26 Burst results for "Charles Dickens"

Alphabet: A tale of two quarters.

MarketFoolery

04:36 min | 3 months ago

Alphabet: A tale of two quarters.

"Got starbucks today. We have got MasterCard. But we're going to start with alphabet alphabet. The first quarter revenue came in higher than expected to report was pretty good but this seems like what are those times where it was the conference call. That is driving the stock to comments from senator by the CEO and Ruth Porn at the CFO. That that that's seems like what is pushing the stock up eight nine percent today. Chris Means Sudar and Ruth I think are just really taught managers and the way they talk to their to their investors of their employees. They wrote the way they run the business. I think I think we've talked about how important ruth has been to to the just the discipline of of Alphabet. Google over the last few years so she tends to be very conservative and so talked about the real challenges they had in this in this quarter especially late soon. Dr talked about the tale of two quarters to take a take a nod from the Charles Dickens novel the fact that early on and was very positive things were going very well and then really in March with with ad sales dropping by ten percent in March so it was a very tough end to the quarter and the guidance. They were very conservative. I think just talking about what's going to happen in the AD market going forward. We don't know how much of the increase in traffic will monetize. But but clearly investors are excited by of which. I am one excited by what is happening at Google. I mean like you said. The revenues came in a little bit higher. They were thirteen percent up. Fifteen percent on a constant currency. The strong dollars had a big impact so many businesses. Eps was a little bit light but it was really just more talking about what the future is. is having and the impact that that. Cova nineteen is having on their business but also in the world. I mean I was just some some comments from the call for example one hundred million students and educators now using Google classroom. That's double the number from just march to just march an extensive use of Google assistant a massive increase in demand from chromebooks. Dr Said So just there's continuing interest youtube revenues. Were up three three percent in the quarter up now more than four billion so it's just a continued emphasis on the way that Google is managing the business and the value. They are Contributing and I think some excitement now on the analysts. A lot of emails upgrades this morning. Just at the advertising market isn't going to be as bad as somebody had expected

Google Dr Said Ruth Starbucks Ruth Porn Charles Dickens Ruth I Cova EPS CFO Senator Youtube Chris CEO
List of copyrighted works entering the public domain in 2020

The Takeaway

04:16 min | 7 months ago

List of copyrighted works entering the public domain in 2020

"As the clock strikes midnight on new year's eve get this thousands of copyrighted works will finally entered the public domain and that includes books movies music all sorts of creative works that were first published in the U. S. in nineteen twenty four and if you're a little hazy on came out that year here's one the first movie adaptation of Peter Pan okay yeah we would have had a clip for that but that one was a silent film but also one of the things coming out this year blues legend of ma Rainey song CC right I'm enters the public domain it means it's no longer protected by copyright and the public can use and consume it without permission and at no cost and without the public domain we wouldn't have so much art that rests on the work of authors like Charles Dickens and William Shakespeare and these mass expirations used to happen every year in nineteen ninety eight though Congress passed the copyright term extension act it extended copyright protections for existing works for twenty years January first twenty nineteen so the first public domain dump since nineteen ninety eight for more on this host and you have a your recently spoke to Jennifer Jenkins a clinical professor of law and director of the center for the study of public domain at Duke University Jennifer thanks for joining me thanks so much for having me on the show tunes in so give us a couple of examples of maybe more of the popular works in the public domain and that some of our listeners might be familiar with well works from before copyright existed such as the works of Shakespeare the works of Mozart the works of Beethoven the works of Charles Dickens all of these are in the public domain and your listeners might be familiar with them because if you think think about the contributions of Shakespeare to our culture because Romeo and Juliet was in the public domain letter bursting was free to write West Side Story the movie's Gnomeo and Juliet and for me unless di did not have to get in touch with his errors and they were not subject to a veto and Shakespeare himself through in the public domain before him Romeo and Juliet you on Arthur Brooks the tragical history of Romeo and Juliet which in turn on all of its Pyramus and Thisbe and so your audience may be able to think of you know scores of works that drew on public domain material when something is not in the public domain what happens then because I understand that the song Happy Birthday was not in the public domain isn't that interesting it is now when something's not in the public domain that means that if you want to use the work you have to locate the copyright holder and you have to get permission from the copyright holder is welcome to say no are they can charge you a fair fee or they can charge you an exorbitant fee now this is a good thing copy rights are very important the public coming in as the yen to the gang of copyright protection so the design of the copyright system is there will be a term of copyright protection when you meet any of us you know enjoy exclusive rights over creative works then after a certain period of time that copyright expires in those works go into the public domain where anyone else is free to use and build upon them so there's some work entering the public domain and twenty twenty what might people be excited about what's coming into our public domain wonderful music so my favorite musical piece going to public domain is George Gershwin's Rhapsody in blue some literary works Thomas Mann's the magic mountain EM Forster's passage to India wonderful children's book a a Milne when we were very young there are also some wonderful silent films works featuring Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd silent film called Dante's inferno which itself to a public domain works Dante's divine comedy of course but also intermixing that with elements from Charles Dickens and the Christmas Carol so they're really great works going to the public domain next year and I know a lot of us are very excited about that so if

On This Day in History: "A Christmas Carol" is Published

This Day in History Class

03:55 min | 8 months ago

On This Day in History: "A Christmas Carol" is Published

"Nineteenth a Christmas. Carol was published by Chapman and hall on a stay in eighteen forty three. It's really likely that you have have heard this story. Ebony scrooge cruel in stingy man is mean to his employees and everyone else around him on Christmas Eve he's visited by the ghost of his former. Mr Partner Jacob Marley followed by the spirits of Christmas past present and future. It was written of course by Charles Dickens and it's become a Christmas this classic and right from the beginning when it was published. It was an instant blockbuster. Dickens got the idea for this in the spring of that year after he we read a report on child Labour at this point child labor was extremely. Common increased urbanization and industrialization in the nineteenth century had had led to children working in factories often. Working incredibly long hours in dangerous and inhumane conditions often with things like rules that seem seem draconian cruel there were assembly lines hauling coal dipping matches. A lot of these working children were even housed above the factory in dormitories so their work was basically their whole lives and for people who were poor and could not find work. There were work houses and they had appalling conditions. Going to a workhouse was actually required by La under the poor law of eighteen. Thirty four if you were poor and had no work and can support yourself. You had to go to the poor house but intentionally the poor houses were so awful. No one wanted to go there. At first. Dickens had plans to write a pamphlet that was going to be called an appeal to the people of England on behalf of the poor man's child and like its name suggests is going to be a pamphlet about the horrors hours of poverty and child labor but soon he decided that a work of fiction might be more effective and he wrote that work of fiction over just a couple of months in the fall all of eighteen forty three. The big moral of the story was that it was up to employers to treat in pay their employees well on on a more practical level than the benevolent goal of encouraging. People to be more generous toward the poor dickens also needed to pay his own bills particularly after spending a lot of money on a tour of the United States the year before so he wrote a story that he thought would sell and it did the first print run of a Christmas. Carol was six thousand copies and it was sold out in a week by the next year. There were fifteen thousand copies in print. Although although Dickens didn't actually earn as much money off of it as he wanted to a lot of this was really of his own making it was at his request that they had. I used very fancy gilded bindings with the book itself full of Etchings and woodcut such were very expensive. He wanted this book to be beautiful and it was but it was also expensive and he even ordered last minute changes to the title page and the end pages because the first ones didn't measure up to what he wanted he had hoped to make a thousand pounds off of this book and instead his first payment was for a hundred and thirty seven pounds even though oh he didn't make nearly as much money as he wanted though he was really really happy with how well this book sold and with how much of an impact it seemed to make and people's humanitarian perspective on the issue of poverty and Child Labor. Today there are so many adaptations of this work and that started pretty much immediately. People were writing plays based on a Christmas Carol right from the very beginning today there are plays and movies and TV shows and musical scrooge. It goes on and on and it's hard to get through a Christmas season without being reminded of it somewhere.

