they interfere in. So consciousness is real and it needs to be part of.

Dr Claude Swanson president Einstein George meek Torigian Mike Purves Charles Marie shea Nobel director Harrison Stevenson one hundred years hundred years four feet One day