3 Burst results for "Charles Lathrop"

"charles lathrop" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"charles lathrop" Discussed on Gastropod

"To get to today's urban gardens, let's go back in time to the founding of the US, there were certainly major cities Philadelphia New York Boston, but it wasn't. Until the eighteen hundreds that more and more people move to cities and urban ization in the US really got underway. These are people who would have grown almost all their own food before, but now they live in a city. They can buy food at the market. So how many of them kept up gardening in their new urban homes? A lot of food production went on. On within city boundaries well through the start of the twentieth century, there were lots and lots of urban livestock, because people were raising pigs and cows and chicken for food within city limits anesthesia day as a historian at the University of Delaware, and she's working on a PhD about Victory Gardens. It's only really during the city, Beautiful Movement and the progressive era that city start passing ordinances that actually outlawed these forms of local food production in the name of cleanliness and sanitation and middle-class standards of respectability, because only poor people grow their. Their own food. The city beautiful movement was big deal during the eighteen nineteen in one thousand, nine hundred wealthy urbanites, all this rural migration and immigration, and of course, the rising inequality and poverty and tenements in their cities, and they were not happy. They tried to clean the city up. They built big boulevards and parks with monumental fountains, and eventually they also introduced strict zoning laws and chickens and vegetable patches were not part of these new beautiful cities urban agriculture. Something poor people needed. It had to go some cities overtime had already. Already banned maybe the animals in the streets, or even keeping certain animals within city limits, but this really solidified during the city, beautiful movement city started to enact ordinances that said no farm animals in the city at all and no front yard vegetables, either meanwhile the poor had more pressing concerns than how the city looked frequently, when bad harvests and economic fluctuations raised food prices, they could not get to eat. There were dozens of major food riots in American cities throughout the eighteen hundreds. The first urban gardening movement starts in eighteen ninety. Ninety three in the town of Detroit, because of this panic of eighteen, ninety three, there were lots of panics. In those days, the stock market was very new, very volatile and long story short, suddenly, basically overnight, forty three percent of detroiters are unemployed in what had been a booming city and the Mayor Hazel S Pingree I has to find some way to answer. The cries of his constituents. So what he does is, he starts the first urban farming movement, which is ironically happening at the same time that many productive activities within the. The city are being outlawed. In other cities, urban leaders didn't want farms in their cities, but they also didn't want riots, and so letting poor people groza food on vacant land was seen as an acceptable temporary band aid in times of shortages. The Detroit plan was called the potato, patch plan and it had pretty impressive results by eighteen, ninety, six seventeen hundred families were farming more than four hundred acres in the city, and there are letters there from local detroiters writing into mayor Pingree, saying you so much I was able to grow. Grow Food for my family and lots of the people that wrote in. It's heartbreaking, because these letters are hardly legible there in broken English. Many of them were recent, German and Polish immigrants who were taking advantage of this program to grow foods dot connected them to their home as well as to feed their families. The Potato Patch program was seen as a success, but it was never meant to be permanent in less than a decade when economic situation in Detroit started to improve urban farms kind of petered out until the next big. Big Crisis, which was World War, one, the city beautiful movement had stamped out urban gardening the Detroit potato patches were gone, but suddenly there was a huge need both for food, and for kind of coming together in a patriotic sense. At least that's how Charles lay through peck sought. He was a lumber baron from New Jersey and early on in the days of the European conflict. He wrote the US government and said people should be reason. Food would help them contribute to the war help stock shortages, and the USDA promptly said Sir. We've got better ideas going here for better uses of fertilizer and seed supplies so <hes> thanks for your input and no thanks Charles hadn't made his fortune by taking no for an answer, so he took that Fortuna and started a Liberty Garden Movement himself, and he quickly found a whole group of rich people who wanted to join him in getting Americans. Gardening again to support the war Charles and his friends created a movement. There were Liberty Gardens. Gardens on Boston Common, and in Union Square in New York and big corporations like Eastman Kodak and General Electric set aside land at their factories for employees to grow and boy scouts even had a garden at Grover Cleveland's Childhood Home in New Jersey. Even the government caught the Liberty Garden fever, and they created a school program to teach budding young home farmers how to grow food and support. The soldiers was actually one of the first nationally. Nationally promoted curricula in the country, the Liberty Garden Movement seemed to really catch the public imagination. However, there was no infrastructure for collecting numbers. The only source we have is Charles Lathrop pack himself wrote a book called the war garden victorious in one, thousand, nine, hundred nineteen, and he claims that the movements sponsored five million gardens which time when there were just over six million actual professional farmers in the US is kind of impressive but remember. Remember Charles is our only source for this number and he might have been biased. It's really incredibly hard to say, but despite its holds on the national imagination, it had nowhere near the impact of world. War Two Gardens in terms at share mount of produce ground, sheer numbers of people participating sheer difference it made in the global war effort, and that's probably why you listeners at least in the US you don't use the Term Liberty Garden. Gardens you probably say victory garden.