Charles Dickens Scrooge Carol Child Labor Chapman Mr Partner Jacob Marley LA England United States Thirty Seven Pounds Thousand Pounds
‘A Christmas Carol’: Guy Pearce Has an Extremely Un-Merry Holiday in FX’s Dickens Adaptation

Steve and Ted

00:23 sec | 9 months ago

‘A Christmas Carol’: Guy Pearce Has an Extremely Un-Merry Holiday in FX’s Dickens Adaptation

"No sex is a Christmas Carol adaptation for the kids this upcoming holiday fare is described as a spine tingling immersion into Scrooge's dark night of the soul the movie adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic stars guy Pearce's the miserly capitalist is visited by three ghosts of Christmas Eve it'll debut December nineteenth with encores all the way up to

Scrooge Charles Dickens Guy Pearce
"charles dickens" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

14:28 min | 11 months ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on Overdue

"And so the latter half of the book is monks who is now a huge important character in the story. He meets up with Mr Bumble from the workhouse who has married. Mrs Corney used to work at the workhouse and they have information on Oliver's. Where's mom they have a lock it that used to belong to her core classically. Johnny tremain staff like there's always a locket or a picture yes for some just like barely legally admissible evidence and they have kept it a secret. Maybe they're going to sell it later and monks. I'll we'll give you money for it now and they say okay and he throws it in the river's okay so now monks confirmed that Oliver is who he thinks he is. The we the reader. You don't know why this is important. and then Mr Brownlow shows back up again turns out he and Oliver going to be friends again and the like the precipitating action for the end of the book is remembered Nancy and Bill Sikes Andrew. Oh Yeah I remember you could forget who could forget now. Bill Sikes is a bad dude and he's the one who got oliver shot and all that kind of stuff nails like the classic like eighties movie bully. Am never a cool dude who ho he's always a guy. Who's GonNa shake you down for your lunch money. Yes and Nancy is probably the most I to me was one of the more complicated characters in the book. She has lived this life of crime which she fell into because of poverty. There's a bunch of passages work. Dickens gives like let's characters talk about the fact that they're doing these bad things because they don't have other options so it it that's where like the social novel aspect aspect kind of creeps in but Nancy will do the bidding of Fagin and Sikes and like capture Oliver but then she's one of the people who actually get in the way and keep keep them from actually beating him to death and so she starts to want to help him she over hears the fact that monks and Fagin know who who Oliver is and that they wanna get him and do sorts of stuff so nancy tries to sneak out form an alliance with Oliver's crew keep in mind. Oliver are knows none of this. There's a whole bunch of adults who are trying to improve Oliver's life and find out who is parents were and stuff and he he doesn't know it. All it's real or seems pretty clueless to be totally and this is a long track to the book where Oliver is like maybe on on every tenth page like he's just is names on the cover. If you know other people are doing stuff and Nancy's Arc arcana culminates in tr- enlisting Oliver's party to help out she gets found out by FAGIN and Bill Sikes Bill Sikes thinks thinks that she ratted him out to people and in like a murderous rage Burger Sir and that's the kind of thing you do in a murderous rage yeah yeah it'd be ashamed of waste of murderous rage on petty theft or something and he does like he did love her in a way so he feels very guilty and he ultimately ends up dying himself in this really like elaborate town mob. WHO's no murder occurs in this book until this moment so up until this point. Everyone's been pickpocket so he really crossed the line bills legs. It is really step and things up and he gets town mobbed up on top of a roof and like falls to his death and then the Oliver Party manages to like fine monks arrest him sort of like citizens arrest. There's a whole big INFO dump on. WHO OLIVER'S FAMILY. Is that honestly like. I don't know if I even WANNA. I tell you because it doesn't to me. Improve the novel little to tell you. It's yeah so we can. We can talk about that a little bit but so dickens begins has like this. This book has a reputation as a social novel. Dickens has this reputation as a writer who brought a lot of attention to the plight of the impoverished especially the urban poor but in this book he also he also muddies the waters a little bit like Oliver is virtuous and he is incorruptible but it turns out to be because he is like innately good because he is a yes. He's a he's a member of the upper class and he just didn't know about it. Yes we've but but all the other characters like the characters who are in Oliver's Oliver Position and sort of share his plight seem like I mean I think Nancy's maybe a little bit of an outlier but otherwise it seems like yeah only the like evil and the stupid and the petty like end up in this level of society any way. It's really rutto like wire. We supposed to care about it. I mean it may well be the Dickens didn't fully intend for this thing to be like a parable about the the plate of the working poor or whatever yeah I've got so I've got a couple of things of that. There's in the like animal house. Montage of the end of this book where you went to loss like Oliver gets adopted we find out who because miss rose also has a secret parentage and her her betrothed Harry actually gives up his political ambitions to become a Parson and Mary her so like there's a little bit of class consciousness going on there air Bates Bates Bailey what is his name Bates Bailey Bates Bailey the artful dodgers a friend Charles Charley Bates. Yes he becomes like a good guy like the stuff when he learns about Sykes committed murder. He's like I'm out of here. I'm going to be a good Ken. I knew we was doing crime. This is too much so artful dodger who cools name the books. He gets arrested like like two thirds of the way through. We never see him again. That kid stinks so not so artful dodging no art no as artful dodging as I was led to believe Pollino and there's another kid early on a friend of Oliver's little little Dick who is just a little sad boy who who does end up passing away he didn't do anything to anybody but he just is because of you know his circumstances so there's some plight of the poor in in that and there's some amount of change for these characters but like there's enough like just evil people just melodramatic attic evil people that I do think complicate the social novel aspect of it. Maybe they're evil because like you said like there. There is nothing else for them. Maybe that is that is the land they've just been pushed into but then by having all overby this incorruptible paragon correct correct. I don't know it just it makes it it makes it feel less straightforward than it could yes and so when I was talking to Dr Van Air Knock about this yes she was she was citing You're going to be able to live with her. I need to like I record a podcast with turn. She was kind of citing this tension of the book because Dickens almost refers to it as a biography griffey does refer to it as a biography of Oliver Multiple Times but like it ends with him still being a kid and getting adopted and then like he doesn't write anything else and so if he's maybe died. I have maybe but it doesn't the end. It is not a story where Oliver grows and changes changes. It is not a coming of he grows up to have like a super cooled workhouse for kids. Who are all the cool. Yes yes some bad people. People get ensure like that's good like the bundles end up. You know running out of money or whatever and they have to work in the workhouse. You look how the mighty fall in Mr Bumble can you have bumble stumbles bounce though as I understand that's one thing I know about bombed. They don't fall down but Oliver Liver as a character doesn't have an arc of change and most of the other characters. Don't not not big ones where you like. Watch them grow and learn and things like that there is I do WanNa shout out this one section from a like the birth of the novel that the storytelling revolution that that I talked about earlier of course chapter the Seventeenth of book the first This is after Oliver has been kidnapped kidnapped and beaten up a bit by Fagan's gang and then we just got this long diatribe from the author directly it is the custom on the stage in all good murderous melodramas to present the tragic and the comic scenes in as regular alternation as the layers of red and white in a side of streaky well cured Bacon and then he goes on to give you a couple of examples of what that means and he says but I've said it in this place because I'm anxious to disclaim once the slightest desire to tantalize my readers by leaving young Oliver Twist in situations of doubt and difficulty and then flying flying off at a tangent to impertinent matters which have nothing to do with him twisting in the wind yes and so he knows like he's upfront with the reader in this serialized story that he needs to balance different tonal sensibilities is that he is aware that by depriving you of access to Oliver's fate. He is like making that more interesting later and so following this Bacon speech we get the scene where Mr Bumble like courts Mrs whatever faces before she's Mrs Bumble and they're just kind of like like goofy and he's like a gross guy and you get a little bit of snippets of plot like you know things that are gonna come up later in the plot but it's mostly just a a comic scene of him courting her and then you get back to the thief stuff later. It's just this interesting like oh you are. You are inventing a style of book that you're gonNA write fifteen fifteen more of later and it was weird to me. I did not know that about this book. That was the thing I didn't know going in in knows lang going so much like groundwork for other stuff well I didn't. I didn't know that Dickens was going to be talking to me. As directly as he was about the nature of novels and storytelling retelling got it okay okay yeah. I can definitely see why Dr Jonquet would WanNa talk about we have so much to say about and the last this'll be my final thing and then and you can ask me any other silly questions if you have any the the I would. You assume that I only have silly questions. That's insulting. No it's I and I didn't I want to questions because that's how you think about me like a like a like a slice of well cured bacon by a clown when whenever these people take Oliver in these people of means Miss Miss Rose Miss you know Mrs Maili Mr Brownlow etc that you've got people who are mean and then people who have been strect and actually you think they really don't want to say enjoy but I guess there's they find virtue value in like here's a Pulawy who needs our help. The system failed him this poor orphan lad who's just so charming and wonderful and they take him in and they comment on like it's a good if I could just save one boy that would be great and like y'all have these giant houses in London it does. I guess it's a little yeah. The ending of that sentence is if I could just save one boy. I would feel better. I wouldn't have to yes that many any reason I wouldn't have to help boys who need like who have lost their way right. That's the back to what we were saying thing before of like the kids who are just kind of bad kids or bad people bill sikes and Fagin or whatever it is. I just WanNa find kids who are innately enabling could who just happened to be in poverty. Yes yes yes yes and have a mysterious identity that will honestly tell all of us later that the all of this work was worth it because he's one of us are exactly yeah so that kind of undercuts the novel but it is very funny any and Dickens's character sketches are usually good when they're not you know steeped in Nineteenth Century Emerson anti-semitism sure ah there's lots of good goofs and pokes at human behavior so like it's a fun read honestly honestly like. I didn't really know how it was going to wrap up until like once. I was like Oh. The only thing left to do is do the mystery part and we're just GONNA find out L. Y. He's related to people and why that matters feel the length of it. They sometimes with a book this long. I feel like the length Ken then smother you a little bit just like or or if you're not paying close enough attention it can kinda become know as that. You realize that you're not are actually getting any meaning out of. Do you know what I mean. I honestly when something is to you know I do. I was honestly surprised that that didn't hit me because I I I wonder if that is to its advantage as a serial story..

Oliver Dickens Nancy Bill Sikes Mrs Bumble Oliver Party Oliver Liver Oliver Twist Oliver Position Mr Brownlow Bill Sikes Andrew Mrs Corney Fagin Ken murder Johnny tremain Bates Bailey Bates Bailey Bates Bates Bailey Dr Van Air Charles Charley Bates
"charles dickens" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"I read oh, I read something that I'm mad about this episode to just be like things, I'm pissed about those favorite episodes. I'm just going to start like flooding or in box things that I think would kind of make you here. Yeah. Okay. So I read that they recently discovered some letters in an archive that revealed that Charles Dickens who had he was with his wife for over twenty years. They intend kids together. Holy crap. And then he started banging some hussy on the side and tried to get his wife put into an asylum. Like so that he could just bang this other Hooker out of here right to this is like when I found out Picasso was dickhead. These guys would never lasted a second me too movement. I almost did a spit take that is so funny. How did you find out about that? Oh from the comedy that Van Gogh you mean, oh van is it been go. Now. It's Cosso is it. Yeah. From a what the hell's her name Hannah get spaghetti? I think that was being go though. Oh, oh, maybe I'm wrong. Well, then you know, what? Sorry Picasso now wave. But now, I wanna know I'm going to go. Visit. Sunflower? Yup. It was it was up. She says talks about both gonna go. So we're both right. How did you find that out? I just googled Hannah Gadsby and Picasso, and she's it I found an article has reframing Picasso Hanno Gatsby and separating the man from the art. It was probably it's probably because then I who did the sunflowers though, Van Gogh. Okay. So that's why it was okay. I got kicked out of the Prince Edward museum for taking a picture of that. No. You did not. You're not gonna take picture. Yep. Couldn't take..

Van Gogh Hannah Gadsby Charles Dickens Hanno Gatsby Prince Edward museum Hooker twenty years
Charles Dickens, One Hundred Sixty Year And Eighteen Year discussed on Laura Ingraham

Laura Ingraham

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Charles Dickens, One Hundred Sixty Year And Eighteen Year discussed on Laura Ingraham

"Let's see Charles Dickens apparently had a devious bid to send his wife to a mental asylum after he fell for an eighteen year old is exposing one hundred sixty year old letter from his ex POWs friend, they had some correspondence wherein, the friend felt very very bad for dickens's

Charles Dickens One Hundred Sixty Year Eighteen Year
Ariana Grande Has A Misspelled Japanese Tattoo