New Hampshire Brooklyn
Dig for Victory

Gastropod

06:06 min | 1 year ago

Dig for Victory

"To get to today's urban gardens, let's go back in time to the founding of the US, there were certainly major cities Philadelphia New York Boston, but it wasn't. Until the eighteen hundreds that more and more people move to cities and urban ization in the US really got underway. These are people who would have grown almost all their own food before, but now they live in a city. They can buy food at the market. So how many of them kept up gardening in their new urban homes? A lot of food production went on. On within city boundaries well through the start of the twentieth century, there were lots and lots of urban livestock, because people were raising pigs and cows and chicken for food within city limits anesthesia day as a historian at the University of Delaware, and she's working on a PhD about Victory Gardens. It's only really during the city, Beautiful Movement and the progressive era that city start passing ordinances that actually outlawed these forms of local food production in the name of cleanliness and sanitation and middle-class standards of respectability, because only poor people grow their. Their own food. The city beautiful movement was big deal during the eighteen nineteen in one thousand, nine hundred wealthy urbanites, all this rural migration and immigration, and of course, the rising inequality and poverty and tenements in their cities, and they were not happy. They tried to clean the city up. They built big boulevards and parks with monumental fountains, and eventually they also introduced strict zoning laws and chickens and vegetable patches were not part of these new beautiful cities urban agriculture. Something poor people needed. It had to go some cities overtime had already. Already banned maybe the animals in the streets, or even keeping certain animals within city limits, but this really solidified during the city, beautiful movement city started to enact ordinances that said no farm animals in the city at all and no front yard vegetables, either meanwhile the poor had more pressing concerns than how the city looked frequently, when bad harvests and economic fluctuations raised food prices, they could not get to eat. There were dozens of major food riots in American cities throughout the eighteen hundreds. The first urban gardening movement starts in eighteen ninety. Ninety three in the town of Detroit, because of this panic of eighteen, ninety three, there were lots of panics. In those days, the stock market was very new, very volatile and long story short, suddenly, basically overnight, forty three percent of detroiters are unemployed in what had been a booming city and the Mayor Hazel S Pingree I has to find some way to answer. The cries of his constituents. So what he does is, he starts the first urban farming movement, which is ironically happening at the same time that many productive activities within the. The city are being outlawed. In other cities, urban leaders didn't want farms in their cities, but they also didn't want riots, and so letting poor people groza food on vacant land was seen as an acceptable temporary band aid in times of shortages. The Detroit plan was called the potato, patch plan and it had pretty impressive results by eighteen, ninety, six seventeen hundred families were farming more than four hundred acres in the city, and there are letters there from local detroiters writing into mayor Pingree, saying you so much I was able to grow. Grow Food for my family and lots of the people that wrote in. It's heartbreaking, because these letters are hardly legible there in broken English. Many of them were recent, German and Polish immigrants who were taking advantage of this program to grow foods dot connected them to their home as well as to feed their families. The Potato Patch program was seen as a success, but it was never meant to be permanent in less than a decade when economic situation in Detroit started to improve urban farms kind of petered out until the next big. Big Crisis, which was World War, one, the city beautiful movement had stamped out urban gardening the Detroit potato patches were gone, but suddenly there was a huge need both for food, and for kind of coming together in a patriotic sense. At least that's how Charles lay through peck sought. He was a lumber baron from New Jersey and early on in the days of the European conflict. He wrote the US government and said people should be reason. Food would help them contribute to the war help stock shortages, and the USDA promptly said Sir. We've got better ideas going here for better uses of fertilizer and seed supplies so thanks for your input and no thanks Charles hadn't made his fortune by taking no for an answer, so he took that Fortuna and started a Liberty Garden Movement himself, and he quickly found a whole group of rich people who wanted to join him in getting Americans. Gardening again to support the war Charles and his friends created a movement. There were Liberty Gardens. Gardens on Boston Common, and in Union Square in New York and big corporations like Eastman Kodak and General Electric set aside land at their factories for employees to grow and boy scouts even had a garden at Grover Cleveland's Childhood Home in New Jersey. Even the government caught the Liberty Garden fever, and they created a school program to teach budding young home farmers how to grow food and support. The soldiers was actually one of the first nationally. Nationally promoted curricula in the country, the Liberty Garden Movement seemed to really catch the public imagination. However, there was no infrastructure for collecting numbers. The only source we have is Charles Lathrop pack himself wrote a book called the war garden victorious in one, thousand, nine, hundred nineteen, and he claims that the movements sponsored five million gardens which time when there were just over six million actual professional farmers in the US is kind of impressive but remember. Remember Charles is our only source for this number and he might have been biased. It's really incredibly hard to say, but despite its holds on the national imagination, it had nowhere near the impact of world. War Two Gardens in terms at share mount of produce ground, sheer numbers of people participating sheer difference it made in the global war effort, and that's probably why you listeners at least in the US you don't use the Term Liberty Garden. Gardens you probably say victory garden.