The Big Picture

13:05 min | 1 year ago

Ariana Grande Has A Misspelled Japanese Tattoo

"Filmmaker. I think the last thing is. What is it? The article experience is what is the definition of it? Now is it five hundred people in the theater is it a hundred is it fifty is a two people on a Friday night in front of a flat screen to me. It is that's the theatrical experience to me if it's one person. I mean, I think that the experience is the definition of it has changed. It's going to have to that's the world we live. Yeah. And your movie to you you have movie stars. And it has the feeling of kind of like an event movie in some ways from the eighties of the ninety s very sort of mid budget. Hi, Jan rutta, and that we were talking about others movies have disappeared from the Cineplex. And Netflix says obviously making strides to bring a lot of those kinds of movies back. Is there any part of you that will miss the kind of like boxoffice quality around some of this stuff or just sort of the pomp and circumstance that comes with the theatrical. It's to me it's always enjoyable to watch a film in theater or other people are laughing and join in crying, but we live in a world where where the traditional studios have centered much of their energy on Brandon, entertainment and. I'm not judging. That's what they're doing. That's their business model. And I think as you just sorta pointed out they've left behind an enormous narrative entertainment world that many people want and Netflix, God bless them have stepped in. And with great care and love has are fostering Roma. It's my favorite film of the year. Yeah. I I'm going to vote for the award people may not agree. But I feel it is. And I would like to think that when they win the Academy Award. This argument of whether net flicks makes films or not will be put the bed. It's that arguments over they make films they make films that are worthy of any award. That people are giving you this. I'm you know, if Roma wins and other films win, I think in the year two is this not even argument discussion is going to be ancient history, which it should be at this point. There's other aspect of this too. So interesting to me, I feel like there's a new part of the equation with a Netflix movie where I don't know how much of the bird box kind of phenomenon valid, but is it is it relevant to you. If you're movie kind of becomes like a mean or something on the internet that is significant because I feel like one. Felt buzzsaw has a lot of things that people could pull out and could become very memorable moments. But to is that like a new barometer for success in a way, if people have creep are creating content around the story that you've told I certainly I'm aware of the marketing of a film in these days memes. And and things taken from films are part of the marketing, so it's relevant on that way. I would like to see that for Netflix sick. They they entrusted me with some of money. And and and I respect that. And I hope it does. Well for them. I'm not really that interested in it. I hope people like it. I at this point, I'm sort of making movies as much for myself as for other people, and I've sort of turned a corner a little bit for better or worse. Hopefully, I don't stray too far that sounds like a really peaceful place to be in while you know, where it came from. I dive discussed this few times before but I worked on superman lives, which was the debacle of all time. So so epic that they made a documentary about it. I've seen it as fascinating. Right. So I I worked for a year and a half on Soumailla's. And as we getting down the wire they pull the plug two weeks before. A lot of money. But I went into the office. They pull the plug and it was living. My worst nightmare for a year. Like, this was gonna happen. I got my car job down Zanu Monica. I'm sitting on the beach, and I'm just processing everything that just happened over the last year. And I'm and I suddenly realized watching the ways that I could have written the words on the sand and the waves could have just washed away. That's how relevant was. And that was a shocking concept. And then I don't know a half hour later. I'm still singing I thought it doesn't matter. I got something that is process. I this was something I did as much for myself. This was not an invalid thing that just happened. And when I finally stood up its onset, I resolved. I was in at this point doing this as much for myself as for other people in these notions are in velvet buzzsaw the end of valid buzzsaw ends with Jewish John Malkovich. Which is literally what I experienced the idea that there is an outsider artist who's who's who's creating art as a cathartic experience for childhood trauma. Art can be as much for the artist as it can be for the audience. And I think in this film, I was really interested in the relationship between commerce and art in today's world. And the relationship is a very rocky won the quality of a work can't be judged by the number of clicks, reviews or dollar paid. I'm not saying that success diminishes the work. But it didn't no way defines it some. I'm sort of speaking to two different groups are speaking of people monetize art, saying art is more than a commodity assign ever forget that. Because I think sometimes we do. And I'm also speaking artists if you can become a brand you can beat yourself become a brand. God bless you. If that's what you want. That's fine. I don't judge that at all. But I think they're I I look at creativity as sort of a knife edge, and you can blunt it if you're not careful with repetition, and these are themes that are in the film. So I'm sort of I'm throwing ideas at their amidst the satire that you've experienced. Yeah. It's so interesting. I wonder if you have heard from anyone in the art world since you've started showing the film to people and what their reaction to it is. I haven't heard yet. I feel very secure in our research and all the almonds, and I'll tell you last week. I finally watched the price of everything on HBO. I was gonna ask you if you've seen it. I saw it a week ago and everything that these titans in the industry talk about are things that are in our film. I find that. I really asked down in my notes here. I it's so. Eerie how so much of what you are hitting on, you know, essentially, mocking there are people doing in real time in this documentary. It's fascinating. And Jake's character one point says when Toni Collette is asking about money, and where where it's all going in Texas on the money question. It's on everybody's talking about it. And in my research. Everybody is talking about what they're time at the present anything. Everybody knows that something's wrong is somehow it's not like they don't know what I don't think it can be stopped when he can't be stopped the more money the more fuel. It's like trying to stop a bonfire. It's not gonna stop. But people are trying to figure out where it's going. What is it? What does it mean? Does it diminish? Does it do this? It's a very interesting time for contemporary, art, anything. Yeah. I mean, do you see some of the same struggles for yourself as a filmmaker do feel any kind of crunch, even though you're in this peaceful moment, the only the crunch. I feel is is is that I'm an industry, which is which is in a transition phase because of the traditional studios going one way, and Netflix and other people coming in Philly that that's interesting to me it the idea as as as somebody who creates. It's that like I said I'm trying to create more for myself now than for other people. I'm trying to turn my back a little bit on all the noise, and China, I feel that if you create if look night took me a long time, but a night Carl I feel like I've found my voice, whatever my voice is a night crawler. I believe it's enrollment. I believe it's an so I'm just trying to follow my voice, I'm trying to create things that that that are relevant to me. And that brings its own piece it at this point, tell me a little bit about Roman because I don't think that there is enough conversation about it. I think it was a little bit overlooked, even though Denzel was acknowledged. And he's really interesting movie. Really well made what's your sort of? How do you look back on it? Now a few years removed from it on tremendously proud of it for myself and for all the people who worked on particularly for Denzel. I mean, I mean, I discuss this when it was out, but really Roman to me is is the story of the burden of of belief. It's it's it's he's a character. Who's carried a a sort of symbolic cross for so long, and he can't hold it up anymore, and he's going to drop it into me. That is the most of all things we are all going to not meet our standards at some point. And the ultimate message Roman is about redemption. It's it's not about failure. It's about finding a way out of out of something when you can turn when you turn your back on everything you believe in and you suddenly say, oh my God. How could this have happened? Where can you go and forgiving yourself and forgiving circumstances? That is an elevating experience that I was interested in. It's I'm very proud of the film when you're writing does the theme comforters. Does the the idea this setup confide? He always comes. First father is a writer told us from a very early age never bore you cannot bore. So I honestly think the first and foremost job of any artist on some level is to engage you can put slash entertain. But you have to engage people, and I'm looking for vehicles at engaging audience, and that become sort of Christmas trees that I can hang ideas on let me ask you a it struck me as I was watching this movie, you have a real knack for name. Tmz you your character names are very creative in this film in particular, they're sort of really elevated, but we're does stuff like that. Come from. Do you spend a lot of time trying to grab something that will really while people or puts, you know, kind of knocked him off their feet. The idea comes from. I I am an enormous Charles Dickens fan and one of the things I loved about dickens was he saw he saw a name as a vehicle to tell you something about the character. So I could spend a day on a character's name, and I have spent eight is been days on a character's name. I have lists of names. I have files of names, I'm put names one name. And I'm always experimenting looking more Vanderbilt. John Don, Don, reduce your Hayes. I just these these are names that I like, I just love names yen. I find the characters are saying those names frequently in the film, you know, it's so much fun. Not to have to ring out in some way. I find that you miss. That's great Dan couple more questions one. I'm curious. What's the last movie you've seen that you're jealous of I am jealous? Of roma. Yeah. What what was it about that? He is reminded Koran reminded us that there's nothing more dramatic than human small events framed in the right way that threw me there are scenes in Roma that rival any spectacle being made on any budget level. It just I was grossed in that film as it went as anything that I've ever seen. And and these are these are these are deep undercurrents that are not evident. They seem like they shouldn't be so important. But, but when you frame them the way he's framed them, so masterfully they become so powerful. And I just think it's it's it's a reminder of of the of of the potential for drama among people away from spectacle. And I'm only jealous in the sense that I'm not jealous. I I I'm at Meyer that he picked up the mantle and said look people life. This is this is this is really dynamite stuff if you can look at it the right way. Don't forget about it. Do you have a checklist of the kinds of films that you want to be able to make future in your career? None. Do you figure out where to go it all just an idea it just suddenly ideas on these seems really relevant? I have ideas for really dumb broad comedies that that. I once in a while I threatened to do I haven't I should write an action film. I wanna do I have I it's just an idea comes to you. I like I remember watching Slumdog millionaire, and I thought man that writer 'cause I based on a book, I must have been so excited the day. They came up with the idea of the game show quiz that became a vehicle to tell a story in flashback. That's like if I come up with that idea. I just wouldn't. That's just too cool. An idea ideas are have the shapes to them, and and you and if you look at them relevant to us on the you can see them other people can't see them. But but ideas, suddenly just leap out and go look at me, they sort of have structured to them, and and you become on my God. That's just like cool little thing. I could it's like a toy you can play with. So what are you doing next? I'm writing in original spec. Another one set in Los Angeles. At night. God help me at night s another night move in LA thought you would have learned by now. I will you. It's funny shooting at night in LA's fantastic after ten o'clock. There's no traffic. I noticed there were a couple of very good LA moments in in the new film as well. Yeah, we we shot, but I love shooting Elliott night. It's empty it's deserted. It's got this cool energy to it. It's cooler, literally, cooler, it's really interesting wild energy. Let's get dinner. I end every show by asking filmmakers. What's the last? Great thing they've seen. So maybe not that you're jealous of. But just a great thing that you saw I am an enormous fan of Ben Stiller as as gave him down tomorrow. Yeah. Guy was blown away. I I heard that he took two years on it. Then if you're listening, it was a really well spent two years, it's an incredible piece Patricia and Paul and Benito these performances are one of the writing was great to six six or seven parts on the did you see it? I did on the fifth or sixth episode when that thing happens, and you all my God, this was because it structurally, so brilliant to put that they're not in the front where it would have so differently affect. The peace, and I would have been so proud to do that piece. I thought it was remarkable. That's a great answer. I had so much fun watching Belva bus ident-. Thank you. Thank you. I appreciate. Thanks so much, Dan Gilroy. And thank you to you. For listening to this week's episode of the big picture, please tune in next week when we will have a brand new Oscar show that we've dubbed the wife of palooza, Amanda Dobbins, and I finally saw the wife, and we are ready to talk about it. And we have so much to say what we'll see you next Tuesday.

Netflix Los Angeles Roma Writer Jan Rutta Denzel John Malkovich Charles Dickens Ben Stiller Dan Gilroy Academy Award Zanu Monica Soumailla Texas Toni Collette HBO China Oscar
"charles dickens" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on KTOK

"Of Charles Dickens. Classic story a Christmas. Carol have made the miserly. Ebony Scrooge a cultural icon, there's a lot of faith in bed in the story of screwed is redemption the most advantageous present. For instance, the ghost of Marley and the three spirits connect with the four lessons of advent Reverend Cheryl can gain. I is hope the second is faith, which is the shepherds in the Wiseman. The third is Bethlehem. And the force is toy to the spirits correlate with each. Israel's lessons can Cates. Book hearing the gospel through Charles Dickens, a Christmas Carol delves into its theological, meaning like Scrooges. First name Ebeneezer. It's from the Old Testament. It means God is my help. But it was tiny. Tim's words that helped Kincaid after a car accident rendered her partially paralyzed, and it touched my heart because he wasn't asking to be healed. He was asking for God to you. And where he miss ad for vox on face, Lauren. Green. Fox news. This is HouseCall for health. Scientists have come up with a way for you to eat as much as you want and not gain weight. If you're a mouse research is in Australia figured out that it all comes down to one, gene, if they removed, the gene the mice could be pigs eating loads of fatty foods and all the while staying Ben and trim now, if you happen to be a human not a mouse, can you look forward to unlimited pizza and bottomless ice cream. The researchers say, maybe they say mouse experiments don't always work the same way with people, but they think it's possible to develop a pill that would neutralise the fat producing gene another possibility would be to trigger your body to burn off fat, even when resting if successful..

Charles Dickens Tim Carol Kincaid Wiseman Bethlehem Marley Cates Cheryl Lauren Israel Ben Australia Fox
Samsung, Verizon are jumping into 5G together with next smartphone (The 3:59, Ep. 497)

The 3:59

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Samsung, Verizon are jumping into 5G together with next smartphone (The 3:59, Ep. 497)

"Welcome to the you tonight. I'm Roger Chan I'm Joanie Sossamon five G is right around the corner. The Qualcomm may give us the first look at what will really be like the is holding its Snapdragon tech summit in Maui of all places tomorrow. We're expecting to see live five demonstrations and devices that will actually be capable of running on them ahead of that variety. And Samsung announced today, they are they're planning to launch a five smartphone in first half of next year. So what do we actually know all these things nothing as as the become a common thing with these five G device ounce, mints, they basically say we're going to have a five G thing. We can't tell you what it's called how much 'cause race back. Czar Bill be it will be available in the first half of next year. So the kind of interesting thing about it is that no really no really five G is coming. Yes, exactly. They like we've been talking about this as a thing that might be happening. For three three years four years. This point that it's actually going to happen in the next few months is I guess exciting enough exciting for people like Roger extremely exciting for people. I Roger because not writing about this for a long time. I'm really eager to see this in the field. It bitch saying our own shar tip can and Jessica dole court will be out at these. Dragon Tech's summit, they'll be checking out this stuff. So we'll get for suppressions from them this week. All right. So let's VR Joan you went to Los Angeles to check out this crazy experience based on a Charles Dickens, Christmas, Carol, right? What what was that? Like, it was really cool. So it's a new wave in virtually trying to get people to make virtuality that people actually want to go see where you combine a headset with site specific performance that includes a live actor that moves around you emotion capture suit. So you don't see the light actor you see them in the headset as avatars different characters. But they can talk to you with their own voice. They can touch you. You can touch them you actually interact with a real human. And so yeah, this one was based on a Christmas. Carol is definitely a lot scarier than like Mickey Christmas. Carol the DVD, and I were talking about earlier, it takes a very like true to the dickens, creepy fashion. And I got to go behind the scenes and check out the motion capture technology, which was fun watching this video. It's basically it's a one on one experience you an actor. And that's it right? Yeah. That's about twenty minutes. There's an actor that you see that's in Victorian costume, as you kind of like put on the she's the one that helps you put on the headset in a way that gets you sort of like in the mindset of you're going to be going, and they do a lot of really like the technology is really cool. But I also do a lot of simple things like they have have walls that appear. So where you there was a while before in your headset. There can disappear physically to an addition to being in your headset. And this is deathly sort of a next level. Or step up from those basic VR experiences. We've all tried and progress, and the funny thing is even as advanced as this is compared to what's come before. It's still at like that they're hacking it together stage, the technologies combining all these different elements. -nology still is at a point where there's a lot farther. It can go as technology gets better. I wo- was alike wearing those motion capture suits fun. Like, it's it's really comfortable wearing a body suit. So it's you know, it's like doesn't cramp or anything like that. But it's it's you look funny like you have gone little balls balls all over you. And it was and it's just really they say every time so motion capture the first thing they do is wave wave Cartwheel's because I can actually still do cartwheels like you're not like plugged in or tied. And it's also that the room is surrounded by cameras day. Have the the balls are the little markers and pick up the markers visually. Oh nice. Did you see yourself in VR afterward? Yeah. Well, they weren't. They didn't have. Chance to do a full there to laments of the motion capture those the body motion capture and then the facial stuff facial stuff takes a long time. Build a profile for yourself. So I just did the body. So I got to see a little avatar myself looks like a little like doll like a little coach doing cartwheels. Nice for full coverage Chickasaw seen it and Roger Chan Joni salsa. Thanks for listening.