Charles Lathrop Liberty Garden Movement United States Detroit Victory Gardens New Jersey Hazel S Pingree Liberty Gardens Term Liberty Garden New York Us Government University Of Delaware Philadelphia Usda Boston
"charles lathrop" Discussed on Scene Of the Crime

Scene Of the Crime

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"charles lathrop" Discussed on Scene Of the Crime

"You know that he really couldn't care less about money I mean. At least it appears that he's into the barter system of like. You're giving me this I'm giving you that I mean. It's just you can see it happening as it as it unfolds as as this type of story always. Does you know you blame? The Guy who looks different acts different, you know. and. That's where we're going here. The search continued and Tornado was. Tied here and there, but he continued to elude capture all through one, thousand, nine, hundred twelve, and into the early spring of the next year again, the reward was doubled now up to four thousand dollars. That's a lot of money back then on. April Sixteenth Deputy Gyles quimby along with deputized trappers from Shelton Lewis, Blair and Charles Lathrop, acting on a tip they got from the sheriff came upon a small shack made of bark. They believed it was a crude cabin belonging to tore no. Quimby wanted to head back for the policy, but the other two didn't want to have to share that. Four thousand dollar bounty with anybody else so with guns ready to of them approached the shack. They both arrive at this log. Frogs were chirping away in all of a sudden they stop. So users is linked to now, and it comes out in. He's allows. Later in Blair to get within eight feet of him I shot rang out hitting Blair who fell into nearby bushes. Leith returned fire, but was immediately hit in the neck. The injured later got off about three shots before his rifle jammed and tore finished him off. Quimby meantime that third guy he was hidden behind a tree stump about seventy five feet away. A, little bit of cowardly side so when he sees that the two had been shot and killed. He starts firing. Any fire six shots. The seven shot is sees a head kind of draw. And a waits and waits, and there's no more shooting. So. He knows that he's shot torn all. No whether he's killed or not. But he's also scared to death sky so worried that tournament just be playing. Dead Quimby scurried away through the woods. He went back to base camp. We called in his brother-in-law. WHO also happen to be a sheriff? They gathered up another posse. And the men began the trek back to the spot where quimby had fired torn Oh. Sure enough tore, was found dead, leaning against a Hemlock, his head, drooping down to his chest, he wore three sets of clothing, including ten pants that had taken off elmer. His boots were from the slain mackenzie. Now they were too small, and he had to cut holes in the toes for them to fit his hair was long, dirty matted, and he had grown a long dark beard as well he was gone to only be shell of the massive man that had grown. Grown to be before the body was returned to. Montesino worded already reached town that the wild man had finally been killed and curious gawkers began lining the street to get a peek at the legendary mountain man Deputy Sheriff Gals. Quimby told a newspaper at the time that John Tornado had. The most horrible face I ever saw the shaggy beard, and long hair out of which gleaned to shining murderous is haunts me now he said I could only see his face, as he uncovered himself to fire a shot, and all the hatred that could fire from the soul of human being was evident. Now. Can we just go back and remember that? Quimby was the one who didn't get very close to tore. No, and he was the one who