Roger Chan Carol Charles Dickens Qualcomm Samsung Jessica Dole Joanie Sossamon Maui Dragon Tech Los Angeles Mickey Christmas Five G Three Three Years Twenty Minutes Four Years
"charles dickens" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"The ghosts of charles dickens who left his wife for an eighteen year old actress or norman mailer who thought that a little bit of rape was good for a man soul why not a few of the celebrities who have been holding on domestic violence charges sean penn emma roberts nncholas cage carmen electra michael lohan mickey rourke josh brolin terrence howard he goes on so this this is why bring all this up the same culture we're living in the same culture larger american culture the same culture that says it's racist to say cotton bacon and it's homophobic to say gay french king and the same culture that says we can't say at risk youth we now have to say at promise youth it's the same culture led by the same culture makers have decided to let these pedophile is off the hook that seems inconsistent at least it's not quite backwards we always say everything backwards i don't know this is quite backwards but it's not well thought out it's not it's not run through a prism of principle thinking and i'm not going to have my life and my thoughts and my actions dictated or manipulated by these people who made those decisions i'm not going to be diverted or lead off course or lead in a certain direction by those people whoever they are i don't even know who they are that's.

charles dickens rape norman emma roberts josh brolin terrence howard eighteen year
"charles dickens" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

Giant Bombcast

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

"First one sure let's add he'd builds contraptions thanks that's benjamin franklin yeah was in that good one like fucking he was in their syndicate had i think charles darwin and charles dickens if a mistaken definitely at least dick yeah anyway whatever you know that game looks like it'll be totally okay that stuff doesn't like the like i said the setting yeah man if they take another year off of that one instead come out with like a really wellconsidered wash sequel in some interesting direction they're probably still working on a wash walk sequel story about i'm sure they are like just in terms of things to get excited about sure lock dogs bg in a weird one because they showed way more of that behind closed doors which i managed to sneak into than they did like those so hard to see at that briefing littlest you're in the audience that like that kind of seems like they're big game but they're not ready to quite show it yet you don't play as any of those yeah it's just a created character vinnie vinnie obviously gave a pretty thorough rundown on our bloodstream already but that sounds interesting but yeah whether showing it so early at this point is that a twenty twenty really doesn't look like at twenty nineteen game at this point very tech demo ish vibe to it of like look how fast we can go from city to planet to orbit to galaxy fezzet ranked fourth which kinda surprised it's it's not points wise it's not far behind newbies off but i mean the thing is yes they had a bunch of announcements but it was just like yeah we know we know you're gonna make another elder scrolls you're not really well that was kind of silence people too because there yeah there there are a lot of people who who don't because they haven't announced their like are you ever gonna make another one they're talking about to next gen they announced three games for the same studio and i think that's toll areas yeah like here's the game they're putting out this year here's the one they're gonna make at some point in the future and here's the one after that they started on we didn't even get clarification on the wolfenstein stuff right definitely coming out next year yeah yeah yeah i think that there are a couple of different ways you can go when it comes to like how you announce your games and i think the trend over the last couple years have been to show stuff late especially with a lot four getting announced win it got announced to win it shipped but any seventy six certain extent is kinda right there and i i like the idea of short pr cycle of hey we announce this game and it's coming out very soon like i get it you know you don't have to spend a ton of time explaining it and talking about it you know it doesn't have to be months and months of drip fed reveals and all this bullshit but i also think the other end of let's stop being so secretive about what video games we're working on is is a is a better way to go you know you look at like the movie industry and how like how in the street all that news is how many marvel movies are yeah no that are coming out that shit all this other stuff obviously games move around and all that stuff in a way that movies usually don't usually don't yeah but like in terms of just like hey this is in pre production and this is in production and we we know stuff about movies ahead of.

charles dickens benjamin franklin charles darwin
Tom Wolfe, pioneering 'New Journalist,' dead at 88

NPR News Now

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Tom Wolfe, pioneering 'New Journalist,' dead at 88

"Secretary lane child told an infrastructure we gathering of business industry and labor leaders as well as state and local highway and transit officials that while some advocate raising the federal gasoline tax and some favor attacks on vehicle miles traveled still others want no tax increase for transportation needs at all which is why this ministration hopes that we will work with congress on a bipartisan basis to cross difficult divide as to how to fund and finance our infrastructure the president's own plan which would shift and even greater share of the funding burden on the state and local governments is stalled so the white house says it is unlikely that any infrastructure funding plan will pass this year david schaper npr news wall street lower by the closing bell the dow down one hundred ninety three points then that twenty four thousand seven hundred three the nasdaq was down fifty nine points to end at seventy three fifty one the s and p five hundred down eighteen points ending at twenty seven eleven you're listening to npr news from washington tributes are pouring in for journalist and author tom wolfe who died yesterday at the age of eighty eight npr's petro mayor reports wolf author of bonfire of the vanities and the right stuff helped reinvigorate american fiction tom wolfe once famously began an essay with the word hernia repeated fifty seven times more or less and in the early sixties that was a revelation a bracing smack in the face of literary america will stream of consciousness wordplay helped create the genre known as new journalism and he brought the same livewire style to his novels let's get out from behind our deft and go into the streets and report on what's happening that's what a novel should be made from that's ron charles editor of the washington post book world he loved wolves nineteen ninety eight novel a man in full i did feel like i was reading kind of modern charles dickens american literature says ron charles had gotten sleepy feet an introspective and then tom wolfe came along petra mayor npr.

Congress President Trump White House Tom Wolfe America Editor Washington Post Charles Dickens Ron Charles Secretary David Schaper NPR Washington
"charles dickens" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"The story of the first christmas charles dickens christmas carol is perhaps the best known best loved of all our christmas mentions it was this short simple story with its christmas ghosts all its wore an timeless compassion that actually define the way that we celebrate christmas today until eighteen forty three win a christmas carol was first published christmas was not as it is today yes people exchanged gifts but with few private charities the destitute the poor the sick and the homeless were often left to their own devices hunger and even starvation wade largely unanswered and families either those with small children could be turned out on the streets in snowy winter weather with the newspapers the only needs of mass communication at the time usually covered society folks at lowes charles dickens visit newspaper man humble beginnings not being able to pay your debts the 19th century britain could land you in prison for the dickens family it did it seemed that this lower middleclass london family was always in debt but charles dickens developed an understanding that few possessed at the time he saw first hand the link between poverty and ignorance win no one else did and so it was in october of eighteen from three just two months away from its publication charles dickens began writing a new story to his closest friends he entrusted the title he called it a christmas carol finished in just two months it was a slim little book deceiving in its size quality binding complete with a illustrations six thousand copies in the first addition arriving in london's bettered bookstores december night teens 18 fortythree a christmas carol sold out in an unheard of five days.

charles dickens christmas wade london middleclass london two months five days
"charles dickens" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on KTRH

"Christmas with howard fish and there's more to come one the program continue it just wouldn't be christmas if we didn't think of that traditional and lovely christmas carol written so many many years ago by charles dickens and the one paragraph and led beautiful story to me means more than all arrest when he said i have always thought of christmas time when it has come around as a good time a kind for giving charitable pleasant time the only time i know of and the long calendar the year men and women seem by one consent to open their shut up hearts freely and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow passengers and not another race of creatures bound another journeys therefore so it has never put a scrap of gold or silver in my pocket i believe that it is done me good and will do me good and so i say god bless it the great american poet henry wadsworth 'longfellow during the dark days of the civil war christmas time me became discouraged and then he sat down one cold winter night just before christmas and he wrote something that will live forever and ever long fellows song of the bells.

Christmas charles dickens henry wadsworth civil war
"charles dickens" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"Very special night for me the gun christmases sorta special for everybody and we have our very special show that i sincerely believe will heighten your christmas now as you all know charles dickens christmas carol one of the most famous pieces and literature a very few people know the dickens road another beautiful rendering of christmas called cricket on the har matter of fact i just found out about it myself so we're going to bring it to you tonight in a way that i'm sure will delight the youngsters and the older folks to in colorful animation and i stars will be morrogh thomas roddy mcdowall ed aims mad be laid in hong kong read the nominee revolve choir and that little toy maker me now this wonderful instrument is called a hops accordance very very ill not trees decorated without lights are so and our fireplace has real long as i saw a roundabout way of telling you that we intend to spend an old fashioned christmas with you tonight and with our friend the lucky christmas cricket he never heard of the lucky cricket on the har well it all started in mary old england a long time ago hear lender near thirty on christmas more you may lead to your son and buying look something shocking and has a curve living among the cameras cannons you do you guys later stout i'm the heart.

christmas roddy mcdowall hong kong charles dickens
"charles dickens" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

KPRC 950 AM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

"In the contiguous us in canada hey beijing room oh how bids is tears the season and this week we roland up some muscle business carol by charles dickens other these rules gabrielle be and the colder you are the see this fool soda ash size thirty eight oath oau is nobody whether it be his work a bob kraft who meet some calls alito predisaster saw awesome plays coming by trying to help the pope screwed given out bad share was screwed his nephew fred drop essay married prisoners prior to this season against joe as the my party blah blah blah blah line low scrolls laps later that night screws chilling up in his career when bowe the ghost of his old business partner jacob morally sway all decked out in change for this pooling aisin these chains is screws vijay money you look like marley said year blur we'll says i'll such a cheap bids life i gotta one around earth with these scrub as chains daca mostow fully early i watch out three other goals going to drop in his school you ubogu while screws china sleep a creepy little girls now serve the ghost of christmas so out and say i'm gonna take you back in the show you how bad you've been these these days looking back at his old self screw star spill a man regret match the fed ads goes the christmas present taken to the kratsa crib would bob broacast trying to feed of spam and kuhn is cripple as son time too tentative sodium nice it makes proves get ossoff schools want to stay but the goes by mab there's somebody else you gotta me lairs as brother rose up on screwed so him of parts of pope targets smack abassin day pool it goes brain screws to a graveyard he sees his own dare name on a tool stone all the this schools.

us canada charles dickens oau bob kraft joe bowe jacob marley christmas kuhn alito fred partner fed bob broacast
"charles dickens" Discussed on The Allusionist

The Allusionist

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on The Allusionist

"Fifties and sixties so there are horrible cholera outbreaks the people don't understand what spreads cholera there is as scurvy their raise dysentry varies a typhoid just terrible deprivation they're dead on people and able to feed themselves unable to have healthy diets there is chalk in the bread you know it's this is a period of history where you can die of aena infection or you can die of a a scratch on your wrist anything can get infected so it's really not a very nice time to be living if you don't have a lot of money and if you do have money you might still die young as happened to several of dickins his closest relatives okay let's do you see if we in pecan we're we're getting close to the house of charles dickens where he's rating you can see in the window hell raid good good now whose is he craving could be one of his twenty novels in the velez dozens of short stories schools and plays but given the environment that is quite a high possibility that he's rotting something about christmas the christmas carol wasn't his first christmas story but it was such a hit that like mariah carey releasing all i won't for christmas is you each year off with said was pressure for dickens to keep supplying festive material his other christmas stories the chimes the cricket on the half the battle of life the haunted man and the ghosts bargain he also writes in household worlds which is his sort of magazine he'd be working on stories for the christmas edition of the magazine from july of each year as the christmas tree a christmas dinner there's a very sad essay written in eighteen fifty one the year in which four of his family members die code what christmas is as we grow older which is a kind.

cholera typhoid the house christmas carol mariah carey charles dickens
"charles dickens" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"And then the people who brought it back in what they brought back is something very much like a christmas today is charles dickens with his story christmas carol and queen victoria in prince albert and they're having a christmas tree and the family gathered around it a lot of what we do now comes out of the 1800s and we it continues today where we've added is more and more presence all along the way right so in the in the story a christmas carol about scrooge and uh jacob marley and all those people was he creating a christmas or was he reflecting what was really going on yeah excellent question because when i you know when i've ever seen it or read it i thought the dickens was telling us kind of what christmas was like at that time and that's not the case christmas had been discouraged and dickins wanted to revive it so you'd have to say he uh revives christmas or helps reinvent christmas for instance scrooge who is such a uh negative figure until his hardest changed he represents a lot of the people of the time who yes everybody worked on christmas day and you weren't supposed to do these other things charles dickens wanted to bring it back in so he's an advocate with this story very successful at the could isn't that interesting 'cause when i watched the movie and i love the movie the one with alistair sim in it as screwed so uh s when you when you see them you know decorating the tree and and you know having their dinner and all that i just assume that that was what life was like that not that he was he was trying to create and encourage that life that that he was reflecting it and run your saying not not necessarily saw messer and and if scholars call this an in invented tradition because as soon as it takes off we think it's always been that way and in fact.