turned tail and ran the second that he thought Turano might not be dead, so I would love to know how he ever got. A look and tornadoes is well. You know and it's interesting to. It's curious about how we've evolved over time about how we view death, and when I mean view I mean it literally according to author, Ron, franch shells website back the nineteenth century when photography was born, it became popular for those with means to take pictures. Pictures of dead loved ones as keepsakes now that sounds extremely I. Don't know about you, but that sounds really creepy. Right? You know in modern day, but another thing happened when wild west outlaws were captured and killed, these gruesome photos became popular, and we're turned into postcards I. I think it you know satisfied. The bloodless that humans have the lookie Loos you know all the people like wanted to look into the eyes of this killer right, but it also was away for law enforcement to calm the nerves of the people because remember the people were so freaked out about really did kill this guy. So it spread the news that they were dead, and it was like like. Here's the proof we got him and you could say that. Those photographs told a story in many ways. It's like the first form of true crime. You know a sort of cautionary tale to WANNA. Be Bad guys like this could be your fate, because they often propped up the bodies in ways that you know it just looked gruesome and grotesque. I don't know if you've seen the photo any of these. Yes, it's really kind of fascinating. So the fashion of post mortem photography went you know went out of fashion, but the practice of taking photos of dead outlaws continued for the next hundred years a more modern day. Example would be Bonnie and Clyde and you know the obviously may nineteen thirty four law enforcement caught up with the duo on a back road in Louisiana they were outnumbered, didn't stand a chance. And Bonnie and Clyde were gunned down shot up to fifty times each and that photo was circulated. Those bodies were almost unrecognizable, but it's like these are snapshots into kind of true. True crime into maybe the allure of like what happened. Who were these people? How can we figure it out right and don't commit these crimes yourself or this could happen to you. Yeah, exactly well. In this case John's eldest brother Fred traveled up from Portland, because he didn't want John's body to go on public display, but there were some two hundred fifty people who stormed into the tiny more demanding to see the body of John Turano the overwhelmed corner, just his hands and let him inside before it was all said and done, it would take. Of deputies to keep the crowd from tearing off bits of his clothing and removing locks of hair, postcards were printed like you mentioned. They feature that photo of. Various poses of death, such as tied to a tree or propped up against a plank. He wasn't just photographed, but he was posed and photographed some newspaper articles would have headlines like the great outlaw of western Washington with a picture of the deceased torn Oh in the newspaper. Later talking about his brother's death, Fred torn would. I'm glad. John is dead. It was the best way now that it's over I would rather see him killed outright than linger in a prison cell. So? He saw no other ending than jail or death for his brother. At the time of his death John, Turano had about sixteen hundred dollars in the Montesano Bank. He owned real estate in Aberdeen. He had a large timber claiming Sheila's county so. He lived off the.

Gyles quimby John Turano John Blair Fred torn Tornado John Tornado Leith Montesino elmer Sheila Bonnie Montesano Bank Washington Ron Shelton Lewis Aberdeen Clyde