christmas charles dickens prince albert scrooge jacob marley dickins alistair sim messer
"charles dickens" Discussed on Sparkle Stories Podcast

Sparkle Stories Podcast

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on Sparkle Stories Podcast

"Mm the the little girls christmas by winifred eat lincoln this is a story that was originally published in 1913 as a part of a collection of children's stories called the children's book of christmas stories which includes stories by charles dickens and hans christian andersen now winifred e lincoln may not be as well known as those two storytellers and truthfully i had a hard time finding any other stories that she wrote but i am confident that you will love this one so here is little girls christmas it was christmas eve and little girl had hung up her stocking by the fireplace right where it would be all ready for santa when he slipped down the chimney she knew he was coming because while because it was christmas eve and because he always had come to leave gifts for her on all the other christmas missy used that she could remember and because she had seen his pictures everywhere downtown that afternoon when she was out with mother still she wasn't just satisfied way down in her heart she was a little uncertain you see when you have never really and truly seen a person with your very own eyes it's heart to feel as if you were exactly believe in him even though that person always has left beautiful gifts for you every time he has come out he'll come said little girl i just know he will be here before morning but somehow i wish.

charles dickens winifred e lincoln christmas santa hans christian andersen christmas eve
"charles dickens" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Let's see what what are we talking about his his creative process how did charles dickens work well again this is something i really love about him he was a magpie he collected names he collected bits and pieces of uh hugh i think if you sat down to lunch with them it would might be slightly uncomfortable because he probably be memorizing every little part of you he collected a details of places that he visited you know he just had that kind of incredible ability to remember and to record everything under the book was always coming out yeah i was always thinking of it in his he said to somebody when i'm not writing the book i feel the characters pulling on my sleeves saying we should get back to work so his process was very very much sort of a collage of things which is what we're trying to show in the film bit little bits and pieces would hit him and then they would somehow end up in the book in ways that were they become something else in the book green describe how real his characters were to him well he apparently his daughter describes watching him one day at work when she was a little girl and he would literally get up and walk around the room and talk to his characters and talkback invoices and become them or then be having a dialogue with them so he had the kind of imagination which is almost a kind of craziness where you can really see the characters there that real to him amalia cents sitting in for tom power you're listening to queue if you're just tuning in i'm speaking with writer and actor susan coin butter new film the man who invented christmas so in the film as charles dickens creates characters they materialize on screen and interact with him as he writes as you were saying uh almost like a greek chorus pushing back on his ideas and fully ideas out of him what does that dynamic between creator and creation at of the story i think what it seems to me to be.

writer christmas charles dickens susan coin one day
"charles dickens" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"That a for a story he had this one story left in him and it had to do it was a very personal story in the sense that had had to do with some of his childhood memories and what's interesting about the book is it's the first time he really drew on his own childhood in a very direct way if you know about at the his biography there are very personal details in the book and in the book he he of course went to a pitch it to his publishers and almost like a modern hollywood way he said i have this idea for christmas book and they said well if you know it sounds interesting does it have to be christmas i mean there's not really a market for christmas but will you know so it was that kind of time uh either in and then personally also unsure the um he he was in in debt right after these flops and and you had mentioned the uh his father and his bankruptcy i'm sure there was you know a personal issue there too he was made he becoming his father worst nightmares by what exactly what he was haunted by the spectre of his father his father was this wonderful kind charismatic could have been an actor could quote shakespeare at the drop of a hot but he was criminally terrible with money i mean he could not keep money in his pocket to save his life any was through his own recklessness that they got into this trouble but yes he was haunted by the spectre of turning into his father did you take away anything from your your your time dissecting this point two in charles dickens life well i became a great admirer of his and i i love his energy i love is very much on display in the he'll eighty di basically ah no he he couldn't sit still he walked through the streets of london for hours and hours that's where he worked out his plots his characters he would.

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"charles dickens" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on talkRADIO

"A crackdown is needed on tax avoidance and failure to de say it's a national scandal the lengthening list of those named in the socalled paradise papers now includes british formulaone champion lewis hamilton and tech giants apple by allegedly avoided paying tax by moving money in some offshore havens by tonight they've acted illegally george said more must be dumped for we have a million people living are food birds in this country we have four million children or officially living in poverty rewards this oliver jewish is this charles dickens that gap between rich and poor getting wide dark and not least because the riches people won't paid their juve the foreign secretary boris johnson is facing mounting pressure to correct comments he made about a british woman in jail in iran he said nothing as the ghauri ratcliffe had been teaching journalism when she was arrested in tehran but a family says she was on a family holiday the foreign office says mr johnson's comments may hit being misrepresented international trade secretary liam fox is backing him what we're seeing here is an attempt to discredit the foreign secretary without thinking for civil what you've but be and what excuses of might give to the iranian regime improperly i think we always have to be very circumspect but what we say in a free society about the implications that may have elsewhere the group that represents hospitals in england have criticized the department of health for its failure to tackle workforce shoot it is nhs provided says urgent steps are needed to ease pressure on frontline star campaign as.

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On Air with On Air with Ryan Seacrest Discussing ryan seacrest, goran goran and la

On Air with Ryan Seacrest

01:18 min | 3 years ago

On Air with On Air with Ryan Seacrest Discussing ryan seacrest, goran goran and la

Ryan Seacrest Goran Goran LA Charles Dickens Brown Putin Bonnie Lorraine Gilles Ten Minutes
"charles dickens" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Honor known nonthrowing actor at alum bonnie because he knew the knew that i do that i call you love human goro gore round go around ever rick party in la because he knew that i knew that i do that woah are gay oh no that stress hormone lancry again john oh man asia swallowed it law which is us casualties charles dickens a number of that oh god yes but in albany now this is gone thank you oh jio is this is mrs yes is it is sixty seconds away from your shock collar question of the day it's brooke and jubal in the morning but before we get into that most of us who don't want to offend other people or get into unnecessary confrontations when round public and some people actually really enjoy immunity but sometimes what somebody's talking in a movie theater or clicking their pan at work or torquing during communion at church at the time when they have an asked you to work because usually i think that's part of the all tradition is it was interesting troops to it but you need to say something and a new survey just figured out when the appropriate amount of time that you should wait is before you handle an awkward situation here's what they found tissue somebody in a movie theater the average person says you should wait just under two minutes before you.

bonnie la goro gore rick party charles dickens albany jubal sixty seconds two minutes
"charles dickens" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"charles dickens" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"Sabet dead wet traffic on ninety seven point one bosch fm iheartradio music he should know featuring charlie booth attention ooh given run around one arrived on our nonthrowing actor law nominee because he knew that i knew that i do call you human goran goran go around every party in la because he knew that i knew that i knew that idea why oh no dresses calm reigned engage gimme now gone you lease asia swoboda campbell law asians yes swamped charles dickens man u running around in that brittan lawyer the but he now in in sure this is gone you come in nia long jio chris soules the commission's yes it is yeah.

goran goran la the commission charlie charles dickens chris soules